Page 1

October 10

Year 45, No. 3

Crusader www.crusadernews.com

2013

Presorted Standard US Postage PAID Liberal, KS Permit NO.114

Liberal, Kansas

Police seize meth, gun in arrest at Hale Court Dawn Shouse Crusader staff

Lady Saints fall to Hutch — Page 1B

Liberal police took Remington Dean Orth, a 20-year-old male, into custody Sept. 24 at Seward’s Hale Court dorms. Orth was arrested between 8:30 and 9 p.m. at the Seward County Community College/Area Technical School dorms in connection with an investigation into suspicion of methamphetamine possession, according to the Liberal Police Department incident report. The police officers were responding to a campus security request for an investigation of alleged drug activity in Hale Court, according to Dennis Mulanax, head of security at SCCC/ATS.

“We have a good working relationship with the Liberal Police Department,” said Celeste Donovan, SCCC/ATS dean of students. “They responded very quickly to our housing staff request for assistance. We have a no tolerance policy in place at Seward. The first time anyone gets caught with illegal drugs they will be evicted from the dorms.” Items seized or taken as evidence included a Browning 20-gauge shotgun, six baggies containing a white powdery substance, several glass pipes with a white powdery substance and a brown and white purse, according to the LPD incident report. Also, according to the report, Orth could face charges of drug and drug parapherna-

lia possession. Captain Patrick McClurg of the LPD said that the police department has always been serious about drugs and will be doing everything possible to make sure their case is protected. According to Seward County Attorney Don Scott, Orth faces two felony charges—one probable cause methamphetamine and one unlawful possession of a controlled substance. Orth appeared before a judge who mandated $5,000 bond that has since been posted. Orth’s court appointed attorney Paul Kitski had filed for a continuance on Sept. 30. Meth is a prevalent problem in Liberal, Scott said after Orth’s arrest. “If convict-

ed he could face time in the penitentiary.” “Besides the obvious health risks, methamphetamine can totally ruin your life,” Scott said, as a warning to others. “If you are caught, you will lose your right to vote, you can lose your right to be on a jury and you could face time in a penitentiary.” According to Donovan, Orth was not a student of SCCC/ATS, however, additional sources indicate he was staying at Hale Court at the time of his arrest. Donovan said there is an ongoing investigation by the college regarding the incident. “Students need to think about their choices and understand the consequences that come with those choices,” she said.

Fall enrollment down 5 percent Kyleigh Becker Crusader staff

Wheels turn for racks — Page 6

Crusader photo/Fabiola Pena

Southern Pioneer employee Ed Baker demonstrates the dangers of electricity at the 2013 Health Fair Saturday. He used a rod to show how powerful and fatal electricity can be to humans and animals. Southern Pioneer was just one of many booths open to the public at the event.

Seward nursing students volunteer at health fair Fabiola Pena Crusader Staff

Saints raise awareness — Page 3

Crusader photo/Fabiola Pena

Giovanna Baca, Miss Liberal and former SCCC/ATS student, gets her lungs checked by SCCC/ATS respiratory student Jose Vidal at the health fair Saturday.

Dorothy faces criticism — Page 4

Housing hurts employment — Page 2

Nursing students from Seward County College/Area Technical School volunteered to administer lab tests and exams for the general public at the 2013 Health Fair Saturday. Both Practical Nursing students and Associate Degree Nursing students were present at the event, as well as other Allied Health students. The PN students administered influenza injections during the event. Allied Health Director Veda King and IV Therapy instructor Jennifer Antrim were there to observe and assist the students when needed. “It was a good clinical experience for them to interact with that many people of the community,” said Mary Ruiz, SCCC/ ATS nursing instructor.

The ADN students performed venipunctures on people for blood draws. A majority of ADN students volunteered to participate at the health fair. The ADN students received four hours of clinical for the IV Therapy course, according to Ruiz. Students also helped with blood sugar tests, eyesight, hearing tests, and blood pressures, assisted by former Allied Health Director Steve Hecox. The event began at 7 a.m. and was quickly busy with patients having blood work done. Others involved with the event included Southwest Medical Center, Advocare, insurances, and the police department, among others. “There was a good crowd. A lot of people took advantage,” Ruiz said.

The number of students enrolled at Seward County Community College/Area Technical School fell by 5.59 percent for fall of 2013, following a trend across Kansas that shows a 1.33 percent decrease in student enrollment. Although SCCC/ATS has 110 fewer students, down to 1,861 from 1,971 in fall of 2012, Dean of Students Celeste Donovan said she didn’t think that anyone has felt the difference. Donovan stated that over the past five years there has been a steady (2-5 percent) increase in enrollment, but this year enrollment has been down. “It’s a national trend,” she said. Seward has 707 full-time students, and they are taking an average of 16.8 credits. The 1,154 part-time students are taking an average of 5.6 credit hours. Continuing with this trend, online enrollment has also decreased. EduKan students are taking 930 credit hours and Seward Online students are taking 489 credit hours, compared to the 944 and 752 of last year, respectively. The full time equivalency for this fall is 1,225, compared to the 1,287 of the fall of 2012. Concurrent high school students number 503, compared to the 222 of fall of 2012– giving SCCC/ATS, a 127 percent increase in high school concurrent enrollment. “A large number of high school concurrent students are in the tech school,” Donovan said. She also said that the college has developed several Career Technical Education programs. Demographics show a 10 percent increase in the number of Hispanics enrolled compared to fall of 2012, while there has been an 8 percent decrease in the number of Caucasians enrolled. For fall of 2013, gender demographics show 59 percent female and 41 percent male. For more enrollment information on Kansas universities, community colleges and technical schools, visit kansasregents.org/news_media.

Cosmetology clocks in Maria Lara Crusader staff Guestvision, a time and attendance timeclock software, has been installed for the first time at Seward County Community College/Area Technical School in the cosmetology building. Instructors Denice Paden and Sheila Scheib decided to order and install this improvement due to students clocking in for one another for clinical hours in the previous years. “It’s a secure system, so nobody is going to get away with much,” Scheib said. It has taken the students a while to get used to it. “But now getting the hang of it, it’s so much more efficient,” Scheib said. It used to take approximately 12 minutes, from start to finish, for all the students to get clocked in and start the day. The time issue affected those who didn’t get clocked in right away because they had to wait in line.

ne w te chnology introduce d

With the new system that was provided by the company, DBBuilder, it takes about two minutes for all students to clock in. “This system eliminated students from clocking in and out for other students,” said Scheib. Now, the actual fingerprint of each student is needed in order to clock in. Not only is this new program time efficient, it also keeps track of an individual’s activities throughout the day. “To keep track of the services is another part of the Guestvision software,” said Scheib, “as appointments are made, it keeps track of how many haircuts, perms, colors, etc.” At the end of the week, the system will show the exact time an individual has clocked in and out, but it also keeps track of how many manicures, haircuts, colors and anything else that the person has done throughout the day. Guestvision has been set up to

be a weekly schedule because that is how the instructors decided they were going to keep track of the appointments, and what each students is doing. There are currently 26 students enrolled in cosmetology, all of which are women, which Scheib said was surprising. The 26 students must each complete a total of 1,500 hours in the salon for the entire oneyear program. The information that is outlined in Guestvision is later submitted monthly to state board, so that they can measure a student’s progress. All cosmetology students have goals per month that they have to report to the state board. Incorporated into these goals are amount of returning clients, retail standards they must reach and a certain amount of products they each have to sell to their clients. “We do this because we want them to learn what it’s going to be like in the professional world,” Scheib said.

Crusader photo/Maria Lara

Cosmetology student Courtney Hendricks clocks out for the day using the latest method of keeping track of time and attendance that SCCC/ATS installed for the cosmetology program.


NEWS

2 CRUSADER

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Liberal resident earns GED at 85 Kristy Flowers News editor

Crusader photo/Jakub Stepanovic

Seward’s students Paola Chavira and Arlene Rivera, as a part of the backpacking / field biology class, enjoy a camp fire during the class trip in the Pecos Wilderness, part of Carson National Forest in New Mexico. This was the second trip the class took, where students combine camping skills with exploring natural diversity as biology research. Students interested in more information or enrolling in the class for the spring semester may visit the instructors, Don Hayes and Chris Guyer. For more pictures from the trip, visit www.facebook.com/CrusaderNews.

Lack of housing sends potential employees, businesses packing Job opportunities in Liberal are being overlooked due to the lack of housing throughout the city. The main people affected by this issue are not necessarily Liberal citizens, but those who are trying to become citizens of Liberal. The housing issue has been a key factor in determining whether or not possible employees choose Liberal as their place of work. It has even impacted work places in towns surrounding Liberal, like Hugoton, making the process of hiring people more difficult there as well. Kirk Koylas, employee of Hugoton Welding company named Bramha , mentioned the struggle he had with locating a place to stay. Although Koylas works in Hugoton, he was trying to find a place in Liberal after failing to find any place to rent in Hugoton. The searching process took a little over a month. A majority of his coworkers also struggled with locating a place to rent. One of the main places where this is evident is in the USD 480 school district. “The housing issues in Lib-

eral have been challenging for new teachers moving to town.” Liberal High School Principal Keith Adams said. “I lost a math teacher and his family because he could not find adequate housing. Several of the teachers on my staff opened up a room in their apartment or house so new people would have a place to live.” Liberal High School isn’t the only school who has faced teachers backing out. Jason Mcafee, Director of Human Resources/Public Relations, said, “We had at least six people we hired, who said they would come and then looked at the housing situation and they ended up backing out and not coming...That’s only since I came in July.” All of the potential teachers referred to the housing issue as a reason for backing out. Some said no houses are available, others said it is too expensive and others said that for what is available, too much money is being asked of them. Mcafee added that some of the teachers, who did go through with moving to Liberal, are living with principals in spare bedrooms for at least the first month of the school year. When asked what Mcafee

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thought about the new housing plan, he said “It’s definitely something that’s needed. The problem is, we need it now.” Additional to those of the USD 480 school district, new employees at Seward County Community College ran into the same housing issues. “I had a very hard time finding a place to live when I got the job here. I had to live in the dorms for a few weeks,” said the new men’s assistant basketball coach, Patrick Nee. “All the apartments had six to eight month waiting lists. I had a lot of people at the college helping me look and it still took over a month before me and my wife Nicole found a place.” The new biology instructor, Myron Perry was able to find a place to rent two days after arriving to Liberal. “Even though we were able to find a nice place to rent, the amount of the rent is much higher for the same size house we rented in Pittsburg, Kan.,” said Perry. “There really needs to be more housing available to the incoming faculty as well as more affordable housing.”

“We had at least six people we hired who said they would come and then looked at the housing situation and they ended up backing out and not coming.” — Jason Mcafee NT THE HU FOR NG HOUSI

Part 2 of a Series on Housing

editor Makiah Adams news editor Kristy Flowers design editor

Jakub Stepanovic

new media director Diana Chavira sports editor Efren Rivero ad manager Dawn Shouse

reporters/photographers

Makiah Adams Editor

Kyleigh Becker Kayla Delgado Marco Garcia Maria Lara Fabiola Pena Jeremiah Wilson

Liberal resident Mary Lloyd wasn’t able to receive her high school diploma as a teenager. Instead, at the age of 85, Lloyd completed and passed an exam to receive her General Education Degree. Lloyd had to leave high school in order to help out at home. By the time she thought about going back to finish school, she was a wife and mother with other responsibilities. With encouragement from her five children, especially her daughters, Lloyd began attending the Colvin Adult Learning Center to earn her diploma. Lloyd’s family members continued to encourage and support her throughout the process. “They all thought it was wonderful,” Lloyd said. “My one grandson said, ‘Go, Grandma!’” Lloyd’s daughter, Marietta Gray, said, “We thought it would be great for her.” Lloyd not only had the support of her family, but also of those working at the Colvin Adult Learning Center. “They were wonderful down there and they kept encouraging me…they went out of their way to be upbeat,” Lloyd said. Travis Combs, the Adult Based Education Coordinator at the Colvin Adult Learning Center remembers the first time he met Lloyd. “Mary was disinterested in the thought of getting her high school diploma because she thought she was too old. It was something her daughter wanted her to get and she didn’t really buy in,” Combs said. Although she wasn’t sure about working toward her GED, Lloyd went forward anyway. On her first official practice test, Lloyd only missed two out of 25 questions. “You could instantly see the excitement and feeling that she knew she could do this. From that point on she was highly motivated to complete her high school diploma,” Combs said. “Mary has a drive and attitude that you don't find every day. Her work ethic is incredible.” Stephanie Wells, Director of Adult Education at Colvin Adult Learning Center said, “It was very refreshing to see someone work so hard to get her GED. Mary is one of those students that did not necessarily need her GED, but worked to get her GED simply because she wanted to fulfill a personal goal.”

Though the course work was challenging, Lloyd said a lot of it was just common sense. “The one subject that bothered me was math. That’s changed a lot in 60 years,” Lloyd said. Lloyd was also worried when she had to write an essay. She asked for help from a high school student and also wrote seven or eight essays on her own. “Then when I did it, there was no problem,” Lloyd said. After three months of hard work and dedication, Lloyd took her GED exam and passed. Although she still doesn’t see any reason for people to t h i n k she’s spec i a l , Lloyd said she is proud of herself. Even though Lloyd doesn’t think her Mary Lloyd not only journey is went back to earn a big deal, her GED, but she t h o s e has also worked at w o r k i n g the Liberal Wal-Mart at the for nearly 28 years. Colvin A d u l t Learning Center as well as her family know what a great accomplishment it is. “We are so proud of Mary for completing her Kansas State High School Diploma. She is the oldest graduate that we have ever had at the Colvin Adult Learning Center. We were fortunate to have her come through our doors,” Combs said. Lloyd has since decided to donate $120 to any member of the Senior Citizens Center that wants to receive his or her high school diploma. The $120 donation will pay for the official GED testing fee. Lloyd said she’s donating the $120 because she thought it was a good idea. “You need to do something to stimulate your brain in older age,” she added. To celebrate, Lloyd’s family is planning something for her, though they will not give her all the details. “We’re so proud of her. We knew she could. She’s very smart. She never had the opportunity so now she’s proved it,” Gray said.

The official student newspaper of Seward County Community College/Area Technical School is published bi-monthly and has special editions by journalism students during the regular college year, except on school holidays and during examination periods. One copy of each issue is distributed free to each student, faculty and staff member, with subsequent copies available for purchase in the Crusader office at 50 cents each. Letters to the editor will be considered for publication if they are signed and the authenticity of the writer’s signature is verified. The staff reserves the right to edit for length. Opinions voiced in letters and editorials are not necessarily those of Seward County Community College/Area Technical School or the Crusader. Advertising is accepted. Rates are $4.25 per column inch or $5 pci for color ads. Insert rates are $50 per thousand. Classified ads are free to SCCC students, faculty and staff; classified rates for all others are $5 per ad, limit of 20 words. The Crusader staff reserves the right to refuse advertising. Mail to: Crusader, Box 1137, Liberal, KS 67905, or editors@crusadernews.com.

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NEWS

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Scholarship Auction nets more than $46,000 Fabiola Pena Crusader staff This year’s 19th annual scholarship auction raised almost $47,000 to be used for student scholarships. About 400 people attended the event, according to Tammy Doll. Last year they raised more than $50,000 for scholarships. The party auction is an annual event where people buy tickets to attend a dinner and auction.

Funds raised from the donated auction items go to Seward County Community College/ Area Technical School student scholarships. “We made many positive changes that will continue on for next year,” Doll said. “Having the fitted tablecloths for the silent auction tables and the stands made it look nicer. The data base was great and we will continue it on for the next year.”

News Briefs THE AUTOMOTIVE technology program is accepting cars, late or newer models, in need of repair. Repairs can include overall inspections, brake inspections, starter, alternator repairs or tune ups. Transmission work will not be accepted. Prices will include the minimal shop fees as well as parts. Call the shop at 416-1667 for more information or to schedule a time for repairs. INTRAMURAL KICKBALL entry forms were due Oct. 9. Contact Wade Lyon at wade.lyon@sccc.edu or 4161064 for more information. The first place team will receive intramurals sports champion tshirts. THREE ON THREE basketball tournament fundraiser for Big Brothers Big Sisters will be held Oct. 19 at Light Park in Liberal, Kan. The deadline to enter a team is Oct. 16. Take registration forms to Bib Brothers Big Sisters Office or Liberal Recreation Department. Entrance fee is $75 and only five players per team are allowed. For more information, contact Kerry Seibel at 620-6249000 or Christi Starr at 620-6260133. FALL BREAK will be Oct. 1415. SCCC/ATS campus will be closed on Monday but will reopen on Tuesday.

KAPPA BETA Delta, the business honor society, has inductions on Oct. 10. BILLY’S BRISKETS are on sale as a fundraiser for the athletic department. The briskets prepared by Billy’s BBQ are $40 per smoked, vacuum packed brisket. Call or email Galen McSpadden at his office, 620-417-1550 or galen.mcspadden@sccc.edu. The briskets will be available for pick-up on Oct. 24.

At the Board of Trustees meeting on Oct. 7, the board discussed academic program review updates for many departments. Dale Doll, humanities division chair, informed the Board about a new procedure that requires all students to be assessed for writing abilities and subsequent placement in writing courses. Placement Test Required The placement requirements are designed to assist students in course enrollment in order to address student retention and success in composition courses. A project has been initiated in English Composition courses which include all students writing a letter of application for employment or scholarship. The letters are graded with a common rubric for all courses as part of the college wide assessment plan. Luke Dowell, division chair for math, science and HPERD

said the science department has initiated a Chemistry in Society course with an emphasis on the utilization of chemistry in typical situations such as forensics, photography, cooking and dyes. The PE department started a Personal Fitness Trainer course to provide those with an interest in personal fitness with techniques and strategies for being a personal trainer. Sharp Drive The Board approved naming the campus circle drive “Jo Ann Sharp Drive” after Sharp purchased the naming rights at the SCCC/ATS Foundation Auction Sept. 21. Proceeds go toward student scholarships. Trustee Sharon Hobble reported that total proceeds from the auction exceeded $46,000. Industrial Technology Course Cynthia Rapp, dean of academic affairs, told the Board that the college has been notified of

funding for a partnership grant with Kansas State University. The grant will emphasize the implementation of a writing resource center to assist students in improving writing techniques. Grant Dean Thatcher told the Board that the college has been selected as a grant recipient to implement a new course in the industrial technology division with a focus on principles of troubleshooting. The course is for students and employees in industry or manufacturing with techniques on how to identify potential risks or equipment failures. New Faculty The Board approved the employment of Ammie Jones, director of outreach, and Macy Millikan, health occupations instructor, and accepted the resignation of Emilyn Jordan, assistant volleyball coach. Science Lab iPads

The Board approved the purchase of microbiology lab equipment from Fisher Scientific in the amount of $146,374 with funds through the US Dept. of Education STEM grant, the purchase of 25 iPads in the amount of $14,150 for the business, accounting and marketing classes through Carl Perkins grant funds and a portable ventilator in the amount of $15,250 for the respiratory therapy program. Career Fair The college will host a career fair the evening of Oct. 23 for anyone interested in learning about the career and technical education programs offered at SCCC/ATS. Information will include course descriptions, procedures for applying for admissions, scholarship opportunities and prospective employment opportunities. n For full report, visit CrusaderNews.com

SIGMA CHI CHI, the criminal justice club, is sponsoring “Breakfast Burrito Thursday,” this semester. They will be in the commons area by the library every Thursday from 7:45 a.m. until sold out. Burritos available include egg, bacon, cheese; egg, sausage, potato, cheese; bacon, ham, sausage, egg, potato, cheese; sausage, egg, and cheese; ham, egg, and cheese. Crusader photo/Fabiola Pena

TRICK-OR-TREAT STREET will be Oct. 31 in the SCCC/ATS Student Union from 6:30-8:30. Clubs must sign up with Wade Lyon by Oct. 25 to participate. For full story, see page 5.

pect arrested and charged. Other administrative action was also taken. The investigation is hereby closed. Sept. 19 – Investigation of contraband (drug paraphernalia). Suspects were identified and immediate action was taken. The investigation is hereby closed. Sept. 16 – An aggravated assault (threat) was investigated. The suspect has been identified and immediate action was taken. The investigation is hereby closed. n Security report provided by Head of Security Dennis Mulanax.

Correction OzFest will be from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m Oct. 12 at Dorothy’s House

Board of Trustees

OzFEST will be on Oct. 12 at the Land of Oz, 547 E. Cedar. Admission is free. Activities and a magic show will be a part of the event celebrating “The Wizard of Oz.” For full story, see page 5.

Security Report Oct. 3 – A non-related Disorderly Conduct incident investigated. The suspect in this series of events has been identified and legal action has been taken. Oct. 3 – Damage to vehicle report taken. Not criminal at this time, unknown how damage actually happened. Investigation closed until further information is received. Oct. 2 – Disorderly Conduct incident investigated. All involved persons have been identified. No further action is needed and no other events related to this have occurred. The investigation is hereby closed. Sept. 25 – Seizure of contraband (drugs) investigated. Sus-

CRUSADER 3

and Coronado Museum, 547 E Cedar. For full story, see page 5.

Emergency response teams show their support for Breast Cancer Awareness Month with pink vehicles at the Health Fair Saturday.

Saints support breast cancer research with Dig Pink and Pink Out nights Diana Chavira New Media Director The Seward County Saints continue to show their support for breast cancer by wearing pink attire and collecting donations at their games. This year for Dig Pink night the Lady Saints volleyball team will wear a clothing item in the color pink to represent their support for breast cancer. The options for clothing items range from ribbons, socks and shoelaces, but unfortunately not uniforms. “At one time pink uniforms were worn for Pink Out nights,” explained Sports Information Director Roy Allen, “but due to cost, that’s no longer feasible.” The volleyball team may not get to play in complete pink attire, but they do get to be a full part of collecting the donations during their games. Between their second and third sets, the Lady Saints go around the stands with a decorated vol-

DIG PINK NIGHT Volleyball Game Oct. 22 PINK OUT NIGHT Basketball Game Feb. 5, 2014 leyball and collect donations that go towards the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. Lady Saints raised $355 at the 2012 Dig Pink fundraiser for Breast Cancer Awareness. As for basketball season, the men and women do not participate in the actual collecting of the donations, nor do they wear pink uniforms, but they do show their support by adding a little touch of pink to their attire. Pink Out Night for basketball season will be Feb. 5 and the Saints will be playing against the

Colby Trojans. Any donations made throughout the night will go towards the Kay Yow Cancer Fund. These events are planned because October is National Breast Cancer Awareness month. Breast Cancer Awareness started as a campaign to educate people about the spreading disease. Over the years it has made fundraisers to help support the research to finding a cure. “Mammography plays a central part in early detection of breast cancers because it can

show changes in the breast up to two years before a patient or physician can feel them,” explains swmedcenter.com. Southwest Medical Center in Liberal offers mammographies, as well as helpful tips for patients who have never had one done. The National Cancer Institute clarifies many of the myths that are connected with breast cancer. Finding a lump doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s because of breast cancer, and women are not the only ones who can die from breast cancer. Men are just as likely to have breast cancer, but they obtain a higher fatality rate. A family history of breast cancer also puts someone at an increased risk, but that does not determine whether or not they will actually develop breast cancer. In any case, it’s encouraged that women in their 40s get a mammography done to decrease the possibility of developing breast cancer.

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4 CRUSADER

Liberal’s Dorothys OPINION

Thursday, October 10, 2013

OUR VIEW ON

INSTILLING OZSOME CIVIC PRIDE OR POINTLESS PROMOTION?

3rd Street & Kansas Avenue ~$850

Hwy. 54 & East Cedar Street ~$850

15th & Kansas Avenue/ Walgreens ~$850

L. Frank Baum wrote about her. Judy Garland portrayed her. And Liberal has adopted her as its own. Dorothy from the “Wizard of Oz” is well known, but has Liberal taken the Dorothy spin too far by placing 13 concrete Dorothy statues around town? Some residents say yes and find them creepy and pointless. Some residents say no and feel the Dorothy facsimiles are something to be proud of. Director of Economic Development Jeff Parsons answered some of the ongoing questions regarding how much the Dorothys cost and how they were funded, why the Dorothys look the way they do, whether they ever been vandalized and the possibility of getting more statues. Parsons knows there will always be people who don’t like the statues. Some are very vocal about it and that’s perfectly okay, but he feels that part of the reason that Liberal residents don’t approve of them is because they don’t take the time to learn more about them. Parsons described the Dorothy statues with an animated attitude and explained everything he could about them to set the record straight. From Parson’s knowledge, the originial idea for the Dorothy statues came from City Manager Mark Hall. The process for getting the Dorothy statues was also a long and interesting one. According to Parsons, it took the city leaders a good year and a half to get everything figured out. The beginning problem with getting the statues was finding a way to have them built. “When we first started looking at them we could only find people who wanted to cast them in bronze,” explained Parsons. This leads us to the fact that the Dorothy statues are not like the one at Dorothy’s House; they are not made of bronze. A single bronze statue would cost approximately $30,000, and the idea behind getting the statues was to make them affordable and easily replaceable. The statues are made of concrete and they’ve been painted with regular bronze house paint, making them inexpensive. “If something were to happen to them, we can patch them,” clarified Parsons. Replacing or fixing an $850 statue does seem more reasonable than having to replace or fix something worth $30,000. The Dorothy statues don’t look like the original bronze statue at the museum because they’re not meant to. A sculptor from Denver, Colo. had to create these statues from scratch. Making actual statues is a job that his compnay has never done before. Their work is centered more on the decorations around attractions. “They do work for Bush Gardens and for a bunch of the major theme parks,” explained Parsons.

Hwy. 54 & Kansas Avenue ~$850

Liberal City Hall ~$850

The molds for the Dorothy statues are from two different women who live in Denver. “...they cast their faces in plaster...so they’re live casts,” revealed Parsons. Some questions remain regarding a sculptor who wishes to remain anonymous. As for how the statues were purchased, the money came from the 1 cent sales tax, voted in by Liberal residents to fund designated areas of improvement in the community. Even though some residents don’t approve of the purchases made to improve the city, the statues have been welcomed in a mischievous, but good-natured manner. “When they first showed up we had a couple of little incidents,” recalled Parsons, “but it’s mostly been clever kind of things.” A Santa hat was placed on a Dorothy statue around Christmas time last year, but Parsons regards it as good humored. Although, minor damages to the statues did have to be fixed. Although Liberal may not be the biggest of cities, taking care of the number of statues there are can be challenging, especially if one isn’t sure just how many there are. It’s true that the third time’s the charm, because it took us three tries to get the count right on the number of statues. At first, we counted 10, but then we found two more locations with statues. Then we discovered another location, bringing the total of Dorothy statues to 13. And Parsons shared that there’s more that have already been cast and are in storage for possible later use. The purpose for having so many statues is to help beautify the city of Liberal, as Parsons put it. Liberal is known as the home of Dorothy, and it should be something to take pride in. The Dorothy statues tie in with the idea that Liberal is a home of Dorothy. Rumors about munchkin statues have also been circulating around the city of Liberal. Although the idea of munchkin statues might sound a little peculiar, we think they would be a great addition to the lack of variety in statues. We understand why Liberal might think the Dorothy statues help beautify the city, but we suggest that it’s enough already. While the bronze statue at Dorothy’s House is, oh, dare we say it, ozsome, too much of even a good thing is too much. If you want to add more statues, bring in other characters. Toto, Munchkins or even the Tin Man would be great. A baker’s dozen of only Dorothy statues is more than a full box. We know we’re back in Kansas without adding anymore.

The statue at Dorothy’s House is different than the statues around town. This statue is the only one made of bronze.

Hwy. 54 & Kansas Avenue ~$850

Liberal Airport ~$850

Hwy. 54 & Clay ~$850

Behind fountain at 3rd & Kansas Avenue ~$850

Six Points on Pancake Avenue ~$850 Chamber of Commerce at the depot ~$850 Memorial Library ~$850

Crusader Photos by Diana Chavira

15th & Kansas Avenue/Burger King ~$850


ENTERTAINMENT

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Pancake predicament flips public opinions Fabiola Pena Crusader staff pena@crusadernews.com

What does Garden City have that Liberal does not? IHOP! The International House of Pancakes is, in my opinion, the best pancake seller out there. Since the beginning of last year, I have been hearing about IHOP coming to town. I read in news articles in the Daily Leader and Times that it is still in progression. Many of those articles mentioned that the only reason Liberal was not getting an IHOP was because of the competition it will give to other businesses. In my opinion, in order for Liberal to become bigger it needs to bring other businesses to town. Getting an IHOP will surely attract the crowd to come and check out Liberal and their wonderful pancakes. Garden City has filled their town with many great businesses such as Menards, Home Depot, Sams, IHOP, Target and they have been approved to get Dick’s Sporting Goods and Hobby Lobby. When I am in the mood to go shopping, I do not always want to travel, but in most cases I have to. Garden City has a variety of stores and restaurants that attract people to visit.

CRUSADER 5

‘Story Theatre’ comes to Seward

I have been a Liberal resident for nineteen years now, and Liberal has added businesses but not enough to get people down here. Liberal recently got a Rue 21 which I believe got some shoppers down here. If Liberal would get an IHOP that would give people the option to choose between the current Pancake House and IHOP. Liberal residents and current business owners should not dread the coming of new attractions. This indeed will help the population to increase. Business owners will have something to compete against, which will make their companies get more traffic in. I personally love being a Liberal resident, but it does get frustrating at times. The restaurants, shopping and entertainment are all the same every Friday for me. Students drive out of town to find entertainment because Liberal does not have it. This can increase the number of car wrecks when not only students but also adults drive out just to enjoy themselves in a different city. If Liberal were to have many different attractions there would be no need for residents to go out of town on a weekly basis. City commissioners should approve of this construction of IHOP for the Liberal area. Not only will it benefit the residents and out of state people, but also the companies in the area.

The Robber Bridegroom, Henny Penny and The Bremen Town Musicians are just a few of the stories coming to the stage in “Story Theatre.”

Crusader photo/Jakub Stepanovic

Drama students Jade Antrim and Franklin Guillen stay in character during a rehearsal Thursdsay evening.

OzFest introduces free magic show Oct. 12 Kyleigh Becker Crusader staff Dorothy’s House and Coronado Museum is bringing magic to the Land of Oz. The Mike and Glenda Mann Magic Show will be performing at OzFest on Oct. 12. OzFest is an annual celebration hosted by Dorothy’s House and Coronado Museum celebrating “The Wizard of Oz.” This year’s theme is “The Magic of Oz.” Activities will include face painting, bouncy castles, train rides, a look alike contest and local entertainment along with Glenda and Mike’s Magic Show. “It is the 74th anniversary of the movie ‘The Wizard of Oz’… based on (the) L. Frank Baum childrens’ novel ‘The Wizard of Oz’,” said JoAnne Mansell, ex-

ecutive director of Dorothy’s House and Coronado Museum. Admission is free to the public and OzFest will be at Dorothy’s House and Coronado Museum, at 547 E Cedar. Activities start at 9 a.m. and end at 5 p.m. There will be raffle tickets available for a chance to win prizes and game tickets will be sold at a booth for 4/$1. Students from Rine’s American Freestyle Karate School will be performing along with those participating in Oz Alive!. Oz Alive! is a tour through the Land of Oz, led by Dorothy, with Munchkins, Glenda, the Lion and other characters making appearances. Dorothy’s House and Coronado Museum will also be hosting a “Night at the Museum” in the Coronado Museum.

Trick-or-Treat Street returns to campus Dawn Shouse Kristy Flowers Crusader staff Candy, costumes, pumpkins and fun. Seward County Community College and Area Technical School will once again be hosting Trick-or-Treat Street on Halloween. Trick-or-Treat Street is an evening for kids around Liberal to come to the Student Living Center in costume to trick-ortreat. The event will be from 6:30-8:30 p.m. on Halloween, Oct. 31.

Campus clubs and organizations have the opportunity to set up booths for the kids. If a club wants to have a booth, it needs to register with Wade Lyon by Oct. 25. SCCC/ATS will also be hosting a pumpkin carving contest for students. Those wanting to participate need to pick up a pumpkin in Wade Lyon’s office in the Student Union by Oct. 20. The actual contest will be Oct. 28-29. Prizes will be awarded for the best carving. First place is $100, second place is $50 and third place is $25.

Crusader Costume Contest is back!

Trick-or-Treat Street

Crusader photo/Jakub Stepanovic

Drama club members Killian Doze, Jade Antrim, Cody Mitchell, Juan Carlos Contreras and Franklin Guillen rehearse a scene for the upcoming production “Story Theatre.” The play will bring improv and humor to classic fairy tale stories and characters.

Drama club revisits classic fairy tales Kristy Flowers News editor The drama club at Seward County Community College and Area Technical School is bringing fairy tales to life in the upcoming production, “Story Theatre.” The play, which will be performed Nov. 7, 8, and 9 at 7:30 p.m. in SCCC/ATS’s Showcase Theatre, consists of many older fairy tales such as “Henny Penny,” “The Robber Bridegroom” and “The Bremen Town Musicians.” Freshman cast member Cody Mitchell said, “It’s a pretty humorous take on classic fables.” The cast is made up of SCCC/ATS students, Liberal residents and also Jay Castor, an SCCC/ATS faculty member. Castor joined the cast in order to cross another item off his bucket list. “I think at first I was terrified, but now that I’ve gotten used to

“If folks read fairy tales as kids, these stories will be so familiar…It’s a gore-fest and a laugh-fest for the ages. I think folks will like that.” —Jay Castor it I love it,” Castor said. “The drama club kids are so amazing. They’re so full of energy, but also they’re so professional.” There are no lead actors for “Story Theatre,” so each cast member has taken on several roles. “This is an ensemble cast, so everyone is kind of on the same level,” said drama instructor Gloria Goodwin. “Each person plays three, four, five characters in this show so they have to very rapidly change from character to character.” Rather than taking long periods of time to change full costumes, the cast is taking a dif-

ferent route. The actors will only use pieces of costumes such as hats, vests, aprons, skirts and coats to embody the characters. “They’ll wear black long sleeved shirts and black leggings or pants, and then as the show goes along and as they need to they’ll just grab a costume piece and put on over that,” said Goodwin. This method will help make changing characters quick for the actors, especially when switching from human to animal characters. To help bring the fairy tales to life, the drama club is collabo-

rating with the art and music departments. The art department will be designing books as well as larger scenic pieces for the play. “We’re doing a book theme since these come from stories from old fairy tale books. So a lot of the stage is going to look like stacked books,” Goodwin said. The music department is providing live music, including some original pieces, during the show. “We’re going to have a small group of musicians on stage…not only playing between scenes but helping in the midst of scenes to create mood and that sort of thing,” Goodwin said. The fairy tales in “Story Theatre” are entertaining for all ages. “If folks read fairy tales as kids, these stories will be so familiar…It’s a gore-fest and a laugh-fest for the ages. I think folks will like that,” Castor said.

Halloween Headquarters

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6 CRUSADER

INFOPAGE

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Bicycle, Bicycle Crusader photo/Jakub Stepanovic

As the popularity of bike riding has increased, the college has deemed it necessary to also increase the number of bicycle racks on campus.

Gears grind over bicycle racks Dawn Shouse Crusader staff

SCCC/ATS freshman Raoul Mentor has been riding a bike for most of his life. He worries about leaving his bike unlocked during class.

Below left, students who are desperate to get to class on time will find anyplace to stash a bike. Below right, signs have been recently hung in the dorms to warn students of fire code violation if they park their bicycles under the stairwells. Dorm managers suggest that bikes be stored in the students’ rooms.

Photos & Illustration by Dawn Shouse

As the hue of sunset the fades and night falls on the campus grounds, against the sound of the wind in the trees, one can hear the vigorous clicking of gears as a young man methodically peddles six laps around the Student Living Center. It is common to see cyclists around campus. Students ride their bikes for various reasons, including cost, convenience or health reasons. “One of the main reasons why I ride my bike is because of gas prices,” said Seward County Community College/Area Technical School freshman Cesar Saquic. “I ride my bike everywhere I go.” Freshman Raoul Mentor has been riding his bike for most of his life. “It’s the best way to get around in Liberal. It’s quick and easy,” Mentor said. Freshman Micah Gayle said that he rides his bike everyday. But these students have more than riding their bikes in common; they all lack a choice of racks to lock their bikes up on campus. “There is only one bike rack and it’s outside the library,” Gayle said. “I have to ride completely

around the campus to get to the rack and my class is so far away.” Mentor has similar concerns. “There are not many places to lock up my bike on campus,” he said. “By the time I get to school, there are no spaces left for my bike, so I have to go way over to the back of the dorms and lock it up there or just leave it unlocked.” Mentor said that leaving his bike unlocked is especially distracting to him during class because his friend’s bike was stolen when he left it unlocked. Recently, multiple signs have been posted up around the stairwells of the dorms to prevent students from storing their bikes under the stairs. Kate Mulligan, director of SCCC/ATS Student Living Center, said that the fire marshal informed Director of Maintenance Roger Scheib that the bikes created a fire hazard, and it’s not just bikes. “Nothing can be stored under the stairs,” Mulligan said. “The way it was explained to me was that if there is a fire and those

things started heating up, then access to the stairs would become hazardous and students would not be able to escape danger.” Mulligan recommends that students store their bicycles in their rooms. According to Dean of Students Celeste Donovan, the college has addressed the problem. “We are in the process of ordering more bike racks as we speak. Hopefully, we will get those in by the time the snow melts next semester,” Donovan said. While installations of the new racks may seem far in the future, these cyclists reacted favorably to the news of the imminent arrival. “It would be beneficial because a lot more people are riding now. It seems that biking is becoming more popular,” Gayle said. Other students offered up more ideas for the college. Saquic has a suggestion beyond bike racks, “The campus does need more bike racks, but not only that, the college needs to encourage the students to start riding their bikes around campus. It’s a great way to get exercise.”

Map courtesy of Google Maps

The map shows one of the more common bike trails for avid cyclists. Biking is a great form of exercising, according to cycling enthusiasts


Crusader

Section B • Page 1

SPORTS October 10, 2013

Crusader photo/Jakub Stepanovic

Lady Saints Kristen Anderson and Morgan Riley react to a disappointing three set loss to Hutchinson in The Green House Wednesday night. Seward and Hutch went into the game tied for second.

Lady Saints six game winning streak ends with conference loss Efren Rivero Sports editor After going unbeaten this past weekend, the Lady Saints volleyball team captured the Ozfest Invitational Tournament at home and improved their overall record to 17-11. Not only did they improve their overall record, they also managed to improve their conference record to 7-2 and rose to 2nd place in the Jayhawk West. The Lady Saints started the tournament against conference rival Barton, and won the match 3-1. After that the games became closer, yet they managed to get the win. Seward went on to take the

match against Frank Phillips and won the game 3-2. Saturday, the action continued with the Saints against Western Texas. That game also ended in Seward’s favor, 3-2, with a big performance by Gasparini who ended the game with 17 kills. The last game was between Seward and Vernon, which was also decided in the last set. Miller gave 45 assists which became her third straight match with over 40 assists. “[I felt] relieved. Every match was very close and we were fortunate to come away with the victory on each one of them,” Head Coach Bert Luallen said about the four victories.

With almost every game going down to the fifth set, what contributed to the four straight victories was the Lady Saints’ “tenacity,” said Luallen. “I think our girls just wanted it more. They worked really hard and didn’t quit.” After suffering a loss against the Blue Dragons from Hutchinson Sept. 27, the Lady Saints have won six straight games to fuel the hopes of winning the Jayhawk West championship. As a result of the winning streak and the Ozfest tournament title, Gasparini and Riley added to the many conference awards the volleyball team has already received.

Gasparini won the Player of the Week award. She averaged 3.52 kills and 3.74 digs per set for Seward for the week of Sept. 30-Oct. 6. She finished the weekend against Vernon with 13 kills and 20 digs. Riley, on the other hand, won the Defensive Player of the Week. During the games throughout the week, she averaged 1.17 blocks per contest and had 19 digs and seven aces. The Lady Saints had to face the Blue Dragons one more time before the conference title could be decided. Even with home field advantage, Hutch proved to be a difficult opponent for the Lady

Saints. The Blue Dragons stopped the Lady Saints’ momentum, ending the six game winning streak. Seward dropped the match in three sets with scores of 25-22, 26-24, 25-18. Gasparini had a total of 13 kills. Sanches followed with six and Riley with five. Anderson led in digs for the Lady Saints in with a total of 15 digs throughout the match. Bedingfield and Gasparini both had 12 digs. Hutchinson had just came off a loss at Cloud County but with this win, the Blue Dragons improved to only the number two spot, just behind Colby.

Hutch’s overall record is now 16-7, with a record of 9-2 in the Jayhawk West conference. Seward now has an overall record of 17-12 and has a record of 7-3 in their conference. After the loss, Seward is now in third place behind both Hutch and Colby. Seward now has seven games left in the regular season. Four of the upcoming games are against teams in the Jayhawk West Conference, so the Lady Saints still have a chance to move up or down in the conference rankings. The next Lady Saints game is a conference match that will be held in Garden City versus the Lady Broncbusters.

Anderson doesn’’t pass up opportunity to defend her team

Lady Saint libero gets crafty with more than just digs

Makiah Adams Editor

Crusader photo/ Makiah Adams

Kari Anderson, Lady Saint libero, demonstrates her love for ducks and crafts through her duck pillow pet and neatly decorated water bottles

“She talks continually on the floor, which not only helps her to play better, but it helps with the entire team.” -Coach Bert Luallen

When it comes to defense, Kari Anderson doesn’t take it lightly. Anderson is ranked second defensively on the Lady Saints volleyball team with a total of 374 digs over all sets played. Anderson is a freshman at Seward County Community College and the libero for the Lady Saints volleyball team. Anderson was named Jayhawk West Defensive Player of the Week Sept. 23-Sept. 29. She is the second Lady Saints volleyball player to be honored as Jayhawk West Defensive player of the week this season. Anderson averaged four digs per set last week. On Wednesday, she had a total of 11 digs against Dodge City. On Friday, although they came out with a loss, Anderson had an outstanding performance with 18 digs against Hutchinson. Then Saturday of last week she came out with 10 digs and two aces against Pratt.

This weekend she had 32 digs against Barton, eight digs against Frank Phillips, 25 digs against Western Texas and 10 digs against Vernon. She leads the Lady Saints with an average of 3.42 digs per set. She also leads the team with a passer rating of 1.97. “The most exciting part about defense is getting an awesome dig,” Anderson said, “the hardest would be reading the hitter.” She then addresses her love of being a part of the Lady Saints volleyball team because of "how well they get along." Head volleyball coach, Bert Luallen, said Anderson is smart and aggressive. "She plays with confidence,” Luallen said. “She talks continually on the floor, which not only helps her to play better, but it helps with the entire team." Not only does Anderson have a talent in volleyball, she has a talent in crafts as well. In fact, making crafts is her fa-

vorite hobby. Her dorm room displayed her hands for craft through neatly decorated water bottles sitting on her desk and string lights, fancied up with colorful paper cups, strung above her bed. Those aren't the only things displayed throughout her room, however. Ducks are scattered all over the room as well. Anderson has a love for ducks. Her love for her favorite animal is expressed through her rubber duck collection, consisting of around 200 rubber ducks. Teammate and roommate Nacole Miller said Anderson is " so loud on the court… she's really talkative and pushes people. She's just so inspiring." Anderson’s love for volleyball began early in life. She is from Colorado Springs, Colo., where she began playing volleyball in elementary school. She has been playing volleyball ever since. Other than playing volleyball at SCCC, she is also majoring in Chemistry.


2B

SPORTS

CRUSADER

Thursday, October 10, 2013

CRUSADER 3B

Alejandro Gonzalez, El Salvador

Four Saints compete at ITA national tournament Efren Rivero Sports Editor Four freshman from the Seward County Saints tennis team have made it to the 2013 Intercollegiate Tennis Association National Tournament. Paula Lopez, Paula Coyos, Alejandro Gonazalez and Ronzi Saurombe are in Florida to compete for a National Championship. Both of the doubles teams had to wait to find out if they had made it to Nationals after losing in the finals at the ITA Regional Tournament in Oklahoma City. Both ended up with second place and did not earn an automatic bid for Nationals. Yet hope was not lost.

Jerry Thor, head coach of the tennis team, delivered the good news to his players that they were invited to Florida. “I was thrilled when I heard the news because these kids work very hard for these opportunities, and it’s great to see the college represented at the biggest tennis event of the year by four outstanding student-athletes,” Thor said. Paula Coyos and Paula Lopez, both from Argentina, have had a great fall season. Together they have a 11-3 record and have beaten eight different NO. 1 teams, seven of which have been from four year universities. They previously won the Metro State Invitational, and finished runner-up at the Bethany Invitational and ITA Regional Tournament.

Coyos and Lopez are just the second Seward women’s doubles team to qualify for the ITA Nationals. Ronzai Saurombe, from Zimbabwe, and Alejandro Gonzalez, from El Salvador, also have had an impressive performance. Their record is 11-1 for this fall season, with the loss coming in the ITA Regionals finals. They, too, have beaten seven teams from NAIA or NCAA schools. Saurombe and Gonzalez won the tournament title at the Bethany Invitational and also won the Metro State Invitational. This pair made history as the first Seward County men’s players to make it to the ITA National tournament. “The preparation for this event began the day they stepped foot on campus,” Thor

said. “With just five weeks to get freshman up to speed, we have been practicing as much as the weather allows.” The ITA National championship is at Fort Myers, Fla. This is composed of eight regional champions and other teams that qualified from NCAA Divisions II and III, NAIA and Junior/Community Colleges. At first, they will compete in their own divisional level. After the champions are crowned, the winners in the singles and doubles at each divisional level will compete to become the overall champions. These champions will then earn the chance, or wild card, into the ITA National Intercollegiate Indoor Championships. The final event will be held at USTA- Billie Jean King National Tennis Center.

Ronzai Saurombe, Zimbabwe

“The competition is brutally tough, and they will need to play their best to win. But as their invitation has shown, they have definitely proved themselves capable of the task,” Thor said. “From the day they signed at Seward County, these four kids have had to handle the huge amount of pressure put on them. Now, they have been given a moment to achieve greatness, and I know they won’t hold back.” When Thor looks for new players to recruit for the tennis team, he looks for players who are serious about training to win and doing all the things that go with it. Thor concluded by saying about his players, “These players are outstanding representatives of the college and community. They have ambitious goals and stay

focused on working very hard to achieve them. Best of all is the heart they show on and off the court. They play with courage that both onlookers and opponents admire. And they truly care about the team, their teammates, and the institution they represent.” Competition for Lopez and Coyos will begin at 4 p.m. today against Owen and Chowdhary from Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College. Saurombe and Gonzalez begin their competition at Nationals against Cutura and Martell from Tyler Junior College, who are ranked first seed in the tournament, today at 12:30 p.m.

Paula Coyos, Argentina

Paula Lopez, Argentina

Courtesy photo/Roy Allen, Crusader illustrations/Jakub Stepanovic, Maria Lara

Gonzalez sets racket on competition ahead

Lopez continues family tradition of tennis

Courtesy photo/Roy Allen

Efren Rivero Sports editor Paula Lopez was raised up in Tucuman, Argentina. While living there, she grew up playing tennis at an academy where she played with her family everyday. Lopez now has 13 years of playing tennis, but enjoys other hobbies as well. “My hobbies are playing ping pong in the student union and supporting the other Saints athletic teams at their events,” said Coyos. “I love just about any sport, especially watching and playing soccer and basketball.” Something that helped Lopez was being raised in a family that breathed tennis. “My family’s involvement in tennis definitely motivated me. All of them played, and my brothers played at a high level. I also learned a lot from my sister who

played team tennis in Germany for six years. She has always been a big source of support,” said Lopez. Lopez now faces a big opportunity for her after a successful fall season. Her singles record is 11-2 and her doubles record is 11-3. “The opportunity is here for me to accomplish my goals, and I want to show the nation who we are,” said Coyos. Coyos likes to prepare for a game by warming up and then spending time alone. She uses this time to focus on her match and visualize some shots along with making a strategy for her game. Coyos added, “I am so proud to be a part of Seward County. [I want to] say thanks for giving me this opportunity. The people of Liberal are very nice and have made me feel so comfortable here.”

want to give thanks to my coach because of the big opportunity he gave [me] to be on his team [and] for being a part of it. My best wishes for all the nationals players [and] the best of luck.” The tennis team is currently coached by Jerry Thor. This is Thor’s second year coaching the tennis team. Right before a competition, Gonzalez takes time to prepare. Some of the things that Gonzalez likes to do before a big game are to just hydrate himself and to focus on the next match. Then, he tries to relax and be calm. Gonzalez’s preparation is evident in his results. His current singles record for the fall season is 10-3. In doubles with Saurombe, their record is 11-1. Gonzalez concluded saying, “I am very glad to be part of this. I feel proud and very happy for me and for my team.”

Efren Rivero Sports editor

Opportunity arises for Coyos this season

Courtesy photo/Roy Allen

Top ranked player, Saurombe from Zimbabwe, takes up challenge at nationals Courtesy photo/Roy Allen

Efren Rivero Sports editor Ronzai Saurombe is from Mutare, Zimbabwe, where he grew up playing tennis. He has been playing tennis for 10 years now. He first started playing when he was only ten years old at Zimbabwe at Mantas Tennis Academy. “My parents, my coach Freeman, and other players who have done it before always [have] motivated me. I believe in myself and that I am capable of achieving

the best I can through hard work. All [of] that has carried me through from the beginning to where I am,” said Saurombe. To have been selected to go to Nationals means a lot to Saurombe. “I feel so blessed to be among such a wonderful group of tennis players from Seward. I am ready to keep working hard with Coach Jerry to achieve the best we can as a team.” “Being one of the four selected to represent Seward is such a good feeling and I feel so honored to represent such a

good school in a big tournament like this with all my team mates,” said Saurombe. Besides playing tennis, Saurombe also enjoys playing soccer and ping-pong. He also enjoys just simply hanging out with friends. To get ready for games, Saurombe doesn’t do anything special. Saurombe said, “After my physical warm-up to get my muscles warm. I enjoy listening to one of my favorite artists, Jay Z, and I enjoy talking to my teammates because I feel so comfortable around them.

Laughing with them makes me relax and calm my nerves so I do not feel scared in my match. I love my team and the supporting administration from Seward and all the community members. I am ready to work with all to achieve the best for the team and school.” Going to nationals means that Saurombe will only add fuel to his record that he has carried from his home town, maintaining his top ranking.

Efren Rivero Sports editor Paula Coyos has been playing the game of tennis for nine years now. She grew up playing tennis in Tucuman, Argentina. She played at the Lawn Tennis Club. “I was [there for] all of the day to see my old sister practice. And then I started to practice with her,” said Coyos. Coyos enjoys other activities along with tennis. Her hobbies include listening to music and also giving tennis lessons. Other sports she enjoys are ping pong and volleyball. Coyos thanks her family for helping her.

Open Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m - 6 p.m Sat. 10 a.m - 3 p.m In Downtown Liberal

“My family...motivated me. My mother and my father were there all the time. [They] supported what I want to do with tennis,” said Coyos. Before playing, she likes to prepare for a game by focusing and putting music on while she starts to warm up. While participating in this big tournament, Coyos will be representing the Lady Saints who will have a chance to show their hard work and training they have done throughout the season. Coyos said, “I feel very proud to represent Seward County Community College. We worked hard to achieve as a team.”

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Alejandro Gonzalez is a freshman from San Salvador, El Salvador, and will be representing Seward at the national championship. He grew up in El Salvador playing tennis for most of his life. This is now his ninth year playing tennis. Yet playing tennis is not the only thing he enjoys. Gonzalez also enjoys other hobbies. For example, he enjoys playing other sports like soccer. He also likes video games and going horseback riding. To be where he is now, in the ITA National Championship, Gonzalez has had some people that were there to motivate him and push him to be the best he can be. “My mother, my ex-tennis coach, and my little brother,” said Gonzalez. “I [also]

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2B

SPORTS

CRUSADER

Thursday, October 10, 2013

CRUSADER 3B

Alejandro Gonzalez, El Salvador

Four Saints compete at ITA national tournament Efren Rivero Sports Editor Four freshman from the Seward County Saints tennis team have made it to the 2013 Intercollegiate Tennis Association National Tournament. Paula Lopez, Paula Coyos, Alejandro Gonazalez and Ronzi Saurombe are in Florida to compete for a National Championship. Both of the doubles teams had to wait to find out if they had made it to Nationals after losing in the finals at the ITA Regional Tournament in Oklahoma City. Both ended up with second place and did not earn an automatic bid for Nationals. Yet hope was not lost.

Jerry Thor, head coach of the tennis team, delivered the good news to his players that they were invited to Florida. “I was thrilled when I heard the news because these kids work very hard for these opportunities, and it’s great to see the college represented at the biggest tennis event of the year by four outstanding student-athletes,” Thor said. Paula Coyos and Paula Lopez, both from Argentina, have had a great fall season. Together they have a 11-3 record and have beaten eight different NO. 1 teams, seven of which have been from four year universities. They previously won the Metro State Invitational, and finished runner-up at the Bethany Invitational and ITA Regional Tournament.

Coyos and Lopez are just the second Seward women’s doubles team to qualify for the ITA Nationals. Ronzai Saurombe, from Zimbabwe, and Alejandro Gonzalez, from El Salvador, also have had an impressive performance. Their record is 11-1 for this fall season, with the loss coming in the ITA Regionals finals. They, too, have beaten seven teams from NAIA or NCAA schools. Saurombe and Gonzalez won the tournament title at the Bethany Invitational and also won the Metro State Invitational. This pair made history as the first Seward County men’s players to make it to the ITA National tournament. “The preparation for this event began the day they stepped foot on campus,” Thor

said. “With just five weeks to get freshman up to speed, we have been practicing as much as the weather allows.” The ITA National championship is at Fort Myers, Fla. This is composed of eight regional champions and other teams that qualified from NCAA Divisions II and III, NAIA and Junior/Community Colleges. At first, they will compete in their own divisional level. After the champions are crowned, the winners in the singles and doubles at each divisional level will compete to become the overall champions. These champions will then earn the chance, or wild card, into the ITA National Intercollegiate Indoor Championships. The final event will be held at USTA- Billie Jean King National Tennis Center.

Ronzai Saurombe, Zimbabwe

“The competition is brutally tough, and they will need to play their best to win. But as their invitation has shown, they have definitely proved themselves capable of the task,” Thor said. “From the day they signed at Seward County, these four kids have had to handle the huge amount of pressure put on them. Now, they have been given a moment to achieve greatness, and I know they won’t hold back.” When Thor looks for new players to recruit for the tennis team, he looks for players who are serious about training to win and doing all the things that go with it. Thor concluded by saying about his players, “These players are outstanding representatives of the college and community. They have ambitious goals and stay

focused on working very hard to achieve them. Best of all is the heart they show on and off the court. They play with courage that both onlookers and opponents admire. And they truly care about the team, their teammates, and the institution they represent.” Competition for Lopez and Coyos will begin at 4 p.m. today against Owen and Chowdhary from Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College. Saurombe and Gonzalez begin their competition at Nationals against Cutura and Martell from Tyler Junior College, who are ranked first seed in the tournament, today at 12:30 p.m.

Paula Coyos, Argentina

Paula Lopez, Argentina

Courtesy photo/Roy Allen, Crusader illustrations/Jakub Stepanovic, Maria Lara

Gonzalez sets racket on competition ahead

Lopez continues family tradition of tennis

Courtesy photo/Roy Allen

Efren Rivero Sports editor Paula Lopez was raised up in Tucuman, Argentina. While living there, she grew up playing tennis at an academy where she played with her family everyday. Lopez now has 13 years of playing tennis, but enjoys other hobbies as well. “My hobbies are playing ping pong in the student union and supporting the other Saints athletic teams at their events,” said Coyos. “I love just about any sport, especially watching and playing soccer and basketball.” Something that helped Lopez was being raised in a family that breathed tennis. “My family’s involvement in tennis definitely motivated me. All of them played, and my brothers played at a high level. I also learned a lot from my sister who

played team tennis in Germany for six years. She has always been a big source of support,” said Lopez. Lopez now faces a big opportunity for her after a successful fall season. Her singles record is 11-2 and her doubles record is 11-3. “The opportunity is here for me to accomplish my goals, and I want to show the nation who we are,” said Coyos. Coyos likes to prepare for a game by warming up and then spending time alone. She uses this time to focus on her match and visualize some shots along with making a strategy for her game. Coyos added, “I am so proud to be a part of Seward County. [I want to] say thanks for giving me this opportunity. The people of Liberal are very nice and have made me feel so comfortable here.”

want to give thanks to my coach because of the big opportunity he gave [me] to be on his team [and] for being a part of it. My best wishes for all the nationals players [and] the best of luck.” The tennis team is currently coached by Jerry Thor. This is Thor’s second year coaching the tennis team. Right before a competition, Gonzalez takes time to prepare. Some of the things that Gonzalez likes to do before a big game are to just hydrate himself and to focus on the next match. Then, he tries to relax and be calm. Gonzalez’s preparation is evident in his results. His current singles record for the fall season is 10-3. In doubles with Saurombe, their record is 11-1. Gonzalez concluded saying, “I am very glad to be part of this. I feel proud and very happy for me and for my team.”

Efren Rivero Sports editor

Opportunity arises for Coyos this season

Courtesy photo/Roy Allen

Top ranked player, Saurombe from Zimbabwe, takes up challenge at nationals Courtesy photo/Roy Allen

Efren Rivero Sports editor Ronzai Saurombe is from Mutare, Zimbabwe, where he grew up playing tennis. He has been playing tennis for 10 years now. He first started playing when he was only ten years old at Zimbabwe at Mantas Tennis Academy. “My parents, my coach Freeman, and other players who have done it before always [have] motivated me. I believe in myself and that I am capable of achieving

the best I can through hard work. All [of] that has carried me through from the beginning to where I am,” said Saurombe. To have been selected to go to Nationals means a lot to Saurombe. “I feel so blessed to be among such a wonderful group of tennis players from Seward. I am ready to keep working hard with Coach Jerry to achieve the best we can as a team.” “Being one of the four selected to represent Seward is such a good feeling and I feel so honored to represent such a

good school in a big tournament like this with all my team mates,” said Saurombe. Besides playing tennis, Saurombe also enjoys playing soccer and ping-pong. He also enjoys just simply hanging out with friends. To get ready for games, Saurombe doesn’t do anything special. Saurombe said, “After my physical warm-up to get my muscles warm. I enjoy listening to one of my favorite artists, Jay Z, and I enjoy talking to my teammates because I feel so comfortable around them.

Laughing with them makes me relax and calm my nerves so I do not feel scared in my match. I love my team and the supporting administration from Seward and all the community members. I am ready to work with all to achieve the best for the team and school.” Going to nationals means that Saurombe will only add fuel to his record that he has carried from his home town, maintaining his top ranking.

Efren Rivero Sports editor Paula Coyos has been playing the game of tennis for nine years now. She grew up playing tennis in Tucuman, Argentina. She played at the Lawn Tennis Club. “I was [there for] all of the day to see my old sister practice. And then I started to practice with her,” said Coyos. Coyos enjoys other activities along with tennis. Her hobbies include listening to music and also giving tennis lessons. Other sports she enjoys are ping pong and volleyball. Coyos thanks her family for helping her.

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“My family...motivated me. My mother and my father were there all the time. [They] supported what I want to do with tennis,” said Coyos. Before playing, she likes to prepare for a game by focusing and putting music on while she starts to warm up. While participating in this big tournament, Coyos will be representing the Lady Saints who will have a chance to show their hard work and training they have done throughout the season. Coyos said, “I feel very proud to represent Seward County Community College. We worked hard to achieve as a team.”

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Alejandro Gonzalez is a freshman from San Salvador, El Salvador, and will be representing Seward at the national championship. He grew up in El Salvador playing tennis for most of his life. This is now his ninth year playing tennis. Yet playing tennis is not the only thing he enjoys. Gonzalez also enjoys other hobbies. For example, he enjoys playing other sports like soccer. He also likes video games and going horseback riding. To be where he is now, in the ITA National Championship, Gonzalez has had some people that were there to motivate him and push him to be the best he can be. “My mother, my ex-tennis coach, and my little brother,” said Gonzalez. “I [also]

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SPORTS

4B CRUSADER

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Texas takes championship intramural football: the final three

Maria Lara Crusader staff After five games and four victories, the Intramural’s flag football team, Texas, claimed the championship title. Seward County Community College/Area Technical School’s Student Life organization hosted the Intramural Football tournament with the help of Director of Student Life, Wade Lyon. Texas and its eight members, led by Captain Victor Silva, defeated five teams between Sept. 10 and Sept. 23. At 5:45 in the evening, Texas played its last game for the season. The game created a threeway tie with The Cunning Stunts and The Disciples. Due to the tie, Lyon had to cal-

culate the overall point difference between the three teams throughout the entire tournament. The largest point difference would then determine the winner. Texas won with a difference of +83 points. The Disciples didn’t fall too short behind with a difference of +79 points. The Cunning Stunts finished third after losing in the last game by 34 points. “It felt great that we had won because that is what me and my team planned on doing from the start,” Silva said. Silva decided to participate in the tournament because he has always enjoyed playing football. He especially enjoyed playing alongside his cousin, Manuel

Ramirez, “and now also with my new friends that I made here,” he added. Teammate Gerardo Martinez enjoyed playing the intramural sport during the short time it lasted. “I like being a team player and having my friends as teammates, and it just couldn’t get any better than that,” Martinez said. “Winning is just a great feeling.” Due to the success of the flag football tournament, Lyon is currently planning on starting other intramural sports for SCCC/ATS. The planning for future intramural sports is still in progress. Lyon plans on having flag football again next fall along with other intramural sports and activities.

Crusader photo/Maria Lara

Archie Mills, right, lines up on defense before the snap. Mills played for The Cunning Stunts who placed third in the tournament for Intramural flag football. The team was involved in a three way tie for first place.

Basketball prepares for preview night As the volleyball season comes to a close, basketball season is just getting under way. The men’s basketball team is busy preparing for the annual preview night on Thursday Oct. 24 at 5:30 p.m. The preview is a chance for the men’s and women’s basketball teams to showcase their talents before the upcoming season. The Saints begin regular season play on Nov. 2 when they take on Northwest Kansas Tech in the Pepsi Classic. The game will begin at 8 p.m. in SCCC/ATS’s Green House. The men go into the 20132014 season as defending Jayhawk West Champions for the last three years.

Crusader photo/Efren Rivero

Crusader photo/Efren Rivero

The men’s basketball team executes a play during Tuesday’s practice. The team will once again be defending their Jayhawk West title.

In his first year as Assistant Men’s Basketball Coach, Patrick Nee observes as the team runs through various drills to prepare for its preview night. The preview will be Oct. 24 at 5:30 p.m in SCCC/ATS’s Green House.

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Year 45 issue 3  

Dorothys invading the town, bicycling or housing issues, tennis features and volleyball game coverage.

Year 45 issue 3  

Dorothys invading the town, bicycling or housing issues, tennis features and volleyball game coverage.