Issuu on Google+

April 9

crusadernews.com

2014

rusader

Year 45, No. 10

Presorted Standard US Postage PAID Liberal, KS Permit NO.114

Liberal, Kansas

Blood moon rises Dawn Shouse Editor

SCCC Athletic Banquet 2014 — Page 7

In one week, a total lunar eclipse will turn the moon an eerie shade of red. Shortly after midnight on April 15 the moon will move into Earth’s shadow. According to Seward County Community College/ Area Technical School physics instructor Darrin Hook, the whole eclipse should be done by 4:30 a.m. Hook said that the eclipse will be visible, if weather permits, across almost the entire continental United States, most of Canada and Central America and parts of South America. Kevin Brown, a guest speaker for the Gas Compressor Institute, is an amateur astronomer who will give a presentation on campus on how to set up a telescope and a camera. Brown will take pictures of the event to share, according to Hook, and viewing the eclipse through the telescope is open to the public. The location where the telescope will be set up on campus has yet to

be determined. A full lunar eclipse is when Earth shades the entire moon. “This moon is called a blood moon,” Hook said. “It is a perfectly natural occurrence. When the moon passes completely into the shadow of the Earth, it turns a reddish color. The red color occurs because even when the Earth has moved directly between the moon and the sun, the scattered light from all the sunsets and sunrises on the rim of our globe and reflects against the moon’s surface. It’s really neat to see.” It has been since Dec. 11, 2001 that a total lunar eclipse has been visible from the United States, but the good news is there are three more on the way after this one. For more information, contact Hook at

Crusader photo/ Diana Chavira

Isabella Martinez, calling on behalf of SGA, raises a pledge sheet after getting a donation during a phonathon session on March 31.

Phonathon answers scholarship needs Makiah Adams Crusader staff Willing callers. Ringing phones. Generous donators. These are all characteristics of the annual Seward County Community College/ Area Technical School Phonathon. As of today, the total amount raised is $37,144, already topping last year’s total of $36,061. The overall goal is set at $38,000. This goal is within reach, especially with how smooth this year has gone. “I’m excited to be so close to our goal after almost two weeks of calling,” said Tammy Doll, Director of Development. Since March 24, SCCC/ATS clubs have been coming together to call out into communities in order to gather donations for student scholarships. The leading club in fundraising is men’s baseball with more than $13,000. Nursing follows in second with around $6,000 raised, and volleyball in third with a little over $2,000. “This is our fifth year of doing this, so sophomores are coming in with more

darrin.hook@sccc.edu.

Xtreme Challenge — Pages 4-5

Children’s Art Day — Page 3

Crusader photo/ Maria Lara

Vocal music instructor Dr. Magda Silva sports her tag of “Smartest Person in the Music Department.”

The Doctor is in(to) Music Kyleigh Becker Crusader staff

Sports — Pages 6-7

“Into the Woods” — Page 8

energy than when we first started. It’s becoming a culture here now,” said Dean of Student Services, Celeste Donovan. “This is one event that’s student driven. I think it’s so important to host this; a lot of our students benefit from scholarships. This is one way they can both benefit and help give back, and walk away feeling good about it, too.” Other clubs involved are agriculture, Auto Business Management, cheer and dance, criminal justice, cosmetology, diesel mechanics, Enactus, HALO, Kylix, Crusader, music, nursing, Phi Theta Kappa, softball, Student Government Association, sports medicine, student ambassadors, tennis, women’s basketball, and International Student Organization. Individual prizes consist of an iPad Touch, Mini Wii, Jambox, Beats by Dre headphones, and iPod shuffle. If students come close on individual prizes they will be called and notified so that they can rack up more numbers. The winners will be announced April 30, at the Dormapalooza.

While vocal music instructor Dr. Magda Silva has a doctorate and can professionally carry a tune, she never takes herself too seriously. Sometimes her busy schedule causes her to run a little late and occasionally be forgetful. “She wanted me to call her stupid one day because she’d thought that I’d lost the flash drive with all the music on it over Christmas break… It was plugged into her computer the whole time,” Michael Fisher, Silva’s student worker said, laughing. Silva, a 2009 doctoral graduate of Arizona State University, is the vocal music instructor at Seward County Community College. This is Silva’s fifth year of teaching at SCCC/ATS. She had to travel back and forth between Arizona and Liberal her first year of teaching in order to finish her doctoral degree. As vocal instructor, Silva is taking the choir to perform at 3 p.m. April 12 at Oklahoma Panhandle State University in Goodwell, Okla., for a joint concert. “I get to take our choir to go let them have a wonderful, professional experience in which we are bringing in professional performers, like soloists and instrumentalists from Wichita Symphony, Amarillo Symphony and I think even a couple from Denver Symphony, which is pretty high-caliber.” Silva is one of the featured soloists for the OPSU concert.

Darin Workman, the head of the Seward music department, says that Silva is one of the best vocalists he’s heard perform. In addition to being the vocal instructor, Silva is also the musical director. Most recently, she is working on “Into the Woods”, which premiers at 7 p.m. on April 10 in the Showcase Theater. The job of the musical director is to teach the students their notes and work to “really hone the music,” Silva said. “(It’s my job to) get characters into

“My name tag says ‘Queen of the Universe’… (but) there aren’t many awards in classical stuff, unless you’re really hitting at a national level.” — Dr. Magda Silva the musical voices and make sure they’re connecting emotionally… you don’t want to separate the drama from the singing because otherwise you get two disconnected styles.” Silva claimed she was a latecomer to musicals. “My first musical (Sweeney Todd) was as a sophomore, because I went strictly into classical music. I didn’t do anymore musicals until my master’s program and on that level they asked me to be the musical director.” At her previous position at Elizabethtown College in

Pennsylvania, Silva did two musicals. Silva prefers to be “behind the scenes” compared to in front of the scenes, though she has been in front more than in the background. Over the past 15-20 years, Silva estimates that she has sung professionally in more than 70 concerts. However, if one had asked her as a child what she wanted to be when she grew, she may have given a very different answer besides “singer” or “professor”. Silva claimed that she was “all over the place” as a child and, “as for getting into music, it was a bet. So it wasn’t like I grew up thinking, ‘Oh, I’m going to be a singer!’” “I like to have fun, and as a kid I was always so bored and my brain would drift if it was very factual— if the teachers seemed like they weren’t having a good time teaching it, I always questioned, ‘Why am I learning this?’, so I always try to have fun,” Silva said. One of her favorite ways to have fun is by telling “bad jokes, horrible jokes.” One of Silva’s jokes is about her age— a question she refuses to answer. “I’m as old as my tongue and older than my teeth,” Silva said, smiling widely. While using a joke to avoid questions about her age, Silva also uses jokes to get students to move notes and change the tune of a song. One of her jokes is described by Jasmine Howell, a music major graduating this May. “It’s like ‘Mary Had a Little nContinued on page 2

Crusader photo/ Jakub Stepanovic

Julio Garcia makes his mark by painting one of the tiles which will eventually be used to cover the wall in front of the amphitheater.

SCCC/ATS students paint tiles for posterity Dawn Shouse Editor All graduating Seward County Community College / Area Technical School students are invited to participate in the “Leave your Mark” project that will eventually cover the wall in front of the amphitheater with individually hand-painted tiles. “Any student that will be graduating or receiving a certificate of completion can paint a tile and have it included on the wall,” Andy Yoxall, public information

director SCCC/ATS said. Students are encouraged to look for the craft tables set up in front of the library, April 9 between 8:30 a.m. and 3 p.m., in the Area Technical School lobby April 10-11 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. and Epworth between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. The school has been collecting titles from graduates for the last three years and begins on placing the tiles to cover the wall starting this summer. For more information, contact Andy Yoxall at andrea.yoxall@sccc.edu or call her at 620-417-1125.


NEWS

2 CRUSADER

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Board of Trustees

Crusader photo/ Dallas Kelling

Cassandra Sponsel presents the goose to the visiting elementary students. About 1,100 Pre-K through first graders attended Farm Ed Day.

Crusader photo/Dallas Kelling Crusader photo/ Dallas Kelling

Washington pre-schoolers attend Farm Ed Day and learn about llamas and other animals. For more photos, see facebook.com/CrusaderNews.

Lance Sandoval teaches one of the students from Farm Ed Day about the uses of tractors.

Farm Ed Day More than 1,000 children attend

Dallas Kelling Crusader staff

On March 25, 2014 the Seward County Community College Ag Department, Seward County Farm Bureau, K- State Research and Extension, Seward County Natural Resources Conservation Service, and Southwestern Heights High School FFA all came together and hosted Farm Ed Day. Roughly 1,100 Pre-K through 1st graders attended farm day and viewed 12 different exhibits. The children learned a little bit about each one of the exhibits. At the soil exhibit the children learned about the importance of the soil and the creepy crawlers that lived in the soil. When traveling to the next exhibit the children would see tractors where they would learn the fundamentals and what they are used for. Depending on what group they were in the children would either move on to the llama or over to the miniature horse. The children learned at the llama exhibit that unlike most llamas this one did not spit and when the llama is scared it makes a humming noise.

At the miniature horse exhibit they learned that the size of the minature horse is as big as it would get. From there the children would move onto the cow or to the regular sized horse. At the cow exhibit the children met Isabelle, who was named by one of the earlier classes, and discussed what the cow eats and what it is used for, but to many of the children were amazed to find out that the cow eats cake too. Of course not the same kind of cake as we do, but some of the students had different food in mind for the animals Dillion Smith said, “I wish the cow ate sandwiches like me.” At the regular sized horse exhibit the children learned what the horse eats and what it is used for. After viewing the horse or the cow then the children would move onto see the goats and the donkeys. They learned generalities about the goats and donkeys such as what they eat, what they are also used for, and how big they will get. The children then moved into the building to learn about the crops and the differences between them. After the crops exhibit they moved on to the poultry exhibt to see the chickens and

a goose were they were able to touch as the exhibitor brought them by. Once they viewed the poultry the children then lined up and were given a bottle of water and GermX to clean their hands before moving onto Choose My Plate. At the Choose My Plate exhibit the children learned which food was healthier. Before the children headed back to school they went to the water conservation exhibit. At this exhibit the children learned how to keep camp sites clean and what they could do to keep the water clean. Overall the children could not decide what exhibit that liked the most. Teddi Winslow, an Agriculture Instructor at SCCC/ATS said, “I enjoy getting to see the young kids and their first time reaction to seeing the livestock.” Farm Ed Day was a great turn out and the students really enjoy getting this experience. Winslow said, “I want the kids to get an interest in agriculture. I hope they have a new perception of agriculture and realize that there is more than just farming and ranching.”

Housing and tuition rates for the 2014-2015 academic year have been raised by approval from the Board of Trustees. Tuition is increasing by $5 per credit hour for all students. Seward County residents will now pay $79 per credit hour, while InState tuition will be $83 per credit hour. Seward’s tuition and fees are “lower than peer colleges in the region,” according to the Board of Trustees report.

Fax: 620.417.1169

Makiah Adams design editor

Jakub Stepanovic

new media director Diana Chavira

CrusaderNews.com

sports editor Maria Lara

2012, 2013 -First Place Online - KCM 2008 - National Online Pacemaker Finalist - ACP 2003, 2004 - National Online Pacemaker Award

The Community Bank offers Internet Banking 2320 N. Kansas in Liberal.

reporters/photographers

Phone: 620.417.1459

editor Dawn Shouse news editor

The ag program will also be selling Mother’s Day flowers and hosted its annual Show Pig sale this spring. SCCC/ATS has been approved to provide associate degrees for Food Science and Safety. SCCC/ATS will soon have an app available for students that will allow them to view enrollment status, academic progress and financial aid.

Security Report 03-26-14: Theft investigation of two cell phones. Unknown suspect(s) stole two cell phones that were left unprotected and vulnerable to theft. Investigation closed until further information is made known. 04-01-14:Theft of cash reported. Unknown suspect(s) stole cash from a purse that was left unprotected and vulnerable to theft. Any person having information regarding these thefts or any other crime is asked to make such information known.

Students and visitors are reminded to be careful and keep speed below 20 mph when driving on campus properties. A couple of accidents and several near misses have happened. Drivers are also asked to park accordingly and keep your vehicle between the lines of one parking space and not two. Driving and parking offenses may lead to a fine being added to a student’s administrative costs in order to enroll or obtain grades. Law enforcement may also

take action by issuing a summons to court for minor violations or making an arrest for serious violations such as reckless driving or DUI. Lock and secure your vehicle. Springtime is here and mowing will start soon. Do not park any part of your vehicle on the grass. Report all crime, suspicious activity or any unsafe condition to any faculty, staff or security officer. n Information is provided by the Security Department.

Noting the musical Magda nContinued from Page 1

Lamb’… only the lamb died’,” Howell said. Silva also frequently reminds Fisher, “Don’t forget to water the pianos.” This climate requires some humidity, and she figures a touch of humor doesn’t hurt. Her light hearted approach to life carries over into her teaching and personal life. “My name tag says ‘Queen of the Universe’… (but) there aren’t many awards in classical stuff, unless you’re really hitting at a national level,” Silva said of her accomplishments. As for being well known, Silva claimed that she was a secret here. “I try to keep myself on the really quiet side of things because I try to focus on the students. There’s a lot to be said about being intimidated. You know, when your teacher’s really good at whatever they’re doing, and you kind of feel, ‘Oh’, so I keep my performance stuff really quiet, because I really want to focus on students and aid in their learning process.” The SCCC/ATS choir has seldom heard Silva sing in class. “She meows everything when she sings,” Howell said. Silva has been taking voice lessons since she was 16. “You have the parental things, ‘Oh,

CRUSADER 2013All-Kansas Award, Kansas Collegiate Media 2012-2013 Fourth Place Special Section - ACP 2012-2013 Sixth Place Section - ACP 2003-2004, 2010-2011 Newspaper Pacemaker Finalist - ACP 2008 First Place Certificate - ASPA

Student housing costs have also increased by $250 for single rooms and $50 for double occupancy rooms in all housing complexes. This sets the cost at $2,790 for a single room in the Student Living Center and the Mansions and $2,290 for a double room. Rooms in Hale Court will cost $2,690 for a single and $2,190 for a double room. Agriculture program offers summer internship opportunities and “shadowing” experiences.

Kyleigh Becker Kelci Bedingfield Grant Glaze Dallas Kelling Maggie Mahan Karisa Pulaski

Crusader file photo / Jose Medrano

Magda Silva announces the next music selection during the Spring 2013 choir concert. they were always singing since they were little children’, but I don’t remember,” Silva said. Silva also speaks four languages and has studied abroad. “My first language is Spanish, and English kind of simultaneously. But when you get your degree in music, especially performance, you have to be profi-

The official student newspaper of Seward County Community College/Area Technical School is published bi-monthly and has special editions by journalism students during the regular college year, except on school holidays and during examination periods. One copy of each issue is distributed free to each student, faculty and staff member, with subsequent copies available for purchase in the Crusader office at 50 cents each. Letters to the editor will be considered for publication if they are signed and the authenticity of the writer’s signature is verified. The staff reserves the right to edit for length. Opinions voiced in letters and editorials are not necessarily those of Seward County Community College/Area Technical School or the Crusader. Advertising is accepted. Rates are $4.25 per column inch or $5 pci for color ads. Insert rates are $50 per thousand. Classified ads are free to SCCC students, faculty and staff; classified rates for all others are $5 per ad, limit of 20 words. The Crusader staff reserves the right to refuse advertising. Mail to: Crusader, Box 1137, Liberal, KS 67905, or editors@crusadernews.com.

cient in another language. So for my master’s, it was Italian and for my doctorate, German was my preferred language. My French is not so good!” Silva said. “I’ve done a couple of summer programs— (American Institute of Musical Studies) in Austria and one in Germany.” Silva is also on the Southwest Symphony Board and a faculty sponsor for Brave, the SCCC/ATS Gay/Straight Alliance. “Goofy is a good word (to describe me). Bad jokes. Mikey described me as a ‘cross between Jesus and Fergie’,” Silva said. Fisher used the words “funny” and “caring” to describe Silva, saying that her best quality is “being a friend… She’s a person you can go and just talk to. She’s a great person to get advice from.” If Silva can remember that she was supposed to be somewhere. “It’s just always funny that she’s never on time,” Workman said, then went on to call her “talented” and “hardworking”. “She’s passionate, energetic and she’s personable,” Howell said. “‘Punny’… Accepting to the nth degree… (she’s a) pretty awesome person in general.”


ENTERTAINMENT

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

CRUSADER 3

y r t e o P Night Perks offered for entering poetry contest Contributed to Crusader Area residents ages 14 and older are invited to enter a poetry contest sponsored by the English Department at Seward County Community College/Area Technical School. Cash and other prizes will be awarded, and the winners will read their poems at the Poetry Coffee House on April 23 at SCCC/ATS. The open category contest is for anyone ages 14 through adult who lives in Seward County or a bordering county. The contest also features a scholarship category, open to high school juniors and seniors. Each contestant may submit up to three poems, and there is no entry fee. Poems will be judged by Texas Tech University Professor William Wenthe of Lubbock, Texas, an award-winning poet who has written three books: Words Before Dawn (2012); Not Till We Are Lost (2003); and Birds of Hoboken (1995). Winners will be announced at the April 23 Poetry Coffeehouse, which is open to the public. Prizes in the open category are $25 in cash and other prizes for first place; $15 in cash and other prizes for second; and $10 in cash and other prizes for third. In addition, the judge may select honorable mention recipients,

who will receive certificates and be invited to read at the Poetry Coffee House. In the scholarship category, first place will receive a $100 scholarship to SCCC/ATS, $25 in cash, and other prizes. Second place will be awarded a $100 scholarship, $15 in cash, and other prizes. Third prize is $15 in cash, plus other prizes. The contest and Poetry Coffee House are being held in conjunction with National Poetry Month in April. Entries will be judged on originality, quality, skillful use of language and poetic devices, and freedom from errors. Entries may be hand-delivered to SCCC/ATS, mailed, or emailed. An official entry form must accompany each submission. Complete rules and

Poetry Contest

Entry deadline Postm

arked April 16 7

Ha n d -delivered April 1

an entry form are available on the web site at college www.sccc.edu. (On the home page under SCCC News and Events, click on Poetry Contest.) Rules and entry forms may also be picked up in the Humanities Office at SCCC/ATS. The postmark deadline to enter is April 16. The deadline for emailed and hand-delivered entries is April 17. For more information, or to request an entry form and a complete list of the rules, contact Janice Northerns at 620-417-1456 or janice.northerns@sccc.edu Students who have poems appearing in the upcoming Telolith, SCCC/ATS’s creative writing/art magazine, will also read. If there are enough entries from SCCC/ATS students (maybe 10), a special, additional prize would like to be given for best poem by an SCCC/ATS student. This would be in addition to anything else that student might win, not in place of it. Gourmet coffees, finger foods, and live music will provide a relaxing atmosphere. The Coffee House/Poetry Reading is set for 7 p.m. in the music wing of the Shank Humanities Building on the main SCCC/ATS campus. For more information, call Terri Barnes at 620-417-1451.

Crusader photo/ Jakub Stepanovic

Liberal High School student Linnae Downs volunteers to help children assemble a jellyfish craft. Fire, water, air, and earth made up the four elements theme. Children’s Art Day is a fundraiser for the Kylix Art Club.

SCCC/ATS Real Skills Car Show set for May 3 at ATS

Cosmetology offers make-overs

Grant Glaze Crusader Staff

Diana Chavira New Media Director The Cosmetology school had free make-over sessions open to anyone. Along with makeovers, they also showed off a new line of makeup that they’re using called Honey Bee Gardens. The make-overs included full face makeup and eyebrows. The sessions overall were meant to give the students more experience and practice with clients.

Crusader photo/Dawn Shouse Crusader photo/Diana Chavira

Crusader photo/Diana Chavira

Deanna Vazquez, student of the Cosmetology department, worked attentively on her clientele.

Cosmetology student Zulema Estrada made sure she was precise when working on her clients.

(

First-year nursing student, Saira Ugarte, front, volunteered at the American Red Cross Blood Drive. Freshman at SCCC/ATS, Kaitlin Carlile, back, also helped on Wednesday by donating blood. Members of HALO helped with the blood drive.

"# #

The college is inviting one and all to the annual SCCC/ATS Real Skills Car Show. The annual event will be from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 3. The Tech School parking lot will be the location for the show. The Colorado Dyno testing will begin at 9 a.m. There will be events to attend throughout the day, such as virtual welding, virtual painting, face painting, bounce house, motorcycle Olympics, custom auto class, all original auto classes, and motorcycle classes. There will be first through third place awards in all of the car show classes. Also, a best in show award, and a best dyno run. Registration has already begun. Pre-registration is $20 now or $25 the day of at the door. Run your ride and measure your horespower and torque on the Colorado Mobile Dyno twice for $95. Proceeds will go toward SCCC/ATS student scholarship funds.

& "

( (

$" (

'

!% (

"" $ # ( $ #

!

For all SCCC Up-to-date coverage on News, Sports, & Events

• Look in the Leader & Times • Look us up at www.leaderandtimes.com • Download our Leader & Times App

LEADER&TIMES 16 S. Kansas • Liberal

Your daily news & views for 126 years

Phone: 620-626-6990

Location: 733 N. Kansas Ave • Sun.-Thur. 10:30 a.m.-10 p.m. •Fri.-Sat. 10:30 a.m.-11 p.m.


XTREME CHALLENGE

4 CRUSADER

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

CRUSADER 5

Crusader photo / Diana Chavira

First-place overall journalism winner Kenzie Jones, Elkhart, works on the news writing challenge, as does Melissa Sanchez, back, also of Elkhart. Crusader photo / Makiah Adams

High school students try their skills at the video game contest, an Xtreme Challenge day activity. Video games challenged students eye/hand cordination.

e Meeting me leng e l h e t a r h t C X Crusader photo / Maria Lara

Rebekah Warner, Elkhart High School, gets creative and builds a unique work of art in the clay challenge during the Xtreme Challenge, April 2..

Twelve high schools arrive on campus to compete for awards in learning activities

contributed to Crusader

Crusader photo / Maria Lara

SCCC/ATS student Kristina Simpson explains the rules of the mock Angry Birds game while Chrissy LaClaire, Meade High School, prepares for her shot, and SCCC/ATS student Miranda Ramsey readies the slingshot. For more photos of Xtreme Challenge go to Facebook.com/CrusaderNews.

Almost 400 students from 12 area high schools participated in the ninth annual Xtreme Challenge on the campus of Seward County Community College/Area Technical School April 2. Elkhart High School repeated as the Overall Award winner for the school earning the most points in all challenges, and defended its possession of the traveling trophy they claimed at last year’s Xtreme Challenge. Meade High School was second in overall points and Rolla High School was third, placings reminiscent of 2013. Other high schools involved in the competitions included Liberal, Hugoton, Garden City, Moscow, and Sublette, plus Tyrone, Okla.; Turpin, Okla.; Keyes, Okla.; and Balko, Okla. Terri Houtz, a teacher from Elkhart, said it was an honor to win. “We were excited to get to bring so many kids,” she said. Houtz said her favorite part is that the students get to actually visit the college. SCCC/ATS accounting instructor Tanya Dowell was the organizer of the 2014 contest. She said she was pleased by how much the attending high school participants seemed to enjoy the event Wednesday. “I did try to get around and speak to all of the sponsors between activities, and I was encouraged,” Dowell said. “They all talked about how much they enjoy this.” The Meade High School representatives showed they had been thinking about the competition in advance and came prepared, wearing T-shirts that read, “Meade takes it to the

XTREME.” The admissions team also helped a great deal, Dowell said. They gave campus tours and provided a fun break for students with a game called the Angry Bird Challenge. SCCC/ATS student ambassadors helped with the events of the day. Elkhart High School senior Kacee Hoskinson said she has attended the Xtreme Challenge event all four of her high school years. “Other than the fact of getting to meet new people, it’s a great way to have people show their abilities,” Hoskinson said. “It’s a good opportunity.” Crusader student journalists recorded many of the activities of the day and photos are posted on Facebook.com/CrusaderNews. Instructional designer Jay Castor prepared a slideshow of Xtreme Challenge photos for the students to enjoy just prior to the awards ceremony. • Art: First, Rebekah Warner, Elkhart; second, Yolanda Ledesma, Garden City; third, Alberto Hernandez-Martinez, Garden City. • English: First, Kaylee Farthing, Balko; second, Nathan Dowell, Liberal; third, Grace Hollingsworth, Elkhart. • Journalism: First, Kenzie Jones, Elkhart; second, Jessica Pinkley, Rolla; third, Victoria Fullerton, Elkhart. • Drama: First, Cherokee McCallion, Elkhart; second, Audrey Mitchell, Elkhart; third, Logan Meek, Elkhart. • Music: First, A.J. Madsen, Hugoton; second Anysia Limon, Liberal; and third, Rory Howard, Liberal. • Physical education: Top Boy, Kyler Telford, Rolla; Top Girl, Natalie Thompson, Meade; Top Test, Alex Gomez, Elkhart. • Transportation: First, Shon Villa, Elkhart;

Scantlin’s Furniture

620-624-3859

#" !

211 S. Washington Ave. Liberal, Kansas C o m e t o us f o r a l l y o u r f u rn i t u re a n d ca r p et n e e d s

#

Check out our inventory on Facebook

World's Best Mango Smoothie

The Best Place to Study Home of "The Spencer"

"Next to North Pizza Hut"

Carry Outs Call (620) 626-5556

"$ % "

Crusader photo / Jakub Stepanovic

Crusader photo / Maria Lara

Extreme Challenge at the tech school involved getting greasy in the auto mechanics challenge.For more photos, see Facebook.com/CrusaderNews.

Liberal High School student Nathan Dowell competes in the English nonfiction essay challenge, Dowell placed second overall in English.

Challenge Timeline

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

Students 250 13 High Schools

250 13

140 8

230 14

250 12

380 14

347 14

866-626-6100,

#

“Coldest Beer in Town” "

L ib e r a l

624 2045

388 12

620-626-6100,

"

Your home loan professionals

n oon t o 10pm

507 13

2014

!

Safeguard Your Assets AND Save Hundreds.

20 E Tuck er Rd.

2013

10th Annual Extreme Challenge will be at SCCC/ATS April 1, 2015

Infographic by Jakub Stepanovic

"!

Caramel Macchiato

Open till 9:00pm 7 Village Plaza Liberal KS 67901

second, Dylon Wornkey, Meade; third, Blake Reimer, Meade. • Manufacturing: First, Michael Losey, Hugoton; second, Marcus Cortez-Cruz, Rolla; third, Grant Sparkman, Elkhart. • Welding: First, Shawn Blackburn, Keyes; second, Bryton Coen, Elkhart; third, Jaron Rusch, Rolla. • Agriculture: First, Reed Papay, Meade; second, Coleman Kirby, Rolla; third Sydney Dougherty, Elkhart. • Cosmetology: First, Keyah Richardson, Elkhart; second, Morgan Sanchez, Elkhart; third, Dalila Amaya, Liberal. • Criminal justice: First, Alex Burciaga, Liberal; second, Bobby Mills, Balko; and third, Josh Eckert, Rolla. • Business: First, Katie Murray, Rolla; second, Colten Clemans, Rolla; and tied for third, Esi Houtz, Elkhart and Mikayla Armer, Elkhart. • Marketing and management: First, Kaleigh Barrett, Rolla; second, Mackenzie Moshier, Meade; third, Katie Weaver, Hugoton. • Computer Information Systems: First, Dacyn Symons, Liberal; second, Aaron Babineaux, Liberal; third, Obie Telford, Rolla. • Math and Science: First, Brendon Carter, Elkhart; second, Morgan Olvera, Meade; third, David Kurt, Hugoton. A total of 49 high school students left the SCCC/ATS campus with prizes in hand earned from placing as winners in the academic categories. Now, college organizers can take a few days to look back on the 2014 event, and then begin planning for the 10th Anniversary Xtreme Challenge to be April 1, 2015.

!

Free Wifi

Crusader photo / Dallas Kelling

Rolla High School student Jessica Johns checks the smell of a plant in the plant identification challenge.

w w w .her i ta gel i ber a l .com S. Ka nsa s, Su i te 2 P.O. Box 1736 L i ber a l , Ka nsa s 67905


XTREME CHALLENGE

4 CRUSADER

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

CRUSADER 5

Crusader photo / Diana Chavira

First-place overall journalism winner Kenzie Jones, Elkhart, works on the news writing challenge, as does Melissa Sanchez, back, also of Elkhart. Crusader photo / Makiah Adams

High school students try their skills at the video game contest, an Xtreme Challenge day activity. Video games challenged students eye/hand cordination.

e Meeting me leng e l h e t a r h t C X Crusader photo / Maria Lara

Rebekah Warner, Elkhart High School, gets creative and builds a unique work of art in the clay challenge during the Xtreme Challenge, April 2..

Twelve high schools arrive on campus to compete for awards in learning activities

contributed to Crusader

Crusader photo / Maria Lara

SCCC/ATS student Kristina Simpson explains the rules of the mock Angry Birds game while Chrissy LaClaire, Meade High School, prepares for her shot, and SCCC/ATS student Miranda Ramsey readies the slingshot. For more photos of Xtreme Challenge go to Facebook.com/CrusaderNews.

Almost 400 students from 12 area high schools participated in the ninth annual Xtreme Challenge on the campus of Seward County Community College/Area Technical School April 2. Elkhart High School repeated as the Overall Award winner for the school earning the most points in all challenges, and defended its possession of the traveling trophy they claimed at last year’s Xtreme Challenge. Meade High School was second in overall points and Rolla High School was third, placings reminiscent of 2013. Other high schools involved in the competitions included Liberal, Hugoton, Garden City, Moscow, and Sublette, plus Tyrone, Okla.; Turpin, Okla.; Keyes, Okla.; and Balko, Okla. Terri Houtz, a teacher from Elkhart, said it was an honor to win. “We were excited to get to bring so many kids,” she said. Houtz said her favorite part is that the students get to actually visit the college. SCCC/ATS accounting instructor Tanya Dowell was the organizer of the 2014 contest. She said she was pleased by how much the attending high school participants seemed to enjoy the event Wednesday. “I did try to get around and speak to all of the sponsors between activities, and I was encouraged,” Dowell said. “They all talked about how much they enjoy this.” The Meade High School representatives showed they had been thinking about the competition in advance and came prepared, wearing T-shirts that read, “Meade takes it to the

XTREME.” The admissions team also helped a great deal, Dowell said. They gave campus tours and provided a fun break for students with a game called the Angry Bird Challenge. SCCC/ATS student ambassadors helped with the events of the day. Elkhart High School senior Kacee Hoskinson said she has attended the Xtreme Challenge event all four of her high school years. “Other than the fact of getting to meet new people, it’s a great way to have people show their abilities,” Hoskinson said. “It’s a good opportunity.” Crusader student journalists recorded many of the activities of the day and photos are posted on Facebook.com/CrusaderNews. Instructional designer Jay Castor prepared a slideshow of Xtreme Challenge photos for the students to enjoy just prior to the awards ceremony. • Art: First, Rebekah Warner, Elkhart; second, Yolanda Ledesma, Garden City; third, Alberto Hernandez-Martinez, Garden City. • English: First, Kaylee Farthing, Balko; second, Nathan Dowell, Liberal; third, Grace Hollingsworth, Elkhart. • Journalism: First, Kenzie Jones, Elkhart; second, Jessica Pinkley, Rolla; third, Victoria Fullerton, Elkhart. • Drama: First, Cherokee McCallion, Elkhart; second, Audrey Mitchell, Elkhart; third, Logan Meek, Elkhart. • Music: First, A.J. Madsen, Hugoton; second Anysia Limon, Liberal; and third, Rory Howard, Liberal. • Physical education: Top Boy, Kyler Telford, Rolla; Top Girl, Natalie Thompson, Meade; Top Test, Alex Gomez, Elkhart. • Transportation: First, Shon Villa, Elkhart;

Scantlin’s Furniture

620-624-3859

#" !

211 S. Washington Ave. Liberal, Kansas C o m e t o us f o r a l l y o u r f u rn i t u re a n d ca r p et n e e d s

#

Check out our inventory on Facebook

World's Best Mango Smoothie

The Best Place to Study Home of "The Spencer"

"Next to North Pizza Hut"

Carry Outs Call (620) 626-5556

"$ % "

Crusader photo / Jakub Stepanovic

Crusader photo / Maria Lara

Extreme Challenge at the tech school involved getting greasy in the auto mechanics challenge.For more photos, see Facebook.com/CrusaderNews.

Liberal High School student Nathan Dowell competes in the English nonfiction essay challenge, Dowell placed second overall in English.

Challenge Timeline

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

Students 250 13 High Schools

250 13

140 8

230 14

250 12

380 14

347 14

866-626-6100,

#

“Coldest Beer in Town” "

L ib e r a l

624 2045

388 12

620-626-6100,

"

Your home loan professionals

n oon t o 10pm

507 13

2014

!

Safeguard Your Assets AND Save Hundreds.

20 E Tuck er Rd.

2013

10th Annual Extreme Challenge will be at SCCC/ATS April 1, 2015

Infographic by Jakub Stepanovic

"!

Caramel Macchiato

Open till 9:00pm 7 Village Plaza Liberal KS 67901

second, Dylon Wornkey, Meade; third, Blake Reimer, Meade. • Manufacturing: First, Michael Losey, Hugoton; second, Marcus Cortez-Cruz, Rolla; third, Grant Sparkman, Elkhart. • Welding: First, Shawn Blackburn, Keyes; second, Bryton Coen, Elkhart; third, Jaron Rusch, Rolla. • Agriculture: First, Reed Papay, Meade; second, Coleman Kirby, Rolla; third Sydney Dougherty, Elkhart. • Cosmetology: First, Keyah Richardson, Elkhart; second, Morgan Sanchez, Elkhart; third, Dalila Amaya, Liberal. • Criminal justice: First, Alex Burciaga, Liberal; second, Bobby Mills, Balko; and third, Josh Eckert, Rolla. • Business: First, Katie Murray, Rolla; second, Colten Clemans, Rolla; and tied for third, Esi Houtz, Elkhart and Mikayla Armer, Elkhart. • Marketing and management: First, Kaleigh Barrett, Rolla; second, Mackenzie Moshier, Meade; third, Katie Weaver, Hugoton. • Computer Information Systems: First, Dacyn Symons, Liberal; second, Aaron Babineaux, Liberal; third, Obie Telford, Rolla. • Math and Science: First, Brendon Carter, Elkhart; second, Morgan Olvera, Meade; third, David Kurt, Hugoton. A total of 49 high school students left the SCCC/ATS campus with prizes in hand earned from placing as winners in the academic categories. Now, college organizers can take a few days to look back on the 2014 event, and then begin planning for the 10th Anniversary Xtreme Challenge to be April 1, 2015.

!

Free Wifi

Crusader photo / Dallas Kelling

Rolla High School student Jessica Johns checks the smell of a plant in the plant identification challenge.

w w w .her i ta gel i ber a l .com S. Ka nsa s, Su i te 2 P.O. Box 1736 L i ber a l , Ka nsa s 67905


SPORTS

6 CRUSADER

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Softball Lady Saints beat No. 1 ranked team in country, Butler Kelci Bedingfield Crusader staff

Crusader photo/ Jakub Stepanovic

Center and outfielder, from Roswell, N.M., Tiffanie Bolanos, hits an infield home run at a home game against Colby, winning the doubleheader 6-5 and 16-0 on March 25.

[

]

Inside Coaches Corner: baseball’s defeat

Maria Lara Sports Editor

During the hard loss the Saints took on March 25 against Hutch, least to say no one was very pleased with the results of the four games. Head coach, Galen McSpadden and one who has also been in the leadership of the Saints, was not at all charmed. In his 33 years of being here, “I don’t like setting negative records. Did not like our efforts, competitiveness, errors, hitting, nor the pitching,” said McSpadden. It was the first time in school history that the Saints had been swept in one series by Hutch Blue Dragons, in the Jayhawk West Conference. As a coach, McSpadden finds it difficult when his players are not giving their best efforts and not “carrying out the performance that is required and noncompetitiveness,” he said. Despite the hard loss for the Saints, McSpadden was expecting to see improvements from his team. He expected to see more competitiveness when something is on the line, “not to play when it is convenient, to throw more strikes, make out pitches, square up when hitting, make routine plays, minimize the base running mistakes and to execute the fundamentals,” said McSpadden. The expectations are being met, as Seward County Saints make a comeback in the following games as they win six straight games, and McSpadden wants to see them not only win those but also the conference, and return to the JUCO World Series.

Lady Saints softball claimed a quality victory for the program in the bottom of a double header when they defeated Butler, the No. 1 ranked team in the country, by a score of 7-1 on April 3. In the first game, Seward took an early lead with two scored runs, but Butler quickly responded with a run and began to come alive. Butler ended up run ruling the Lady Saints 10-2 for the first game. Even after losing the first game, the Lady Saints dug in for a battle. In the third and fourth innings of the second game, the Lady Saints took advantage of Butler’s errors and scored four more runs, to stretch to a 6-0 lead. Butler finally put a run on the board in the bottom of fourth to cut into the Lady Saints lead, 6-1. Seward quickly responded with one more run in the seventh inning. The Seward Lady Saints beat No. 1 ranked Butler 7-1. The Lady Saints matched up with Lamar on April 5 at Lady Saints home field for the double header. The third inning was huge for the Lady Saints. Lamar’s errors kept stacking up, and allowed Seward to extend the lead to 6-0. Lamar finally put a run in the

fourth inning, but the Lady Saints also got a run in the bottom of the fourth, for a score of 7-1. The Lady Saints went on to defeat Lamar 9-2 in game one. Having the momentum from game one, the Lady Saints quickly scored five runs in the first inning, but they weren’t finished. After the second inning, the Lady Saints had a 12-0 lead over Lamar. Seward run ruled Lamar 13-3. Seward is now 35-8 for the season. Becky Allen was named Jayhawk West Player of the Week. She is a sophomore for the Lady Saints, and this is her second time to receive Jayhawk West Player of the Week this year. Allen has a .550 batting average, 12 RBIs, and seven runs for the week of March 31-April 6. Prior to April, after spending spring break in Arizona, the Lady Saints came back to conference games. They took on a double header against the Colby Lady Trojans at the Lady Saints softball field on March 25. The Lady Saints kept making error after error in the second inning which gave the Lady Trojans the lead 3-2 in the second inning. Seward comes out with an ugly win 6-5 over Colby. In the first inning the Lady Saints had a 5-0 lead, and they carried their momentum over to

the second inning. In the second inning the Lady Saints came alive, and they extended their lead to 11-0. Seward run ruled Colby in three innings 16-0. With the Saints hoping to continue their winning streak, they played at home on Saturday, March 29 against Dodge City. Seward scores and takes the lead 2-1 over Dodge City. Seward takes the win 2-1. The second game of the day Seward kept scoring and pulling away from Dodge City. Defeating Dodge City 11-3, and improving their winning streak to 8. Following their two wins on Tuesday, the Lady Saints took on another double header against Clarendon, March 26. The Lady Saints were off to a good start. Clarendon makes errors which allowed Seward to take the lead even further to 6-0. The Lady Saints came out with another win 9-1. The second game Clarendon takes an early 2-0 lead in the first inning then moves the lead to 50. Tiffany Bolanos made an inside the park homerun to put Seward on the board, and shortly after Seward scored again to shorten the lead 5-2. Seward came out with the win 7-5 against Clarendon. This gave the Saints a 6 game winning streak which is the longest have had all season.

Baseball rebounds after tough losses After losing five straight games Saints come back and sweep up Beavers Maria Lara Sports Editor The first doubleheader against the Saints rival, Garden City Busters on March 15 ended swiftly as JB Olsen lead the Saints to a win for the key conference doubleheader opener. In the series finale, Seward County takes control and steals the game 6-5, winning the series against Garden 3-1. The Saints next victory came on March 20 against Frank Phillips Plainsmen, holding a solid win of 18-17, improving to 18-11 for the year. Saints lose a huge conference series against the rival Hutchinson Blue Dragons at Hobart Detter Field. Entering the game, Saints held the position of being the first in the conference, but after March 25, they dropped to fifth place. Season pressed on after the sweep from Hutch, and the Saints come back for more, but

their troubles from the weekend follow as they fall down to Clarendon on March 27, 25-20. Returning to the conference play, Seward County hosts the Pratt Beavers in two doubleheaders at Brent Gould Field on both Saturday and Sunday of March 29-30. The season take a turn around as the take victory over the Beavers in all four games, 84, 19-5, 18-4, 21-2. After the four game sweep of Pratt, the Saints traveled to Borger Texas where they fall to Frank Phillips 16-3, leaving Seward County 22-17 for the year. The Saints luck changes back at home, where they host Frank Phillips at Brent Gloud Field and in this midweek game, win. With this non-conference game, a triple play took place, something that very rarely occurs. This high point contributed to the domination the Saints took over Frank Phillips and are now 23-17 for the year.

Crusader photo/ Maria Lara

Crusader photo/ Maria Lara

Right handed pitcher and starter, JB Olsen, breezed through the 3rd inning on March preventing any base-runner press forward from the Pratt Beavers and aiding the Saints to defending their lead.

Saints player and sophomore from Borger, Texas, Max Lusk, walks back to the pit and prepares to bat.

BIRTHLINE

let

LISTEN TO “THE SPORTS GUYS”

Pregnant? Thinking abortion?

help

A L SH A N K IN SUR A N CE SERVING THE SOUTHWEST FOR OVER 70 YEARS

FREE Pregnancy Test

H ome to Liberal H igh School & SC C C Sports

!

• Confidential • 2nd & Clay • Liberal, KS

ST D A RN “IT ’S T HE BE EV ER. ” W O SH SP O RT S

620-626-6763

Go to Girlfriends for flowers and gifts to brighten any occasion!

Open Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sat. 10-3 in DOWNTOWN LIBERAL

(620) 624-2559 www.alshank.com

24 W. 2nd St. Liberal


SPORTS

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

CRUSADER 7

Tennis battles through challenging season Maria Lara Sports editor Women’s Tennis: An extended break had no effect on the No. 13 ranked Seward County Lady Saints on the afternoon of March 15 in Great Bend. They took control over the Barton Lady Cougars in their first dual for the spring season, 9-0. With no hesitation, the Lady Saints dominated the Hesston Larks on March 29, where that afternoon they came with a win of 7-2, putting them at 4-2 overall for the year. On April 3, the Lady Saints encountered their hardest match for the year against Seminole State Lady Trojans in a dual meet. The Lady Saints started with a 2-1 lead, and ended later at 4-3, leaving them a 5-4 win overall that day and with a 5-2 record for the season. As the Lady Saints advance forward to the Trojan Dual Match Classic, they were unable to come with a complete victory as they win one of their final three matches. Seward County Lady Saints battle against Hesston on April 7 as a team and fall to the Tigers 6-3. The Lady Saints are 6-5 for the year and 1-1 in Jayhawk Conference. April 8, luck doesn’t seem to be on the Lady Saints side as they fall 5-4 for the third straight outing Tuesday in Wichita to Johnson County, their Region VI rival. The Saints fall to 6-6 for the year, and finish their Jayhawk West regular season at 1-2. Men’s Tennis: On one hand, four Seward Saints went on the court March 15 against Newman University and came with a win of 4-2 in six matches. On the other hand, the Saints began the match losing 3-0 and fell at

the end, leaving the opening of their season at 5-4. The season continued on as March 15 came and the Saints faced the Cougars from Barton at Great Bend. The confident team stepped on the court that day to be surprised that the unranked team put up a fight and the Saints fall to 0-2 for the year as a team. The men’s season took a turn on March 30 as the team traveled to Hesston and knocked the Larks off of their winning streak. At 5-4, the Saints have their first win of 2014. In hopes of keeping the winning stretch going, the Saints stumble upon No. 4 Seminole State on April 3. That afternoon, Seward County won all four singles but fell at both doubles, and forfeited matches, giving the Saints a loss to the Trojans, 5-4, and 1-3 for the year. A weekend in Oklahoma City for the Trojan Classic on April 6 gave the Saints a chance to make a comeback. It’s those missed opportunities to win those forfeited matches that are costing the Saints. Seward was 12-6 in matches played, though nine points cost them, finishing the weekend 1-2. The Saints are back at Hesston where they battle an anticipated match against the Cowley Tigers. This Monday, Seward County lost 7-2 to their Region VI rivals. After winning an ITA National Championship and being ranked No. 1 in the ITA rankings in the fall, both Seward’s Ronzai Saurombe and Alejandro Gonzalez’s had difficulties in Wichita on Tuesday as they fell 8-5, leaving the Saints at a loss of 7-2 to Johnson County, a 2-7 for the year and a fall of 1-3 in Jayhawk Conference. Both of Seward’s top women’s team players, Paula Lopez and Paula Coyos, win all individual matches and go undefeated on Monday.

Courtesy photo/ Roy Allen

Crusader photo/ Jakub Stepanovic

Crusader photo/ Jakub Stepanovic

Pat Stangle adds his plaque to the Hall of Fame wall. Stangle, the winningest volleyball coach in Seward history, was inducted into the Hall of Fame Friday before the Athletic Banquet.

Saints baseball player Austin King awards baseball coach Galen McSpadden with a bat to commemorate his 1,100th win.

Stangle inducted into Hall of Fame Athletes, coaches recognized at Athletic Banquet Grant Glaze Crusader staff The Saints athletic banquet began Friday night with the induction of Pat Stangle into the Seward County athletic Hall of Fame. Stangle coached the Lady Saints volleyball team for five years beginning in 1997. Stangle was very successful, leading the Lady Saints to an overall record of 225-34 record and a Jayhawk West record of 42-4. Stangle talked about how Seward County was “a big step for me because it allowed me to find out if I was any good at this(coaching)”, and let’s just say Stangle definitely found out he was good at coaching. Stangle owns nine all-time records, including highest average of wins per season (45), conference wins in a single season (14, twice), career overall winning percentage (.869 percent), overall conference winning percentage (.913 percent), appearances in NJCAA National Tournament (3), best finish at NJCAA National Tournament (5th - 1999 & 2000), Jayhawk West Conference titles (2), Region VI Tournament championships (3), and 50-win seasons (2). In the five years Stangle coached in the Jayhawk West, he was named the Coach of the Year three times. Now Stangle has his place in two Hall of Fames, as he was inducted into the National

Junior College Athletic Association Hall of Fame in 2008. Stangle is currently the assistant coach of the 2013 Conference USA Champion University of Texas-San Antonio Roadrunners. The Saints Hall of Fame is now three years old, and Stangle joins the company of Seward’s previous Hall of Fame members such as the 2001-2002 women’s basketball team, Jim Littell, Galen McSpadden, Kim Ortega, Cory Patton, Charles Brownlee, Brent Gould and Tony Slaughter. After Stangle’s induction, the Athletic Banquet began. Saints and Lady Saints sports teams were introduced, and some of the athletes received awards from their teammates. Brent William’s won the Wade Johnstone Award, voted on by his teammates, for his efforts on the baseball field. The Lady Saints basketball team voted Janel Tammen the winner of the Jamie Talbert Award for her efforts on the hardwood. Also announced at the banquet were the W.A. Shufelberger Award Finalists for the graduating male and female with the highest GPA. Those finalist are Shanise Brooks, Katelyn Cracker, Carmen Hughes, and Janel Tammen for the Lady Saints, and Keenan Hall, Austin King, Max Lusk, and Reid Thompson for the men. Next up was recognition of coaches. Galen McSpadden,

head baseball coach, was awarded a signed bat by his team for his 1,100th win in his career. Volleyball coach Bert Luallen received the gameball from his historic school record breaking 226 win. Men’s basketball coach Bryan Zollinger was also recognized for his fourth straight Jayhawk West Coach of the Year award. One of the greatest moments of the night actually didn’t come from a coach or an athlete, but rather a man who has quietly served the coaches and athletes in the shadows without recognition. Al Pittendrigh was a maintenence worker at the college for 25 years, but retired this year. Pat Stangle, in his Hall of Fame speech, mentioned seeing Al in the mornings cleaning up the gym with what looked like a toothbrush, scrubbing up every little mark in the stands. “If our world had the same passion for our jobs that Al had, this world would be a much better place,” Stangle said. Pittendrigh was recognized with signed balls from all of the sports teams. As he walked up, one could see the joy in his face, and he seemed overwhelmed with the recognition. Then as Pittendrigh began his walk back to his seat, he received a very nice standing ovation. It was clear that those present were thankful to and respected Pittendrigh for all that he had done.

Crusader photo/ Jakub Stepanovic

Al Pittendrigh, who is well known for his service to the college as a maintenance worker, received a standing ovation at the Athletic Banquet as he was recognized for his hard work and dedication. Pittendrigh retired this year after 25 years at the college.


ENTERTAINMENT

8 CRUSADER

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Into the

Woods 7:3 0

m.

p.

$12 foradults

April 10-12 Showcase Theat re

$8

f

On center stage of “Into the Woods” will be not only Prince Charming, but also a witch, a wolf, Rapunzel and even Snow White. The college musical production premiers nightly at 7:30 p.m. April 10-12 at the Showcase Theater. “Into the Woods” is a darker comedy not intended for small children, but director Gloria Goodwin decided that a child narrator will help make the story more relatable. During intermissions, the drama group will present a dessert bar to be used as a fundraiser for more of a sweet surprise. Magda Silva, musical director, finds this production impressive. She said while all shows have good aspects, she feels this one excels in acting, staging, dancing and singing. A bar has been set by Silva, along with Director Gloria Goodwin and Julie Bunnnell, who assists with the choreography and also plays the role of the witch. “This group has grown closer as performers and as friends, this closeness adds to the chemistry on stage,” Silva said. “I am extremely proud of these young performers and the dedication they have put into this production.” “Into the Woods” is being made into a movie starring Johnny Depp, Meryl Streep, and Anna Kendrick. But locally, theater-goers can see the story play out first hand. “The performers have worked many hours for months, and are bringing a level of professionalism to this year’s production. Into the Woods has something for everyone. It explores many things such as love, loss, self-discovery, and parenting. There are many flat-out hysterical moments, and many incredible songs,” Goodwin said.

C

ontreras-B Ju aker an C los r a g some you cin ng u d ma id se

“H off e’s probably

en.”

K

rince Cha P rm ing illia oze nD “I

wa sr

aised to be

rm cha ing no

ts

y-

Steward No lan Loble !” “Shut up

Julie Bunnell- Witch

ill listen.” “Ch w ildren

inc e re .”

ree

seniors & r e 2 und 1 for

udents with t s to

Get into:

ID

Cosmetology or Nail Technology


Year 45 Issue 10