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March 12 2014

rusader www.crusadernews.com

Year 45, No. 9

Presorted Standard US Postage PAID Liberal, KS Permit NO.114

Liberal, Kansas

SGA funds student relief Dawn Shouse Editor

Luck of game offers prize — Page 7 Crusader photo / Kelci Bedingfield

The newly crowned Miss Liberal and SCCC/ATS student Emily Bayouth upholds tradition by running with the International Pancake Day racers Hannah Belton, SCCC/ATS student Lakeria Eatmon, Mikayla Knudsen, and Sandra Nash.

Bayouth crowned Miss Liberal 2014 Diana Chavira New Media Director

Player pitches fight against adversity. — Page 8

Performers shine at talent show — Page 6

Season ends on long shot — Page 9

The theme for the Miss Liberal Pageant this year was Surf’s Up and none of the contestants showed any signs of the chills with the freezing weather outside. The ladies were glammed up and ready to walk the stage for the pageant, but not without a well prepared introduction that included last year’s winner, Giovanna Baca. Seven contestants ran in the Miss Liberal Pageant, and even though only one could take the title, most of the ladies left with at least one prize. The crowning, however, went to Seward County Community College sophomore and accounting and finance major, Emily Bayouth. Running for a pageant isn’t something that Bayouth would have done in high school, but college calls for new beginnings. “My mom really encouraged me to do it,” Bayouth said, “and it was something outside of my comfort zone, and I just wanted to try something different.” Bayouth described the pageant as a “great experience” and she enjoyed meeting all of the girls as well as all of the other people involved with the pageant and the Pancake Day activities. Bayouth had her handful in events, but there was only one in specific that got her worked up. The day of the pageant was nerve wrecking for some, but Bayouth shared that she wasn’t really nervous. “The one thing I was most nervous about was the interview,” Bayouth said, “and that was one of the easiest things ever.” Also, Bayouth mentioned that while someone was on-stage performing, the rest of the girls would be dancing backstage. This made their performances something to look forward to, and that part of the experience was stress-free. The opening number, a major event in the pageant, was also the most fun for Bayouth, she enjoyed dancing with her fellow contestants, and she equally looks forward to spending time with new contestants in a couple of months. Bayouth is more than excited

to compete for Miss Kansas. She has been working out and is already preparing for the first week of June in Pratt. Bayouth thinks it would be awesome to win the Miss Kansas title, and if she did, she would then move on to compete for the Miss America title. If Miss Kansas isn’t realized, Bayouth has decided to compete in an OSU pageant in the fall. As one might guess, a pageant takes a lot of preparation, and Bayouth indeed had a lot of preparing to do for the talent portion of the Miss Liberal Pageant. When it came to deciding on a talent, Bayouth explained that she cannot sing or dance, and she thought that karate was more “her” and it was plenty athletic. Bayouth trained and practiced for a couple of months at Rine’s Karate, and she is continuing to do so Monday through Friday for an hour every night, and a little bit of kicking boxing afterwards. “I went in not knowing anything,” Bayouth said, “and then practiced it for months and months and months, and now I love it.” Another thing that Bayouth loved was the support she received from her parents Larry and Clareisa Bayouth. “My parents cried when I won,” Bayouth said, “I was trying not to cry when I was getting crowned.” Bayouth left the pageant with not only great support but also with a total of five prizes including the Miss Liberal title. “I don’t want to make it just about the scholarships,” Bayouth added, “ but it is known that Liberal is the best pageant in the state scholarship-wise, and that was definitely very helpful, and I just want to thank everyone for donating.” Bayouth also had some advice for girls interested in pageants. “Definitely do it,” Bayouth said, “it’s a great experience.” Bayouth also mentioned that getting ready for a pageant isn’t as expensive as one might think. “I used some of the stuff I already had in my closet,” Bayouth shared, “borrow stuff it’s not a big deal.” For her overall experience, the only thing she would change is staying positive with everything.

Courtesy photo / Leader & Times - Elly Grimm

Former SCCC/ATS student and 2013 Miss Liberal Giovanna Baca secures the crown on the 2014 winner of the Miss Liberal Pageant SCCC/ATS student Emily Bayouth.

Courtesy photos / Leader & Times - Elly Grimm

From Left: SCCC/ATS students Olivia Robinson and Jessica Martinez competed in the pageant with Bayouth. For stories about Robinson and Martinez go to facebook.com/CrusaderNews.

The Student Government Association has unanimously passed a motion to allocate funds and create an Emergency Student Relief Fund. The fund will assist Seward County Community College / Area Technical School students who encounter an unforeseen emergency or catastrophic event that would not be the fault of the student. The idea for the fund came after an event in the Student Living Center last month left a student without any resources to replace damaged personal property. A fire suppressant sprinkler head broke and flooded Jackie Arnold’s dorm room and destroyed many of her personal belongings. Some of the items ruined were her Xbox, cell phone, microwave, computer laptop, books, furniture, clothes and homework. Arnold did not have renter’s insurance; however, the cause of the sprinkler head breakage was of no fault of her own. If the SGA Student Relief Fund had been in place at the time, Arnold more than likely would have qualified for the money to replace some if not all of her property. The SGA board stressed that funds may not be used for routine expenses or as a supplement to other funding sources or to pay for common supplies. While the specific conditions for qualifying for the funds have yet do be determined, it was the feeling of the student board as a whole that consideration would be given to students who have experienced any unforeseen emergency or catastrophic event. So far the requirements that have been discussed are that each applicant will be asked to describe, in detail, the nature of the emergency and state how the funds would assist in alleviating the circumstances. Each applicant would be asked to provide documentation, such as copies of bills, to support the application. The maximum award being considered is $1,500 per student per school year. “Hopefully there won’t be a reason to use it every year, but it is nice to know that it is there when it is needed,” first year SCCC/ATS LPN student and SGA member Janet Burhenn said. Due to limited funding, the Student Government Association may not approve every request. Repeated requests from the same student also are not likely to be approved. After the SGA confirms eligibility, it may forward the application to a special committee for further review. Each application will be considered for approval on a case-by-case basis. Some of the criteria for applications to be considered may be based on the following: academic program, educational goals, grade point average, application content and quality, financial aid, financial need, financial emergency, and/or special circumstances. All decisions would be final and not all applications would be funded.

3.1415926535897932384626433832795028841971693993751058209749445 923078164062862089986280348253421170679821480865132823066470938 446095505822317253594081284811174502841027019385211055596446229 489549303819644288109756659334461284756482337867831652712019091 “So if students have a class 456485669234603486104543266482133936072602491412737245870066063 Karisa Pulaski they can grab a slice of ‘pi’ and Crusader staff keep going.” 155881748815209209628292540917153643678925903600113305305488204 In honor of the day, a prize will be This Friday, March 14, is Internaawarded to whoever can remember tional Pi Day, as well as Albert Ein665213841469519415116094330572703657595919530921861173819326117 stein’s birthday, and SCCC Mathe- the most digits of the pi song. “The math and science department matics Resource Center is ready to 931051185480744623799627495673518857527248912279381830119491298 has wanted to celebrate this event for celebrate. At noon on 3/14, matching the pi a couple of years now to draw inter336733624406566430860213949463952247371907021798609437027705392 number of 3.14, the Mathematics est in STEM related fields but were Resource Center in the library will unable too because Pi Day usually host an event where pizzas, pies occurs during spring break,” 171762931767523846748184676694051320005681271452635608277857713 and pi cookies are free for all stu- Moore said. “We decided to do it Free pie, pizza and cookies this year because it is the Friday dents and faculty. 427577896091736371787214684409012249534301465495853710507922796 will be served at noon on “This is a come-and-go before spring break and will event,” said Derric Moore, allow people to see the 3/14 in the Math Lab. 892589235420199561121290219608640344181598136297747713099605187 STEM mathematics lab goofier and wackier monitor and SCCC side of STEM 072113499999983729780499510597317328160963185950244594553469083 majors.” instructor. 026425223082533446850352619311881710100031378387528865875332089

Pi Day plans infinite fun

3.14

Day

Spring brings break ideas — Page 3


NEWS

2 CRUSADER

Ag event sponsors high school contests

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Gay Straight Alliance offers judgement-free campus organization Karisa Pulaski Crusader staff

Courtesy photo/Erin Russell

A student from one of many visiting high schools sorts through grain during the SW District Agribusiness and Agriscience Contest. The schools who participated in this contest were La Crosse, Holcomb, Garden, Dodge City, Cimarron, Southwester Heights and Hugoton. The contests were of Farm and Ranch management, Entomology, Food Science and Crop Science.

The Gay Straight Alliance is a group organized last year at Seward to provide a campus club for gay or questioning students along with their allies. “We want to pave the way for a society that values equality for all,” said GSA Co-president Jessica Williams. “The Gay Straight Alliance is on the forefront of teaching acceptance in the school, and the town. We are not looking for people to agree with us, in reality we are just looking for acceptance without intolerance.” The Gay Straight Alliance is a club that is open to anyone, regardless of sexual orientation, as a safe place to hang out and be with like-minded individuals. “I was in the club last year as a member and it seemed like a good place for people to come and just be themselves,” said by fellow GSA co-president Jasmine Howell. “We have a strict

do not ask policy about your sexual orientation. If you want to let it be known in the club you can share, but that is not something you have to divulge to be a part of the Gay Straight Alliance.” Founded last year by Sandro Juarez and sponsor Dr. Magda Silva, the GSA is the newest club on campus. Juarez approached Dr. Silva with the idea of the G.S.A. because he felt that our community needed a place for people to feel safe to be themselves. “After Juarez came to me with the idea, we contacted Fort Hays University to get advice on how to start the club,” Said Dr. Silva. “They were very forthcoming with rules and bylaws which aided greatly in the development of our Gay Straight Alliance.” Dr. Silva also stated,” the GSA members at SCCC feels no one should be bullied, isolated or feel alone for being themselves. That is why anyone is welcome to be a part of our club.” In order for the creation of a

campus club paperwork must be filed with the Student Government Association. “The students had to talk at the SGA meeting and explain why a Gay/Straight Alliance would be beneficial to our school,” Silva said. “They spoke about how many gay or questioning students have a higher dropout rate, bullying issues, thoughts of suicide, feelings of isolation and lower grades, compared to nongay/questioning students.” The founding members were very nervous in presenting at the student government meeting and were not immediately approved, according to Silva. “Student government realized that this was a sensitive and emotional issue and gave the members a second chance to regroup and had a small ‘committee’ talk to the students’ one on one. After that, the club was approved.” While the emphasis of the club is mostly social they are also involved in community service. On April 5, the GSA will vol-

unteer at the Liberal area rape crisis and domestic violence shelter annual auction night, and the club is hoping more students will come get involved.” I would very much like to stress the gay straight alliance is a judgment free place. If you feel you could benefit from what our club has to offer, then by all means please come and attend one of our meetings,” Williams said. The club meets every Wednesday at 4:30 p.m. in H146. Those interested may attend the meetings or email Silva with questions at magda.silva@sccc.edu. Originally, the club was small and kept quiet for safety reasons. Currently, there are seven active club members who are now ready to invite more people to join the club. “I am glad the Gay Straight Alliance is here because this is a very conservative place to live and we now have a place to come to and not be judged,” Williams said.

News Briefs PI DAY is this Friday, March 14 ( or 3.14), which is also Albert Einstein’s birthday, and students can celebrate both in the Mathematic Resource Center. Pizza, Pi(es) and Pi cookies will be served starting at noon, all free. A prize will be given to the person that remembers the most digits of the PI SONG (look on YouTube for the song). Warning: Pi jokes may be served. SPRING BREAK means no classes March 17-21, but campus offices will remain open from those days from 7:45 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. The library will be closed Saturday, March 15 and Sunday, March 16, but will reopen 7:45 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. March 17-21, and will be open from 1-9 p.m. Sunday, March 23.

PHONATHON 2014 will begin on March 24 and end April 10. The phonathon is to raise money for student scholarships at Seward County Community College/Area Technical School. Dean of Student Services Celeste Donovan has stressed the importance for all clubs and organizations to participate in making calls for pledges during 4:306:30 or 6:30-8:30 p.m. timeblocks. Sign up schedules are available by contacting Donovan, Roy Allen, or Wade Lyon. COSMETOLOGY SHOW featuring free brow makeovers and Honeybee Garden Natural make-up will be from 2-8 p.m. March 27 at the SCCC/ATS cosmetology building. For more information, call 620-417-1361.

DEFENSIVE DRIVING course is offered by the SCCC/ATS Business & Industry Office from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. March 28 in the student union, SU214 E/W. Cost is $35 per person. The course instructor will be Michael Racy, Kansas Highway Patrol. The course helps participants learn to avoid accidents by identifying and responding to risky driving hazards, identify effects of impaired driving, understand driving errors and recognize uncontrollable driving conditions. It also teaches the importance of vehicle maintenance, defensive driving maneuvers. For more information or to enroll, call 620-417-1170 or email b&i@sccc.edu. LIFE GUARD CLASS for certification will start in April. Stu-

dents who are interested should sign up at the Wellness Center as soon as possible. Red Cross lifeguard courses will be from 6-9 p.m. April 25, from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. April 26, and from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. April 27. Certified lifeguards at the college are paid $7.50 per hour, but can make up to $9.50 per hour at a public pool. For information the lifeguard certification, lifeguard instructor or water safety instructor classes, contact Andy Highfill at 620-417-1141 or email andy.highfill@sccc.edu. GRADUATES WILL PAY a $10 late fee on graduation items ordered after March 11. The original deadline of Feb. 28 was followed by a grace period, but fees are now required.

Courtesy photo

SIGMA CHI CHI students are at a competition in Overland Park. They left March 9 and will return March 19. SCCC/ATS sophomore Angel Corral (in black T-shirt) climbs the rock wall at the Fall 2012 regional competition in Warrensburg, Mo. The rock wall is one of the activities the students are able to enjoy when not competing. Far left: Amy Knop, Phi Theta Kappa president, holds the Phi Theta Kappa plaque at the March 2 induction ceremony and explains what each symbol represents for the Seward County Community College chapter. A couple of the additional symbols are a white rose, and a blue candle. Left: The new Phi Theta Kappa inductees group together in front of the fireplace at the tech school to get several pictures after the induction ceremony. Twenty-one students attended the chapter induction. Photos courtesy of Jill Adams

2013All-Kansas Award, Kansas Collegiate Media 2012-2013 Fourth Place Special Section - ACP 2012-2013 Sixth Place Section - ACP 2003-2004, 2010-2011 Newspaper Pacemaker Finalist - ACP 2008 First Place Certificate - ASPA

Phone: 620.417.1459

Fax: 620.417.1169

editor Dawn Shouse news editor

Makiah Adams design editor

Jakub Stepanovic

new media director Diana Chavira

CrusaderNews.com

2012, 2013 -First Place Online - KCM 2008 - National Online Pacemaker Finalist - ACP 2003, 2004 - National Online Pacemaker Award

sports editor Maria Lara

reporters/photographers

CRUSADER Kyleigh Becker Kelci Bedingfield Grant Glaze Dallas Kelling Maggie Mahan Karisa Pulaski

The official student newspaper of Seward County Community College/Area Technical School is published bi-monthly and has special editions by journalism students during the regular college year, except on school holidays and during examination periods. One copy of each issue is distributed free to each student, faculty and staff member, with subsequent copies available for purchase in the Crusader office at 50 cents each. Letters to the editor will be considered for publication if they are signed and the authenticity of the writer’s signature is verified. The staff reserves the right to edit for length. Opinions voiced in letters and editorials are not necessarily those of Seward County Community College/Area Technical School or the Crusader. Advertising is accepted. Rates are $4.25 per column inch or $5 pci for color ads. Insert rates are $50 per thousand. Classified ads are free to SCCC students, faculty and staff; classified rates for all others are $5 per ad, limit of 20 words. The Crusader staff reserves the right to refuse advertising. Mail to: Crusader, Box 1137, Liberal, KS 67905, or editors@crusadernews.com.


NEWS

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Spring Break March 15- March 23 Every spring, students across the country look forward to one thing: Spring Break.

2014

Here are some ideas to get SCCC/ATS students thinking about theirs.

• The 11th Avenue Hotel and Hostel has single rooms with a shared bath for $41 or single-sex dorm style rooms starting at $20, plus a $10 locker key deposit.

40

• The Colorado Avalanche vs Boston Bruins game at 7 p.m. on March 21 in the Pepsi Center. Tickets start at $21. • March 22 the Denver Botanical Gardens is offering a free entry day.

• The Denver International Hostel, has rooms for $19 per night and is completely dorm style accommodations.

• The Cheapest motels/hotels • The Wichita Botanical Gar-

in Wichita start around $50 per dens is open 9 a.m to 5 p.m., Monday through Saturday. Entry night. fee is $7. • For something a little more romantic or relaxing, try Delano’s • Fifty Shades of Men is at 9 Bed and Breakfast (starting at p.m., March 15 at The Cotillion. $89 night) or Serenity Bed and The cost is $20 at the door and Breakfast (starting $109, two per- $15 in advance. son rate).

• The Great Plains Nature Center is free and open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Archive photo / Jakub Stepanovic Saturday. Downtown Wichita offers a variety of entertainment. • Stoney LaRue performs at 8 • Justin Moore’s Off the Beaten p.m. March 21 in the Cotillion. Path tour is 7 p.m. on March 21 in Tickets range from $16.50 to the Hartman Arena. Tickets range $20. from $29.75 to $39.75. • The Edge paintball is open • Graffiti Paintball is open from 9 a.m to 5 p.m. Saturday Saturday and Sunday from 10 and Sunday. Cost is $25 plus a.m. to 5 p.m. For rental equipment and paint, the cost is $38. paint.

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Cheney State Park

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Cheney State Park and Reservoir day trip: boating, fishing, swimming, camping, walking and hiking trails

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Courtesy photo/USGS

• Delta Rae will be performing at 8 p.m., March 21 in the Bluebird Theater, with at-the-door ticket prices beginning at $24.

Oklahoma City

The costs were calculated using $3.35 as the price of gas in a vehicle with an average of 20 MPG, four nights in an average priced hotel (hostels in the case of Denver) and food, along with a few activities.

Diana Grejada: “I want to go to Chihuahua, Mexico, my hometown.”

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Colorado Avalanche

• Cervantes’ Masterpiece Tuesday through Sunday for concerts. Tickets average $15.

Students’ plans for spring break

Wichita

Denver • Check out the Moon Room at Summit Music Hall for live music and concerts. Tickets range from $5-$25. A Black Day, Wandering Monks, Prime Element and Bullhead*ed (rap and hip hop) will be performing on March 22. The cost is $10 at the door.

CRUSADER 3

Fabiana Monte: “I’m going to go see my best friend at Midland College.”

• Oklahoma City Museum of Art is hosting an Ansel Adams exhibit. Cost of entry is $12 for the museum.

• RIVERSPORT in the Boathouse District is open from 1-8 Saturday and Sunday. Day passes cost $35 and include: SandRidge Sky Trail, Rumble Drop, Sky Slide, Air Express Zip Line, bungee trampolines, climbing walls, kayaking, cycling and other activities.

• Russian Circles, Helms Alee and KEN Mode at 9 p.m. March 14 at The Conservatory. $15 at-the-door ticket price.

• The Oklahoma City Zoo and Botanical Gardens are open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Parking is free and entrance is $8 for adults. Archive photo / Jakub Stepanovic

Page by Kyleigh Becker

Many modern buildings were recently built in Oklahoma City.

Fabiola Teran: “I am going to Mexico to visit my family.”

Does studying food processing, food spoilage and foodborne diseases interest you?

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PANCAKE DAY

4 CRUSADER

Crusader photo / Karisa Pulaski

Crusader photo / Jakub Stepanovic

Crusader photo / Jakub Stepanovic

Onlookers cheer for the runners in the International Pancake Day Race as they round the second curve of the 417-yard race course.

Tony Evans represents Olney, England, at the Liberal festivities. Evans spoke prior to the Men’s Pacer Race. Looking on is emcee Al Shank.

Jan Nondorf finishes first in front of Shawn Steele in the Last Chance Race. After the final flip, Nondorf’s pancake hit the street.

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

CRUSADER 5

Pancakes connect community for international event 65th annual anniversary of International Pancake Day features races, food & fun as Liberal ushers in Lent with unique celebration.

Crusader photo / Dawn Shouse

In the children’s Division I Flipping Contest, Elijah Denoyer, age 4, tries to flip his pancake while Mia Phan, age 5, flips hers very high, causing a surprised reaction from counters Rob Rogers and Dave Rine. The Division I winner was Brooks Kappelmann, 7, who flipped his pancake 80 times in 2 minutes. Pancake Day offers activities over a four-day span including flipping, eating, and a cooking contest in which SCCC/ATS fiscal officer Mike Bailey won third place.

Crusader photo / Jakub Stepanovic

In front, International Pancake Race winners, from left, SCCC/ATS student Lakeria Eatmon (third place), Destyni Lucero (second place), and Summer Parsons (first place). In the back row are, from left, Sam Brownback, Kansas Governor and Dr. Jack Jacob, Pancake Day chairman. Parsons won the Liberal race with a time of 63.5, but third-time Olney race winner Devon Byrne’s time was 55.61, which set a new record for the race.

Crusader photo / Jakub Stepanovic

Crusader photo / Jakub Stepanovic

Emery Swagerty, SCCC/ATS library technician, ran in the Men’s Pacer Race. Making the most of his “Duck Dynasty” Si look, Swagerty carried an iced tea glass and wore a sign saying “Hey, Jack, you can’t even abbreviate Sports Illustrated without S I.”

The Men’s Pacer Race runs immediately prior to the International Pancake Day Race. Firstplace winner Alejandro Avila breaks the tape at the finish line and Tyson McGuire follows closely in second place.

Crusader photo / Dawn Shouse

Crusader photo / Jakub Stepanovic

Former SCCC/ATS student and psychology major Kelsey Childress has won first-place four times in the pancake eating contest, winning this year with a time of five pancakes in 37 seconds. Childress said that this year’s prize money will go towards training for the event next year.

Seward student Bradley Kinser, who finished third in the Men’s Pacer Race rolled to rest on the brick street after crossing the finish line. Hayden Ukens, also a student at Seward, offers him a hand as other runners Joshua Juma, an SCCC/ATS student at far left, and Cruz Eatmon, far right, finish the race.

Free Wifi World's Best Mango Smoothie

The Best Place to Study Home of "The Spencer"

Crusader photo / Diana Chavira

Student Emily Bayouth, who was crowned Miss Liberal in the 2014 pageant March 2 , waves to the crowd at the Pancake Day parade. Bayouth had also ran in the International Pancake Day Race in keeping with local tradition.

Safeguard Your Assets AND Save Hundreds.

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Your home loan professionals

“Coldest Beer in Town”

Open till 9:00pm 7 Village Plaza Liberal KS 67901

L ib e r a l

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n oon t o 10pm

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PANCAKE DAY

4 CRUSADER

Crusader photo / Karisa Pulaski

Crusader photo / Jakub Stepanovic

Crusader photo / Jakub Stepanovic

Onlookers cheer for the runners in the International Pancake Day Race as they round the second curve of the 417-yard race course.

Tony Evans represents Olney, England, at the Liberal festivities. Evans spoke prior to the Men’s Pacer Race. Looking on is emcee Al Shank.

Jan Nondorf finishes first in front of Shawn Steele in the Last Chance Race. After the final flip, Nondorf’s pancake hit the street.

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

CRUSADER 5

Pancakes connect community for international event 65th annual anniversary of International Pancake Day features races, food & fun as Liberal ushers in Lent with unique celebration.

Crusader photo / Dawn Shouse

In the children’s Division I Flipping Contest, Elijah Denoyer, age 4, tries to flip his pancake while Mia Phan, age 5, flips hers very high, causing a surprised reaction from counters Rob Rogers and Dave Rine. The Division I winner was Brooks Kappelmann, 7, who flipped his pancake 80 times in 2 minutes. Pancake Day offers activities over a four-day span including flipping, eating, and a cooking contest in which SCCC/ATS fiscal officer Mike Bailey won third place.

Crusader photo / Jakub Stepanovic

In front, International Pancake Race winners, from left, SCCC/ATS student Lakeria Eatmon (third place), Destyni Lucero (second place), and Summer Parsons (first place). In the back row are, from left, Sam Brownback, Kansas Governor and Dr. Jack Jacob, Pancake Day chairman. Parsons won the Liberal race with a time of 63.5, but third-time Olney race winner Devon Byrne’s time was 55.61, which set a new record for the race.

Crusader photo / Jakub Stepanovic

Crusader photo / Jakub Stepanovic

Emery Swagerty, SCCC/ATS library technician, ran in the Men’s Pacer Race. Making the most of his “Duck Dynasty” Si look, Swagerty carried an iced tea glass and wore a sign saying “Hey, Jack, you can’t even abbreviate Sports Illustrated without S I.”

The Men’s Pacer Race runs immediately prior to the International Pancake Day Race. Firstplace winner Alejandro Avila breaks the tape at the finish line and Tyson McGuire follows closely in second place.

Crusader photo / Dawn Shouse

Crusader photo / Jakub Stepanovic

Former SCCC/ATS student and psychology major Kelsey Childress has won first-place four times in the pancake eating contest, winning this year with a time of five pancakes in 37 seconds. Childress said that this year’s prize money will go towards training for the event next year.

Seward student Bradley Kinser, who finished third in the Men’s Pacer Race rolled to rest on the brick street after crossing the finish line. Hayden Ukens, also a student at Seward, offers him a hand as other runners Joshua Juma, an SCCC/ATS student at far left, and Cruz Eatmon, far right, finish the race.

Free Wifi World's Best Mango Smoothie

The Best Place to Study Home of "The Spencer"

Crusader photo / Diana Chavira

Student Emily Bayouth, who was crowned Miss Liberal in the 2014 pageant March 2 , waves to the crowd at the Pancake Day parade. Bayouth had also ran in the International Pancake Day Race in keeping with local tradition.

Safeguard Your Assets AND Save Hundreds.

Caramel Macchiato

Your home loan professionals

“Coldest Beer in Town”

Open till 9:00pm 7 Village Plaza Liberal KS 67901

L ib e r a l

"Next to North Pizza Hut"

20 E Tuck er Rd.

Carry Outs Call (620) 626-5556

n oon t o 10pm

624 2045


ENTERTAINMENT

6 CRUSADER

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Guest Column —

Sometimes the magic works: A call for submissions to Telolith 2014 Bill McGlothing Guest Columnist bill.mcglothing@sccc.edu

In 2005, I wrote my annual Telolith column for the Crusader and included a poem featuring a dialogue, between two characters named Hilltote and LeTiloth, gossiping about an old friend named Theo just convicted of burning down the Lit Hotel. You may not recall the crime or the

column, but you should be beginning to detect a pattern here. Sometimes the magic works, and sometimes it doesn’t. The deadline: to write a new column calling for submissions to Telolith 2014 by March 10. The rules: to include a poem using only the letters of the name of the publication. Did you know thill is a word? I didn’t either. But that’s putting the cart before the horse. And should convey a peek at what’s involved. Some options make me wince; the rules of the game lead to lite, instead of light. So Hit the Lite could well describe a trip to the

refrigerator instead of the wall switch. But lit works just fine, if the illumination is past, or with a cap to abbreviate one of my favorite courses. Some options remain Greek to me, as in Helio and Theo, both excellent prefixes, but not much for meaning by themselves. Although there’s great promise in the Copernicaseussian Heliotheo, can both be centric at the same time? And what about Heliolith? Sunrock. Or Theolith? Godstone. Tantalizing, but terminal. I refuse to yield to such English teacher abominations as LOL and OTL. My students

know these will set me spinning in my grave. And speaking of a cheap date--Elliot, and his paramour Ellie, both lithe and worthy of the title. Hello, Elliot! Hello, Ellie! But then what? Dinner and a movie? History tells us workers in the nonrenewable fuel industry may once have been told to “Tote the oil to Hotel Hill.” Were they not then, at the end of their day, hot to tell the toll of toil? And if to drown their drudgery they overdid, the morning after did they hit the toilet tile? Sink their sorrow to the hilt. And curse their fate to Hell. To the hilt then tithe to hell?

Devotees of Kansas culture protest “Lie to Toto! Lie to Toto?” only to be told, “It’s good for you, Yes, LIE TO TOTO!” He’s just a dog, after all. When one witch puts him down, another will pick him up. English teacher fail: Othelli, the Italian Moor. You see, I’m fading. But before I do, I’ll leave you with this: Eli Eli O.

The season of Telolith, the SCCC/ATS publication for student creative writing and art, is upon us once again. Deadline for submissions of original and previously unpublished art, photography, poetry, short fiction, personal essays, and creative nonfiction is Monday, March 24. Submission forms are available from Telolith advisers Susan Copas (susan.copas@sccc.edu/ 417-1453/ Humanities 108) and Bill McGlothing (bill.mcglothing@sccc.edu/ 417-1457/ Humanities 107).

Pancake D ay Talent Show 2 0 14 Talent Show Winners Tiny Tot division: 1st- Faith Belsky 2nd- Cash Wheeler 3rd- Jetta Guidicy

Junior Division: Crusader photo/Maggie Mahan

Juan Carlos Contreras practices for his role of the baker in the April 1012 productions of “Into the Woods” with director Gloria Goodwin.

Contreras rolls as baker in ‘Into the Woods’ production Maggie Mahan Crusader staff “Into the Woods” is a play is about a baker and his wife trying to break a spell that has been put on them so that they can have a baby. The play premieres at 7:30 p.m., Thursday, April 10 and runs for the next two nights, Friday, April 11, and Saturday, April 12, all at 7:30 p.m. at the Showcase Theatre in the Shank Humanities Building. Juan Carlos Contreras has the role of the baker. Contreras is a sophomore at Seward County Community College/Area Technical School.

He landed his first lead role in a musical when he was still attending Liberal High School. Contreras said he auditioned for the role as the baker because he enjoys both music and acting. Contreras also likes the twists and turns “Into the Woods” has, and all the fairytale elements and characters that are involved in the musical. When Contreras found out that he had gotten the main role in Into the Woods, he said he was frightened but excited, and that this would be a great learning experience. The “Into the Woods” cast rehearses four or five days a week, for about three hours each day.

1st-Grace Crossman 2nd-Sydney Beesley 3rd- Korben Clawson

Senior Division:

1st- Mariah Rome 2nd- Dance 4:1 Team 3rd- Syndey Matthews

People's Choice Award: Mariah Rome

Contestant Top Ticket Sales Award: Katelynn Draper

Crusader photo/ Makiah Adams

Kimberly and Natalie Robinson perform a dance along with their three other sisters to the song “Stand Out” at the the 2014 Pancake Day Talent Show. Kimberly, Natalie, and Olivia all attend Seward County Community College/ Area Technical School. The Robinson sisters, Dance 4:1 Team, ended up placing second in the senior division.

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ENTERTAINMENT

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

CRUSADER 7

St. Patrick’s Day

All can be Irish on St. Paddy’s Day Dawn Shouse Editor Saint Patrick is the patron saint and national apostle of Ireland. Saint Patrick is credited with bringing Christianity to Ireland. According to st-patrickday.com, Saint Patrick described himself as a "most humble-minded man, pouring forth a continuous paean of thanks to his Maker for having chosen him as the instrument whereby multitudes who had worshipped idols and unclean things had become the people of God." The iconic threeleaf clover is actually a weed. According to life123.com, the Irish shamrock is a threeleafed clover that grows in the summer and is native to Ireland. They grow from bulbs and bloom with white flowers around St. Patrick's Day. Ancient Celts also revered the shamrock as a food source for livestock. During the fifth century, St. Patrick used the Irish shamrock to illustrate the concept of the Holy Trinity. By drawing on the Irish love for the shamrock, St. Patrick was able to convert many pagan Celts into Christians. Rarely, a fourth leaf will grow on a shamrock and is called a four-leaf clover. Because if its uniqueness, it is said to bring good luck to the finder. For centuries children and adults have had fun hunting through patches of shamrocks to find a lucky four-leaf clover. What would St. Patrick's Day be without the traditional dish of corned beef and cabbage? According to csmontor.com only half of the meal is really Irish. Though cabbage has historically been a staple of the Irish diet, it was traditionally eaten with Irish bacon, not corned beef. Irish immigrants in America could not afford the bacon, so they substituted it with corned beef, a cheaper alternative they picked up from Jewish immigrants. Did you know that blue was the first color associated with St. Patrick’s Day? According to csmonitor.com, the color changed in the 17th century. Green is one of the colors in Ireland’s flag and Ireland is the “Emerald Isle,” so named for its lush green landscape. The Chicago River has been dyed green on St. Patrick’s Day for more than 40 years. If you don’t wear green on St. Paddy’s, prepare to be pinched. According to KNUE.com, it’s an entirely American tradition that started in the early 1700s. The Irish immigrants thought wearing green made one invisible to leprechauns. If you forgot to wear green, they could see you and would pinch you because you were the only thing visible. Peers started pinching those who forgot to wear green as a warning that the leprechauns could see them and would sneak up on them. Saint Patrick is most known for driving the snakes from Ireland. While it is true that there are no snakes in Ireland, according to most herpetologists, scientists who study snakes, there never have been snakes located in Ireland because the island was separated from the rest of the continent at the end of the Ice Age. According to csmonitor.com, in many old pagan religions, serpent symbols were common and often worshipped. Driving the snakes from Ireland was thought to be symbolic of putting an end to that pagan practice.

SCCC/ATS freshman Aubrey Evans was told at a young age that her first name means rules with elf wisdom. Only fitting that she was chosen to be the Crusader campus leprechaun. Illustration by Dawn Shouse.

If you were wearing nothing but a smile in front of a mirror, how many visible body parts can you name (without using slang words) that have no more than three letters? 1. ___________________

4. ___________________

7. ___________________

10. __________________

2. ___________________

5. ___________________

8. ___________________

__________________

3. ___________________

6. ___________________

9. ___________________

Your name

(___)______________ contact number

Name all 10 body parts with three letters (no slang) and enter to win a Saints Bookstore $35 gift certificate by dropping off your entry with your name in the box located in Room AA131. The winner will be drawn on March 28.

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SPORTS

8 CRUSADER

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

When cancer isn’t right, pitcher goes left (handed) Dallas Kelling Crusader staff

Crusader photo/Jakub Stepanovic

Katelyn Craker warms up before the inning begins in Monday’s game against McCook. The Lady Saints swept the double header 5-1 and 11-0. The Lady Saints current overall standings are 17-4.

“My biggest achievement off of the field would be overcoming cancer.”

—Katelyn Craker

BASEBALL MARCH 7 Saints Seal Series with Two Wins Over Barton The Seward County Saints and Barton Cougars finally wrapped up their four game series on Thursday at Brent Gould Field in Liberal after a six day wait to get in their final two games of the set. Saints go on to win 9-5 to win the series 3-1. FEBRUARY 28 Seward Settles For Split On Opening Day of Jayhawk West Play The reigning Jayhawk West Conference Champion Seward County Saints didn’t quite get off to the start to conference play they were looking for on Friday afternoon at Brent Gould Field in Liberal. Taking on a Barton team who was the lone West team to miss the playoffs last season, the Saints managed only a split on the first day of the series, getting a pitching gem from freshman JB Olson in the opener to win 2-1 before seeing a late rally come up short in game two as they fell 11-7. Visit SewardSaints.com for updates on the schedule. —Information by Roy Allen, Sports Information Director

Katelyn Craker is a sophomore who plays as a left-handed pitcher for the Lady Saints softball team. She has played more than 50 innings and has more than 50 strikeouts. She was named KJCCC Pitcher of the Week in April of 2013. Craker is from San Marcos, Calif., where she earned 1st Team All League and 2nd Team All County Selection her senior year at Mission Hills High School. However, Craker’s success in softball didn’t come easy. At the age of 9, Craker was thrown a curve ball when doctors found a cancerous tumor in her right shoulder that threatened to ruin the then-right-handed pitcher’s hope of ever playing softball again. As a child, Craker started off pitching right handed. When she was 9, she noticed a pain in her arm. Craker decided that she should go to the doctor to see if maybe she had pulled a muscle. When she went to the doctors they told her it was probably bursitis or tendonitis. Craker iced her shoulder and took pain relievers for a couple months, but the pain wouldn’t go away. Then they noticed there was a lump on her shoulder. Kristen, Craker’s mom, asked her pitching coach if the lump was normal, if it could be an overdeveloped muscle. Craker’s coach explained that she had never seen anything like it before. So Craker was sent to a physical therapist, and from there they ordered an MRI. Her doctor told them that it would take about two weeks before they would receive the results, but Kristen received a phone call the next day. They insisted that she would need to have Katelyn at her pediatrician that day. Craker’s mom was worried that it had to do with an ankle disorder that Katelyn had when she was younger, where 50 percent of her muscle died and they had to rebuild it. Craker remembers what happened at the pediatrician’s office. “He began by saying, ‘Well, I guess you know by now that it isn’t good.’ My mom just looked at my dad. The doctor continued on to say that I had cancer,”

Craker said. “My mom instantly started crying, and I just patted her on the back and told her it was OK. I was only 9 at the time, and I didn’t really know what cancer was.” They sent Craker to an oncologist for surgery to determine what kind of cancer she had. “They said I have Synovial Sarcoma, which is a soft tissue cancer and is rare in children. I had a five-inch, slow-growing tumor in my shoulder,” Craker said. She went through eight months of chemotherapy and six weeks of radiation. “During chemotherapy I lost all of my hair, but I didn’t really get sick until later on,” Craker said. “When I did began to get sick from the chemo I could walk like 10 feet and would need to take a 45 minute nap. The radiation gave me third degree burns and made my bones brittle. The chemo was supposed to shrink my tumor tremendously, but it didn’t even shrink it 3 percent.” The doctors ended up taking the entire tumor out of Craker’s shoulder. “They thought they might have to amputate my arm, but they scraped clean down to the bone. I’m missing half of my deltoid and pectoral muscles. I can’t do any long distance running because it rubs my shoulder bones together and hurts really bad, or do push- ups or pull- ups since the radiation made my bones brittle it could break my bones,” Craker said. Craker missed her entire fifth grade year. “My teacher would come to the hospital and try to teach me, but I was on so many medications and so tired, I just slept,” Craker said. “The funny thing about this whole situation is that the patients are supposed to sleep in the bed, but I didn’t like the bed so I let my mom sleep on the bed so I could sleep on the couch.” When Craker was diagnosed with cancer, the doctors told her she would no longer be able to do the one thing she was the most passionate about, which was playing softball. Bennett, Craker’s dad, asked, “What if she uses her left arm to pitch?” The doctors said that it was possible, but would require a lot of hard work. That’s when Craker decided she would learn how to pitch with her left hand. “My dad and I started off

throwing a wadded up sock around the house,” Craker said. After I completely recovered, I went back to pitching lessons. I had to completely reteach myself how to pitch. It was very frustrating and took some time, but I was determined to play again.” Craker said her family members are her No. 1 supporters. “I’m mostly influenced by my dad, Bennett,” Craker said. “He introduced me to softball, he coaches me and catches for me. My dad knows what to say or what not to say depending on how I’m playing.” She is a very family-oriented person. She explained that her first year at Seward was hard. “Being so far away from my family was difficult. I was a little homesick, but now I have adjusted and it’s not so bad. I get to see them next week, so I’m pretty excited,” Craker said. Craker’s hobbies include playing softball, snowboarding, going to the beach, hanging out with friends, reading and watching movies. “When not on the field, I can be found with my friend Jaclyn Wagner (who also plays softball), or in my bed because it’s where I go to relax and be myself. I can be comfortable while reading, watching movies, or doing homework,” Craker said. “I love to read,” she said. “I like to just pick up anything and read it. I can spend hours in Barnes and Nobles and have 20 different books in my hands.” She also listens to all genres of music and her favorite movies include “Tangled” and “Just Right.” Her goal after Seward is to continue to play softball for two more years, continue with her major in psychology and then go to law school. Craker said, “My biggest motivation to reach all my goals is my family because I don’t want to disappoint them.” So far, Craker hasn’t. Her achievements have been noticed by others, but in her eyes, two achievements stand out. “My biggest achievement on the field was last year at regionals against Butler.” She pitched a shut out into the seventh inning when Butler scored. “My biggest achievement off of the field would be overcoming cancer,” Craker said.

Ambitions set for final season

Maria Lara Sports editor

Going 10-2 for Seward’s Lady Saints in singles, 7-6 in doubles, winning her final six matches of the season, including the title of No. 5 singles Region VI Tournament Championship, was Kathryn Roohan in her freshman year as an athlete student for Seward County Community College. Roohan is currently a sophomore, here on a scholarship and aspiring for so much more as her final season for tennis at Seward arrives. Knowing she had to finish her education, and needing some sort of motivation, she took the opportunity to play tennis at Seward and that has been her motivation since. When not on the courts playing tennis, or in the Wellness Center doing her extra training, “you can probably always find me in the RA’s office; that’s where I work. Also, if it’s not windy, you’ll find me at the courts.” Other than that, Roohan puts in a lot of time on her part to train, and preparing herself for this semester. After Seward, Roohan does plan on going closer to her home, San Antonio. Roohan is very

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family oriented and being away from home is something that she is not very fond of. She will not be seeing her family for spring break because she will have tennis. “It’s hard being away, I don’t do the whole 10-hour thing,” she said. “But the fact that summer is around the corner and I will see my family then, makes the thought more bearable,” Roohan said. She is a big fan with children and being away from her little cousins is just as hard. It’s bittersweet to go home and having to come back. Roohan prefers to head home and stay longer than just a week. She will stay in Liberal and work throughout her spring break. Living in the dorms, Roohan finds herself being in her room quite often, simply studying for her classes and giving herself time to listen to music. “The dorm life is quiet, just because I’m a bit older than everyone else.” Age doesn’t stop Roohan from going out and enjoying her time with her teammates outside of the courts and class. Roohan is looking forward to see what this semester holds for her and the rest of the team. “Last year was hard, we didn’t act as a team,” Roohan said. The

women fell short at Nationals but with Roohan as team captain she is hoping to lead them back to Nationals. Roohan is a big supporter to all the other sports here at SCCC. “I’m a huge baseball fan. I grew up at the fields and watched my brothers as they too grew up in the sport,” Roohan said. Though Roohan is still undecided on what she wants to major in, she is confident that her future will soon be revealed as the season begins to unfold. In 20 years, Roohan does see herself still playing tennis, maybe even coaching a tennis team for a high school, and she says high school because that’s where it all starts. “Got to do your hits, got to do your time, work up the ladder. It always going to work out that way,” she said. Playing recreational tennis, or anything with it involved, she thinks that would be nice. “I just want to wake up and love my job,” Roohan said, laughing. With this year coming to an end, Roohan is hoping for a big impact, because that is what she is waiting for — something big to happen and to bring forth what the future holds for her.

Crusader photo/ Maria Lara

Sophomore and Singles Region VI Champion for 2013, Kathryn Roohan from San Antonio, Texas, starts her last season as a Lady Saint. The team will play at 2 p.m. today at Newman University in Wichita and at noon Saturday in Great Bend.

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SPORTS

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

CRUSADER 9

Crusader photo/Kelci Bedingfield

ROUND 2 - REGION VI Quentin Purtue gets ready for defense at the Region VI playoffs in Koch Arena at Wichita. The Saints lost to the Pratt Beavers 71-68. Niem Stevenson and Malcolm Hill-Bey were both named to the Region VI all-tournament team.

Saints season ends on Pratt long shot Kelci Bedingfield Crusader staff

Crusader photo/Jakub Stepanovic

ROUND 1 - REGION VI A flyover by a Cowley player sets up an easy shot for Malcolm Hill-Bey in the first round of the Region VI playoffs, where the Saints defeated Cowley 82-39 in the team’s final Green House appearance. The win advanced Seward to the second round of Region VI playoffs in Wichita.

All-Jayhawk West 1st team & Freshman of the Year NJCAA All-Region VI 1st Team Niem Stevenson

In the second round of the Region VI tournament, Seward took on Pratt March 7 at Koch Arena in Wichita. This would be the third meeting between these two teams this season as the teams split the games in the previous meetings. This was a big game as it would determine who would go to the regional semifinal game so this is the one that really counted. Pratt had the crowd advantage with a full student section that was yelling the entire game. This seemed to fire up the Beavers as Pratt grabbed the lead early in the game. The Saints were having trouble making buckets which gave Pratt the opportunity to take and keep

the lead. The Saints seemed to struggle grabbing rebounds which also gave Pratt the opportunity to make a lot of second chance baskets. Seward made a late first half surge to go up 21-20, only to have Pratt have a 6-0 run of their own. At half time, Pratt led Seward 26-21. Seward grabbed points early in the second half thanks to a fast pace effort, but Pratt quickly responded with point after point of their own. Pratt was on fire from the three point line and stayed ahead thanks to three after three. It looked like it was going to be a Pratt blowout at one point but Seward had a huge run of their own. Seward suddenly was back in the game. The final six seconds of the game proved to be

nail biting and heartbreaking for the Saints. Pratt was leading by one point. Niem Stevenson drove to the basket and was fouled with 3.1 seconds to go. He missed the first free throw with the Pratt crowd going wild. However, he made the second which tied the score at 68. While Seward fans were thinking the game was going into overtime, Pratt quickly threw the ball in and dribbled to half court. Javis Flynn threw up a half court shot that somehow made its way through the net right at the buzzer to give Pratt the win. The Saints season was over at the hands of Pratt with a final score of 71-68. Niem Stevenson had the team high with 24 points. Seward’s final season record was 23-10.

All-Jayhawk West 2nd team Secean Johnson Malcolm Hill-Bey Jayhawk West Defensive Player of the Year Secean Johnson All-Jayhawk West Honorable Mention Brian Bridgeforth Jayhawk West Coach of the Year Bryan Zollinger

Cosmetology

Crusader photo/Jakub Stepanovic

Crusader photo/Kelci Bedingfield

ROUND 1 - REGION VI Niem Stevenson flies in for the dunk in Seward’s first win of the playoffs. Seward absolutely dominated the first round playoff game, advancing to the regional playoff round in Wichita.

ROUND 2 - REGION VI Evan Allen drives to the basket and puts up two points for Seward against Pratt at the regional tournament. Seward lost in an absolute heartbreaker as Pratt caught a break on a buzzer beater half court shot to win the game.

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SPORTS

10 CRUSADER

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Crusader photo/ Jakub Stepanovic

ROUND 1 - REGION VI Kyndal Davis makes a layup against Neosho County in the Saints final home game.

Crusader photo/ Jakub Stepanovic

ROUND 1 - REGION VI Fabiana Monte looks to pass the ball cross court to Kyndal Davis (4) or Shanise Brooks (33) against Neosho County.

All Conference

Jayhawk West Awards All Jayhawk West 1st team Shanise Brooks

All-Jayhawk West 2nd team Alana Simon Korina Chapman

All Good Things Must Come to an End: Lady Saints fall to Barton in regionals Kelci Bedingfield Crusader staff The Lady Saints season came to an end earlier than they had hoped with a loss to Barton, 6156 in the second round of the Region VI playoffs. The Lady Saints ended the season with a great record of 26-6, and won second in the Jayhawk West conference. Three Lady Saints were named All-Jayhawk West: Shanise Brooks, Korina Chapman, and Alana Simon. Shanise Brooks was named 1st team All-Jayhawk West. Brooks was the leading scorer for Lady Saints and the 6th leading scorer in the Jayhawk West Conference. Korina Chapman was named second team All-Jayhawk West. Neosho County The Lady Saints basketball

team started off the Region VI tournament with a home game in the Green House against Neosho County on March 1. In order to keep playing they had to win. Having this in mind, the Saints came ready to play. At the tip off the ladies in green got off to a good start as they had a 8-0 lead with only three minutes into the game. Neosho County had a hard time scoring, while Seward was not having any problems putting the ball in the basket. Going into half time, Seward led Neosho 4812. Heading into the second half, Seward did not let up. They kept extending their lead bucket after bucket. Seward County defeated Neosho County 90-36. This win secured the Lady Saints a place in the Region VI tournament in Wichita. Fabiana Monte led all Seward Lady Saints in scoring with 20 points against Neosho County.

Barton Seward County took on Barton for the third time this year in the first round of the Region VI tournament on March 5. The Lady Saints started off the game rather slowly which set the pace for the rest of the game. Barton took an early lead and the Saints could not catch up. The Lady Saints were having trouble making baskets. At half time Barton was winning 35-27. Seward was hoping it would be a tale of two halves, but unfortunately that did not happen. Nothing they put up would fall and nothing was going in the basket. Barton beat Seward by a score of 61-56. This brought the Seward Lady Saints season to an end. One highlight of the game was that Shanise Brooks had a double-double with 14 points and 13 rebounds.

Crusader photo/ Jakub Stepanovic

ROUND 1 - REGION VI Brianna Scott drives to the basket in Seward’s defeat over Neosho County 90-36.


Year 45 Issue 9