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Men’s tennis wins national tournament • Lady Saints take third — Page 1B

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Saints start new season — Page 2B

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Brownlee dies at 75

Fourteen-year-old Amira Coleman plays a betrothed maiden in “The Robber Bridegroom,” one of the stories in the Drama Club’s fall production of “Story Theatre.” Also appearing on stage are high school senior Jessica Malin, SCCC/ATS students Tabitha Barnett, Cody Mitchell, Erandi Garcia-Peralta, Franklin Guillen and Juan Carlos Contreras. The play opens at 7:30 Nov. 7-9. For more photos, see page 7.

HigherGrounds

Papers vanish from racks — Page 6 Crusader photo and illustration/Maria Lara

Jairo Vazquez, Bradley Kinser, Rhonda Kinser, Shelby Stevens, Drew Swan and Zach Carpenter stay after Bible study for a photo. The group encourages other students to join them on Sunday mornings.

Maria Lara Crusader staff

Staff takes on the Big Easy — Pages 4-5

It’s early on a Sunday morning, the fall breeze is chilly outside as students begin to gather around a table at Spencer Browne’s Coffee Shop. Students are there not only for the coffee, but also to share common grounds in one purpose, the study of the Bible. Spencer Browne’s has been the location for non-denominational Bible studies every Sunday since the beginning of April last year. Rhonda Kinser, Counselor and Retention Specialist at Seward County Community College / Area Technical School is the leader of the gatherings that have been open to SCCC/ATS students. “It is an informal gathering of students who are hungry for more of God,” Kinser said. In the spring of 2012, Kinser noticed that a group of her college students were on fire for God. “Maybe it’s selfish of me, but I wanted to be a part of what God was doing in their lives,” Kinser said. Then on a Sunday morning, Kinser’s pastor’s title to his message was “Let God’s dreams become your dreams.” Kinser said, at that moment, “I heard the Spirit of the Lord speak to my heart and say, ‘I want you to start a college Bible study.’” Kinser didn’t know how she was going to make this happen, because at her church there was no more space for another class. So she reached out to her pastor. After praying over the situation, Kinser said she feels the Lord gave her the thought having the

studies at Spencer Browne’s. She checked Spencer Browne’s that following Sunday to see the space it would provide and to seek permission from the owner to host the Bible studies. Shannon Francis, owner of Spencer Browne’s, said he was very happy that Kinser asked to host the Bible studies there. “Coffee shops are places for people to meet, visit and discuss the important things in life,” Francis said. The classes began that Sunday after Easter. “In addition to Rhonda’s class, we have at least three other groups meeting here on a regular basis. One is a Women’s Bible Study, a Widow/Widowers Christian support group and a Wednesday Men’s Coffee,” Francis said. Not only does it benefit the coffee shop in business because of the attendants purchasing coffee and other beverages, but it also benefits the group in general. It’s more accessible, and a little less traditional place to meet, making the groups feel comfortable. One Spencer Browne’s worker, Shannon Francis’s daughter, Kimberly Francis, added, “I would say no one was surprised because my parents wanted to add a space like that specifically for groups wanting a good place to meet.” Kimberly said that everyone

she knows that works the morning shifts likes the studednts in the group because they are genuinely so nice whenever they come, especially the group leader, Kinser. There have been no advertisements of the Bible studies because Kinser wants it to be a word of mouth choice taken by the s t u dents. At the beginning, as the students themselves passed the word, 10 students showed up to the first meeting and are still going. They meet every Sunday from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. “Since we have several different students from different denominations, some students leave before 10:15 because their church starts at 10,” Kinser said. Being a non-denominational Bible study group, despite all the different backgrounds, the students have been cooperative and open-minded toward each other. “We’re pretty chill, no conflicts ever break out,” said Zach Carpenter, recent graduate of SCCC/ATS and now drummer at New Beginnings Church. Another student who participates in the Bible studies, Drew Swan, said, “I started to attend last semester, the beginning of May and that is when I gave my heart to the Lord. It’s simply been a blessing.”

Charles Brownlee, one of the first faculty members of the college, died Tuesday, Oct. 29. Brownlee served as a math instructor, athletic director and division chair of math, science and HPERD. He taught at SCCC for 30 years before his retirement. In April of 2013, he was inducted into the SCCC/ATS Athletic Hall of Fame. He was also an active part of SCCC/ATS Athletic Booster Club. For full obituary, see page 3.

Mulligan talks twins, tea and traveling Diana Chavira New Media Director

Sigma Chi Chi succeeds — Page 2

2013

Charles Brownlee

Crusader photo / Dawn Shouse

College treats young visitors — Page 8

November 6

The all girls boarding school, Pipers Corner, located in England, is where Katherine Mulligan was given her first job out of college as the head of the lacrosse program and assistant boarding house mistress. Mulligan arrived in England last August and moved to Liberal in July. She is now the director of the Student Living Center at Seward County Community College/Area Technical School. Mulligan was about to graduate from college and she realized that she still didn’t know what she wanted to do. She didn’t want to go back to school, but she knew she would love to have a job as a lacrosse coach. Originally, Mulligan wanted to find a job in her home town of Denver, Colo., but one day while job hunting, she came across an opening in England for a lacrosse coach. Mulligan had played the sport throughout college and saw the job opening as a perfect opportunity. Before Mulligan arrived at Pipers Corner she had to interview with United States lacrosse and English lacrosse in Baltimore where she was hired; 30 coaches were hired along with Mulligan. At Pipers Corner during the day, she was a P.E. teacher, and during the afternoons she ran the entire lacrosse program with no assistance. Mulligan was in charge of four teams, which consisted of about

100 girls. It was a lot to keep track of, but the job translated to what she does now. At night, Mulligan would work with all of the girls in the boarding house. Mulligan shared that she doesn’t like her experience in England better than Seward, she just likes it differently. “It’s just so different, when I was over there, every weekend I could go to a different country if I wanted to,” responded Mulligan. She described it as one of the big perks of her former job, but she also included that it was nice to be somewhere more settled. Most of Mulligan’s traveling was paid for out of her own pocket, but she also didn’t have any living expenses to worry about so affording travel was no problem. As far as seeing the world, Mulligan has traveled to Ireland, Scotland, Poland, France twice, Austria, Croatia and up and down England. Although she had the experience of a lifetime and was able to travel Europe, she was not able to travel back home to see her family. Mulligan also shared that her time in England made her grow up and it made her appreciate where she was in life. “It made me appreciate home a lot more, but it also taught me that seeing the world is something that you can’t take for granted,” said Mulligan. She fully acknowledges the fact that her overseas adventures are something that not many get to experience. n See MULLIGAN, page 3

Cosmo students compete for Million Hair Runway Maria Lara Crusader staff Cosmetology students are putting their skills to the test at the annual Million Hair Runway competition. Sheila Scheib and Denice Paden have organized the competition to take place on Nov. 11 at 2 p.m., hosted at SCCC/ATS Room SU 214. “The January 2013 class is about to graduate and they are the ones competing against each other,” said Scheib. Judges will be former students from the Cosmetology program. “We have also asked our past students, currently licensed stylist, to be judges,” said Scheib. Each of the student stylists will select a model to makeover. According to Scheib, the purpose of

holding this event is to enhance the students’ skills and to assess each of the assignments given for the competition. “First, the students decide on a theme, and have to design a poster to promote the competition finale,” said Scheib. After the students have chosen their models, they will write a report about what they are going to do for the makeover. On the day of competition, the makeovers will be in the cosmetology school from 8:15 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The students will take before and after pictures as well as give presentations of their models and describe their makeovers. Anyone who would like to observe the competition is welcome.


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Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Community service gets colorful with Presidential Scholars project Kristy Flowers News editor Presidential Scholars at Seward County Community College / Area Technical School are bringing a splash of color to campus this spring. The Scholars are planning a Color Run for the spring of 2014. The run will be for a service project the Scholars plan and host each year. In previous years, the students have hosted a dance for senior

citizens, painted a homeless shelter and collected food cans. “One of the reasons that the Scholars do a service learning project is to give back to the community. Since the community contributes to the college for student scholarships, we like to show the community that we appreciate all that they do give back,” Dean of Students Celeste Donovan said. Color Runs have grown in popularity in the last several years. The idea of the Color Run

is to worry less about running a certain time and more about having fun. The race will be untimed and runners will be splashed with different colors at certain intervals of the race. Participants should wear a white shirt during the run. Each individual who finishes the race will receive a Tshirt as a prize. The proceeds from the color run will go toward a fund against maternal neonatal tetanus. MNT kills about 60,000 infants and many mothers each year.

Kiwanis and UNICEF have joined forces to eliminate the devastating disease. Their goal is to raise $110 million by 2015. SCCC/ATS freshman and Presidential Scholar Perla Hernandez introduced the cause to the rest of the Scholars at their last meeting. “I thought about this because I was really involved in Key Club my senior year. I remembered about their cause, and it was just something different,” Hernandez said.

While none of the other Scholars knew about MNT, Hernandez explained the disease and the group decided to donate the proceeds to the cause. The planned date for the run is March 29, but that is subject to change. Registration fees will be $20 per person if registered before the actual date and $25 per person the day of the race. The location of the race is still being decided. Planning and working for the

event is not solely for Presidential Scholars. Any students who want to volunteer time are more than welcome to help. “The more students involved, the better and bigger the project,” Donovan said. Registration will begin at 10 a.m. and the actual race will begin at 11 a.m. More information about the event will be available closer to the proposed date. For more information on the cause, visit Kiwanis.org.

Crusader photo/Dawn Shouse

SCCC students mill about outside of the Student Living Center on Wednesday Oct. 30 after Resident Assistants turned on the fire alarms for a fire drill and went door to door telling students to evacuate.

News Briefs

VETERANS DAY event will be from 12-2 p.m., Monday, Nov. 11 in the student union. Events include music and posting of the colors along with a free lunch for veterans and their families. To reserve a spot at the luncheon, contact Chris Hickman, 620-4171679 or email Hickman at chris.hickman@sccc.edu. MONEY TREE will be 8 p.m.9:15 p.m., Nov. 12, in the Showcase Theater. $500 worth of $5 bills will be available to win by pulling them off the Money Tree. The challenge will be in using oversized gloves to grab the money. Each contestant will be given an apron to stuff the money inside. SPRING ENROLLMENT is now open. Students may enroll online at sccc.edu. AG DEPARTMENT OPEN HOUSE will be 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 13 in the Ag Building on campus. Food and drinks will be provided. In-

formation about programs and job opportunities will be available. For information, call 620417-1353 or email Winslow at teddi.winslow@sccc.edu. CHILDRENS ART DAY, for grades 1-6, hosted by Kylix Art Club, will be 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 16, in the art room. The cost is $15, and the fee is due on Saturday when participants arrive. Supplies and drinks are included. Participants will need to bring a sack lunch. Register by Nov. 15 with Susan Copas at 620-417-1453 or email Copas at susan.copas@sccc.edu. FREE THANKSGIVING DINNER from 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 19, in the cafeteria. Turkey, ham, mashed and sweet potatoes, carrots, peas and green bean casserole, slaw, relish and cranberry sauces, fresh rolls and pies are included. PHI THETA KAPPA door-todoor scavenger hunt will be 2-4 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 24. Phi Theta Kappa is looking for cash or food donations including turkeys, potatoes, stuffing, yams, canned vegetables or cranberries, rolls or dessert mixes. Those who would like to donate or would like for the students to come to a home to pick up items, call 620-417-1455 or email Stafford at debbie.stafford@sccc.edu.

Security Report Nov. 3 – Criminal damage to vehicle. Suspect damaged mirror of victim’s personal passenger car. Investigation in progress. Nov. 1 – Criminal damage to vehicle. Suspect keyed the paint on the hood of victim’s personal passenger car. Possible suspect identified. Investigation in progress. Oct. 18 – Possession of alcohol investigation. Suspect identified and charged. No further investigation needed. Incident is

closed. Three possession of alcohol violations were reported by management of the Student Living Center for the month of October. All students are reminded to slow down and use caution when driving on all college properties. The speed limit is 20 mph on all campus properties. n Security Report provided by Head of Security, Dennis Mulanax.

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Seward County Community College/Area Technical School’s Criminal Justice Club, Sigma Chi Chi, attended the American Criminal Justice Association Region 3 Conference in Garden City Oct. 18-20. Edgar Gonzalez, Luis Vazquez, and Angel Hernandez, all of Liberal received first place in crime scene. Dylan McLemore and Marcos Gonzalez received third place in the same category. Shawna Polk and Dennis Mulanax, SCCC/ATS firearms instructor, received second place in team firearms at the professional level. SCCC/ATS Criminal Justice Coordinator, Cristy Mulanax, received second place in physical agility in her age division.

Phi Theta Kappa keeps organization alive Kristy Flowers News editor Phi Theta Kappa, Seward County Community College / Area Technical School’s honor society, is picking up steam and planning service activities for the fall semester. PTK is a community college national honor society. Students must have a 3.5 GPA or higher during their first semester of col-

lege in order to be eligible for the organization. A faculty member must recommend students for the organization. Once students become members, they must maintain a 3.0 GPA. At the beginning of the semester, it was unsure whether there would be a PTK club at SCCC/ATS. The club has had a hard time getting started in this school year.

To help get back into the swing of things, PTK recently elected new officers. Amy Knop is the president and Fabiola Pena is the vice president. Now that the officers are in position, sponsor Debbie Stafford is trying to help the students plan service activities. In the month of November, the students are planning a Thanksgiving Food Collection and

The SCCC/ATS Board of Trustees discussed new employees, retirements, campus activities and other events at the monthly meeting. Jerry Thor, tennis coach, introduced four members of the Saints and Lady Saints tennis teams. Ronzai Saurombe and Alejandro Gonzalez made history by becoming the first Saints tennis team to win the ITA National Championship in Junior College Doubles. The two students were the “wild card” and became the first Saints tennis players to earn a trip to the ITA National Tournament. The second “wild card” to enter the tournament was the Lady Saints Tennis duo of Paula

editor Makiah Adams news editor Kristy Flowers design editor

Jakub Stepanovic

new media director Diana Chavira sports editor Efren Rivero ad manager Dawn Shouse

Lopez and Paula Coyos, who won third place at the tournament. The board approved the program review of the Criminal Justice program after a presentation by Cristy Mulanax, criminal justice coordinator. Deb Weilert, human resources director, informed the board that the college health insurance falls in line with the Affordable Health Care Act. The college will begin a Principles of Troubleshooting class, funded through a Kansas Board of Regents Innovative Technology Grant. The course will use Flight Safety International software at a cost of $30,000 for three years. An enrollment fee of $75 will be required.

Kyleigh Becker Marco Garcia Maria Lara Fabiola Pena

Dean of Student Services Celeste Donovan presented the results of a housing survey that show a high level of student satisfaction for campus housing. Dean of Finance and Operations Dennis Sander told the board that Jerri Lynn Lyddon, director of the Saints Bookstore, will be the new president of MidStates Association of College Stores. Dr. Duane Dunn, SCCC/ATS president, informed the board that new federal regulations may determine where online classes can be taught without additional fees from other states. Dean Janese Thatcher announced plans to include heritage crops and plants for the agronomy and soil courses as

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part of the sustainable agriculture program. The board hired Sonia Hernandez as the education specialist for the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics grant. They accepted the early retirement of Andy Yoxall, director of public and alumni relations, effective May 31, 2014. The board recognized the membership of the SCCC/ATS Professional Employees Association and its officers including President Chris Guyer, President-Elect Jay Castor, Secretary Dawn Hemphill and Treasurer Cristy Mulanax. Mulanax, Rusty Tuman, and Ed Anderson were approved as representatives to the PEA Professional Welfare Committee.

The official student newspaper of Seward County Community College/Area Technical School is published bi-monthly and has special editions by journalism students during the regular college year, except on school holidays and during examination periods. One copy of each issue is distributed free to each student, faculty and staff member, with subsequent copies available for purchase in the Crusader office at 50 cents each. Letters to the editor will be considered for publication if they are signed and the authenticity of the writer’s signature is verified. The staff reserves the right to edit for length. Opinions voiced in letters and editorials are not necessarily those of Seward County Community College/Area Technical School or the Crusader. Advertising is accepted. Rates are $4.25 per column inch or $5 pci for color ads. Insert rates are $50 per thousand. Classified ads are free to SCCC students, faculty and staff; classified rates for all others are $5 per ad, limit of 20 words. The Crusader staff reserves the right to refuse advertising. Mail to: Crusader, Box 1137, Liberal, KS 67905, or editors@crusadernews.com.

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Thanksgiving Food Basket Delivery. “We will be delivering 10 complete Thanksgiving meals the Sunday before Thanksgiving,” Stafford said. “We will be requesting referrals to determine who the recipients will be.” PTK’s next meeting will be at 5 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 7. It will be located in SW229 in the second floor of the Student Union.

Board of Trustees

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3-ON-3 BASKETBALL for intramural teams starts at 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 7 in the Green House. Each team will play to 25 points. The teams play for bragging rights and championship Tshirts. The 3-on-3 basketball is sponsored by the Student Government Association.

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Former SCCC instructor and booster dies at age 75 Contributed to Crusader Charles William Brownlee, 75, died Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013 at Southwest Medical Center in Liberal. He was born Sept. 20, 1938 in Buffalo, Mo. to James and Norma (Moore) Brownlee. He graduated from Satanta High School in 1956. He went on to receive his Bachelors of Science degree from Emporia State University and a Masters in Physics from the University of Wyoming. He retired from Seward County Community College (SCCC) after 30 years as a math, science, and physics instructor. He was a member of the Satan-

ta United Methodist Church, Liberal Kids Inc. and Kiwanis Club. He was a member of the SCCC Athletics Booster Club and was inducted into the Seward County Community College Athletic Hall of Fame in April of 2013. He enjoyed his spending time with his grandkids and doing woodworking, stamp collecting and SCCC sports. Brownlee remained active in SCCC activities until his health was affected by Lou Gehrig’s disease. On June 20, 1958 he married Evelyn Hockett in Satanta. She survives. Other survivors include: three sons - Glenn Brownlee and wife Kim of Texarkana, Texas, Garry

Brownlee and wife Susan of Mulvane, Gregg Brownlee and wife Getana of Canyon City, Ore.; Mother - Norma Brownlee, Hoxie. Three brothers - James Brownlee, Murdock, Mike Brownlee and wife Mary of Baton Rouge, La., Robert Brownlee and wife Esther of Baton Rouge, La. Three sisters - Charlotte Hagaman and husband Lynn of Hillsboro, Barbara Brookshire and husband Larry of Hoxie, Terrie Romero and husband Russell of New Iberia, La. Five grandchildren - Loren and Kyle Brownlee of Canyon City, Ore., Joshua and Sally Brownlee of Mulvane and Hannah Brownlee of Texarkana, Texas.

Preceded in death by his father and his granddaughter, Margaruite Ray Brownlee. Funeral services were held at 10 a.m. Saturday at the Satanta United Methodist Church in Satanta with Pastor Kelvin Heitmann presiding. In lieu of flowers and plants, memorial contributions may be sent to the SCCC/ATS Foundation for the Brownlee Science and Math Endowment Fund in care of Brenneman Funeral Home 1212 W. 2nd Liberal, KS 67901.

Crusader file photo

Charles Brownlee socializes at the 40th Anniversary of SCCC/ATS in 2009. Brownlee was a math and physics instructor when the college first opened. He also served as division chair and athletic director.

Livestock judging raises money for scholarships Makiah Adams Editor

Crusader photo/Diana Chavira

Dorm manager Kate Mulligan and her twin sister Maureen watch the Lady Saints regional volleyball tournament in the Green House Tuesday night. Mulligan moved to Liberal to both be close to her sister and to become the dorm manager at Seward.

Mulligan moves from100 lacrosse players to 250 college students

Mulligan: Continued from page 1

Mulligan took full advantage of her location to learn about other cultures and see how they lived. It was in Paris, France, that Mulligan had her first taste of culture shock. No one in Paris spoke English, everything from signs and menus were all written in French. “When I went to Paris, I felt helpless because I couldn’t communicate with them.” Had a friend of Mulligan’s not accompanied her on her journey she probably would’ve been stranded at the airport, because initially she had planned on traveling alone. Mulligan explained that it wasn’t like the people there weren’t friendly, they just didn’t speak any English. Mulligan then realized how little she knew about the city, and now she understands how hard it is for others who come to America because English isn’t their native language. Mulligan sees it as a life lesson. Most of the time, where she had traveled, there were accommodations and others spoke English, but Paris was the exception. And that wasn’t the only language barrier that Mulligan faced while she was in Europe. Another difficult situation that Mulligan was faced with was not only trying to understand people’s accents but also their dialect and slang. For instance, in Amer-

ica a person would be asked “How are you doing?”. Whereas, in England, a person is asked, “Are you all right?”. During her first week of school, Mulligan heard this continously thinking that she might appear upset to others, but later she learned from a co-worker, that “Are you all right?”, is their way of asking, “Hey, how’s it going?”. Mulligan is positive that she was probably the only American in the town that she was working in. There were three Australians at Pipers Corner as well, but Mulligan was alone when she talked about her home country. To English folk, a trashcan is a “bin.” Mulligan was also made fun of when she said “sidewalk,” because in England it’s called the “pavement.” She also picked up a lot of the slang, Mulligan realized, when she came back home. “Lovely” is not a common word in American vocabulary. Another cultural norm in England, that Mulligan had to get used to, is tea time. “After every lacrosse game, we had a ‘tea’ with our opponents, said Mullig a n . “Whether the game was home or away, we would have a ‘tea time’.” Every morning there was a tea time, the whole staff had a tea break, and all the girls that were at the boarding house would also have tea. For the teas after games, the

teams would come together in the dining halls. Mulligan mentioned that the dining hall at the school that she worked at was more modern compared to other school’s dining halls that she had seen. “Some of these schools have been around for hundreds of years,” said Mulligan “one school we went to in particular had a Hogwarts type dining hall.” For anyone not familiar with Hogwarts, it is the name of the school in Harry Potter. Mulligans described it as having long wooden tables and big fire places. “These schools weren’t made from Harry Potter, Harry Potter was made from the English school system,” explained Mulligan. Even while she was seeing and experiencing the world, Mulligan still missed home and after about a year at Pipers Corner, she began looking for jobs to come back to the U.S. Another year in Europe was not in the books for Mulligan, according to her, she had accomplished everything she could have in England. Mulligan’s twin sister, Maureen Mulligan, helped Kate find the job that she now has. At first glance, a person could not have guessed that Kate had a twin sister, and it’s not something she hides either. Maureen allocated that she and Kate had always called having a twin as “ having a built-in best friend.”

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Needless to say, they’re very close. Maureen often times gave Kate advice about places to visit in England because she once lived there, too, while she was studying abroad. Maureen also described her sister as “outgoing” and “hard working.” She continued by saying that Kate took her job seriously, and she was always working to improve the organizations at the dorms. A co-worker of Kate’s also had good things to say about her. Celeste Donovan, Dean of Students at SCCC, knows Kate very well. “Kate is a young professional starting to build her career. She is intelligent, motivated, driven and passionate,” Donovan described. In addition, Donovan thinks that Kate has fresh ideas that she brings to the residence life program. “She is creative, energetic and extremely positive.” Donovan furthermore acknowledges that it is not always easy to supervise over 200 students, but Kate has the skill and ability to be both firm and fair with her students. Kate has made a big transition, from living in England at an all girls boarding school, to working in a small town at a community college. “I would suggest to anyone, if they have the chance, go abroad and see the world,” Kate concluded. “ There will always be a job back home for you, but go see the world.”

The Celebrity Livestock Judging Contest, sponsored by the Agriculture Department at Seward County Community College/Area Technical School, is no average competition. No prior experience or knowledge is even required for those who are judging the competition. “All of the proceeds go toward scholarships,” Agriculture Instructor and Livestock Judging Coach Sam Rucker said. The main goal of this contest is not to win, but to raise money for scholarships. The judging teams will consist of two to three members, with an additional member: the celebrity. The judging contest begins at 10 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 23, located at the agriculture building on SCCC/ATS campus. Those wanting to be on a team need to pre-register by Nov. 14. On Nov. 22 there will be a social at the Hampton Inn, beginning at 6:30 p.m., to purchase a “celebrity” for the teams judging at the contest.

“Local businesses sponsor the team which consists of individuals from those businesses and alumni of the agriculture program,” Rucker said. Businesses or individuals are able to sponsor a full team for a minimum of $400, or half of a team for $250. Another option is to become an event sponsor. The highest three individual scores per team will go toward the team total. Awards will be provided by the college for teams and individuals who place. This semester, the SCCC/ATS livestock team is an all freshmen team. The three freshmen are Logan Hernandez, Michael Schmidt and Kalli Hoskinson. The team’s latest contest in Stillwater, Okla. was a practice contest. The livestock team won’t actually compete until this Friday at Texas Tech in Lubbock, Tex. There, students will compete in the freshman division. n Crusader staff reporter Fabiola Peña contributed to this story.

Crusader Photo/ Dawn Shouse

Spent dry erase markers, mechanical pencils, pens, etc. fill a cardboard box located in the math and science quad, room A138. These plastic utensils are sent off to be recycled. The proceeds received from the recycled material will come back to the college. To learn more about the recycling of materials, visit http://www.terracycle.com/enUS/brigades.html


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Kristy Flowers News editor Jazz music, seafood, beignets and bread pudding. The SCCC/ATS Crusader staff experienced the sights, sounds, smells and flavors of New Orleans and also earned national awards when they attended a National College Media Convention in October. The staff not only experienced the city, but also competed for various awards against 59 two-year and 459 four-year college newspapers from around the country. The Crusader competed in the categories of Two-Year Non-Weekly Newspaper and Newspaper Special Editions. The Telolith, SCCC/ATS’s literary magazine, competed in the category of Literary Magazine. In the Two-Year Non-Weekly category, the Crusader came out with a third place finish behind the el Don from Santa Ana College in Santa Ana, Calif. and The Sentinel from North Idaho College in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. “Both the el Don and The Sentinel are powerhouses in the college media field. The el Don is from Santa Ana College in California with a student population of more than 30,000 and The Sentinel is from Idaho and has been a consistent Best of Show winner for at least the past two decades,” Crusader adviser Anita Reed said. In Special Editions, the staff earned sixth place for their Back to School issue, falling

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behind schools like Florida Atlantic University, Rutgers University, Oklahoma State University, Auburn University and Pennsylvania State University. “This is all judged on work that has been done since the start of this school year. I am really impressed with this staff that have come in with so little experience and have stepped up and brought talent and teamwork to the Crusader,” Reed said. The Telolith also finished the competition with a high ranking. They earned sixth place for a Literary Magazine behind North Carolina State University, College of Charleston, California State University, Cuyahoga Community College and Appalachian State University. Bill McGlothing said he and Telolith co-adviser Susan Copas are both surprised at the outcome and are proud of the students. “The Telolith has won honors and recognition for years, but this one is another exceptional award from a prestigious organization,” said McGlothing, “Telolith contributors past and present all have a stake in the publication’s success.” When the list of award winners was first released, there was some confusion. The Crusader was listed in sixth place under the category of Four-Year Non-Weekly Newspapers instead of the two-year category. There were also other two-year schools that were included in the wrong category. “A clerical error occurred after the judging. Our database doesn't allow for ties in

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Best of Show categories. So, if you try to enter the same place in a category (say, FourYear Non-Weekly), it will go to the next available place,” ACP Contest and Critique Coordinator Grace Christiansen said. “While filling in the two-year category I accidentally changed the category of a few publications. The system compensated, as it was designed to do. I failed to doublecheck my work,” Christiansen added. The two-year and four-year schools were split back into two separate categories to avoid ties and confusion from other schools. "The decision was made because the error was ours and it did not seem fair to ask several schools to send back their awards because of our mistake,” Christiansen said. At first the Crusader staff didn’t quite know how to react to being placed in a fouryear category, even though it was with an impressive sixth place finish. “Because the Crusader has enjoyed success so often in the past, I think it becomes hard to remember how difficult it is to make it to the top of the Best in Show. We start to kind of take it for granted, but there’s no reason to do that. It’s always hard at the top,” Reed added. The staff members were confused about the category errors, but in the end they were happy to have placed so well at a national competition. “I was actually quite proud for the Crusader to have landed in sixth place in Four-

CRUSADER 5

Year Non-Weekly, I thought that was an honor in itself. I do think it’s fair and exciting to move up when they pulled us to the two-year schools,” Reed said. The Crusader staff not only took the paper to competition, but also honed their journalism skills through sessions at the convention. The sessions available helped inform students about writing, editing, photography and many other aspects of journalism. Successful journalists in newspaper, broadcast and educational professions led each session. There were also two keynote addresses, one of which was given by Hoda Kotb from The Today Show. The staff also had the chance to listen to a critique of their paper by an adviser from another school. They were able to hear an outsider’s perspective on the design and content of several issues of the newspaper. After each day of sessions and journalism education, the Crusader staff had the opportunity to explore the city of New Orleans. The staff had a riverboat ride on the Mississippi River, experienced Bourbon Street and the French Quarter, saw numerous street performers and experienced the local cuisine. The staff also had a chance to experience the New Orleans Halloween parade. After several long days and late nights, the Crusader staff came back to Liberal with more knowledge and journalism skills as well as awards to hang up and be proud of. Crusader illustration/Jakub Stepanovic

Crusader photo/Jakub Stepanovic

Crusader photo/Diana Chavira

Crusader photo/Jakub Stepanovic

Crusader members Kristy Flowers, Efren Rivero, Makiah Adams and Marco Garcia enjoy night life on Canal Street in New Orleans. The Crusader staff was in New Orleans for a National College Media convention, where they won a sixth-place award for Special Sections and a third-place award for Two-Year Non-Weekly Newspaper in competitions.

The streets of New Orleans are filled by musicians, artists or performers, just like this “Silver Man”, who called the Crusader staff “cheap white people” and later took a knife and slashed a man’s bicycle tires.

New Orleans was in the top 10 most populous cities from 1810 until 1880 and is the home of several skyscrapers and historic buildings. Since it has a lucrative position on the Mississippi River, there are also many industrial sites to see. Pictured above is the New Orleans skyline behind the Crescent City Connection.

Crusader photo/Jakub Stepanovic

A Dracula float was one of the attractions in the French Quarter in the official New Orleans Halloween parade on the evening of Oct. 26.

Crusader photo/Jakub Stepanovic

Crusader photo/Makiah Adams

After the last session of the CMA/ACP convention Oct. 26, Crusader staff members visit the Aquarium of the Americas in New Orleans. From left: Ad Manager Dawn Shouse, Design Editor Jakub Stepanovic, Photographer Maria Lara, News Editor Kristy Flowers, Editor Makiah Adams, New Media Director Diana Chavira, Sports Editor Efren Rivero, Staff Members Fabiola Peña, Marco Garcia, Kyleigh Becker and Adviser Anita Reed.

Mary Beth Tinker speaks at a convention session in front of a photo of herself as a young girl. Tinker was an advocate of First Amendment freedom of speech rights during the


4 CRUSADER

ORLEANS

NEW

Kristy Flowers News editor Jazz music, seafood, beignets and bread pudding. The SCCC/ATS Crusader staff experienced the sights, sounds, smells and flavors of New Orleans and also earned national awards when they attended a National College Media Convention in October. The staff not only experienced the city, but also competed for various awards against 59 two-year and 459 four-year college newspapers from around the country. The Crusader competed in the categories of Two-Year Non-Weekly Newspaper and Newspaper Special Editions. The Telolith, SCCC/ATS’s literary magazine, competed in the category of Literary Magazine. In the Two-Year Non-Weekly category, the Crusader came out with a third place finish behind the el Don from Santa Ana College in Santa Ana, Calif. and The Sentinel from North Idaho College in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. “Both the el Don and The Sentinel are powerhouses in the college media field. The el Don is from Santa Ana College in California with a student population of more than 30,000 and The Sentinel is from Idaho and has been a consistent Best of Show winner for at least the past two decades,” Crusader adviser Anita Reed said. In Special Editions, the staff earned sixth place for their Back to School issue, falling

FEATURE

behind schools like Florida Atlantic University, Rutgers University, Oklahoma State University, Auburn University and Pennsylvania State University. “This is all judged on work that has been done since the start of this school year. I am really impressed with this staff that have come in with so little experience and have stepped up and brought talent and teamwork to the Crusader,” Reed said. The Telolith also finished the competition with a high ranking. They earned sixth place for a Literary Magazine behind North Carolina State University, College of Charleston, California State University, Cuyahoga Community College and Appalachian State University. Bill McGlothing said he and Telolith co-adviser Susan Copas are both surprised at the outcome and are proud of the students. “The Telolith has won honors and recognition for years, but this one is another exceptional award from a prestigious organization,” said McGlothing, “Telolith contributors past and present all have a stake in the publication’s success.” When the list of award winners was first released, there was some confusion. The Crusader was listed in sixth place under the category of Four-Year Non-Weekly Newspapers instead of the two-year category. There were also other two-year schools that were included in the wrong category. “A clerical error occurred after the judging. Our database doesn't allow for ties in

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Best of Show categories. So, if you try to enter the same place in a category (say, FourYear Non-Weekly), it will go to the next available place,” ACP Contest and Critique Coordinator Grace Christiansen said. “While filling in the two-year category I accidentally changed the category of a few publications. The system compensated, as it was designed to do. I failed to doublecheck my work,” Christiansen added. The two-year and four-year schools were split back into two separate categories to avoid ties and confusion from other schools. "The decision was made because the error was ours and it did not seem fair to ask several schools to send back their awards because of our mistake,” Christiansen said. At first the Crusader staff didn’t quite know how to react to being placed in a fouryear category, even though it was with an impressive sixth place finish. “Because the Crusader has enjoyed success so often in the past, I think it becomes hard to remember how difficult it is to make it to the top of the Best in Show. We start to kind of take it for granted, but there’s no reason to do that. It’s always hard at the top,” Reed added. The staff members were confused about the category errors, but in the end they were happy to have placed so well at a national competition. “I was actually quite proud for the Crusader to have landed in sixth place in Four-

CRUSADER 5

Year Non-Weekly, I thought that was an honor in itself. I do think it’s fair and exciting to move up when they pulled us to the two-year schools,” Reed said. The Crusader staff not only took the paper to competition, but also honed their journalism skills through sessions at the convention. The sessions available helped inform students about writing, editing, photography and many other aspects of journalism. Successful journalists in newspaper, broadcast and educational professions led each session. There were also two keynote addresses, one of which was given by Hoda Kotb from The Today Show. The staff also had the chance to listen to a critique of their paper by an adviser from another school. They were able to hear an outsider’s perspective on the design and content of several issues of the newspaper. After each day of sessions and journalism education, the Crusader staff had the opportunity to explore the city of New Orleans. The staff had a riverboat ride on the Mississippi River, experienced Bourbon Street and the French Quarter, saw numerous street performers and experienced the local cuisine. The staff also had a chance to experience the New Orleans Halloween parade. After several long days and late nights, the Crusader staff came back to Liberal with more knowledge and journalism skills as well as awards to hang up and be proud of. Crusader illustration/Jakub Stepanovic

Crusader photo/Jakub Stepanovic

Crusader photo/Diana Chavira

Crusader photo/Jakub Stepanovic

Crusader members Kristy Flowers, Efren Rivero, Makiah Adams and Marco Garcia enjoy night life on Canal Street in New Orleans. The Crusader staff was in New Orleans for a National College Media convention, where they won a sixth-place award for Special Sections and a third-place award for Two-Year Non-Weekly Newspaper in competitions.

The streets of New Orleans are filled by musicians, artists or performers, just like this “Silver Man”, who called the Crusader staff “cheap white people” and later took a knife and slashed a man’s bicycle tires.

New Orleans was in the top 10 most populous cities from 1810 until 1880 and is the home of several skyscrapers and historic buildings. Since it has a lucrative position on the Mississippi River, there are also many industrial sites to see. Pictured above is the New Orleans skyline behind the Crescent City Connection.

Crusader photo/Jakub Stepanovic

A Dracula float was one of the attractions in the French Quarter in the official New Orleans Halloween parade on the evening of Oct. 26.

Crusader photo/Jakub Stepanovic

Crusader photo/Makiah Adams

After the last session of the CMA/ACP convention Oct. 26, Crusader staff members visit the Aquarium of the Americas in New Orleans. From left: Ad Manager Dawn Shouse, Design Editor Jakub Stepanovic, Photographer Maria Lara, News Editor Kristy Flowers, Editor Makiah Adams, New Media Director Diana Chavira, Sports Editor Efren Rivero, Staff Members Fabiola Peña, Marco Garcia, Kyleigh Becker and Adviser Anita Reed.

Mary Beth Tinker speaks at a convention session in front of a photo of herself as a young girl. Tinker was an advocate of First Amendment freedom of speech rights during the


OPINION

6 CRUSADER

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Living dead: From Russia, with love Kyleigh Becker Crusader staff becker@crusadernews.com

Rotting gums, lips, noses and ears. Decaying faces. A skull full of ulcers. Open, oozing sores across the forehead. It sounds like something from a nightmare. A nightmare of the dead—killed by something from the inside out. A zombie, slowly losing its form as it decomposes. They might not be just a myth anymore, though I hope they stay dead and non-existent—I am NOT a fan of zombies. Or other dead things. Or bugs. This zombie though, isn’t just a zombie. This zombie is a person—still breathing and living at the moment. A victim of krokodil. Most people have heard of the “bath salt” incident, where a man got high on bath salts and turned into a “zombie,” attacking a man and trying to eat his face—but not very many have heard of krokodil. Krokodil, pronounced crocodile, is an opiate with an effect similar to heroin. It is, however, cheaper than heroin. If none of the above effects are enough of a deterrent, the high does not last as long as a high from heroin. The drug is also more powerful than morphine and easily made inside the comforts of home. Created in Russia in the early ‘90s, as heroin was hard to get and codeine extremely easy, krokodil was a cheap high. Honestly, I don’t understand the draw of using hard drugs. I understand addiction, but killing yourself from the inside out for a few hours or so of euphoria? It boggles my mind. The pain krokodil must cause as it rots the body must be excruciating. If

you factor in the risk of prison time, then that’s definitely a no from me. Krokodil, in case someone wants to know, is made a bit like meth and only takes about 30 to 45 minutes if the maker knows what he’s doing. The drug is also injected, which can lead to infections and gangrene. Not to mention HIV/AIDs or other diseases transferred by blood. Another side effect is also greenish, scalylooking skin. Hence the name krokodil. It just doesn’t seem worth it. A slow painful death with skin decomposing and falling off, extremities dying and turning black. This drug is definitely NOT worth the hour and a half high or the extremely high risk of death. Luckily for us here in America, the drug isn’t too prevalent. There have been three deaths just across the border in Oklahoma due to suspected krokodil use. It is only suspected that they died from krokodil because the main ingredient, desomorphine, leaves the system so quickly. It’s almost hard to think that people in such close proximity have died from using the drug. I can’t wrap my head around the fact that three people have died from a drug that’s extremely rare in the United States. Meth, heroin and cocaine are common and dangerous. But those don’t turn users dry and scaly, or cause people to literally start dying from the inside out. I guess it’s just the visibility of it. But these people—krokodil users, drug users and those addicted to anything, really, have changed themselves. They have turned themselves into the zombies that they probably once feared. Aching, hungering, wanting that next high. Brains? No, krokodil. They’re wanting their Russian dream.

Thieves on campus Newspaper popularity or intentional removal? The first copy of the school’s newspaper that students and faculty pick up is free. The newspaper staff encourages students and faculty to read up on the latest news, and we appreciate how popular SCCC’s newspaper has gotten. The last issue that the Crusader put out seemed to disappear from the racks in the blink of an eye. Either the staff is writing some eye-catching stories, or our main suspicion is that the newspapers are being taken off the racks with the intention of keeping students and faculty from reading them. There is no charge for picking up a copy of this week’s issue. In fact, our staff would love it if you picked up a copy and took the time to read through it. A student or faculty member can also take extra copies for their grandmas, or parents, or their boyfriend and girlfriend back home. Anyone can take up to 20 copies at a time to take back home to their families. But let’s not take this out of context, if a person wishes to have various copies of the newest issue, they can simply come ask for more copies in the newsroom, free of charge. We would rather you come ask for more copies and not take them straight off the racks. This is because it’s hard to prove when their is an actual theft of our newspapers. For our last issue, various racks had to be refilled, and not too long after they were, the racks were completely empty. We would hate to assume that copies of our school newspaper were removed intentionally, because like we said, it’s hard to prove. But if our readers really are that interested in reading our issues, then have at it. We only want to ensure that our readers understand that they CANNOT REMOVE our newspapers from their racks. There have been many cases in which this has

happened in other colleges, and we would like to avoid that kind of situation here. According to the Student Press Law Center, “Each year dozens of student newspapers and other publications across the country fall victim to thieves whose intent is to prevent the dissemination of news, information and opinion with which they disagree.” At least 600 copies of The Butler Collegian from Butler University went missing and some were even found dumped in trash cans. The issue that was dumped had various “potentially upsetting” stories. The Crusader had one potentially upsetting story. We have no proof that our newspapers were dumped, but there is a possibility that this one potentially upsetting story could’ve been the reason for why some of the racks were emptied so rapidly. Executive Director of the Student Press Law Center, Frank LoMonte, has dealt with so many thefts of these kinds that their website now contains a section dedicated entirely to it and what to do in an event that it does happen. LoMonte generously informs us that “even though student newspapers are free, it’s possible to commit theft by taking items that were meant to be taken away.” LoMonte uses the example of someone taking things from a homeless shelter. Even if whatever was taken did not have a price tag on it, those items were not all going to one person, because that would be depriving others of those items. “The same is true of newspapers,” says LoMonte, “– interfering with the delivery of newspapers to their intended audience, even free newspapers, can be prosecuted as a crime.” LoMonte also shares that not only is hiding newspapers against the law, it’s an ignorant

act. “It not only doesn’t succeed in concealing news – it ends up calling vastly more attention to a story that probably would have blown over in a few days.” The job of a newspaper is to inform the school, most importantly, its students, about what is happening on and around campus. By taking our newspapers out of various racks, the Crusader is limited to doing so. It’s hard to prove this kind of thing when it happens, but what some people need to remember is that there is a First Amendment, and a school’s newspaper has the right to say and inform about whatever it feels like. The Crusader staff does a full evaluation of what it prints, and we take in consideration what the outcome might be from a story, but we do not hide information from our alumni, no matter the case, no matter the subject. This includes drug related stories. And not only do our newspapers get taken away, but a form of media to communicate news to others is also taken away. Without internet and social media, newspaper would be the only way to get news out, and years ago, that was the only way to get news out. What if the internet was down, or we couldn’t get our story to the radio? Our only other way to notify our students would be through the Crusader. Take that away and we’re out of sources. Just so we’re clear, we’re not pointing any fingers, or blaming anyone for what happened. But if anyone has any concerns or problems with what is going into the newspaper then please don’t hesitate to write a letter to the Editor. We do reserve the right to edit for length and libel. The school also has security cameras. In many cases, thieves have been caught on camera. So beware. We take pride in our paper and we’re watching.

Outside opinion: From community to university Crusader photo/Fabiola Pena

In a recent editorial, the Crusader noted 13 Dorothy statues. This letter to the editor pointed out a 14th statue at Pine and South Kansas.

Letter to the Editor

Guest columnist

Dorothys as assets, the pros and cons Dear Editor(s): I read the opinion page regarding the Dorothy statues. While I don’t have anything against the Dorothy statues, when I first heard there were going to be some Oz-themed statues around town, I presumed there would be more variety than just a couple different Dorothys, such as the tin man, lion, scarecrow, Munchkins, etc. I think there would be less objection to more variety than so much repetition, but I imagine there was a cost break made possible by the duplication, and having a couple spares in the wings would make repairs/replacements a smoother proposition. I do wonder though why the Dorothy in front of Memorial Library isn't the one that’s holding a book instead of the one with an armload of fruit. I think another aspect that might be overlooked might be the placement of the statues. I realize that they've been placed in conspicuous locations to attract the attention of tourists, but I think at least some of them would be better placed in public

Levi Adams

parks, and could still be noticed, especially at Light Park and Mary Frame Park, but Bluebonnet and Mahuron parks would also be good candidates. There are many events at the parks which draw in visitors as well. A potential negative of placing them at busy street corners is that at certain times of day, motorists can mistake them for pedestrians about to cross the street, or worse yet, mistake a pedestrian for one of the statues. Overall, I think the statues are an asset to tourism in Liberal, and Liberal’s tourism impact on the local economy is vastly underestimated by most locals. It’s a good sign that the city leaders do recognize the value of our local attractions enough to show support in this way. By the way, I think there’s a fourteenth statue that wasn't counted, at Pine and South Kansas. Don’t feel bad though, evidently the Director of Economic Development didn’t supply the proper count for you either. — Emery V. Swagerty

Now that I am a big, bad college senior at Oklahoma Panhandle State University, I would like to pass on my infinite wisdom to the freshmen and sophomores of Seward County Community College. Seriously, though, because enrollment for next semester at SCCC opened on Monday, I want to go over two things I wish I would have known a little more about after high school and during my time at Seward. First: There is a limit to how many credit hours can transfer from a twoyear community college to a four-year university bachelor’s degree. If you don’t plan on obtaining a bachelor’s degree, that’s fine; it won’t matter if you go over the limit, and you probably won’t have much more than the required 64 credit hours for an associate degree, anyway. However, this information might be nice for future reference in case you later decide to pursue a bachelor’s degree. Not many students realize it, but four-year universities set a maximum amount of transfer credits that will count toward a degree. That maximum is typically 60 credit hours (plus four credit hours of P.E) or it might be

slightly more. Each university might have a different limit, so make sure to investigate the university before enrolling in classes at your community college; talk with the dean of the department you plan to major in or the university’s transfer adviser. To clarify, the limit only applies to the actual bachelor’s degree. For example, let’s say you accrue 66 credit hours from SCCC and decide to attend the University of Kansas. If KU has a 60 credit hour limit, you may only choose 60 credit hours to count toward a degree—even if all classes can transfer. Also, the limit counts for all two-year colleges, so, for example, if you have 60 credit hours from Seward County Community College and 12 credit hours from Garden City Community College, only 60 credit hours total may count toward a bachelor’s. You may pick and choose which of those classes you wish to utilize. This limit exists simply so the four-year universities reach a minimum amount of credit hours. That minimum is the bachelor’s degree requirement (120 credits) minus the community college limit. Many high school students now have the ability to take concurrent classes or to take Advanced Placement exams for college credit. It is common for students to enter college with a full semester already completed. This means, many times, students don’t need to take the traditional

15-credit-hours-per-semester route; they don’t need to stay two years at two-year colleges. If they do, they might be wasting their time without knowing it. I know, I know, it’s dumb, and the four-year universities are big bullies, but it is what it is. Second: If you know what bachelor’s degree you want to obtain, find out what classes will count toward that degree. This is similar to the first statement. Even though all classes taken at SCCC might transfer, not all those classes will necessarily count toward your degree. Those classes might count as electives, and that’s fine, but it is usually best to research this stuff before it is too late. Again, speak with the dean of the department you plan to major in or the university’s transfer adviser. Also, find out if the four-year university you want to transfer to accepts “D” grades; some will only accept “C” or higher. The moral of the story is to do your research. Only the university you plan to transfer to will know everything about its degree requirements. Research, and research early. These two statements might not totally apply to everyone, however. Here are some questions to ask yourself: • Do you want more than one associate degree? • Do you need to retake classes you have failed? (The last grade you take will replace an earlier grade). • Do you think you need an in-

troductory class before you take a higher-level class at a university? • Are you undecided? (The sooner you declare a major, the less total amount of classes you will need to take—usually). • Are you a returning student? Are your classes out-of-date? (College classes might be obsolete after around 10 years). • Do you want to take advantage of the school’s library, workout facilities, etc.? • Do you simply want to take classes for fun? (Yes, it happens). While I don’t think taking extra classes is what’s best for me right now, you’re probably different. Factor in opportunity costs, do a cost-benefit analysis, take Instructor Kim Thomas’ economics class if you’re not sure what these terms mean, etc. Many times, students think, “Go to a community college because it is more affordable,” but if you don’t make your classes count toward a bachelor’s, it can cost more in time and money than you may want. Also, discuss these things with your advisor; he/she would be glad to help. Just don’t expect your advisor to do everything; you have the final say in your education. http://www.fastweb.com/college-search/articles/771-how-totransfer-from-a-community-college http://www.collegetransfer.net/ AskCT/Howdoesthecoursecredittransferprocesswork/tabid/


Wednesday, November 6, 2013

ENTERTAINMENT

CRUSADER 7

Gory Bedtime Stories T C

Drama Club promises a Grimm evening of storytelling in fall production he fall production of “Story Theatre” opens at 7:30 p.m. on Nov. 7 and will show Nov. 8-9 in the Showcase Theatre on the SCCC/ATS campus. rusader photographer Dawn Shouse captured these scenes from dress rehearsal Thursday and offers her predictions on the memorable moments audience members might watch for in the upcoming live stage productions of “Story Theatre.”

Amira Coleman is warned by Glenda Patterson in The sky is falling exclaims Tabitha Barnett as “Henny Penny.” “The Robber Bridegroom.”

SCCC Showc ase Theater

Scene from “The Robber Bridegroom”: Jessica Malin plays a maiden who has been murdered and eaten by robbers. From left, Juan Carlos Contreras, Cody Mitchell, Franklin Guillen and Erandi Garcia-Peralta play the murdering robbers.

Nov. 7-9

7:30 p.m. Jay Castor and Glenda Patterson play the parents in “The Master Thief.” Their expressive performances steal the show when they recognize their long lost son, but do not approve of his new profession.

Jamie Mix and Juan Carlos Contreras make a convincing couple in “Venus and the Cat.” Mix’s character starts out as a cat, then magically turns into a woman. What happens next startles Contreras and leaves the audience speechless.

For all SCCC Up-to-date coverage on News, Sports, & Events

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NEWS

8 CRUSADER

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Trick-or-Treat Street

2013

Crusader photo/Kristy Flowers

Celeste Donovan and Kate Mulligan stand in their Cruella de Ville and dalmation costumes Thursday night in the dorms.

Crusader photo/Makiah Adams

Trick-or-treaters look on a HALO booth in amazement.

Crusader photo/Makiah Adams

Tania Lujan and Brittany Norton pass out candy at the entrance of Trick-or-Treat Street Thursday night.

Crusader photo/Makiah Adams Crusader photo/Makiah Adams

pkin pum ular, SPEC members hand out glow rings to trick-or-treaters on Halloween. e r befo e pop nd Long becam in Irela nd a ng e carvi c peopl turnips ers, b i g t l m n Ce carvi with e were ing them il spirits. light rd off ev to wa

Kylix representatives pose for the camera after passing candy out.

Crusader photo/Kristy Flowers

Men’s basketball player, Brian Bridgeford, passes out candy to two of the many trick-or-treaters who passed through the dorms Thursday.

The nam in origin a e Halloween is Sco tt n low's Eve d is short for "All H ish ," the nigh Hallow’s D t before " alAll a y ," o r A That day ll was set b Saints’ Day. face IV y Pope B to o saints, an honor the Cath nio Roman pa d also to replac lic e (which ha gan festival of the d a d been in ead the end o la f the old te February, Roman y Later, Pop e All Saints e Gregory III chan ar). ’ Day to N ged ov. 1.

Crusader photo/Makiah Adams

Kylix provides a “candy house” for kids to walk through as they are handed halloween candy.

Crusader photo/Makiah Adams

A member of science club passes out candy to one of the 1,035 people that attended Trick-or-Treat Street. eference known r lloween t s e li r a The e gging on Ha North be to ritual lish speaking when a in Eng occurs in 1911, ntario, America er in Kingston, Ote New newspap border of upsta as nornear the ported that it w dren to York, re the smaller chil ween. o mal for guising on Hall go street

pumpkin carving contest

Crusader photo/ Dawn Shouse

Hernan Becerril carves a traditional jack-o’-lantern.

G Can wa eorge dy C en s or Re or use fee igina ning n, in d a d" lly er ve s fo an kno in t nte od d w wn he 1 d b for as as 88 y liv co "ch 0s, est mm ick ock o . nly

Crusader photo/ Dawn Shouse

Freshmen Sonia Ramirez and Monica Padilla apply a ghost stencil to their pumpkin.

See more pictures at www.facebook.com/ CrusaderNews Crusader photo/ Dawn Shouse

Dalibor Cohadarevic won first place for his carved lion head pumpkin.

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Crusader

Section B • Page 1

SPORTS November 6, 2013

National Champions Saurombe and Gonzalez: Road To Glory Saurombe

Gonzalez

Cutura/Martell (Tyler JC) vs Gonzalez/Saurombe 6-4, 3-6, (10-3)

Clark/Hackling vs Gonzalez/Saurombe 6-1, 6-2

Top seeded Cutura and Martell are taken down and eliminated by Gonzalez and Saurombe.

Gonzalez and Saurombe beat #4 seed in two quick sets.

Bessinger/Varenne vs Gonzalez/Saurombe 6-4, 6-2 Gonzalez and Saurombe defeat their last opponents and are the 2013 ITA National Championship winners.

Men’s tennis team captures national title Efren Rivero Sports editor

Courtesy photo

Alejandro Gonzalez and Ronzai Saurombe pose with their trophies after being declared the 2013 ITA National Champions for junior college doubles.

The Seward County men’s tennis team duo of Ronzai Saurombe and Alejandro Gonzalez took everyone by surprise as they upset every opponent and took the 2013 National Championship, despite being ranked as last seed. In thier first round against the top ranked team, Saurombe and Gonzalez took on Mate Cutura and James Martell from Tyler JC. Strong play by the Seward duo helped them take the first set 6-4. It was in the second set that Saurombe and Gonzalez went down. Despite leading the set 20, Tyler caught up and won the set 6-3. To decide the winner, they played to a ten point tiebreaker. A quick 6-0 lead led Saurombe and Gonzalez to the upset in a 10-3 win that gave Gonzalez and Saurombe the pass to semifinals. In the semifinals, Seward was again the underdog going against a higher seed. They were up against No. 4 seed Patrick Hackling and Chris Clark of Georgia Perimeter. It was another quick start for Seward as they went up 5-1. Another break gave the set to Seward who won it 6-1. In the second set, Saurombe and Gonzalez went up again early for a 3-0 lead. While Hackling and Clark tried to catch up, the Saints made a push to win the final three

games left in the set to get the victory 6-2. From the lowest seed in the tournament, Saurombe and Gonzalez found themselves in the final against Alec Bessinger and Adrien Varenne from Fresno City College. Bessinger and Varenne were ranked third for the tournament. The first set was even from the start. Back and forth action took the set to 3-3 before Gonzalez served to put the Saints in the lead 5-3. As Saurombe served, the Rams from Fresno City kept answering and proved thier endurance to extend the set to 26 points and 10 deuces. Seward still came on top and won the set 6-3. In the second set, Seward made it look easy by taking an early 40 lead. After both teams won a game, the score was 5-2 and the duo from Seward was just one point away from the national title. Fresno was not giving up yet as they took the next point to make it 5-2. Saurombe stepped up to serve and held it enough to score the winning point and to win the game, making Seward County the 2013 ITA National Champions in the junior college doubles division. This pair of freshman made history by becoming the first Saints tennis team in history to win a National Championship. ITA also organized an event titled the Super Bowl in which the

four small college champions from Junior College, NCAA Division II, NCAA Division III, and NAIA would battle for a winner of the whole event. The winner would then win an invite to the NCAA Division I National Tournament. Freshmen Saurombe and Gonzalez played against the NCAA Division III duo of Branter Jones and Palmer Campbell from Middlebury College. Both teams were off to the start exchanging breaks in the first set to make it 2-2. The Panthers from Middlebury then got the lead 3-2. The next two games were traded between both teams to make it 4-3. Seward lost momentum and Middlebury took the remaining two games to win the first set 6-3. In the second set, Seward fell behind 3-0 and couldn’t catch up. Their weekend came to an end as they lost the second set 6-1. At the beginning of the weekend, they were the first Seward County Men’s players to even earn a trip to the ITA National Tournament. As Saurombe and Gonzalez left Fort Myers, they left as the first Seward tennis team to win a National Championship, men’s or women’s. For more statistics on the ITA National Tournament, visit www.itatennis.com

Lady Saints place third at National Tournament Efren Rivero Sports editor The women’s Seward County doubles team of Paula Coyos and Paula Lopez also made a run for the title at the ITA National Tournament and placed third at the overall. “It was difficult. All of the opponents were tough, but we knew we had a chance in every match,” Coyos said. That perseverence pushed her and Lopez to keep hopes high despite losing their run to the title. Lopez and Coyos showed that their presence was going to be a problem for the other teams. The duo first beat third seeded Owen and Chowdhary from Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College 6-1 in both sets. Their next opponents were not any easier. Pietersz and Savva from Tyler JC were ranked sec-

ond in the tournament. After a slow start, they found themselves losing in the set 4-0. Even though they managed to get within one game, Savva and Pietersz won the first set 6-4. The second set was even closer at 3-3. Yet the duo from Tyler won the remaining games to take the set 6-3. Pietersz and Savva ended up winning the ITA National Tournament “I injured my knee, but I never stopped playing because I wanted to finish the match even if I was hurting. We played with the team that took third last year and with the team that won Nationals [this year], which for me was a very good experience,” Coyos said. Even though they could no longer win the national title, Lopez and Coyos continued to play for third. In the third place match, they

beat Olivia Erlandsson and Jazz Whittaker from St. Petersburg College. Seward won both sets with the score of 6-4. Coyos said, “As we advanced through the tournament I felt very proud of what we accomplished by defeating some of the best teams. I couldn’t believe we were actually advancing through to third place.We would like to thank Seward County and the President of the College for giving us this unforgettable opportunity. We are going to keep improving and continue on to hopefully win nationals next year.” By placing third at Fort Myers, Lopez and Coyos added their name to the few Saints who have gone to the ITA National Tournament and placed. Courtesy photo

Paula Coyos and Paula Lopez stand next to head coach, Jerry Thor, as they placed third at the 2013 ITA National Tournament.


2B

SPORTS

CRUSADER

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Courtesy photo/Roy Allen

Raoul Mentor going up for the dunk on Seward County’s annual preview night on October 24. Mentor was one of the four who participated in the dunk contest.

Preview Night Crusader photo/Maria Lara

Lady Saint Fabiana Monte drives to the basket and is fouled in transition. Monte ended the evening with 16 points and five assists on the night.

Lady Saints win both games in Pepsi Classic Undermanned Lady Saints beat NEO in last minute of the game; blow out Murray State Efren Rivero Sports editor The Lady Saints are off to a perfect start to the 20132014 season by getting both wins here at the Green House on opening weekend. Going into the game, the Lady Saints had an undermanned team. “Everyone was scared,” Fabiana Monte said, “we wouldn’t be able to win. We were worried about not having enough to play.” The Lady Saints had two players hurt, both with torn ACLs. Another player had to quit because of a heart problem, and another one returned home to Michigan. Yet this didn’t hold them back. The Lady Saints tipped off action against Northeastern Oklahoma A&M Friday afternoon. While the game was a constant back and forth battle, the entire game was al-

ways too close to call. When Seward managed to get a lead, NEO would quickly catch up. No team had a clear lead throughout the game. The number of turnovers by both teams contributed to the close score throughout the game. NEO had 22 total turnovers and the Lady Saints had 21 total turnovers. With no clear lead, the game was decided in the last few minutes of the game. Fabiana Monte stepped up in the last few moments to get a steal at half court. Monte then passed the ball to Alana Simon for the easy layup that put Seward up by three. The crowd got really into the game with just a few seconds left in game. NEO tried to tie the game up , but the Lady Saints were the ones who came out victorious. Four Lady Saints cracked double figures in the night. Shanise Brooks led the Lady

Saints with 18 points and nine rebounds in the win. Monte also scored 16 points and led the team in assists tallying five. Kyndal Davis added 11 points while Brianna Scott added ten. On Saturday, the story was different for the Lady Saints yet the outcome was the same. Their new opponent was Murray State who had just come off a big win against Garden City. Seward was scoreless for the beginning of the game, but after holding Murray State to 28 percent shooting in the half, the Lady Saints quickly caught up and closed the half by scoring nine straight points to take the lead by six. After opening their lead with a 15-3 run, Seward continued to increase their advantage. Murray State didn’t come close for the rest of the game. During the second half, Seward upped thier

shooting pace and shot at 46 percent compared to their first half percentage of 31. Brooks led defensively with four blocks and 11 rebounds. Scott also added seven rebounds and 17 points. Davis also helped Seward came away with the win by adding 13 points making it her second straight game with double figures. The game ended with a score of 71-54 in a blowout to improve Seward’s record to 20. The Lady Saints will return to the court on Monday against Oklahoma Baptist JV at Shawnee, Okla. Next Friday, the action returns to the Green House for the Billy’s/Days Inn Classic. The Lady Saints will play South Plains on Friday at 6 p.m. and will play Ft. Carson on Saturday at 6 p.m.

Courtesy photo/Roy Allen

Secean Johnson jumps over a kid for the winning dunk during preview night. Johnson scored a perfect 40 on his first attempt and won the dunk contest.

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SPORTS

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

CRUSADER 3B

Seward searches for new announcer as Voice of the Saints Roy Allen Sports Information Director ­At­college­athletic­events,­excitement­ is­ pumped­ up­ by­ the presenter­of­the­team­and­the­announcer­of­events.­ The­ Seward­ County­ Athletic Department­is­now­accepting­applicants­for­their­public­address system­announcer­for­the­20132014­basketball­season.­­Interest-

ed­parties­shall­possess­an­enthusiastic­attitude,­an­understanding of­basketball­and­volleyball,­and be­able­to­comfortably­work­in­a high­paced­college­athletics­setting.­­If­you­are­interested­in­taking­advantage­of­this­great­opportunity,­ please­ contact­ Roy Allen­ at­ 620-417-1553­ or roy.allen@sccc.edu­ or­ Galen McSpadden­at­620-417-1550­or galen.mcspadden@sccc.edu.­

Crusader photo/Maria Lara

Malcolm Hill-Bey, one of the four sophomores on the team this year, tries to create space around a defender from the Southern Colorado Kings. The Kings won the season opener for the Saints 71-68.

Crusader photo/Makiah Adams

Rowdy Sheets pitches during a scrimmage at Gould Baseball Field.

Saints split on opening weekend Seward start the 2013-2014 regular season with a loss against the Kings and a win against the Mavericks Efren Rivero Sports editor The­ Seward­ County­ Saints basketball­team­started­the­season­ at­ home­ with­ the­ Pepsi Classic.­They­began­action­Friday­against­the­Southern­Colorado­Kings­with­a­loss­and­finished­ Saturday­ against­ the Northwest­Kansas­Tech­Mavericks­with­a­win.­ The­ Saints­ return­ this­ year with­only­four­sophomores,­and were­ matched­ up­ against­ an older­ and­ more­ experienced Southern­Colorado­Kings­team. After­a­couple­of­good­runs by­ the­ Saints,­ they­ extended their­lead­­to­six­with­five­minutes­left­in­the­half.­The­Kings then­ used­ their­ experience­ to erase­ the­ lead­ and­ turn­ the game­ into­ their­ favor­ for­ the break.­ The­ Kings­ led­ at­ the break­35-30. After­ halftime,­ the­ Saints went­on­another­run­to­take­the lead­back.­But­the­lead­did­not

last­ very­ long.­ After­ hitting some­threes,­the­Kings­cut­the lead­and­put­them­in­a­toe-totoe­battle­with­the­Saints.­ Seward­led­66-60­with­1:02 left­on­the­clock­but­again,­after some­ quick­ three­ pointers­ by the­Kings,­they­caught­up­once again.­With­eight­seconds­to­go, one­more­three­gave­the­Kings the­ lead.­ After­ some­ free throws,­the­Kings­got­the­victory­71-68. When­asked­about­how­quick the­Kings­would­catch­up­­after a­ Seward­ run,­ head­ coach, Bryan­ Zollinger,­ said,­ “Too many­turnovers­[contributed­to the­Kings­catching­up].”­­ Despite­ the­ loss­ on­ Friday, Niem­ Stevenson­ had­ an­ impressive­night­in­his­debut­with 27­points,­while­Kevin­Smith added­14­points. Saturday­was­just­as­tough­as Friday­ for­ the­ Saints.­ The Saints­ had­ to­ dig­ themselves out­of­an­8-3­hole­from­the­beginning.­For­the­entire­first­half,

the­ teams­ kept­ switching­ the lead.­To­end­the­half,­Seward went­on­a­6-3­run­and­the­Saints took­a­one­point­lead­into­the break. Coach­ Zollinger­ told­ his players­ to­ stick­ with­ the­ plan for­ the­ second­ half­ to­ get­ the victory.­ During­ the­ second­ half,­ the Saints­and­Murray­State­were constantly­ at­ the­ free­ throw line,­especially­during­the­last few­minutes­of­the­game.­ With­a­Smith­conversion,­the Saints­took­the­lead­71-67­with 1:15­to­go­in­the­game.­Saints player­Quentin­Purte­was­then fouled­in­the­last­few­seconds and­ made­ one­ out­ of­ two­ attempts­at­the­free­throw­line.­ This­ was­ enough­ to­ put­ the Saints­ up­ 72-69­ and­ win­ the game­after­Clavell­missed­the game­tieing­three. With­ the­ amount­ of­ free throws­that­the­Saints­took,­Seward­took­advantage­and­shot 64­percent­from­the­free­throw

line­and­converted­them­into­30 points.­From­the­field,­Seward only­shot­35­percent­and­struggled­from­the­three­point­line once­again­shooting­22­percent from­beyond­the­arc.­ Despite­being­fouled­out,­Secean­Johnson­led­the­night­for the­Saints­with­19­points­while Smith­put­up­17.­Malcolm­HillBey­ also­ contributed­ double digits­with­10­points. With­ a­ relatively­ young squad,­ Coach­ Zollinger­ said, “Our­sophomores­need­to­show more­leadership.” The­Saints­now­have­the­remainder­of­the­season­to­show that­leadership­as­they­look­to defend­ their­ Jayhawk­ West Conference­ title­ for­ a­ fourth year­in­a­row. The­1-1­Saints­will­travel­to Garden­ City­ on­ Friday­ to­ go against­25th­ranked­North­Platte­and­will­face­Kingdom­Prep on­Saturday.­Both­games­will be­at­3:30­p.m. ­

Courtesy photo/Roy Allen

Kyndal Davis guards Fabiola Monte during the scrimmage on preview night. The scrimmage ended as a tie 11-11.

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4B

SPORTS

CRUSADER

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Crusader photo/Jakub Stepanovic

Hitter Morgan Riley, sophomore at Seward County Community College, spikes the volleyball Tuesday night against Garden City in the first round of the regional tournament and the team’s final outing at the Green House.

Lady Saints defeat Garden City to advance in Region VI tourney Diana Chavira New Media Director The Lady Saints started out with a boom last night at the first round of volleyball Regionals. The momentum was only lost for one set and Seward celebrated a win with a final score of 25-10. With their win, the Lady Saints move on to play at Hutchinson against Colby. Barton also defeated Cloud County, and Hutchinson defeated Dodge. The winners will also be advancing to play in the NJCAA Region VI tournament at Hutchinson. The match to determine the region champions will be next Monday. Taking the lead in the first set, the Lady Saints constantly stayed on top of their game. There were a

few times where Seward took some blows, but they finally brought back their momentum with a lead of 13-10. The game was quickly tied at 16. Carolina Gasparini gave the Lady Saints another point lead and they had their first four point lead since the start of the game with a score of 21-17. The energy within the team stayed high all throughout the game and they finished with a score of 25-20. The second set did not commense with the same energy and the Garden City Broncbusters took the lead until halfway through the game. The Lady Saints struggled to get in the lead in the second set and eventually tied the game 11 and 16. Finally, with a score of 17-

16, Seward took their first lead of the set. Morgan Riley gave her team another point with a block, making the score 22-17. Garden could’ve closed in, but the Lady Saints put down yet another kill, leaving the Busters at a final score of 25-21. The Lady Saints could’ve gone for three sets in a row but unfortunately came up short by two points and lost their third set 2325. The momentum was not there from the beginning of the third set and it was a back and forth game until the end. Seward began to close in on the Busters when the score was at 16-18, but it wasn’t until six points later that the Lady Saints tied with the Busters at 20 and then again at 22.

The rally to win was a scrappy one, but the Busters succeeded over the Lady Saints. To conclude the match, Garden once again took the lead only to be left in the dust. Seward was not going to let the Busters take another lead. After the score of 5-3 with the Saints on top, the Busters were only able to score one more point, making it was obvious that they weren’t coming back from their beat down with the score at 21-4. The Busters made various attempts to put the ball down, but they were unlucky and their efforts fell through. A double block from Seward put Seward at 24-9. The Lady Saints won their last set against the Busters 25-10.

Crusader photo/Jakub Stepanovic

Lady Saints meet their opponents after Seward’s four-set victory.

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Profile for The Crusader

Year 45 issue 4  

National title for men's tennis team, New Orleans trip, halloween, basketball, volleyball and more in Crusader's fourth issue of the 2013-14...

Year 45 issue 4  

National title for men's tennis team, New Orleans trip, halloween, basketball, volleyball and more in Crusader's fourth issue of the 2013-14...