__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1


GOLD SPONSORS

SILVER SPONSORS

BRONZE SPONSORS


TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION Message from Chair, Jury Panel 4

OVERVIEW About the CRRF 5

AWARDS About the Awards6 Woodland Cultural Centre 7 Akinomaagaye Gaamik 9 Temiskaming Native Women’s Support Group 11 CommunityWise Resource Centre 13 Conseil provincial des sociétés culturelles 15 Carrefour de ressources en interculturel 17 Cornwall Chinese Association/ 19 Cornwall and District Multicultural Council Horizons Community Development 20 Associates Inc. Migrant Women’s Association of Halifax 22 Inter-Cultural Association of Greater Victoria 24 Snowland Outdoor Club (SLOC) 26 The Mosaic Institute 28 University of Victoria (UVic)  30 Université Du Québec À Montréal (UQÀM)  32 Dr. Kang Lee’s Development Lab, 34 Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE)  Faculty of Social Work, University of Manitoba 36 Friends of Simon Wiesenthal Center  38 Harmony Movement  40 Migration and Diaspora Studies Initiative, 42 Carleton University Town of Truro, Nova Scotia 44 Professor William Cunningham, 45 University of Toronto Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) 46 Diversity and Inclusion Unit, 48 Government of Manitoba Ontario Human Rights Commission 50 Sinking Ship Entertainment 52 Jam3 53 STEM Fellowship 54 Canadian Cultural Mosaic Foundation 56


I

MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR, JURY PANEL t has been an honour to serve as the Chair of the Best Practices Jury Panel for the Canadian Race Relations Foundation (CRRF), for the Awards of Excellence programme. The panel consisted of voting members Albert Lo, Gina Valle, Ayman Al-Yassini, and Palinder Kamra, and non-voting

advisors Toni Silberman, Madeline Ziniak, and Art Miki. I could not have asked for a more cohesive and gifted panel, with well-established and acknowledged achievements in the spheres of race relations and multicultural initiatives in Canada. The Awards of Excellence, a biennial flagship programme, brings together representatives of the public, private, and voluntary sectors who took action to address inequalities within their workplace or community. These initiatives demonstrate a variety of innovative and effective best practices currently used to promote positive race relations in Canada. The submissions for this year spanned the country, showcasing a variety of approaches and communities. The jury was impressed with the quality and breadth of the submissions, as well as the creativity and passion put into each initiative. We will be interested in following the progress of each initiative as they continue to serve Canadians by promoting inclusion and equality. We hope that the Best Practices Reader will serve as a valuable resource and inspiration for our individual and collective efforts to develop and implement practical and innovative race relations initiatives. With your help, we can all work towards creating and fostering a Canada that we can be proud of. On behalf of the CRRF, the Jury Panel extends its sincere congratulations to the Awards of Excellence winners, Award of Excellence Honourable Mentions, and all individuals and organizations who submitted to the 2018 CRRF Best Practices. We also extend our gratitude to the CRRF staff for their diligent efforts on our behalf. And, as always, our gratitude to you- our partners, colleagues, and supporters – for your determination and commitment to combating racism, discrimination, and inequality in all forms, and your enthusiasm and drive towards promoting positive race relations in Canada.

Roy Pogorzelski Chair, Jury Panel 4


ABOUT THE CRRF In 1988, the Government of Canada and the National Association of Japanese Canadians signed the Japanese Canadian Redress Agreement. The Agreement acknowledged that the treatment of Japanese Canadians during and after World War II was unjust and violated principles of human rights. Under the terms of the agreement, the federal government also promised to create a Canadian Race Relations Foundation, which would "foster racial harmony and cross-cultural understanding and help to eliminate racism." The federal government proclaimed the Canadian Race Relations Foundation Act into law on October 28, 1996. The Foundation officially opened its doors in November 1997. The Foundation's office is located in the City of Toronto but its activities are national in scope. It operates at arm's length from the federal government, and its employees are not part of the federal public service. The Foundation has registered charitable status.

VISION The Canadian Race Relations Foundation will be recognized for its role as a leading non-partisan resource and facilitator, helping to eliminate the racism and racial discrimination that will be seen as inherent contradictions to a Canada based on the mutuality of rights and responsibilities, participation, belonging and equity.

MISSION

The mission of CRRF is defined in The Canadian Race Relations Foundation Act S.C. 1991, c. 8, as found in Section 4, Purpose of the Foundation: The purpose of the Canadian Race Relations Foundation is to facilitate throughout Canada the development, sharing and application of knowledge and expertise in order to contribute to the elimination of racism and all forms of racial discrimination in Canadian society.

VALUES The work of the Foundation is premised on the desire to create and nurture an inclusive society based on equity, social harmony, mutual respect and human dignity. Its underlying principle in addressing racism and racial discrimination emphasizes positive race relations and the promotion of shared Canadian values of human rights and democratic institutions. It strives to coordinate and cooperate with all sectors of society, and develop partnerships with relevant agencies and organizations at the local, provincial and national levels.

5


The Canadian Race Relations Foundation’s Awards of Excellence Program recognizes public, private, or voluntary organizations whose efforts represent excellence and innovation in combating racism in Canada. The Awards of Excellence event is a part of the CRRF’s Best Practices initiative, which is one of the educational programs sponsored by the CRRF to gather, document, and celebrate innovative approaches to promoting harmonious race relations. By Best Practice, the CRRF means a program, strategy or initiative.

6


2018 Awards of Excellence Winner Aboriginal

WOODLAND CULTURAL CENTRE

Save the Evidence

DESCRIPTION Save the Evidence is developing a site which tells the history of a traumatic event in Canadian history by raising awareness and understanding, encouraging dialogue between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people and groups, and building partnerships and relationships which focus on highlighting the "Truth" in "Truth and Reconciliation" to be a positive factor in the nation's healing journey. Save the Evidence works closely with MIRS Survivors, elders, and members of the Traditional community at Six Nations to create a holistic space and learning experience, which will enhance learning opportunities for visitors and student groups of all ages and abilities. Visitors will develop a greater understanding of the history and impact of residential schools. The information presented is research-based through the development of primary materials; Interpretive objects are replicas of those found at the school or recreated through photographic evidence, in concert with discussions with Survivors. Interpretive materials, audio-visual presentations, and tour materials will foster and enhance understanding; visitors ought never to feel shame or guilt during their visit, but may begin to recognize the losses suffered by communities and individuals, and may feel a personal sense of responsibility to participate in the reconciliation process.

INSPIRATION This project is inspired by and entirely devoted to the experiences and memories of the children who attended residential schools across Canada, and particularly the Mohawk Institute. We work with Survivors on a regular basis through our programming and throughout the Save the Evidence project. We are continually inspired by their resilience, and are honoured that the Survivors we work with have allowed us to be a part of their healing journey. We in turn wish to honour their experiences, and to give them a place where they can ensure that they will be heard and where their truths will be preserved.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE Through learning about Indigenous history, heritage, arts, languages, traditional and contemporary culture, and the history of residential schools; having the opportunity to ask questions and to broaden their concept of Indigenous peoples in Canada; and understanding the impacts of systemic racism; visitors develop their own cognitive toolkit to better comprehend the positions now occupied by Indigenous people; what colonization is and what decolonization looks like; and how Indigenous and non-Indigenous people can begin to work together moving forward in harmony, friendship and peace.

7


2018 Awards of Excellence Winner Aboriginal

WOODLAND CULTURAL CENTRE

Save the Evidence

VISION FOR THE FUTURE Once complete, the Mohawk Institute Residential School building will be used for interpreted tours and educational programming. After opening, we will continue to work with Survivors and Intergenerational Survivors to develop dynamic programming to accurately present the history of residential schools in Canada. The space will be utilized to increase awareness and comprehension of the history and the impacts of residential schools, and will stand as physical evidence of this dark history. Programming will be regularly updated to represent best knowledge and new findings, and will continue to respect the histories of the children who attended the schools, and meeting the educational needs of visitors and school groups.

ABOUT THE WOODLAND CULTURAL CENTRE The Woodland Cultural Centre (WCC) is a First Nations educational and cultural centre. It was established in 1972 to protect, promote, interpret, and present the history, language, intellect, and cultural history of the Onhwehon:weh and Anishinaabe. WCC demonstrates the highest standard of excellence in presentation, interpretation, and collection of resources in education, museology, arts, language, and cultural heritage. WCC is situated on the site of the former Mohawk Institute Residential School (MIRS), one of the earliest and longest-running residential schools in Canada, and one of only a few still left standing today. The building has been utilized as an historic site to teach the history and impact of residential schools in Canada. WCC strives to share and honour the history and experiences of Survivors of the residential school system in Canada.

CONTACT PERSON Carlie Myke 184 Mohawk Street Brantford, ON N3S 2X2 http://www.woodlandculturalcentre.ca/

8


2018 Awards of Excellence Honourable Mention Aboriginal

AKINOMAAGAYE GAAMIK

The Moccasin Project

DESCRIPTION Da-giiwewaat (so they can go home) is a national campaign to raise awareness about child apprehension impacting Indigenous children in Canada. Through education and citizen action our goal is to eradicate racism and bring children home to their families and communities. Participants who partake in the project learn about facts regarding child apprehension that has led to a current national crisis and a human rights ruling of discrimination towards Indigenous children in Canada. Participants then make baby moccasins that will be send to First Nation family advocates who will distribute them to babies in care. Participants are also encouraged to make their own call to action as a way of spreading awareness and speaking out against racism and discrimination. This project also promotes the goals of the Calls to Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. The website contains examples of moccasin projects in schools as well as resources that are connected to the Ontario school curriculum.

BACKGROUND For over 150 years Indigenous Peoples have endured the impacts of legislated genocide through the policies carried out in the Indian Act, residential schools, 60s scoop, and now today what is being termed the millennial scoop. Recognized today by the federal government as a humanitarian crisis, Indigenous children have the highest rates of apprehension in the Western world. In many cases, such as in Manitoba, newborn babies are being taken away from their mothers shortly after giving birth without any grounds for removal. This project aims at raising public awareness in order to create pressure on the federal government who now has 4 non compliance orders as they refuse to implement the orders stemming from the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal who found the government guilty of discrimination. Through this initiative we hope to reunite children with their families and end the cycle of colonial violence towards Indigenous Peoples.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE This project has uncovered many localized cases of overwhelming numbers of apprehensions of Indigenous children. The Ontario Human Rights Commission also participated in this project and as a result has requested that Ontario Children's Aid Societies start collecting and tracking data on Indigenous and Racialized kids in care as there is an overrepresentation of those children in the system. Through continued efforts of education and grassroots movements, this project hopes to create systemic change in the child welfare system in for families to be kept together and efforts be made to address the healing required from the intergenerational trauma stemming from 150 years of colonialism and genocide.

VISION FOR THE FUTURE It would be great to have resources created that are connected explicitly to the curriculum. It would be powerful to have videos that tell the story of the project, share stories of individuals who have been impacted by child welfare, and also share stories of how the moccasin project has made a difference in many ways. This truly is an example of how nonIndigenous people can participate in reconciliation efforts in partnership with Indigenous peoples and communities.

9


2018 Awards of Excellence Honourable Mention Aboriginal

AKINOMAAGAYE GAAMIK

The Moccasin Project

ABOUT AKINOMAAGAYE GAAMIK Many Anishinaabek communities have a house of learning, or a Roundhouse and is the pride of their community. A Roundhouse is a space in which the original Anishinaabek lifeways, knowledge and education is delivered in the oral and/or customary traditions passed along by Elders and Knowledge Holders. Akinomaagaye Gaamik is a grassroots initiative, which formed under the guidance of Elders and Traditional Practitioners in and around the New Credit community to promote education and healing through traditional Indigenous methods, pedagogies and language. Akinomaagaye Gaamik provides an appropriate environment and atmosphere for Indigenous Knowledge Carriers to share and teach from. Our mission is to facilitate, coordinate, partner, promote and fundraise for events and activities that provide local and regional opportunities for learning and engaging in Indigenous ways of doing, being and understanding customary practices and languages.

CONTACT PERSON Jodie Williams 274 New Credit Rd. Hagarsville, ON N0A 1H0 http://www.akinommagaye.weebly.com/

10


2018 Best Practices Submission Aboriginal

TEMISKAMING NATIVE WOMEN’S SUPPORT GROUP

Urban Thinkers Campus

DESCRIPTION The Temiskaming Native Women’s Support Group (TNWSG) was formed in 1995 by an ad hoc group of First Nations and Metis women tasked with developing culturally rooted services in the region for Indigenous women and their families. The organization was incorporated as a non-profit agency in 1997 and by 2005 had established two, wholly owned Indigenous Early Learning and Childcare Hubs, one in Temiskaming Shores and one in Kirkland Lake in Northeastern Ontario. Over the past two decades, the TNWSG has designed a broad range of programs and services delivered through the Keepers of the Circle centres. They established an Elders Council to guide their work and have formed partnerships with other Indigenous agencies in the District to create an Indigenous Community Hub that expands beyond Early Learning and Childcare services. They also spearheaded consultations to develop an Indigenous Cultural-linguistic Competency Framework that facilitates stronger inter-cultural relationships and equality-producing partnerships.

BACKGROUND As is true for communities and cities across Canada, moving past a history of colonization, racism and marginalization of Indigenous Peoples poses ongoing challenges. The journey of reconciliation for the District of Temiskaming began in 2005, a decade before the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Calls to Action. It began with the establishment of two Indigenous-led Early Learning and Childcare Centres that over the subsequent years has grown into full-fledged Community Hubs that offer culturally-rooted programs and services for everyone across the life cycle. The Temiskaming Native Women’s Support Group led by Ann Batisse and Carol McBride demonstrated a tremendous amount of courage and faith in stepping forward to challenge the status quo, which served to entrench the marginalization of Indigenous Peoples. The District of Temiskaming Social Services Administration Board responded by funding the Keepers of the Circle Centres and over the years building the capacity of the Indigenous community to design and deliver their own services. As their representative, Dani Grenier-Ducharme offered a steady hand over a decade in reducing racism and discrimination by leading partner organizations to a shared vision of a region that embraces diversity. The City sponsored the Urban Thinkers Campus to promote that vision.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE The Urban Thinkers Campus inspired a visual reflection of the CITY WE NEED as defined by participants who came from a variety of sectors including governments, business and industry, and civil society organizations. The decades long race relations work of the two organizations, the Temiskaming Native Women’s Support Group and the District of Temiskaming Social Services Administration Board who co-sponsored the Urban Thinkers Campus with the City of Temiskaming Shores gave impetus to the initiative. There has been a visible and demonstrated shift in attitudes and relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous stakeholder agencies and community members. As a result of this work, the District of Temiskaming Elders Council assumed their traditional leadership role in guiding the work of both Indigenous and non-Indigenous agencies. The Elders have spoken about their leadership role as going beyond the tokenism they often experience in engaging with service providers. Stakeholders across the District express an excitement about collaborating with the Indigenous community and have fully backed systemic changes that support Indigenous-led initiatives. Most recently, over 27 agency partners signed on to support the establishment of an Indigenous Interdisciplinary Primary Care Team. Community people are also excited and express a renewed sense of pride and self-determination.

11


2018 Best Practices Submission Aboriginal

TEMISKAMING NATIVE WOMEN’S SUPPORT GROUP

Urban Thinkers Campus

VISION FOR THE FUTURE In keeping with an Indigenous worldview, members of the Elders Council and the Temiskaming Native Women’s Support Group look to global change in race relations – change inspired by local experiences, local wisdom, local cultural practices and local solutions. Now that we have our first Urban Thinkers Campus under our belt, the District of Temiskaming Elders Council, the Temiskaming Native Women’s Support Group and our key partners in the form of the District of Temiskaming Social Services Administration Board and the City of Temiskaming Shores and leaders in the persons of Dani GrenierDucharme and James Franks, will organize an annual Urban Thinkers Campus. An inclusion lens will be applied that looks at the engagement needs of people with differing abilities, ages, languages and cultures to ensure no-one is left behind. And, we will explore follow-up methodologies that provide regular citizen feedback to build on best practices in reducing marginalization. The visual map from the District of Temiskaming Urban Thinkers Campus was presented at the World Urban Forum 9 in Malaysia. The purpose of the presentation was to highlight the Urban Thinkers Campus model as an inclusive community engagement tool that could be replicated in other regions around the globe.

ABOUT THE TEMISKAMING NATIVE WOMEN’S SUPPORT GROUP The Temiskaming Native Women’s Support Group (TNWSG) was formed in 1995 by an ad hoc group of First Nations and Métis women tasked with developing culturally rooted services in the region for Indigenous women and their families. The organization was incorporated as a non-profit agency in 1997 and by 2005 had established two, wholly owned Indigenous Early Learning and Childcare Hubs, one in Temiskaming Shores and one in Kirkland Lake in Northeastern Ontario. Over the past two decades the TNWSG has designed a broad range of programs and services delivered through the Keepers of the Circle centres. They established an Elders Council to guide their work and have formed partnerships with other Indigenous agencies in the District to create an Indigenous Community Hub that expands beyond Early Learning and Childcare services. They also spearheaded consultations to develop an Indigenous Cultural-linguistic Competency Framework that facilitates stronger inter-cultural relationships and equality-producing partnerships.

CONTACT PERSON Arlene Hache 21 Scott Street Temiskaming Shores, ON P0J 1P0 https://unhabitat.org/urbanthinkers/

12


2018 Awards of Excellence Winner Community

COMMUNITYWISE RESOURCE CENTRE

Anti-Racist Organizational Change (AROC)

DESCRIPTION Racism can be experienced in several ways. For example, hate speech or bigotry between individuals is an indicator of interpersonal racism, a person’s negative thoughts about their own race is an indicator of internalized racism, and a lack of voting rights for a racialized group would be an example of structural racism. The last piece, and the one we wanted to address, is organizational/institutional racism. Unlike incidents of hate speech or an overt denial of rights, racial inequity in organizations can be hard to see and measure. We wanted to understand how organizational racism works and manifests, then develop a framework to address the issues that materialised. Given that those in the communities served by organizations are most influenced by those organization’s policies, culture, and structure, we created AROC as a process to centre racialized and Indigenous voices to initiate anti-racist organizational change. We sought to consult with racialized community members and used an emergent process to allow new ideas to unfold and come into fruition. There is a constant pressure within organizations to default back to the status quo, but we have been building our skills in learning and reflection so that we do not succumb to the feelings of having “done” or “finished” the work. Instead, we honour the active nature of anti-racism work and the constant effort that needs to be exerted to make progress.

BACKGROUND The inspiration for AROC was our organizational culture or values, which have always been rooted in an aspiration to be truly diverse, inclusive, and equitable. We felt that we couldn’t live up to these words by using standard corporate practices for diversity and inclusion because they don’t address the key barrier to achieving those things: systemic racism. We drew further inspiration for our work from the principles of anti-racism, which demand that we talk head on about something that makes everyone extremely uncomfortable. Discomfort, for us, is a sign that we’re going in the right direction. Anti-racism asks us to confront issues of power and privilege; to locate ourselves within broader intersecting systems of oppression; to be active in addressing racism beyond efforts at an individual level; and to incorporate an intersectional analysis in our work. As we began to undertake the work, the broader context became more urgent. In Canada, racism was making headlines, whether it was the inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, Islamophobia in reaction to Muslim migrants and refugees, or the disproportionate police brutality and carding faced by black men. This context is also an inspiration, though not always a positive one. In AROC, we take time to process what is happening in the world around us, to heal and grieve but also to build tools that help organizations combat racism in real tangible ways.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE AROC is an inherently adaptive process. For our organization, it has involved examining every level of our organization— to be specific, eleven different organizational categories—and slowly making changes to address racism in each one. We’ve passed an Employment Equity Policy, amended our Board Terms of Reference, updated our organizational Theory of Change, developed an external communications strategy, and built equity measures into our data collection, all with a lens of anti-racism. These changes are difficult to implement in any case, but anti-racist organizational change is a particularly hard adaptation. It’s not just about changing policies and procedures; every person in the organization needs to do some

13


2018 Awards of Excellence Winner Community

COMMUNITYWISE RESOURCE CENTRE

Anti-Racist Organizational Change (AROC)

level of personal work to understand their role and responsibilities within the changes. We have engaged external antiracism educators, but we’ve also incorporated regular doses of learning in our meetings and retreats. Through our efforts, we are becoming more able to recognize and address racial inequities. We are able to tolerate higher levels of the tension and discomfort that result from doing this work. We are also able to move from problem to action to learning with greater ease.The impact has also been significant for the community members who were part of our Advisory Group. AROC contributed to an increased awareness of what working equitably means on a day to day basis, how racism plays out in their own agencies, as well an increased confidence confront racism in personal and professional sphere. Advisory Group members also reported strengthened personal understanding of their own racial identities and validation for what it means to hold those ideas in an organizational sphere.

VISION FOR THE FUTURE Through AROC, we have made significant organizational changes, but one piece remains unfulfilled: becoming more accountable to the Indigenous communities of the Treaty 7 area in which we are located. While our current engagement process has involved perspectives from Black, racialized LGBTQ2+, and immigrant communities, it has been inadequate in centering Indigenous concerns. Anti-Indigenous racism is different than that faced by other racialized individuals and communities due to Canada’s specific history and context of colonialism, and thus requires its own process to address. The future of AROC is to take up the calls to action articulated in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) report so that 1) we do our part in redressing the legacy of residential schools and colonialism while 2) also ensuring that we as an organization are accountable to Indigenous communities in an on-going way. We want to focus on “being accountable” rather than “reconciling” or “Indigenizing” to put the responsibility and work on us while ensuring we are guided by the leadership of Elders and members of the Indigenous communities of Treaty 7.

ABOUT THE COMMUNITYWISE RESOURCE CENTRE CommunityWise Resource Centre is a community driven non-profit centre that provides inclusive and affordable office and community spaces to grassroots and small non-profit organizations. Our organization provides backbone infrastructure (for example, shared internet access, kitchen access, and office equipment) to non-profit member organizations. We support around 90 small and grassroots organizations whose work spans a diverse spectrum of social, environmental, and cultural issues. Among other areas, CommunityWise member organizations work in ethnocultural community supports, LGBTQ community services, culturally relevant Indigenous services, poverty reduction and community economic development, addictions support, mental health, and community arts. CommunityWise uses a community development model with an anti-oppressive framework and, in 2016, began a community engagement process called Anti-Racist Organizational Change, designed to combat organizational racism in the non-profit sector.

CONTACT PERSON Thulasy Lettner 223 12th Ave SW Calgary, AB T2R 0G9 http://communitywise.net/about/aroc-and-the-equity-framework/

14


2018 Awards of Excellence Honourable Mention Community

CONSEIL PROVINCIAL DES SOCIÉTÉS CULTURELLES

Creative Cells in Community Theatre

DESCRIPTION Creative Cells in Community Theatre is a project that resulted in the formation of the Mathieu Da Costa Troupe, a multicultural community theatre group comprised of both immigrants and Acadians whose members were able to express themselves artistically via the theatre by performing the play [É+IM] Migrant.e. This play facilitated the integration and inclusion of immigrants while raising the Acadian community’s awareness of immigrants and their reality. The project’s success lies in the fact that immigrant participants were able to become more integrated while also developing an interest in community theatre and expressing themselves artistically. The Acadian community was also involved, with the aim of becoming more welcoming to immigrants and encouraging them to stay in New Brunswick. This project received a Soleil Award from the Mouvement acadien des communautés en santé du Nouveau-Brunswick.

BACKGROUND Minority francophone communities in New Brunswick (NB) face various challenges, such as the aging and migration of the population and the assimilation of new arrivals. Between 2006 and 2011, the province welcomed 7,155 immigrants. Only 12% of these spoke French as their first language, while 4% spoke French and English. In comparison, Acadians and francophones represent 32% of the province’s total population. While NB is receiving more and more French-speaking immigrants, maintaining the province’s linguistic balance remains a significant challenge. It is necessary to introduce measures that support the retention of newly arrived francophone immigrants, in order to stimulate demographic growth among the province’s francophones. While the proportion of francophone immigrants to NB may be growing, their desire to stay here permanently is tenuous. As a host society, is the province doing enough to welcome these new arrivals? Immigrants’ level of satisfaction is based on the advantages of the retention measures in place, which are often implemented through the province’s various welcome and integration centres and training centres. Our organization wished to address the issue of francophone immigration in a distinctive and meaningful way. Specifically, we wanted to contribute to the retention of francophone immigrants through a flagship project that would serve as a best practice for our members located throughout the province. We believe that our goals will be obtained more quickly, and have more lasting effects, through collective action. What’s more, we wish to prevent the discourse surrounding immigration from becoming too pragmatic and ensure that people who come here from other countries are more than just numbers or statistics and not viewed solely in terms of their economic contribution. Adopting a more humanistic approach will lead to achieving our goals on a sustainable basis.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE The results and impacts of the project are as follows:

• Participants developed an interest in community theatre and artistic expression. • The experience facilitated the integration of immigrant participants into the Acadian community. • Acadian society has become more inclusive and understanding of the realities faced by francophone immigrants. • Both the host community and the neo-Acadian community benefited from an enriching cultural experience.

15


2018 Awards of Excellence Honourable Mention Community

CONSEIL PROVINCIAL DES SOCIÉTÉS CULTURELLES

Creative Cells in Community Theatre

Creative Cells in Community Theatre is a cultural activity aimed at connecting members of the immigrant community with each other and members of other communities. Leveraging the Acadian community’s enthusiasm for community theatre, it highlights the rich cultural heritage of all participants, regardless of their beliefs, affiliations and allegiances.

VISION FOR THE FUTURE The CPSC recently submitted a funding request in order to continue developing Creative Cells in Community Theatre, with the aim of producing Act 2 of the play [É+IM] Migrant.e.s. This act would explore the relationship that older immigrants have with their home country compared to the relationship that children of immigrants born in Canada have to it. We will also share the process with our network.

ABOUT THE CONSEIL PROVINCIAL DES SOCIÉTÉS CULTURELLES The Conseil provincial des sociétés culturelles (CPSC) is recognized for its leadership in the development of arts, culture and heritage in all Acadian and francophone regions of New Brunswick. It supports 17 regional organizations dedicated to cultural activities. Through financial support and other means, it enables these organizations to offer a variety of programming that meets the needs of Acadian and francophone communities across the province. The CPSC develops and implements innovative and creative projects that directly benefit the cultural associations and communities where they are carried out. It also offers mentoring services to its members.

CONTACT PERSON Marie-Thérèse Landry Place de la Cathédrale 224 St-George St. Moncton, NB E1C 0V1 http://www.cpscnb.com/

16


2018 Best Practices Submission Community

CARREFOUR DE RESSOURCES EN INTERCULTUREL

Êtes-vous de bonne rumeur? Workshop

DESCRIPTION The workshop entitled “Êtes-vous de bonne rumeur?” (“Are You in Good Rumour?”) aims to disprove various “rumours” (prejudices) in a multi-ethnic context. Using a playful and humorous approach, the workshop offers a venue for participants to explore sensitive subjects. Treating prejudices as rumours enables participants to admit them in order to then debunk them. The workshop addresses both rumours about the host community and rumours about various cultural communities. The flexible format allows the workshop to be adapted to all age groups. After completing the activity, participants are able to: define what a rumour is and identify its characteristics; understand the impact that rumours have on people from various cultural communities and the host community; and to take steps to halt rumours by relying on facts and data (statistics, etc.) and asking the right questions. The workshop is offered in schools, community centres, low-cost housing complexes and seniors’ homes. According to evaluations, the results are very positive, since it equips participants to fight prejudice. We are now in the process of developing a training course in order to train workshop leaders in other districts of Montreal.

CONTEXT In Montreal, we see a lot of prejudice, stereotypes and discrimination. Our neighbourhood is evolving, with a significant increase in residents from diverse cultural backgrounds. This can sometimes lead to offensive behaviour or even acts of violence. Just last year, following the mosque attack in Quebec City, the neighbourhood mosque was vandalized. Inspired by a vision of cross-cultural integration, the CRIC has always worked to educate the public about respecting people of all kinds. Our approach is always flexible and aimed at empowering people to take action and think critically. During a symposium on cross-cultural communities in Montreal, this led to a discussion between the organization’s director and Daniel Torres from Barcelona. The Spanish city had a municipal Anti-Rumour program, which the CRIC adapted for use in Montreal. The changes included addressing both rumours about cultural communities and about the host community and adding three tools (recognizing generalizations, cultural biases and good questions) as well as the workshop format. We deal with the participants’ rumours and not rumours from elsewhere. This has since been identified as a good practice in the Council of Europe’s anti-rumour program guidelines.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE Evaluations show that after taking the workshop, participants are able to recognize generalizations, to conduct a centering exercise to help them see that their perspective may be wrong, to ask good questions and to seek out information. They also realize that rumours have a major impact on the people concerned, which helps in debunking and stopping them.

VISION FOR THE FUTURE To train people in other areas so that they can master the workshop and apply it in their communities.

17


2018 Best Practices Submission Community

CARREFOUR DE RESSOURCES EN INTERCULTUREL

Êtes-vous de bonne rumeur? Workshop

ABOUT THE CARREFOUR DE RESSOURCES EN INTERCULTUREL The Carrefour de ressources en interculturel (CRIC) is an independent organization that gathers and develops resources in the field of cross-cultural relations. It works with and for organizations and residents of Montreal’s Centre-Sud district in order to promote better cross-cultural relations between all of the neighbourhood’s communities. The four mandates of the CRIC are: • To engage and influence the neighbourhood with regard to collective cross-cultural issues, using methods such as: providing information, raising awareness, offering representation, adopting positions, implementing collective actions and projects, promoting civic involvement, etc. • To provide organizations with support adapted to their needs so that they will embrace inclusion and diversity, using methods such as: project support, consulting services, training, development of tools, referrals, etc. • To support families from diverse backgrounds in order to promote their integration into the host society. • To document and analyze the neighbourhood’s cross-cultural issues, using methods such as: documentation, knowledge exchange, learning communities, research, studies, etc. The organization has an excellent reputation, having received the Mayor of Montreal’s Democracy Award in 2015 and a CSDM Board of Commissioners Bravo award in 2016.

CONTACT PERSON Veronica Islas 1-1851 Dufresne St. Montreal, QC H2K 3K4 https://www.criccentresud.org/

18


2018 Best Practices Submission Community

Cornwall Chinese Association/Cornwall and District Multicultural Council

DESCRIPTION These two organizations were established to foster better relations and proper communication between the ethnic communities living in the Cornwall area and other ethnic mainstream communities. They aim to try to encourage these communities to try their best to join the mainstream and to educate them about Canadian cultures and customs so that they understand that they are no different from anybody else. It is very important to live with each other in peace and harmony.

BACKGROUND The circumstances leading to this initiative were rooted in systemic racism. When a Chinese businessman wanted to move to a “posh� residential area, there was a lot of anger, distrust, and even an open demonstration on the part of the residents already living there. Today, the situation is the opposite. This initiative was an inspiration and a blessing. Today, people of all communities live side by side in complete harmony. The distrust has disappeared.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE We had multicultural festivals for years where people of all ethnic backgrounds mingled with the mainstream community and created a real understanding that we are all equal. Today people of all ethnic communities work together as a united group.

VISION FOR THE FUTURE We would like to continue with our work to foster better race relations between all ethnic minorities, First Nations peoples, and mainstream Canadians. It is very important to remember that Canada is a nation with immigrants from all around the globe.

CONTACT PERSON Mr. Sultan Jessa 9 Colbrook Crescent Cornwall ON K6H 6E4

19


2018 Best Practices Submission Community

HORIZONS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATES INC.

Stepping Up: Non-Indigenous People’s Role in Truth & Reconciliation

DESCRIPTION Horizons Community Development Associates Inc. is a community centred consulting company. Formed in 2002, we focus on helping communities achieve their goals. We specialize in planning, research and evaluation, community development and project management. Based in Nova Scotia and serving Atlantic Canada, Horizons offers service to a broad range of clients, including the health sector, government agencies, First Nations communities, and not-for-profit organizations. The Horizons team has committed to supporting non-Indigenous people’s journey in understanding truth and reconciliation. We have also developed internationally recognized resources in measuring community capacity, and we are a recognized leader in health promotion and population health initiatives. We utilize these approaches to build on the strengths of our clients and work towards creative solutions for helping communities achieve their goals. Our best practice is engaging non-Indigenous people in learning about our shared history with Indigenous people. It is unique in that we are not educating participants about Indigenous people, but helping them learn about our role in creating and maintaining systems that discriminate against them. Together we explore our responsibility in understanding truth and taking action to bring about reconciliation.

BACKGROUND The development and implementation of this course is guided by several core beliefs. It was inspired by our ongoing work with First Nations, the Truth & Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action, and our social justice values. It also builds on our previous work with our local university/business community/municipalities/faith groups to take action for reconciliation.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE Several months after participating in the course, people are telling us that they are looking at the world through a new lens and applying their new understanding to their professional and personal lives. For example, they are considering the TRC Calls to Action and the impact of their policies, decisions, and resource allocation on Indigenous people and our relationships with them. Personally, they are curious, self-reflecting, and committed to continued learning.

VISION FOR THE FUTURE In partnership with the Municipality of the County of Kings, we are in discussions with the NS Department of Communities, Culture, and Heritage to resource and expand future offerings of the course.

20


2018 Best Practices Submission Community

HORIZONS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATES INC.

Stepping Up: Non-Indigenous People’s Role in Truth & Reconciliation

ABOUT HORIZONS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATES INC. Horizons Community Development Associates Inc. is a community centred consulting company. Formed in 2002, we focus on helping communities achieve their goals. We specialize in planning, research and evaluation, community development and project management. Based in Nova Scotia and serving Atlantic Canada, Horizons offers service to a broad range of clients, including the health sector, government agencies, First Nations communities, and not-for-profit organizations. The Horizons team has committed to supporting non-Indigenous people’s journey in understanding truth and reconciliation. We have also developed internationally recognized resources in measuring community capacity, an we are a recognized leader in health promotion and population health initiatives. We utilize these approaches to build on the strengths of our clients and work towards creative solutions for helping communities achieve their goals.

CONTACT Cari Patterson 2283 Gospel Woods Rd., RR #3 Canning, NS B0P 1H0 https://www.horizonscda.ca

21


2018 Best Practices Submission Community

IMMIGRANT MIGRANT WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF HALIFAX

Mosaic: Identity and Community Connection

DESCRIPTION One of our best practices is to use art to support the integration of immigrant and migrant women and girls. One of our projects Mosaic: Identity and Community Connection was developed to: celebrate and explore identity from an immigrant women’s perspective; to create an opportunity for immigrant women, female youth and girls to collaborate; create a traveling art exhibit that enhances their identity, sense of place, belonging and community connection; to support the development of welcoming and inclusive communities in the Halifax Regional Municipality; To increase IMWAH’s capacity and its relationship and connection to other community organizations such as art galleries, museums libraries and cafes. The success of this practice is its alternative way to create social change and provide opportunities to recognize the contributions immigrant and migrant women make to the communities where they settled permanently or temporarily.

BACKGROUND This project was inspired by the desire to create a welcoming community for immigrant and migrant women. The idea and goal of the project aligned with the objectives of the association including the interest in bringing the voice of women into larger movements aiming to improve the wellbeing and progress of women in Kjipuktuk (Halifax); to celebrate the contributions and address the challenges and concerns of immigrant and migrant women and girls. My (Maria Jose Yax-Fraser) interest was to create an environment for immigrant and migrant women to collaborate and explore identity, sense of place, belonging and community connection.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE This project has had a personal impact on participants who have spoken about accessing a space where they can nurture their mental health, explore their artistic abilities, discuss issues that affect their daily lives and create community. Some participants have gone further in exploring their artistic talents and bringing their learnings to their workplaces. The project contributes to creating welcoming communities by raising awareness of the contributions immigrant and migrant women make in different spheres of social, economic, and political life.

VISION FOR THE FUTURE We are building on this promising practice to continue the work with immigrant and migrant women through art forms. We hope we can take this initiative to other communities in the Maritimes and continue to promote integration and welcoming communities. As the One Nova Scotia report outlines, racism and discrimination is a barrier that prevents the full integration and the retention of new immigrant to Nova Scotia. Through this project, IMWAH has been able to develop partnerships with other organizations to continue working to make Nova Scotia a more inclusive province.

22


2018 Best Practices Submission Community

IMMIGRANT MIGRANT WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF HALIFAX

Mosaic: Identity and Community Connection

ABOUT THE IMMIGRANT MIGRANT WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF HALIFAX IMWAH is a non-profit and culturally diverse organization established in 2012 and registered with Joint Stocks in 2013. It serves im/migrant women, female youth and girls in the Halifax Regional Municipality (HRM). Its goal and mission are to address the challenges, celebrate the contributions, and respond to the unique needs and concerns of immigrant women and girls. Our gender related mandate is to provide support tailored to female focused initiatives. We have four objectives: • To bring the voice of im/migrant women into larger movements aiming to improve the well-being and progress of Haligonian women.

• To bring awareness into the larger community of im/migrant women and girls concerns and to do advocacy work.

• To research and assess situations affecting immigrant/migrant women and girls.

• To showcase women’s projects, initiatives and contributions to the community.

CONTACT Maria Jose Yax-Frasner 99 Braemar Dr. Dartmouth, NS B2X 2B5

23


2018 Best Practices Submission Community

INTER-CULTURAL ASSOCIATION OF GREATER VICTORIA

We Speak Translate Project and Training

DESCRIPTION The We Speak Translate project is a first of its kind collaboration between Google Translate and the Inter-Cultural Association of Greater Victoria (ICA), BC, Canada, which uses the Google Translate app to aid in refugee resettlement and newcomer inclusion in communities. The We Speak project addresses the number one barrier to new immigrant integration – language – by re-purposing technology as a tool and symbol for welcoming communities, which value diversity and inclusion. The project involves training community stakeholders, organizations, and institutions in the Google Translate app. Upon completion of a free 45-minute training session, participants receive a We Speak Translate decal, a visible symbol of their commitment to promote diversity and communication across language barriers. Familiarity with the Google Translate app establishes a common platform for communication while newcomers develop their English language skills. Since the project launched in April 2017, over 2000 community members and stakeholders have received Google Translate training through the We Speak Translate project.

BACKGROUND Migration both forced and voluntary is occurring globally at a level never experience before. There are 65.6 million displaced people worldwide, 22.5 million of which are refugees (UNHCR, Figures at a glance, 2017). The World Bank’s Migration and Remittances 2011 Factbook estimated the total number of immigrants at 215.8 million. Unfortunately, immigration and resettlement of refugees can lead to public resentment of migrants and fear of difference that leads to discrimination, community tensions, and racism. In response, communities, businesses, organizations, and institutions need opportunities to demonstrate their support for new immigrants and refugees. So, in October 2016, ICA’s Community Integration Coordinator, Kate Longpre, M.A., approached Google Translate with the idea for the We Translate project. The Project objective was to address the number one barrier to integration: language. Kate was also interested in how technology can be used to assist with the resettlement of refugees in host countries like Canada. The idea that Google, one of the largest corporations globally, could put their product and image to use as a tool and symbol to improve race relations was exciting. Finally, there was tremendous interest from community stakeholders who wanted to play a role in creating welcoming communities. Kate tapped into that energy in a tangible way to create a tool and visible symbol of inclusion and commitment to diversity.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE Since the We Speak Translate project launched in April 2017, over 2000 community members and stakeholders across Canada have received Google Translate training through the We Speak Translate project. Project training has occurred for Local Immigration Partnerships (LIP's), settlement organizations, staff at libraries, recreation centre’s, social service organizations, Universities, public health centres, museums, banks, etc. The project started in Victoria, BC, but interest in the project has expanded across Canada and beyond. As such, the We Speak Translate trainings are now available via webinar. Communities and cities that have participated in the We Speak Translate training are more welcoming of resettled refugees and new immigrants.

24


2018 Best Practices Submission Community

INTER-CULTURAL ASSOCIATION OF GREATER VICTORIA

We Speak Translate Project and Training

“When I see the We Speak Translate sticker in a window, I feel confident that people want to speak with me and get to know me.” – Ibrahim Hajibrahim, Syrian Resettled Refugee

VISION FOR THE FUTURE The vision for the future of the We Speak Translate project is that it will continue to scale up and reach more countries across the globe. Kate hopes that success of the pilot project may encourage Google Translate to expand the We Speak Translate project on a larger scale with the more support from Google. Google is one of the most well known corporations globally: their stance and support of a project that reduces language barriers and promotes diversity and inclusion sends a powerful message.

ABOUT THE INTER-CULTURAL ASSOCIATION OF GREATER VICTORIA The Inter-Cultural Association of Greater Victoria (ICA) offers services for immigrant and refugee newcomers, including settlement and integration services, translation and interpretation, English classes, mentoring, job search assistance and guidance, volunteer matching, and peer support. We also provide outreach and education in the community through arts programming, as well as community development workshops on anti-racism, multiculturalism, diversity awareness, immigration, and human rights. ICA illuminates cultural connections through community arts. Founded in 1971 as an organization to produce FolkFest, ICA has evolved over the years to encompass many different strategies for the creation and support of a welcoming community for newcomers to Canada. The Inter-Cultural Association of Greater Victoria is a non-profit society that: • Encourages sensitivity, appreciation, and respect for individuals of all cultures in our changing community • Assists newcomers to settle in the Greater Victoria area and facilitates their inclusion and full participation in the community • Advocates for the human rights of people of all cultures • Animates cultural awareness by promoting public multicultural events within Greater Victoria.

CONTACT Kate Longpre 930 Balmoral Road Victoria, BC V8T 1A8 http://www.icavictoria.org/community/we-speak-translate/

25


2018 Best Practices Submission Community

SNOWLAND OUTDOOR CLUB (SLOC)

Engaging New Immigrants Into Canadian Society Through Sports

DESCRIPTION Many immigrants come to Canada with a language barrier and experiencing culture shock, and may have difficulties to integrating into Canadian society. This practice utilizes sport and outdoor activities, especially downhill skiing and snowboarding to help the Chinese community integrate into Canadian culture, weather and landscapes. This familyoriented practice provides children’s ski/snowboard lessons; and more importantly, the practice encourages parents, who have never been on ski hills, to learn this new skill so they can join their children outdoors. The practice offered free “Mommy Daddy Ski with Me” classes, videotaping and technique analyzing, and demonstrations from club instructors. Many parents expressed their excitement when they were able to go on lifts and ski down with their children, “not just waiting in the lounge and worry about their safety”. This practice also includes summer activities, such as yearly members’ BBQ at conservation areas, group camping in provincial parks and hiking on various trails. The year-round outdoor activities have made the members easier to merge into Canadian traditions and their daily life more colourful.

BACKGROUND Outdoor activities, especially snow activities, are an important part of the Canadian lifestyle. Helping immigrants and their families merge into Canadian culture and enjoy beautiful Canadian landscapes through outdoor activities is our organization’s core value. Many immigrants state that winter in Canada is too long and they feel depressed sometimes. Many parents said their children started to learn about winter sports from their schools or friends but they did not know how to support their kids. We have many ski/snowboard instructors so we decided to provide lessons to children. We also provide free classes for beginners, “Mommy Daddy Ski with Me” for parents, so they can start to taste the activities and finally they can accompany and lead children.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE The initiative has affected around 1200 Chinese immigrant families directly or indirectly via over 500 hours of ski/ snowboard teaching, 2-3 ski trips every winter, 2-3 camping trips every summer, annual barbecues, year-round badminton tournaments, and daily discussions on three separate WeChat groups. The initiative has helped more than 10 people become Canadian ski/snowboard instructors, almost 100 families for ski trips and camping, and more people love outdoor activities.

26


2018 Best Practices Submission Community

SNOWLAND OUTDOOR CLUB (SLOC)

Engaging New Immigrants Into Canadian Society Through Sports

VISION FOR THE FUTURE We will continue to expand our initiative to more outdoor activities. This initiative will be a good model to utilize for other ethnic immigrant groups.

ABOUT THE SNOWLAND OUTDOOR CLUB (SLOC) Snowland Outdoor Club (SLOC) is a Federally Registered Non Profit Organization (NPO) since August 2016. Volunteers run the club, which represents the Canadian core value of volunteerism. The club has attracted more than one thousand families into skiing, snowboarding and other outdoor sports. The club is using the mobile media platform WeChat as its main communication method, which can provide fast and convenient response for the club’s event and members’ requests. SLOC also links up with the Canadian Ski Instructors Alliance (CSIA) to provide training camp to the club members. In less than two years, there are more than 10 people from SLOC that have achieved their certificate and became ski/snowboard instructors. One of the instructors has written a series of articles to promote skiing in Chinese, including “Skiing Safety”, “Skiing Equipment”, “How to Prepare as a Skiing Beginner”, “The Benefits of Skiing”, and “Skiing Professional Development”, et al. His articles have attracted and encouraged many people into skiing industry. The Technical Standards and Safety Authority (TSSA) in conjunction with the CSIA Board has honoured this instructor as the only receipt of TSSA Safety Award of Year (2018) for his excellence in promoting sports safety and a healthy life style.

CONTACT PERSON Jiao Jiang 60 Murellen Crescent Toronto ON, M4A 2K5 http://www.snowlandclub.org/

27


2018 Best Practices Submission Community

THE MOSAIC INSTITUTE

18Qs – UofMosaic

DESCRIPTION The goal of the 18Qs is to facilitate person-to-person interactions that break down stereotypes and barriers between the people, with goal of eliminating any prejudgments they might have had going in based on how the other participants look or speak. Two or three people sit face to face and ask each other 18 Questions. This list of 18 Questions is designed to make the participants really to get to know each other in a way that isn’t superficial. The questions probe deep in to themes that reveal the true humanity of each participant. For example, these questions probe themes about the participants' aspirations and motivations, what stereotypes created by the media and society they think they might suffer from, and what lessons they’ve learned from their past. The point of these deeply personal questions is to deem the categories we use to judge each other irrelevant. When answering these questions, the participants realize that all our experiences matter regardless of who we are, and that we are all complex beings. This is what makes the 18Qs successful—it is a platform for deeply human interactions that begin in emotional territory.

BACKGROUND Through our research and initiatives, we have learned that prejudice is often caused by fear of those who that are different than us in some way-- whether it's skin colour, religion, immigration status, gender or race. This fear is then vindicated and perpetuated by the stereotypes and views that media/popular culture perpetuate. We know for a fact that our differences are actually our most valuable asset. They are the source of our creativity and prosperity—they should be celebrated and valued. They are what makes our humanity. There is already an air-tight business case for diversity; companies that are more diverse perform better. Now it was time to go further and create an initiative that makes people appreciate our differences even beyond reasons of prosperity--they have intrinsic value.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE In the short time the 18Qs have been in existence, the feedback has been tremendous. The fact that they debuted on campuses with young people and that we've been able to transition this to bigger platforms such as the Walrus Talks and Diversity and Inclusion conferences is a testament to the 18Qs early success. The impact is that in every instance the 18Qs were conducted, someone learned something about someone else that they didn't know before, and in many instances, got to know somebody they had never met in a personal way. We believe that one aspect of instigating systemic changes begins with bringing individuals together. Even changing one person's mind with the 18Qs is a step in the right direction. In scaling the 18Qs to reach influencers and decision makers, we believe this initiative has the real ability to effect both individual and systemic change.

28


2018 Best Practices Submission Community

THE MOSAIC INSTITUTE

18Qs – UofMosaic

VISION FOR THE FUTURE As mentioned in previous answers, we want the 18Qs to become viral, and we want to scale up on the importance and number of partnerships we have with participants. We officially ask those who participate to do the questions with other people they know and to ask others to do the questions with their friends. We are also proposing the 18Qs to a number of corporate and media entities. We also hope to expand the number of campuses our UofMosaic fellowship operates in next year, and thereby plan on reaching untapped groups of young people with the 18Qs.

ABOUT THE MOSAIC INSTITUTE The Mosaic Institute is dedicated to dismantling racism and prejudice. Through our dialogues, research and programs, we hope to help cultivate a society that can see beyond the racial stereotypes, prejudgments and rigid categories that often paralyze our humanity. For the past ten years, we have worked with a variety of communities, as well as high school and university students, to cultivate respect and dignity amongst and between different cultures and communities – and in many instances overcome conflicts and improve human connections. Today social permissions are shifting, there are increasing instances of dangerous intolerance and a heightened prevalence of not just discomfort, but fear. In this context we are working toward solutions that emphasize that our differences are not be feared but rather are the source of our creativity, respect and prosperousness. We have range of programs and initiatives designed to carry out our mandate, some of which include: • • •

UofMosaic Undergraduate Fellowship: 20 Fellows, 10 Universities create a national social initiative. Next Generation: high-school program that cultivates a generation that is beyond prejudice. The Mosaic Stories: stories of Canadians who have lived with the horrors of hatred in text+video+spoken word performances.

CONTACT Ashkay Sharma 2 Bloor Street West, Suite 3405 Toronto, M4W 3E2 http://www.mosaicinstitute.ca/18qs-take-the-challenge/

29


2018 Awards of Excellence Winner Education

UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA (UVIC)

Landscapes of Injustice

DESCRIPTION Landscapes of Injustice (LOI) is a 7-year project on the dispossession of the property of Japanese Canadians in the 1940s supported by a SSHRC Partnership Grant. Dozens of individuals—academics, community leaders, museum professionals, teachers, programmers, and students—as well as 17 institutional partners work together to ask how the dispossession occurred, who benefited from it, and how it has since been remembered and forgotten. LOI practices sustained integration of research, community engagement, and resource development. From 2014, teachers, curators, and community members supported and helped to steer research; now the collective will support public educators. Its publications are changing scholarly understandings of Canada’s 1940s and the complex and permanent harms of the loss of home. Now LOI will engage students and public audiences. A violation of human and civil rights in the guise of security, the dispossession of Japanese Canadians holds lessons for our times.

BACKGROUND This project found inspiration in our discovery of shared questions about dispossession and a shared conviction that this history still matters. In 2011, our Project’s leader and Director, Jordan Stanger-Ross, entered the Nikkei National Museum in search of archival materials that he hoped would help him to understand the dispossession. There he found an institution, a staff, and a wider community asking their own unanswered questions about the dispossession. Why had the property of Japanese Canadians been sold, given that its sale made no one safer? How had this violation of citizenship been made legal? Who benefited from the sales? As we enter an era of renewed concern about the overlap of purported security concerns, migration, and race, the founding members of this collective believe that the history of the dispossession is too important, and too big, to be told by one individual or institution.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE Students on our project convey its impact upon them. Nicole Yakashiro joined us as an undergraduate at the University of Toronto. Her family seldom discussed the internment. After working with Landscapes of Injustice, she writes that the project “offered me an entry point into Japanese-Canadian, student, and activist communities . . . who have provided me, as a yonsei, a place to begin understanding myself.” Camille Haisell encountered our project in a course module at UVic: “[Landscapes of Injustice] has changed my life in significant ways . . . strengthened my faith in the ability of academic pursuits to affect real and compelling changes in the world ... [and] sent me on an academic trajectory that I hadn’t imagined possible.” Deep, community-engaged, and anti-racist research inspires both members of the community affected by racism and outsiders learning this past for the first time. Through our programs of public education, we aim to widely spread these transformative impacts.

30


2018 Awards of Excellence Winner Education

UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA (UVIC)

Landscapes of Injustice

VISION FOR THE FUTURE Our project is now poised to do its most important work. This summer, teachers will develop plans for the dissemination of their lessons across Canada. The digital archive and narrative websites will be designed. Our travelling museum exhibit, already booked in Vancouver, Victoria, Toronto, and Halifax, is in its interpretive planning and marketing phase, seeking venues across the country. Our first book, Witness to Loss, has sold out its first print-run and been shortlisted for the $10,000 Wilson Institute Book Prize; two more books are under contract. A dedicated special issue of a leading scholarly journal, the Journal of American Ethnic History, will this summer feature our research. In this context, recognition from the Canadian Race Relations Foundation will help to enhance public knowledge of this story and to connect us with museum venues, teachers and school boards, and public audiences.

ABOUT THE UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA The University of Victoria is one of Canada’s leading comprehensive universities, with a track record of achievement in indigenous and community-engaged research. Its Strategic Framework commits the university to engage both locally and globally and to foster respect and reconciliation. UVic fulfills these objectives in its exemplary support for the Landscapes of Injustice project (support ranked as excellent by the SSHRC expert adjudication committee) and its leadership of other community-engaged research practices. UVic aims to be the Canadian research university that best integrates outstanding scholarship, engaged learning and real life involvement to contribute to a better future for people and the planet.

CONTACT PERSON Jordan Stanger-Ross c/o University of Victoria PO Box 1700 STN CSC Victoria, BC V8W 2Y2 http://www.landscapesofinjustice.com/

31


2018 Awards of Excellence Honourable Mention Education

UNIVERSITÉ DU QUÉBEC À MONTRÉAL (UQÀM)

Cross-Cultural Pairings to Combat Racism and Promote Social Harmony

DESCRIPTION Cross-cultural pairing is a mandatory learning and exchange activity that matches an immigrant who is studying French (in the oral and written communication, phonetics, grammar and reading class) with a francophone student in education, career counselling, psychology, social work or communications. Its success is founded on the collaborative approach to developing it, which helped to create a solid framework. Over 50 language teachers, professors and instructors from seven departments across three faculties worked together in a spirit of co-operation. The initiative’s success is also based on the mutual benefits for francophone and immigrant students who are paired with each other. Since 2002, over 15,000 participants have met, with both parties sharing a common goal: to develop their cross-cultural communication skills for the purpose of establishing an egalitarian, equitable and inclusive society.

BACKGROUND The pairing initiative started with an observation: more than 15 years ago, immigrants who were registered in a Frenchlanguage learning program told their instructors that they had little or no contact with the university’s francophone student population—even though they shared the same building, the same classrooms and the same services. We also we realized that francophone students in various programs had little or no awareness of the challenges faced by immigrants and the need to integrate them into francophone social networks. This led to the idea of transforming the culture of the relevant programs by facilitating encounters between students that would enable them to learn and get to know each other.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE From the perspective of both immigrant and francophone students, the impact of cross-cultural pairing has been striking. Year after year, francophone students have learned to recognize the types, causes and harmful effects of prejudice and discrimination, to become more empathetic toward minority, racialized and stigmatized groups, and to feel less concerned about threats to their identity while gaining a stronger sense of linguistic and social security. On the other hand, immigrants have gained many opportunities to practice French through multiple pairings during their language studies. They have also learned about the culture of their host society and developed their linguistic and cross-cultural skills while confronting their own prejudices regarding people from that society. The pairing initiative gives them more confidence and encourages them to establish friendships with individuals from other communities.

32


2018 Awards of Excellence Honourable Mention Education

UNIVERSITÉ DU QUÉBEC À MONTRÉAL (UQÀM)

Cross-Cultural Pairings to Combat Racism and Promote Social Harmony

VISION FOR THE FUTURE The team is moving forward by setting up a new cross-cultural pairing research, documentation and action team (in French: GReJI) which brings together partners from various institutions, including universities, CÉGEPs, school boards, schools and community groups. Our aim is to provide francophones, anglophones, allophones and First Nations Peoples with the possibility to meet and share with each other through activities and projects. We are also planning to launch a website featuring pedagogical materials, videos and testimonials.

ABOUT THE UNIVERSITÉ DU QUÉBEC À MONTRÉAL (UQÀM) UQÀM is distinguished by the quality of the pedagogical support provided by its teaching faculty, the emphasis it places on practical training, the services it provides to foreign students and its vibrant campus life. Dynamic and innovative, UQÀM offers over 300 programs affiliated with its School of Social Sciences. Thanks to the achievements of its professors and students, UQÀM is ranked as one of Canada’s leading research universities, especially in the fields of human sciences, natural sciences, social health and creative arts. Its researchers form almost a hundred research teams notable for their interdisciplinary approach. UQÀM has an international reputation in many of the sectors in which it is active. In order to facilitate the exchange of research and movement of students, UQÀM has signed agreements with over 450 partners in 60 countries on five continents, in addition to the relationships established through its participation in various international university networks.

CONTACT PERSON Myra Deraîche Université du Québec à Montréal, Faculty of Communications C.P. 8888, Downtown Branch Montreal, QC H3C 3P8

33


2018 Best Practices Submission Education

DR. KANG LEE’S DEVELOPMENT LAB, ONTARIO INSTITUTE FOR STUDIES IN EDUCATION (OISE)

Reducing Racial Bias in Early Childhood

DESCRIPTION We aim to improve the living and social environment of racialized minorities and build harmonious race relations over the last decade. In collaboration with scholars locally in Ontario and internationally, we found an early emergence of racism at age 3, much earlier than previously predicted. Our findings further the public’s understanding of racism and enhance collective response to the issue of racial equity, positive race and relations. To address racism among young children, we developed training programs including perceptual individuation training, counter-stereotypical exposure, and interpersonal movement. As an interdisciplinary team, we are testing and refining these training programs to be widely disseminated in childhood educational settings across Ontario and beyond.

BACKGROUND Anti-racism efforts have mainly targeted explicit racial bias, an overt form of racism. However, such efforts have neglected implicit racial bias, a covert and unconscious form of social bias that is pervasive and pernicious. Such bias exists even in children as young as 3 years old. Implicit racial bias has far-reaching negative personal and societal consequences in all spheres of human life such as the heightened physical and psychological health risks to its recipients. However, nearly all efforts to reduce implicit racial bias has focused on adults which have largely failed. Given this failure, there is an urgent need to develop an empirically supported intervention program to reduce implicit racial bias in those who are most amenable to change - preschool-aged children. Unfortunately, no such program exists. My research aims to bridge this important gap.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE First, my initiative is the first systematic, evidence-based research program in Canada to develop, test, and refine an implicit racial bias reduction program for early childhood education settings. Building on our pioneering laboratory research examining the effects of individual training on young children's implicit racial bias, we will, for the first time in the world, adapt this innovative method for use by ECE teachers in field settings (e.g., classrooms). This allows us to assess the reduction program's real-world feasibility and sustainability when trained researchers may not be available to assist the ECE teachers. Moreover, we targeted both short- and long-term effects, aiming to reduce racism in the long term. Second, my initiative will provide a comprehensive examination of the theoretical account of how implicit racial bias emerges and develops in early childhood (i.e., the Perceptual-to-Social Hypothesis). In turn, this will transform our understanding of developmental causes of implicit racial bias and provide theoretical support to our child-based bias reduction program (i.e., individuation training).

34


2018 Best Practices Submission Education

DR. KANG LEE’S DEVELOPMENT LAB, ONTARIO INSTITUTE FOR STUDIES IN EDUCATION (OISE)

Reducing Racial Bias in Early Childhood

VISION FOR THE FUTURE In the future, we will work with an interdisciplinary team of psychologists, economists, early childhood educators, and policy advocates, to develop, test, and refine an innovative implicit racial bias reduction program to be widely disseminated in childhood educational settings across Ontario and beyond. Our initiative also has an innovative knowledge mobilization plan that will engage not only developmental researchers in different parts of the worlds but also other stakeholders such as ECE teachers, ECE policy advocates, economists, as well as such important teacher training institutions. The engagement of all these stakeholders at different levels enables our research findings and the resultant educational tool to be optimally and widely disseminated. With the support of these stakeholders, will we be able to work towards achieving our ultimate goals with this innovative program of research: to reduce racism, to foster social inclusion and harmony, and to make Canada a truly multicultural society.

ABOUT THE OISE Dr. Kang Lee is the principal investigator in Dr. Kang Lee's development lab. He is a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair (Dr. Eric Jackman Institute of Child Study, Applied Psychology and Human Development, OISE/University of Toronto). Dr. Lee's lab has contributed significantly to our understanding of the development of racial bias, the social information derived from faces and its effects on racial bias. Over the last twenty years, Dr. Lee's lab has used behavioral and neuroscience methods to study this social development, which led to novel findings of the age at which racial bias develops. OISE is recognized as a global leader in teaching and learning, continuing education research. As one of the largest and most research-intensive faculties of education in North America, OISE is an integral part of the University of Toronto— Canada’s most dynamic and comprehensive institution of higher learning. OISE is committed to enhancing the social, economic, political and cultural wellbeing of individuals and communities locally, nationally and globally through leadership in teaching, research, and advocacy.

CONTACT Miao Qian 252 Bloor Street West Toronto, ON M5S 1V6 http://www.kangleelab.com/

35


2018 Best Practices Submission Education

FACULTY OF SOCIAL WORK, UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA

Intergroup Dialogue

DESCRIPTION Intergroup dialogue is a facilitated learning experience that brings together individuals from two or more social identity groups over a sustained period of time. Typically intergroup dialogues include 14-16 individuals evenly split between two different social identity groups who commit to meet over a sustained period of time (usually 10-14 weeks) and are co-facilitated by two individuals of the same two social group identities represented in the intergroup dialogue group. One of the critical components of the intergroup dialogue model is the need for systematic training and support of the facilitators. A recent multi-year multi-university research project that examined the effectiveness of intergroup dialogue programs utilizing the critical-dialogic pedagogy in several US post-secondary institutions demonstrated significant positive results. Participants were found to have increased understanding, better relations with different identity groups and a willingness to challenge oppression. The intergroup dialogue pedagogy that addresses both the cognitive and affective aspects of participant learning, and that is delivered over a sustained period of time with trained facilitators, appears to influence these positive findings. Although many lessons can be learned from the US research, the intergroup dialogue model has been developed to fit the particular needs of the Canadian context, and specifically the need to reconcile the Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples. Since 2012, work has been done to develop the capacity for graduate students and community members to deliver intergroup dialogues both on the University of Manitoba campus and in the Winnipeg community.

BACKGROUND On May 21-22, 2013 two faculty members from The Program of Intergroup Relations, University of Michigan delivered a two day workshop at the UM for over 40 participants drawn from both the University of Manitoba and city of Winnipeg community members (http://news.umanitoba.ca/intergroup-dialogue-a-powerful-new-tool/). The goals of the two-day workshop were to introduce participants to the philosophy of intergroup dialogue and provide some skill development. The city of Winnipeg has long struggled with the divide between its Indigenous and non-Indigenous citizens. This issue was dramatically highlighted in the 2015 MacLean’s article that claimed that racism was “at its worst” in Winnipeg. This infamous label has inspired has inspired many community members to seek ways to address this, however practical solutions remain elusive. In the 2016, funding was secured under the Ethnocultural Community Support Program from the Province of Manitoba, Multiculturalism Secretariat to train community members from different ethno-cultural groups in intergroup dialogue facilitation. The ECSP proposal was submitted in partnership with the India School of Dance, Music, and Theatre Inc. who have remained strong supporters of this initiative (http://news.umanitoba.ca/community-members-challenged-to-address-racism-in-winnipeg/). The Hon. Rochelle Squires attended the graduation ceremony and was impressed with initiative. Post training evaluations were also overwhelmingly positive and as one participant stated, "intergroup dialogue has the capacity to create real and authentic change...and could change the dynamics of this city, this province". In 2017, funding was again awarded from Ethnocultural Community Support Program in partnership with the India School of Dance, Music, and Theatre Inc. and the University of Manitoba Major Outreach Award to develop capacity among interested youth from the Indigenous and ethno-cultural community to become intergroup dialogue facilitators. This training occurred in May -June 2018 and the youth participants verbally stated that the experience was transformative. Future work is planned with the youth to highlight their experience with intergroup dialogue through digital storytelling.

36


2018 Best Practices Submission Education

FACULTY OF SOCIAL WORK, UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA

Intergroup Dialogue

VISION FOR THE FUTURE The goal of the intergroup dialogue initiative has been to first create the capacity for both graduate students and community members to facilitate intergroup dialogues both on campus and within the community. The intergroup dialogue initiative on campus includes the capacity building of graduate students to facilitate intergroup dialogues with undergraduate students. The curriculum utilizes the most current understanding of the dynamics of oppression at the individual, institutional and societal level and helps participants to develop practical skills on how to address racism and build a better society for all. This initiative has been supported by the Indigenous/Newcomer Engagement Sector Table through the Social Planning Council - Immigration Partnership Winnipeg (IPW). This specific Sector Table is working to fulfill a primary IPW strategic priority to "enhance bridges between the Indigenous and newcomer communities through the creation of new opportunities and the further development of current practices that allow for cross cultural learning, understanding and support". Currently, the Indigenous/Newcomer Sector Table is working on identifying organizations and funding support for the delivery of community intergroup dialogues facilitated by the participants from the dierent training initiatives.

ABOUT THE MIGRATION AND DIASPORA STUDIES INITIATIVE The intergroup dialogue initiative is being spearheaded by Dr. Cathy Rocke, Associate Professor in the Faculty of Social Work, University of Manitoba. The vision of the Faculty of Social Work at the University of Manitoba is to help create and contribute to a world where there are no great inequalities and where diversity is celebrated. The mission of the University of Manitoba is to preserve and communicate knowledge that contributes to the cultural, social and economic well-being of the people of Manitoba, Canada, and the world.

CONTACT Dr. Cathy Rocke, MSW, PhD Associate Professor Faculty of Social Work 521 Tier Building University of Manitoba Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 Cathy.Rocke@umanitoba.ca http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/social_work/

37


2018 Best Practices Submission Education

FRIENDS OF SIMON WIESENTHAL CENTER

Compassion to Action

DESCRIPTION Compassion to Action has been specifically designed as a professional education vehicle for Canadian leaders with a sphere of influence, to learn about the Holocaust and apply those lessons to issues of intolerance and hatred today. Exploring the reasons for this single greatest genocide in human history, contemplating how it could have been prevented, and discussing how the lessons learned apply to today's complex world, can help professionals examine critical issues in their daily tasks. Our belief is that by providing historical context to the disease of hatred and intolerance (like antisemitism) and inspiring leaders to create change, they will return to their homes and communities ready to share their knowledge and work to counter all forms of hate. Experts from a variety of professional fields are brought in to share their knowledge and engage participants in meaningful discussion that not only evaluates the historical significance of this history, but also inspires these leaders to take this knowledge and pass on to future generations.

BACKGROUND Avi Benlolo, President and CEO of Friends of Simon Wiesenthal Center for Holocaust Studies (FSWC) was the creator of the Compassion to Action initiative. While Compassion to Action was inspired by Holocaust survivors like Simon Wiesenthal and Max Eisen and the need to carry on their legacy, Avi was also aware of the rising tide of antisemitism, racism and all forms of hatred and intolerance. Despite the mountains of documentation kept by the Nazis that recorded their crimes, Holocaust denial and revisionism has continued to be rampant over the past seventy-plus years all over the world, including here in Canada. In fact, hate crime statistics in Canada have been staggering, and point towards the fact that antisemitism and racism did not end in 1945 with the end of World War II. Compassion to Action is an answer to addressing this hatred and intolerance. It’s a program that shows the direct consequences of what happens when hatred and intolerance are left unchecked. The program provides a forum for discussion and a means of building community outside of one professional field or one province or territory. It enables decision-makers to share both the challenges they’ve faced and the successes they’ve achieved in their respective professions. The historical lessons are there to guide participants and help them develop tools that will shape their work in the future.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE The impact of Compassion to Action continues to grow. Since the initial journey in 2010, more than 150 Chiefs of Police, Directors of Education, School board trustees, superintendents, and board chairs, politicians, and business leaders have taken part in the program. The following is a sample of the individual and systemic change that have resulted from the impact of Compassion to Action: Helena Karabela and Anthony Quinn, trustees from Halton Catholic District School Board, travelled on the 2016 Compassion to Action journey. They helped establish a board initiative to formally recognize International Holocaust Remembrance Day each year in their schools. Helena and Anthony spread the lessons they had learned from their journey by presenting their journey to a group of students. Helena also arranged for survivor Max Eisen to speak at her schools multiple times.

38


2018 Best Practices Submission Education

FRIENDS OF SIMON WIESENTHAL CENTER

Compassion to Action

VISION FOR THE FUTURE Compassion to Action will continue to be a priority program for FSWC. Avi Benlolo’s vision for carrying on the legacy of Simon Wiesenthal and that of Holocaust survivors will continue to expand across the country. While there has been positive response from provinces outside of Ontario, we will continue to grow this support through continued outreach and support from past participants. We will reach the point where each journey will have representation from every province and territory across Canada. Each itinerary, as we move forward, will include the most prominent sites while considering travel to newly established museums and memorials. The program will stay current and involve those that are on the cutting edge of Holocaust research. The impact of this initiative is the area that, in the future, will see the greatest growth. As participants return from Compassion to Action and begin to implement change in their respective fields, it opens up the opportunity for them to share their successes. As ideas are shared, future participants will build on the ideas and initiatives of past participants to expand the reach and impact of Holocaust and human rights education. The vision for Compassion to Action for the future is that it becomes the catalyst for establishing strong, positive systematic change throughout the country in all sectors of society.

ABOUT THE SIMON WIESENTHAL CENTER FOR HOLOCAUST STUDIES (FSWC) Friends of Simon Wiesenthal Center for Holocaust Studies (FSWC) is the top Jewish human rights foundation in Canada with a substantial constituency. It directly impacts over 100,000 people each year and 500,000+ peripherally. FSWC is committed to countering racism and antisemitism and to promoting the principles of tolerance, social justice and Canadian democratic values through advocacy and educational programs including workshops, Freedom Day, Spirit of Hope Benefit, Tools for Tolerance, Compassion to Action and its widely acclaimed Tour for Humanity. FSWC is affiliated with the Simon Wiesenthal Center, an international Jewish human rights organization headquartered in Los Angeles, which has won two Academy Awards, has built two Museums of Tolerance (with a third being built in Jerusalem) and is an NGO at the United Nations, UNESCO, OAS, OSCE, the Council of Europe and the Latin American Parliament.

CONTACT Melissa Mikel 902-5075 Yonge Street Toronto, ON M2N 6C6 http://www.fswc.ca/

39


2018 Best Practices Submission Education

HARMONY MOVEMENT

Race and Racism: Igniting Student Voice

DESCRIPTION Race and Racism: Igniting Student Voice is an interactive student leadership program that encourages youth to critically analyze race in Canada. Programming is based on experiential learning models and developed in collaboration with educational partners. The content allows students to analyze identity, discrimination and advocacy via one-day conferences or two to three-day programs, each with similar but distinct goals. Single day conferences engage up to 100 students in critical thinking skills sparking youth-led discussions, analyzing mass media, demystifying concepts of race and exploring changes they would like to implement in their schools. Two and three-day programs intentionally bring together 30 racialized students, providing the time and space necessary to build trust, explore self-identity, have deeper discussions about school climate, student voice and to develop detailed action plans for social change. Follow-up support to groups through post-program forums is provided, allowing students to continue to hone their skills and reflect on the implementation of their plans. All three formats share the goal of amplifying the voices of youth and to giving racialized students a space in which they can share their experiences, find their voices and develop the skills necessary to engage in conversations that create change.

BACKGROUND The mandate of Harmony Movement has always been to challenge “us vs. them” attitudes that act as barriers to social inclusion. Since the organization’s inception, school programs have always focused on addressing racism, sexism, homophobia, islamophobia, and other forms of systemic oppression. As such, Race and Racism programming was simply an opportunity to expand on our mandate by encouraging youth to more closely analyze race relations in Canada. At the time the Provincial Government announced financial support for school programs addressing racism, Harmony Movement had already been delivering anti-oppression workshops for over a decade. It did however, create a greater opportunity for us to lead school discussions on race and intersectionality, for which we tailored content that would help move the overarching discussion forward. Our collaboration between schools, community groups and the Ontario Government has continued alongside the implementation of A Better Way Forward: Ontario’s 3-Year Anti-Racism Strategic Plan.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE Our conferences are meant to first initiate individual change. For many racialized students, our programming may be the first time they’ve engaged in interactive content that allows them to deeply and safely explore their own experiences with race. The second day of the conference in particular is meant to encourage youth to start thinking about the impact their voices can make and about what they, as leaders, would like to see change. With the support of facilitators, students work together to create detailed action plans for social change. Post-program collaboration between Harmony Movement staff, school educators and students helps ensure that plans are implemented and that feedback and evolution is continuous. In the past, students have gone on to develop initiatives such as a Red Dress Campaign or mural art addressing discrimination and promoting inclusion. Another group of students spent a day visiting immigration lawyers and community organizations in order to learn about the challenges faced by newcomers and how they can help to eliminate some of those social barriers.

40


2018 Best Practices Submission Education

HARMONY MOVEMENT

Race and Racism: Igniting Student Voice

VISION FOR THE FUTURE In the future, we hope to expand our reach and ability to impact more racialized youth across the country so that they can create change on individual and collective levels. We hope to collect even more qualitative data which will inform next steps as determined by the experiences and voices of racialized youth in our schools and communities. We also will help create more allies amongst youth and educators through education to support and affect systemic change. Last, we will continue to enrich program content as determined by the needs of the ever-changing socio-political landscape and remain a progressive and respected resource in transformational education.

ABOUT THE MIGRATION AND DIASPORA STUDIES INITIATIVE Harmony Movement is an educational non-profit that encourages all Canadians to value diversity and to foster a commitment to a just and caring society. The organization was formed in 1994 in order to address inter-racial intolerance and to confront all forms of discrimination that act as barriers to a harmonious society. Harmony Movement delivers diversity education programs in schools, community centres and workplaces across Ontario. Its youth-led programs provide a space for students to critically think about stereotypes, diversity and inclusion, and interactive content guides them in the creation of action plans. In this way, programs allow students to analyze and challenge social and cultural constructs and then turn conversations into concrete change. Starting in the spring of 2018, Harmony Movement has begun expanding its programming beyond Ontario as part of a national project entitled Voices of Canadian Youth.

CONTACT Roz Espin 85 Scarsdale Road, No. 303 Toronto, ON M3B 2R2 http://www.harmony.ca/

41


2018 Best Practices Submission Education

MIGRATION AND DIASPORA STUDIES INITIATIVE, CARLETON UNIVERSITY

Exodus: Movement, Culture, People

DESCRIPTION This collaborative project provides support for high school students in the National Capital Region to examine the connections between migration, diaspora and Canadian diversity as refracted through the power of arts and culture. Students are invited to attend masterclasses with internationally-renowned playwrights, spoken word artists and choreographers in which they have the opportunity to perform, develop improvisation skills, research characters and examine genres. They participate in postcolonial and decolonial readings groups and workshops led by faculty affiliated with the Migration and Diaspora Studies Initiative at Carleton University that provide historically informed and forward looking approaches to migration, diaspora and Canadian diversity. Drawing on the skills and insights gained from these masterclasses and workshops, students then use theatre, song, rhyme, prose, storytelling and African diasporic art forms in performances that commemorate World Refugee Day and the International Day for the Elimination of Racism. The project reflects Carleton University’s strategic goal to achieve global prosperity through a foundation of sustainable communities. It drew strength from the excellence and expertise of partner institutes such as the University of Ottawa (and its international, interdisciplinary and bilingual Migration/Representation/Stereotypes Conference), Ottawa-Carleton District School Board, the Ottawa Local Immigration Partnership, House of Paint Arts Festival, and the Ottawa Native Friendship Centre. It will grow and extend to anticipate and meet the demands of partners in Toronto and Vancouver in 2019 and 2020 as well as the experiential learning component of the new MA program in Migration and Diaspora Studies at Carleton University.

BACKGROUND The Migration and Diaspora Studies (MDS) Initiative takes seriously Carleton’s place in Ottawa, and initiates as well as responds to innovation within research, policy and practitioner communities beyond the campus. We offer analysis on issues of interest to government, non-government, cultural organizations and the public, from the Syrian refugee challenge to climate change. We continue to grow our connections nationwide as well as globally, fostering links to researchers, experts, activists, migration and diasporic community organizations and migration centers. Our commitment to ‘Exodus: Movement, Culture, People’ emerged from conversations and experiences with high school students, the first cohort of students in the Bachelor of Global and International Studies, and colleagues in the city of Ottawa and Ottawa-Carleton District School Board. We were determined to offer practical support to existing anti-racist practices in the region and cultivate spaces for informed reflection about key terms and ideas that may sharpen and deepen our ability to communicate across ethnic and cultural groups. We were also fortunate to draw on the strategic hire in MDS, appointed in July 2014, who has extensive experience supporting applications to higher education in the UK and US from minority ethnic communities and students from non-traditional backgrounds (as director of the Oxford University Access Scheme and Ida B Wells-Barnett Professor of African and Black Diaspora Studies). They have played a leadership role with the National Student Commonwealth Forum and the Ontario Black Youth Action Plan in Canada.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE It brings together the arts, social sciences and public affairs to advance our mutual understanding of the phenomena associated with migration and diasporas. It brings together faculty, student and practitioner communities who enhance the policy development process. It brings together migration and diaspora studies to address: • the multinational and transnational ties and practices of migrant and diaspora communities; • the relationships between the nation-state, non-state agents and transnational economic, cultural, social and political structures;

42


2018 Best Practices Submission Education

MIGRATION AND DIASPORA STUDIES INITIATIVE, CARLETON UNIVERSITY

Exodus: Movement, Culture, People

• the processes whereby migrants mobilize social and political action in the societies of settlement and departure, and articulate transnational, diasporic identities to contest racism and racial hierarchies. It also investigates the human stories behind the statistics to provide students with the tools and confidence to contribute to civil society in a manner that is academically rigorous, creative and attuned to the ethics of addressing sensitive issues relating to affective themes and issues such as trauma, racism and identity.

VISION FOR THE FUTURE We anticipate adding two extra dates for performances that draw on the workshops and masterclasses (one to coincide with Human Rights Day and another during orientation week at universities). We will add workshops with internationallyrenowned filmmakers, and also record and edit the performances so that they may be shared with national and international colleagues in Migration and Diaspora Studies as well as related fields such as Performance Studies, Education and Pedagogy. We also anticipate extending our network of high school teachers in the National Capital Region, and developing a national program with partners at York University and Simon Fraser University that will work with students in the Greater Toronto Area and Vancouver.

ABOUT THE MIGRATION AND DIASPORA STUDIES INITIATIVE The Migration and Diaspora Studies Initiative focuses on the social, economic, cultural and political implications of the movement and transnational settlement of people. The Initiative was launched in 2011 with the support of the Office of the VP Research and International, awarded a Carleton University strategic hire in 2012, and received a Carleton University Building Connections award in 2015 for its activities across campus that have had a sustained impact on research and teaching. The MDS Initiative received a seven-year, $400,000 grant from the TD Bank Group in 2012 with which it has supported an annual Graduate Fellowship in MDS and dozens of successful national and international events that bring together participants from government, business, academe and civil society. In addition, in 2012, the Metropolis Project, an international research network of researchers, policy makers, and community groups, moved its Secretariat to Carleton University and has been actively involved with the MDS Initiative. The MDS Initiative developed Canada’s first undergraduate program in Migration and Diaspora Studies with the launch of the Migration and Diaspora Studies Specialization in the Bachelor of Global and International Studies program in 2015. The MDS Initiative also was awarded a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Immigration and Refugee Law and Policy in 2017, appointed to Law and Legal Studies with a starting date of July 1, 2018. It anticipates building on the successful interdisciplinary collaboration in teaching and research that has established Carleton as a global hub for Migration and Diaspora Studies by offering the first MA program in Migration and Diaspora Studies in Canada in 2019-20.

CONTACT Daniel McNeil 1125 Colony By Drive Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6 https://www.carleton.ca/mds/

43


2018 Best Practices Submission Education

TOWN OF TRURO, NOVA SCOTIA

Rally Against Racism

DESCRIPTION Each year from March 21, the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination until Rally Against Racism Day, students at participating schools learn about what racism is, anti-racism strategies, equality, respect for others and accept the things that make us different. With the full support of the Town of Truro, Truro Police Services, Chief Bob Gloade and Millbrook First Nations Community, Business and private Sector, this Rally started out with a few hundred participants in 2010 to now having a few thousand involved. Every year the Rally expands and includes schools all across the region and all cultural groups and performances. After the march, the rally begins with the Singing of "O’Canada", and the Mi'kmaq Honour song along with «Lift Every Voice and Sing», then the Rally Against Racism pledge performed in English, French and Mi’kmaq. This has helped Truro become one of the top communities to live in as outlined in the National News.

BACKGROUND In 2009, Ian McLeod, Cobequid Family of Schools Supervisor, with the blessing of Chignecto Central Regional School Board struck a Committee to raise the awareness that racism still exists. It was decided to create a Rally in Truro, Nova Scotia during the spring of 2010. The planning committee was lead by Mr. McLeod with Educators and Students from Cobequid Educational Centre (Seniors), Truro Elementary School, and Truro Junior High School. The Committee also included Teachers, Student Support Workers, Administration and Community members with major input from the African Nova Scotia and Millbrook First Nations Communities. It was further decided the Students would lead this initiative with the full support of the School Board and Family of Schools under the leadership of Ian McLeod. The Town of Truro, who fully supported the Rally Against Racism, signed a Proclamation that the last Thursday in May will be “Rally Against Racism Day”.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE The Rally Against Racism first started off with a few hundred students participating in 2010 and has since grown to now having a few thousand participants from schools all across the region and all cultural groups and performances.

VISION FOR THE FUTURE Our vision for the future is to develop the Rally program and help end racism in our community.

ABOUT THE TOWN OF TRURO The Town of Truro is located in the hub of Nova Scotia and is home to over 12,000 residents. The current mayor of Truro is W. R. Mills.

CONTACT Raymond Tynes 695 Prince Street Truro, NS B2N 1G5 https://www.truro.ca/

44


2018 Best Practices Submission Education

PROFESSOR WILLIAM CUNNINGHAM, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

Changing the Categories by Which We See Others

DESCRIPTION In my lab, we take a social neuroscience approach to self and social categorisation in which the current self-categorisation(s) is constructed from relatively stable identity representations stored in memory (such as the significance of one's social identity) through iterative and interactive perceptual and evaluative processing. Our approach describes these processes across multiple levels of analysis, linking the effects of self-categorisation and social identity on perception and evaluation. We find that self-categorisation with an arbitrary group can override the effects of more visually salient, cross-cutting social categories on social perception and evaluation. The top-down influence of self-categorisation represents a powerful antecedent focused strategy for suppressing racial bias without many of the limitations of a more response focused strategy. Thus, our work seeks to understand how these biases are represented and used, with special attention paid to how they can be reduced by shifting goals and contexts. This research has been useful for developing new ways to combat prejudice by building a common communal identity.

BACKGROUND I am a full professor of psychology at the University of Toronto. Here I teach in the social and cognitive programs, with cross appointments in Clinical Psychology and the School of Management. My background is in social and cognitive psychology. I began with a more basic science approach - being curious about the unconscious mind - but soon came to realize that racism and prejudice was an area that this was most important to explore. A big question became - why is there still bias when people say that they are motivated to not be biased? Might understanding unconscious processes help us understand that? From this starting point, the whole research program unfolded. The inspiration for this work comes from Social Identity Theory in social psychology, combined with the work of my PhD advisor Mahazarin Banaji. This work is done in collaboration with my amazing students; in particular Jay Van Bavel.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE We have stayed in the University of Toronto for some time. But, now, we are working with diversity training groups and groups interested in prejudice (such as the CRRF) to get what we know in the basic science to the field. We can hopefully build better interventions that way.

VISION FOR THE FUTURE We are now working with diversity training groups to develop new tools for measuring prejudice, and for building upon common values. We would like to begin working directly with the Canadian government soon with this, and have started making new connections.

CONTACT Professor William Cunningham 100 St. George Street Toronto, ON M5S 3G3 https://canlabuoft.wordpress.com/prejudice/

45


2018 Awards of Excellence Winner Government

CORRECTIONAL SERVICE OF CANADA (CSC)

Employment Equity and Diversity Committee

DESCRIPTION The Correctional Service of Canada operates three levels of Employment Equity and Diversity Committees including National, Regional, and Local levels. Initiated in 2010 by then Commissioner Don Head, the EEDC was launched to create an inclusive work environment consisting of valuing diversity and an engaged workforce. Making CSC more diverse and inclusive begins with the National EEDC, which advises the CSC executive committee on employment equity and diversity issues. The National EEDC Terms of Reference sets out the objectives, roles, responsibilities, and reporting relationships for EED Committees operating throughout the organization. The EEDC is committed to creating and supporting barrier-free, accessible, and inclusive work environments based on the Employment Equity Act and the Canadian Human Rights Act, and through four points of focus: Education, Engagement, Personal Accountability, and Sharing Information. Each of our 6 regions has a Regional EEDC operating under a Chairperson appointed from senior management. The regional committees promote EED initiatives in the workplace, consult with designated diversity groups, and increase the visibility of EED through communications, projects, learning opportunities, and events. Each worksite operates a Local committee of volunteer staff members that promotes EED activities, and ensures dissemination of information and recognition of commemorative dates, engaging with staff and equity groups on EED initiatives. Each of these 3 levels works independently and together in order to reduce racist stereotypes, prejudicial practices and critical discussion about the diverse nature of Canada.

BACKGROUND Committed to the Employment Equity Act and Canadian Human Rights Act, CSC has an obligation to identify and remove barriers and make accommodation for differences for members of four employment equity groups: Aboriginal Persons, Visible Minorities, Persons with Disabilities, and Women. In 2010, CSC had some policies and initiatives that recognized diversity, but there was no cohesive plan that served and respected the cultural background of the employees or the offenders. Employees from the four EE groups were teamed up to oversee consultations and a strategic plan. The result was a strategic action plan that provided an overarching approach to promoting an inclusive workplace where employees understood the challenges of biases, stereotypes, privilege and racism. In 2018, EEDC now has a national, regional, and community presence across the country and helps inform policies and improve practices from HR to Information Management to Learning and Development. Furthermore, EEDC works to ensure that CSC’s workforce is reflective of the Canadian population, the labour market availability and the offender population.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE EEDCs are crucial components in ensuring that CSC policies and processes reflect the needs of Employment Equity designated group members, and that CSC embraces the value of promoting a diverse workforce that respects Canadian human rights and multicultural legislation and policies. In the second phase of its strategic plan, the EEDC promoted broader concerns of all of their employees through a variety of educational commemorations of national dates, support for the LGBTQ2 community, and discussions with Human Resources and other sectors and stakeholders. EEDC is now asked to comment on the majority of policy developments to ensure that they are inclusive and reflective of our multicultural nature. The most significant action taken on broadening our understandings of each other was the training on cultural competency, mandatory for all CSC staff. By creating a system to regularly measure our workforce, CSC has increased representation in the EE groups, engaged stakeholders, educated CSC employees, communicated success stories about inclusion and diversity and demanded personal accountability from all CSC employees in creating a respectful and inclusive workplace.

46


2018 Awards of Excellence Winner Government

CORRECTIONAL SERVICE OF CANADA (CSC)

Employment Equity and Diversity Committee

VISION FOR THE FUTURE Our vision for the future of EEDC is to build its presence both within CSC and in the Federal Government as a whole. In 2017, Treasury Board Joint Union/Management Task Force on Diversity and Inclusion in the Public Service released its report after months of cross-country consultations with public servants. Many of the recommendations outlined in the report are already happening at CSC, placing us as a leader in diversity and inclusion. EEDC has already been approached by other departments to share our experiences and to provide expertise. These departments include the CRTC, Treasury Board Secretariat, Canadian Revenue Agency and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. Within CSC, EEDC has accomplished a lot in a few shorts years. The committee has developed CSC staff in the EE groups, engaged stakeholders, educated CSC employees, communicated success stories about inclusion and diversity and demanded personal accountability from all CSC employees in creating a respectful and inclusive workplace. In 2018, EEDC paid for CSC to become a member of the Canadian Centre for Diversity and Inclusion. Membership provides free diversity training for all CSC employees. Our next step is to revamp our strategic plan to reflect legislative changes and to establish a higher bar for employment equity and staff development.

ABOUT The Correctional Service of Canada (CSC), as part of the criminal justice system and respecting the rule of law, contributes to public safety by actively encouraging and assisting offenders to become law-abiding citizens, while exercising reasonable, safe, secure and humane control. CSC recognizes that there is a disproportionate number of offenders from particular ethnocultural groups such as African Canadians and Indigenous communities. CSC also recognizes that the racism experienced by these groups significantly contributes to their elevated levels of incarceration. CSC has several practices that are promoted by the EEDC to help challenge racial biases and help ethnocultural offenders reintegrate back into their communities. These include: • Use of Aboriginal Social Histories to understand the background and challenges of our Indigenous offenders. A similar approach for Black offenders is in progress • Effective, culturally appropriate interventions and reintegration support for First Nations, Metis, and Inuit offenders

• Effective and timely interventions in addressing mental health needs of offenders

• Productive relationships with diverse partners, including the national ethnocultural advisory committee and regional ethnocultural committees, a citizen-based volunteer group that advises CSC on race relations

• Hiring of Elders and faith leaders to meet the various spiritual needs of offenders.

CONTACT Dr. Manju Varma 340 Laurier Avenue West, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0P9 http://www.csc-scc.gc.ca/careers/003001-2200-eng.shtml

47


2018 Awards of Excellence Winner Government

DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION UNIT, GOVERNMENT OF MANITOBA

The Manitoba Government Diversity and Inclusion Strategy

DESCRIPTION The Manitoba Government Diversity and Inclusion Strategy (MGDIS) is the framework and action plan guiding efforts to advance diversity and inclusion within the Manitoba government. Approved in 2014 after significant review on current best practices, analyses of organizational data, and broad stakeholder consultations, the MGDIS represents an update to previous efforts – a continuation of some prior activities, modifications to others, and some new initiatives to address identified gaps. In particular, it shifted previous approaches in three main respects:

• From a primary focus on representation statistics, to include efforts to build a workplace culture of inclusion

• From a primary focus on four designated employment equity groups, to support a greater awareness of the many dimensions of diversity, intersectionality, and recognition that all employees are part of the “diversity landscape” • To promote increased awareness of how diversity and inclusion positively impact capacity, engagement and innovation. The strategy has been well-received by senior management and other stakeholders, in part because it promotes a broad vision of diversity and inclusion, intended to be meaningful and relatable for all in the organization.

BACKGROUND The Manitoba government has a long history of efforts supporting public service diversity, going back over 30 years to measures such as an Affirmative Action Policy established the early 1980s. Development of the current MGDIS was initiated in 2013 as a review of the previous Provincial Civil Service Diversity Strategy, which had been in place since 2008. There was a recognition that further analysis, consultations and updated approaches were needed for further progress in building a civil service fully inclusive of minority groups. For example, the benchmarks that served as the representation goals for employment equity groups had become outdated given the significant growth of Indigenous people and visible minorities in the broader provincial population. Also, there was a growing recognition that a focus on diversity – bringing a diverse mix of employees into the public service – was not enough; in a diverse organization, there’s also a need to foster inclusion, so employees can work cohesively, respectfully and productively together.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE We have seen representation of employees from employment equity groups continue to rise across government. Also, in our periodic Employee Engagement Surveys, we ask employees whether they feel their department values diversity, and whether they are treated respectfully at work. We have seen improvements in both these measures, overall and across all employment equity groups, in our last two surveys (one in 2013, prior to the release of the MGDIS, and one

48


2018 Awards of Excellence Winner Government

DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION UNIT, GOVERNMENT OF MANITOBA

The Manitoba Government Diversity and Inclusion Strategy

after, in 2015). These, and other less quantifiable indicators, point to positive progress in our efforts to build a more diverse and inclusive provincial public service. We believe that this translates into a public service that more fully understands and can better serve the diverse needs of Manitobans.

VISION FOR THE FUTURE There are plans to review the MGDIS and make any updates deemed necessary, after approximately five years of implementation, in 2019.

ABOUT THE DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION UNIT, GOVERNMENT OF MANITOBA The Diversity and Inclusion Unit (DIU) is part of the Manitoba Civil Service Commission, the department responsible for human resource management within the Manitoba government. The DIU is a centralized unit responsible for government-wide initiatives advancing workplace diversity and inclusion (DI), and support to departments in their own activities. Functions of the DIU include administering employee recruitment, internship and development programs, with a particular focus on members of designated employment equity groups; developing and delivering employee training and learning events on DI topics; and providing support to employee resource groups representing demographic groups facing barriers to full inclusion.

CONTACT PERSON Sam Grande 935-155 Carlton Street Winnipeg, MB R3C 3H8 http://www.gov.mb.ca/govjobs/government/emplequity.html

49


2018 Best Practices Submission Government

ONTARIO HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION

OHRC eCourse - "Call It Out: Racism, Racial Discrimination and Human Rights"

DESCRIPTION On March 21, 2018, the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) released Call It Out. Call it Out is the latest addition to the OHRC's eLearning series. This new interactive eLearning tool is designed to raise awareness of the history and impact of racism and racial discrimination and to promote a culture of human rights in Ontario. The concepts and theory are applicable throughout Canada, and the eCourse caught the attention of human rights agencies on both the west coast and the east coast. Call It Out is based on the OHRC’s Policy on preventing racism and racial discrimination, which focuses on practical examples and encourages dialogue around exclusion, discrimination and harassment based on race. The eCourse is also an effective workplace resource, designed to complement employers’ existing diversity and inclusion training programs. It is also suitable for youth aged 12 and older and includes reviews, knowledge checks and scenarios. Every member of the Ontario Public Service (@65000) will have the opportunity to access this training as part of our internal Anti-Racism Policy.

BACKGROUND For several years the OHRC has been developing an eLearning series that includes interactive modules and webinars. This eCourse is a team effort that involves every branch at the OHRC. The content is based on OHRC's work on racism, including its Policy and guidelines on racism and racial discrimination. The scenarios come from real-life experiences. “Racism and racial discrimination are pervasive and a continuing reality for many Ontarians. This is unacceptable”. “Before we can stop racial discrimination, we have to understand what racism is and how it can violate human rights. Call It Out is a step in identifying,understanding and ending racism and racial discrimination.” [OHRC Chief Commissioner Renu Mandhane]

MAKING A DIFFERENCE The OHRC is mandated to provide public education and eLearning is a tool for doing so. eLearning allows the OHRC to reach out to a broad audience. We provide copies for organizations/businesses that have their own internal LMS. We've found it to be a key education tool whether for in-house training or for career development.

VISION FOR THE FUTURE We will build on your best practice initiative in the future by taking what we learned from developing this eCourse.

50


2018 Best Practices Submission Government

ONTARIO HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION

OHRC eCourse - "Call It Out: Racism, Racial Discrimination and Human Rights"

ABOUT THE ONTARIO HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) is Ontario’s human rights watchdog and focuses on preventing discrimination before it takes root, and eliminating it when it does happen. Its work often involves identifying and eliminating systemic discrimination. The OHRC uses its mandate to advance understanding – and compliance – with human rights laws, which protect against discrimination. The OHRC’s role in Ontario’s human rights system is to protect, promote and advance human rights. It’s working to make sure that each person understands their rights and responsibilities under the Code and can advocate for themselves, their friends, families, neighbours and communities. The OHRC:

• Educates the public so that everyone can understand their rights and responsibilities

• Develops human rights policies and promotes public interest remedies

• Works to reduce or resolve tension and conflict in communities

• Does outreach and education, and partners with stakeholder groups

• Intervenes in the courts and tribunals in the public interest

• Initiates its own legal action on systemic, public-interest issues

• Sometimes we take legal action when the law needs to be clarified

• Provides advice to government, and calls for changes in areas like education, policing, corrections and housing regulations.

CONTACT Dora Nipp 180 Dundas Street, West 9th floor Toronto, Ontario M7A 2R9

51


2018 Awards of Excellence Winner Media

SINKING SHIP ENTERTAINMENT

Casting for Diversity

DESCRIPTION Sinking Ship operates under one core tenet: kids need to ‘see it, to be it’. To be more specific, our diverse audiences deserve to see themselves accurately and authentically reflected on screen. Regardless of the writer’s vision for a role, Sinking Ship implements gender and ethnically blind casting ensuring no bias to find the best person for the role. In series like Annedroids, Odd Squad, and Dino Dana we work to ensure all kids are represented. While the company focuses on diversity on screen, Sinking Ship Entertainment also puts a focused emphasis on diversity behind the camera ensuring a team comprised of a range of ethnicities and genders working in every department from development to post production.

BACKGROUND There is no one event that inspired this initiative, our company has always worked from the motto that kids need to ‘see it to be it’. The problem we were looking to address was representation; we wanted to ensure that children everywhere would see themselves in our characters, and in identifying with them, unlock a love of the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) based educational subject matter of our series. We strive to ensure that all kids, across our wonderfully diverse nation, are able to see themselves represented in a positive way.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE The impact of our initiative is widespread; children across Canada, and the world, are able to see themselves in the characters on our shows from Odd Squad to Annedroids to Dino Dana. This representation allows them to connect more meaningfully with the subject matter and broaden their potential for the future. Additionally by having ethnically diverse characters we are allowing kids in communities that are not ethnically diverse to see this representation devoid of stereotypes.

VISION FOR THE FUTURE Our plan for the future is to continue to push for equal representation both on and off screen on all of our projects. As we continue to grow, these tenets of representation will continue to be one of our core values at the forefront of our work and we hope to influence others in the industry to do the same.

ABOUT SINKING SHIP ENTERTAINMENT Sinking Ship Entertainment is a multiple Emmy® Award winning production, distribution and interactive company specializing in kids’ live-action CGI blended series. Since its launch in 2004, Sinking Ship has produced over 500 hours of content and sold to over 200countries internationally. The company has rapidly earned a reputation for high quality, ground breaking original series and companion interactive experiences. In 2016, the Kidscreen Hot 50 ranking of all kids’ companies in the world listed Sinking Ship Entertainment as#3 in Kids Production, #7 in Kids Distribution and #7 in Kids Interactive. Sinking Ship was also named the #1 Kids Production Company in 2016 by Playback Magazine Canada. Overall the company has won 12 Daytime Emmy® Awards and a variety of other international awards including Canadian Screen Awards, Youth Media Alliance Awards, Fan Chile Awards, Parents Choice Awards, the Shaw Rocket Prize, and the Prix Jeunesse International. The Toronto-based company is home to over 125 shipmates and in addition to production operates a VFX and Interactive Studio.

CONTACT Rikki Cohen 1179 King Street West, unit 302 Toronto, ON M6K 3C5

52


2018 Best Practices Submission Media

JAM3

East of the Rockies

DESCRIPTION East of the Rockies is an experimental augmented-reality narrative written by 83-year-old Joy Kogawa, one of Canada’s most acclaimed and celebrated literary figures. The story is told from the perspective of Yuki, a 17-year-old girl force from her home and made to live in the Slocan internment camp during the Second World War. As Yuki and her family adjust to their new reality inside the camp, they struggle to make life as normal as possible. Users follow the story by tapping, swiping, inspecting and zooming in on key elements within each scene. Every interaction activates a piece of scripted narrative spoken by Joy’s own granddaughter, Anne. Spoken in the first person, each line illuminates a different aspect of life in the camp, as documented in Yuki’s journal. East of the Rockies uses cutting-edge AR technology to bring impactful storytelling into the palm of users’ hands.

BACKGROUND The project began with Joy Kogawa—famed author, poet, activist, and member of the Order of Canada and the Order of British Columbia, as well as Japan’s Order of the Rising Sun. Joy is also a former internee at the Japanese-Canadian internment camp at Slocan, BC. Kogawa’s novel Obasan stands as the most important account of this chapter in Canadian history. Powerful and passionate, Obasan tells, through the eyes of a child, the moving story of Japanese Canadians during the Second World War. We wanted to educate people, touch people's hearts and spread goodwill. As lofty as that sounds, that has always been the goal for East of the Rockies. Although the narrative of East of the Rockies is bittersweet we really believe it will resonate with young minds. The technology is a sort of Trojan horse for getting Joy's words and ideas into the hands of today's youth. Kogawa has worked closely with Jam3 throughout the development of our project and will continue to be the main focus of curriculum we develop.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE By using the latest mediums and technology to tell substantive stories, we will no doubt influence students in Canada and around the world. Together with the National Film Board of Canada and Joy Kogawa, we are working to develop a nationwide curriculum that will help frame the history of the internment of Japanese Canadians for a whole new audience.

VISION FOR THE FUTURE We are going to lead by example and continue to support East of the Rockies over the next several years. It's our hope that the curriculum that is being developed will be taught at high schools across Canada for years to come and not only encourage young minds to learn more about the internment of Japanese Canadians as well as the circumstances leading up to it. We want to help foster the next generation of critical thinkers so that history doesn't repeat itself.

ABOUT JAM3 Jam3 is an internationally recognized Design and Experience studio. We create better ways for people to form unforgettable connections with lasting impact.

CONTACT Jason Legge 325 Adelaide St. West Toronto Ontario, M5V 1P8

53


2018 Awards of Excellence Winner Youth

STEM FELLOWSHIP

STEMpowerment Internships and Mentorships Program

DESCRIPTION The STEMpowerment program offers experiential learning and mentorship opportunities for high school students in a variety of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) fields. We seek to empower students from communities traditionally underrepresented in STEM including students who are socioeconomically disadvantaged, Indigenous students, refugees and recent immigrants. Our internships program allows students to experience scientific research at an academic lab for five days over March break. Student interns are mentored one on one by postdoctoral fellows or graduate students and engage in cutting edge research in a specific field. This program allows interns to explore careers in research and develop insight into scientific inquiry through the research process. Our internships program has been active since March 2015 and has expanded to reach students in Metro Vancouver, Calgary, and the Greater Toronto Area. Students have worked in areas of research including biomechanics, climate change, rheology, nanotechnology, brain stimulation, stem cells, bioinformatics, energy innovation, disease prevention, transplant immunology and more. Our mentorship program pairs high school students with undergraduate students at universities across Canada based on their mutual areas of interest. The focus is to facilitate a long term connection where the high school student is encouraged to explore STEM in terms of post-secondary education, careers, or other opportunities.

BACKGROUND As undergraduate students, we could see that while diversity in STEM is increasing, there is still a long way to go before it is common for all students to see someone from the same cultural background or community pursuing STEM. We wanted to address this issue at the youth level by providing opportunities for students to meet these researchers and learn from them. The current high school student experience is insufficient to determine what a career in STEM research is like, for example, students are not exposed to the real life applications of much of the theoretical knowledge they learn in class. We wanted to provide hands-on opportunities where students could truly experience the research process and connect with professionals in the field.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE Our initiative helps high school students make connections with researchers and university students who can guide them as they explore opportunities and potential careers in STEM. From the internships program, students become familiar with the process of scientific inquiry and can learn about how the past experiences and goals of researchers have shaped their current career pursuits. From our student feedback collected after every placement, students have identified that this experience helped them see how different cultures and personalities worked together in scientific research and that they could then begin to think about how they themselves could fit into it someday. This is a direct reflection of individual change. We impact systemic change by breaking down stereotypes of what a scientist has to look like by introducing high school students to day to day life in university labs, which they can then share with their peers. The mentorship program gives students the answers to their questions about STEM, or encouragement to pursue their interests, or link them to other opportunities to help them find those interests. This helps our next generation of STEM change-makers be prepared for their future.

54


2018 Awards of Excellence Winner Youth

STEM FELLOWSHIP

STEMpowerment Internships and Mentorships Program

VISION FOR THE FUTURE Besides expanding both the internship and mentorship program across Canada to more communities, we are currently focusing on better initiatives for Indigenous students, starting with a hackathon this fall in metro Vancouver. Our event is focused on encouraging students to identify relevant problems in their community and support them as they create solutions. Indigenous high school students from across BC’s Lower Mainland will work together in groups at this one day event along with mentors from various disciplines including but not limited to data science, engineering, medicine, Indigenous studies, social sciences, and the arts. The hackathon will culminate in presentations of student solutions and judges will provide feedback to hopefully further these ideas beyond this event and help these solutions become reality. Our goal is to empower Indigenous students using STEM and particularly data science in order to impact change in their community.

ABOUT STEM FELLOWSHIP STEM Fellowship is a national, student-run, non-profit organization that aims to enrich the paths of students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) fields through programs, competitions, and workshops. We have our own peer-reviewed open source journal through Canadian Science Publishing and are the organizers of The Big Data Challenge: a longitudinal, mentorship-based research competition in which students analyze big data to discover trends related to socioeconomic or environmental issues in their communities. Our mission is to use mentorship and experiential learning to equip the next generation of change-makers in STEM with indispensable skills in research, data science, inquiry and scholarly writing.

CONTACT Megan Chan www.stemfellowship.org/stempowerment-mentorship/andstemfellowship.org/internships/

55


2018 Best Practices Submission Youth

CANADIAN CULTURAL MOSAIC FOUNDATION

Anti-Racism Arts Festival

DESCRIPTION Canadian Cultural Mosaic Foundation's annual event Anti-Racism Arts Festival is national arts festival that travels across Canada. Every year, the youth organization hosts the festival to get different cities involved in Anti-Racism action through arts. During the past festivals, the organizers held workshops, 48-hour anti-racism film challenge, poetry jam, painting challenge, photography and digital art competition and more. All these events allowed the community to come together, learn about racism and how we can eliminate it together, while promoting arts as well. The festival is a national festival that takes place in February and March of each year, travelling to a different city on an annual basis. The purpose is to get citizens engaged in anti-racism through arts. In 2016 the event took place in Calgary, 2017 in Edmonton, 2018 in Winnipeg and 2019 will take place in Vancouver.

BACKGROUND Our organization's culture and value inspired this festival. We were looking for a way to engage everyday Canadians to spark conversations about racism while making it something engaging. This is where arts play a major role. Racism is hard to talk about it. Our goal with this festival was to bring this topic into the community in a unique and fun way this is where the arts festival part came together.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE The results have been amazing. Every year, the event gets bigger and better. We have more folks participating every year.The results of the festival and the art created are also circulated heavily. We have had institutes and everyday people reach out to us saying they've learned a lot through our events and hope to lead similar events in their community to bring understanding as well.

VISION FOR THE FUTURE Every year we host this festival and learn so much. We partner up with youth community partners and engage on how best to lead the festival in every city. We continue to learn through this process to make it even better.

ABOUT THE CANADIAN CULTURAL MOSAIC ASSOCIATION

The Canadian Cultural Mosaic Foundation (Canadian CMF) is a not-for-profit organization run by committed volunteer youth. We work to improve Race Relations in Canada and also mitigate racism by creating cultural understanding through multicultural education, technology and arts. Being on the forefront of advocacy and multiculturalism, our foundation often works with ethnic communities on projects. We started out as a multicultural volunteer group in 2009 made up of post-secondary students in Calgary, and officially registered as a not-for-profit in 2015. Our head office is in Calgary but our work is on a national basis. Our vision is to educate Canadians, mitigate racism, and promote multiculturalism. Our values are multiculturalism, inclusion, collaboration, education, and love.

CONTACT Iman Bukhari 6420 Crowchild Trail SW Calgary T3E5R5 http://www.canadianculturalmosaicfoundation.com/anti-racism-arts-festival.html

56


OR COMMANDITAIRES

ARGENT COMMANDITAIRES

BRONZE COMMANDITAIRES


TABLE DES MATIÈRES INTRODUCTION Message du Président du Jur

60

APERÇU Qui Sommes-Nous

61

PRIX À propos des Prix 62 Woodland Cultural Centre 63 Akinomaagaye Gaamik 65 Groupe de Soutien aux Femmes 67 Autochtones de Timiskaming Centre de Ressources CommunityWise 69 Conseil Provincial des Sociétés Culturelles 71 Carrefour de Ressources en Interculturel 73 Association chinoise deCornwall/Conseil 75 multiculturel de Cornwall et de ses districts Horizons Community Development Associates Inc 76 Association des Femmes Immigrantes/ 78 Immigréesde la municipalité d’Halifax Association Interculturelle du Grand Victoria 80 Snowland Outdoor Club (SLOC) 82 The Mosaic Institute 84 Université De Victoria (UVic) 86 Université Du Québec À Montréal (UQÀM) 88 Laboratoire De Développement du Dr Kang Lee, 90 Institut D’études Pédagogiques De L’Ontario (IEPO) Faculté de Travail Social, Université du Manitoba 92 Les Amis du Centre Simon Wiesenthal 94 Harmony Movement 96 Projet d’Études sur la Migration 98 et la Diaspora, Université de Carleton Ville de Truro, Nouvelle-Écosse 100 Professeur William Cunningham, 101 Université de Toronto Service Correctionnel du Canada 102 Section Diversité et Inclusion, 104 Gouvernement du Manitoba Commission Ontarienne Des Droits 106 de la Personne Sinking Ship Entertainment 108 Jam3 109 STEM Fellowship 110 Canadian Cultural Mosaic Foundation 112


C

MESSAGE DE LA PRÉSIDENTE DU JURY

e fut un honneur de présider le comité du jury des Pratiques exemplaires pour la Fondation canadienne des relations raciales (FCRR) dans le cadre de son programme de Prix d’excellence. Le jury était composé des membres votants Albert Lo, Gina Valle, Ayman Al-Yassini et Palinder Kamra, ainsi que des conseillers sans droit de vote, Toni Silberman, Madeline Ziniak et Art Miki. Je n’aurais pas pu demander un panel plus solidaire et plus doué, ayant autant de réalisations reconnues dans les domaines des relations raciales et des initiatives multiculturelles au Canada. Les Prix d’excellence, un programme phare biennal, rassemble des représentants des secteurs public, privé et bénévole qui ont pris des mesures pour lutter contre les inégalités présentes dans leur milieu de travail ou dans leur communauté. Ces initiatives sont autant de pratiques exemplaires novatrices et efficaces actuellement utilisées pour promouvoir des relations raciales harmonieuses au Canada. Les soumissions de cette année provenaient de tout le pays et faisaient appel à une grande variété d’approches tout en représentant de nombreuses communautés. Le jury a été impressionné par la qualité et l’ampleur des soumissions, ainsi que par la créativité et la passion associées à chaque initiative. Il sera intéressant de suivre les progrès de chacune d’entre elles alors qu’elles continueront d’offrir leurs services aux Canadiens en faisant la promotion de l’intégration et de l’égalité. Nous espérons que le Guide des pratiques exemplaires servira de ressource précieuse et d’inspiration pour chaque effort, individuel ou collectif, visant à créer et à mettre en place des initiatives concrètes et novatrices qui favorisent des relations interraciales harmonieuses. Avec l’aide de tous, nous pourrons faire du Canada un pays dont nous sommes fiers. Au nom de la FCRR, le comité de sélection adresse ses sincères félicitations aux lauréats des Prix d’excellence, à tous ceux qui se méritent une Mention honorable et à toutes les personnes et organisations qui ont soumis leur candidature aux Pratiques exemplaires de la Fondation. Nous remercions également les membres du personnel de la FCRR dont les efforts diligents nous ont permis de continuer à progresser. Et, bien sûr, toute notre reconnaissance va à nos partenaires, nos collègues et nos sympathisants pour leur détermination et leur engagement à lutter contre le racisme, la discrimination et l’inégalité sous toutes ses formes, et leur enthousiasme à promouvoir des relations raciales positives au Canada.

Roy Pogorzelski Président du Jury 60


QUI SOMMES-NOUS?

Le gouvernement canadien et l’Association nationale des Canadiens d’origine japonaise ont signé, en 1988, l’Entente de redressement à l’égard des Canadiens japonais. Cette entente reconnaît que les mesures qui ont été prises par le gouvernement du Canada à l’encontre des Canadiens japonais pendant et après la Seconde Guerre mondiale constituent une grave injustice ainsi qu’une violation des droits de la personne. Le gouvernement fédéral promettait également de créer la Fondation canadienne des relations raciales pour « favoriser l’harmonie raciale, et faciliter le développement et le partage de toute connaissance pouvant contribuer à l’élimination du racisme ». La Fondation a été constituée par la Loi sur la Fondation canadienne des relations raciales le 28 octobre 1996 et a débuté officiellement ses activités en novembre 1997. Les bureaux de la Fondation sont situés à Toronto, mais elle exerce ses activités dans l’ensemble du pays. La Fondation est un organisme autonome et une oeuvre de bienfaisance enregistrée en vertu de la Loi de l’impôt sur le revenu. Ses dirigeants et employés ne font pas partie de l’administration publique fédérale.

VISION

La Fondation canadienne des relations raciales sera reconnue tant comme ressource non-partisane de premier plan que comme facilitatrice afin d’aider à l’élimination du racisme et des discriminations raciales, deux contradictions inhérentes dans un Canada fondé sur la réciprocité des droits et des responsabilités, la participation, l’appartenance et l’équité.

MISSION

La mission de la FCRR est définie dans la Loi sur la Fondation canadienne des relations raciales, L.C. 1991, ch. 8, telle qu’elle figure à la section 4, Mission de la fondation : La Fondation canadienne des relations raciales a pour mission de faciliter, dans l’ensemble du pays, le développement, le partage et la mise en œuvre de toute connaissance ou compétence utile en vue de contribuer à l’élimination du racisme et de toute forme de discrimination raciale au Canada. Le travail de la FCRR repose sur le désir de bâtir et d’entretenir une société inclusive fondée sur l’équité, l’harmonie sociale, le respect mutuel et la dignité humaine. Le principe qui sous-tend sa lutte contre le racisme et la discrimination raciale accentue les relations raciales positives et la promotion des valeurs canadiennes communes que sont les droits de la personne et les principes démocratiques. La FCRR tente de coordonner les efforts de tous les secteurs de la société et d’y coopérer, et de nouer des partenariats avec les institutions et organisations pertinentes à l’échelle locale, provinciale et territoriale, et pancanadienne.

61


Les Prix d'excellence de la Fondation canadienne des relations raciales (FCRR) rendent hommage à des organismes des secteurs public, privé et bénévole dont le travail représente l'excellence et l'innovation dans la lutte contre le racisme au Canada. La remise des Prix d'excellence est un évènement qui fait partie de l'initiative des Pratiques exemplaires de la FCRR qui représente un des programmes éducatifs parrainés par la FCRR pour recueillir, documenter et célébrer des approches innovatrices en matière de promotion des relations raciales harmonieuses. Par pratiques exemplaires, la Fondation entend un programme, une stratégie ou une initiative.

62


Gagnant Prix d’excellence Autochtone

WOODLAND CULTURAL CENTRE

Save the Evidence

DESCRIPTION Save the Evidence élabore actuellement un site racontant l’histoire d’un événement traumatisant de l’histoire du Canada. L’objectif est de sensibiliser et de faire comprendre tout en encourageant le dialogue entre peuples/groupes autochtones et non autochtones et en établissant des partenariats qui désirent mettre l’accent sur la vérité. La Commission de vérité et réconciliation constitue un facteur positif dans le processus de guérison du pays. Save the Evidence travaille en étroite collaboration avec les survivants de l’Institut Mohawk (anglais : Mohawk Institute Residential School), les Aîné-e-s et les membres de la communauté traditionnelle des Six Nations afin de créer un espace global et une expérience d’apprentissage permettant aux visiteurs et aux groupes d’étudiants de tout âge et de toute condition d’en apprendre plus sur les événements. Les visiteurs y acquerront une meilleure connaissance de l’histoire des pensionnats et de l’impact qu’ils ont eu. L’information sera basée sur des résultats de recherches et présentée à l’aide de différentes copies d’artéfacts. Les objets d’interprétation seront des répliques de ceux trouvés à l’école ou seront recréés à partir de photographies, avec l’apport de souvenirs de la part des survivants. Les objets d’interprétation, les présentations audiovisuelles et les objets apportés en tournée contribueront à une meilleure compréhension. Les visiteurs n’éprouveront ni honte ni culpabilité lors de leur visite, mais ils découvriront les pertes qu’ont subi les communautés et les individus et se sentiront personnellement responsables de participer au processus de réconciliation.

CONTEXTE Ce projet est entièrement consacré aux enfants qui ont fréquenté les pensionnats du Canada, en particulier l’Institut Mohawk. Il a été inspiré par leurs souvenirs et les événements qu’ils y ont vécus. Tout au long du projet Save the Evidence, nous avons régulièrement travaillé avec des survivants et nous continuons à le faire dans le cadre de notre programmation. Nous sommes continuellement motivés par la capacité de résistance des survivants et sommes honorés qu’ils nous aient autorisés à faire partie de leur processus de guérison. Nous souhaitons à notre tour leur rendre hommage et leur donner un endroit où ils pourront être entendus et où leur témoignage sera préservé.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT Les visiteurs découvriront l’histoire, le patrimoine, les arts, les langues et la culture traditionnelle et contemporaine des peuples autochtones, tout comme l’histoire des pensionnats. Ils auront la possibilité de poser des questions et d’élargir leur perception des peuples autochtones du Canada et de constater les impacts du racisme systémique. Ils développeront ainsi des outils cognitifs les aidant à mieux comprendre la situation actuelle des peuples autochtones, en quoi consiste la colonisation et à quoi ressemble la décolonisation, et de quelle façon les peuples autochtones et non autochtones peuvent travailler ensemble et aller de l’avant en toute harmonie, dans l’amitié et la paix.

63


Gagnant Prix d’excellence Autochtone

WOODLAND CULTURAL CENTRE

Save the Evidence

VISION DE L’AVENIR Une fois le bâtiment du pensionnat Mohawk Institute complété, nous y offrirons des visites d’interprétation et des programmes éducatifs. Nous continuerons à développer une programmation dynamique avec les survivants et les survivants intergénérationnels afin de présenter avec exactitude l’histoire des pensionnats au Canada. Tout en constituant une preuve physique de cet épisode sombre de notre histoire, cet espace favorisera la compréhension de ce qu’ont été les pensionnats et fera prendre conscience des impacts qu’ils ont eus. La programmation sera régulièrement mise à jour afin d’y intégrer les plus récentes découvertes, dans le respect de l’histoire des enfants qui ont fréquenté ces écoles et en répondant aux besoins éducatifs des visiteurs et des groupes scolaires.

À PROPOS DU WOODLAND CULTURAL CENTRE Le Woodland Cultural Centre (WCC) est un centre éducatif et culturel des Premières Nations. Il a été créé en 1972 afin de protéger, de promouvoir, d’interpréter et de présenter l’histoire, la langue, l’esprit et la culture des Onhwehon: weh et des Anishinaabe. Le WCC respecte les normes les plus élevées en matière de présentation, d’interprétation et de collecte de ressources dans les domaines de l’éducation, de la muséologie, des arts, du langage et du patrimoine culturel. Le WCC est situé sur le site de l’ancien pensionnat de l’Institut Mohawk (en anglais : MIRS), le plus ancien pensionnat du Canada et l’un des rares à être encore debout aujourd’hui. L’édifice a été utilisé comme site historique pour enseigner l’histoire et l’impact des pensionnats au Canada. Le WCC s’efforce de raconter l’histoire des survivants du système des pensionnats au Canada et de leur rendre hommage.

CONTACT Carlie Myke 184 Mohawk Street Brantford, ON N3S 2X2 http://www.woodlandculturalcentre.ca/

64


Prix d’excellence 2018 Mention honorable Autochtone

AKINOMAAGAYE GAAMIK

Le projet Mocassin

DESCRIPTION Da-giiwewaat (pour qu’ils puissent rentrer chez eux) est une campagne nationale de sensibilisation à la prise en charge par l’État des enfants autochtones au Canada. Grâce à l’éducation et à l’action citoyenne, notre objectif est d’éradiquer le racisme et de ramener les enfants chez eux dans leurs familles et leurs communautés. Les participants au projet prennent connaissance des faits sur la prise en charge par l’État des enfants autochtones qui ont mené à la crise nationale actuelle et de l’arrêt discriminatoire en matière de droits de la personne rendu contre les enfants autochtones du Canada. Les participants fabriquent ensuite des mocassins pour bébés qui seront envoyés aux intervenants prenant la défense des familles des Premières Nations et distribués aux bébés pris en charge par l’État. Les participants sont également invités à passer eux-mêmes à l’action en sensibilisant et dénonçant le racisme et la discrimination. Ce projet soutient les objectifs des appels à l’action de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation. Sur le site Web se trouvent des exemples de projets de fabrication de mocassins pour les écoles et des ressources liées au programme scolaire de l’Ontario.

CONTEXTE Plus de 150 peuples autochtones ont subi les effets du génocide culturel amorcé par la Loi sur les Indiens, ceux des pensionnats autochtones, de la rafle des années 1960 et de ce que l’on appelle aujourd’hui la rafle du millénaire. Reconnue aujourd’hui par le gouvernement fédéral comme crise humanitaire, la prise en charge des enfants autochtones par l’État connait des taux qui sont parmi les plus élevés du monde occidental. Dans de nombreux cas, comme au Manitoba, les nouveau-nés sont enlevés à leur mère sans motif valable, peu de temps après l’accouchement. Ce projet vise à sensibiliser le public pour faire pression sur le gouvernement fédéral qui, malgré quatre ordonnances de nonconformité, refuse d’exécuter les ordonnances du Tribunal canadien des droits de la personne qui l’a déclaré coupable de discrimination. Grâce à cette initiative, nous espérons réunir les enfants et leurs familles et mettre fin à ce cycle de violence coloniale envers les peuples autochtones.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT Ce projet a permis de découvrir beaucoup de cas locaux et un nombre impressionnant de prises en charge par l’État d’enfants autochtones. La Commission ontarienne des droits de la personne a également participé à ce projet et demandé aux sociétés d’aide à l’enfance de l’Ontario de recueillir et de retracer des données sur les enfants autochtones racialisés en raison de la surreprésentation de ces enfants dans le système. En poursuivant ses efforts constants d’éducation et en continuant son mouvement populaire, ce projet espère créer un changement radical dans le système de protection de l’enfance qui permettra de réunir les familles et de faire en sorte que l’on remédie au traumatisme intergénérationnel créé par 150 ans de colonialisme et de génocide.

VISION DE L’AVENIR Il serait formidable que des ressources clairement liées au programme soient créées. Des vidéos sur l’historique du projet seraient un outil puissant. Elles permettraient de raconter l’histoire de personnes ayant été touchées par les services de protection de l’enfance et de quelle façon, à bien des égards, le projet Mocassin a permis de faire changer les choses. Il s’agit d’un excellent exemple où les personnes non autochtones peuvent participer aux efforts de réconciliation en partenariat avec les peuples et les communautés autochtones.

65


Prix d’excellence 2018 Mention honorable Autochtone

AKINOMAAGAYE GAAMIK

Le projet Mocassin

À PROPOS DE AKINOMAAGAYE GAAMIK De nombreuses communautés anishinaabek ont une maison d’apprentissage ou une maison ronde (roundhouse) qui fait la fierté de leur communauté. Une maison ronde est un espace dans lequel sont transmis les modes de vie, les connaissances et l’éducation Anishinaabek selon la tradition orale et/ou rituelle des aîné•e•s et des passeurs culturels. Akinomaagaye Gaamik est une initiative populaire, créée sous la direction de aîné•e•s et de praticiens traditionnels de la communauté de New Credit, qui vise à promouvoir l’éducation et le ressourcement par le biais de méthodes d’enseignement, de pédagogie et de langues autochtones traditionnelles. Akinomaagaye Gaamik offre aux passeurs culturels autochtones un environnement et une atmosphère appropriés pour transmettre et enseigner leurs connaissances. Notre mission consiste à recueillir des fonds et à faciliter, à coordonner et à promouvoir des activités et événements locaux et régionaux ayant pour objectif l’apprentissage des façons de faire autochtones et l’initiation aux pratiques et aux langues traditionnelles afin de mieux les comprendre.

CONTACT Jodie Williams 274 New Credit Rd. Hagarsville, ON N0A 1H0 http://www.akinommagaye.weebly.com/

66


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Autochtone

GROUPE DE SOUTIEN AUX FEMMES AUTOCHTONES DE TIMISKAMING

Campus de penseurs urbains

DESCRIPTION Le Groupe de soutien aux femmes autochtones de Timiskaming (en anglais : TNWSG) a été créé en 1995 par un groupe spécial de femmes des Premières Nations et de femmes métisses chargées de créer dans leur région des services culturellement adaptés aux femmes autochtones et à leurs familles. L’organisme a été constitué en société à but non lucratif en 1997 et, en 2005, il a créé deux centres d’apprentissage et de garde des jeunes enfants en propriété exclusive autochtone, l’un à Temiskaming Shores et l’autre à Kirkland Lake, dans le nord-est de l’Ontario. Au cours des 20 dernières années, le Groupe a conçu une vaste gamme de programmes et de services offerts par les centres Keepers of the Circle. Il a établi un Conseil des Aîné-e-s pour orienter les travaux et s’est associé à d’autres organismes autochtones de la région afin de créer un Centre communautaire autochtone dont les activités vont au-delà des services d’apprentissage et de garde des jeunes enfants. Il a également piloté des consultations pour définir un ensemble de Critères de compétences culturelles et linguistiques autochtones facilitant les relations interculturelles et les partenariats équitables.

CONTEXTE Pour toutes les communautés et les villes du Canada, surmonter une histoire chargée de colonisation, de racisme et de marginalisation des peuples autochtones pose des défis constants. Pour le district de Timiskaming, la réconciliation a débuté en 2005, dix ans avant les Appels à l’action lancés par la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada. Tout a commencé par la création de deux centres d’apprentissage et de garde des jeunes enfants dirigés par des autochtones qui, au cours des années suivantes, se sont transformés en carrefours communautaires complets offrant des programmes et des services culturellement adaptés pour tous. Le Groupe de soutien aux femmes autochtones de Timiskaming, dirigé par Ann Batisse et Carol McBride, a dû faire preuve de beaucoup de courage et de ténacité pour aller de l’avant et défier le statu quo qui a contribué à marginaliser les peuples autochtones. Le Conseil d’administration des services sociaux du district de Timiskaming a répondu en finançant les centres Keepers of the Circle et, au fil des années, en renforçant la capacité de la communauté autochtone à concevoir et à offrir ses propres services. À titre de représentante du Groupe, Dani Grenier-Ducharme a consacré dix ans de sa vie à lutter contre le racisme et la discrimination en faisant évoluer des organisations partenaires vers la vision commune d’une région qui embrasserait la diversité. La ville de Temiskaming Shores a parrainé le Campus Urban Thinkers afin de promouvoir cette vision.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT Le Urban Thinkers Campus a inspiré une réflexion visuelle sur le thème The City We Need (traduction : La ville dont nous avons besoin) de la part de participants issus de divers secteurs, notamment des gouvernements, d’entreprises et de l’industrie, et d’organisations de la société civile. Plusieurs décennies d’échanges sur les relations raciales entre le Groupe de soutien pour les femmes autochtones de Timiskaming et le Conseil d’administration des services sociaux du district de Timiskaming, qui a coparrainé le Campus Urban Thinkers avec la ville de Temiskaming Shores, ont donné une impulsion à cette initiative. Un changement visible et manifeste s’est produit dans les attitudes et les relations entre les organismes de parties prenantes autochtones et non autochtones et les membres de la communauté. À la suite de ces échanges, le Conseil des Aîné-e-s du district de Timiskaming a assumé son rôle de leadership traditionnel en guidant le travail effectué par des organismes autochtones et non autochtones. Les Aîné-e-s ont parlé de leur rôle de leadership comme allant au-delà du rôle purement symbolique auquel ils sont souvent confrontés dans leurs relations avec les fournisseurs de services. Les intervenants de la région montrent un grand enthousiasme à collaborer avec la communauté autochtone et ont pleinement appuyé les changements organisationnels qui viennent soutenir les initiatives dirigées par les Autochtones. Récemment, plus de 27 agences partenaires ont signé un accord pour la création d’un groupe interdisciplinaire autochtone de soins de première ligne. Les membres de la communauté montrent également de l’enthousiasme et décrivent un sentiment renouvelé de fierté et d’autodétermination.

67


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Autochtone

GROUPE DE SOUTIEN AUX FEMMES AUTOCHTONES DE TIMISKAMING

Campus de penseurs urbains

VISION DE L’AVENIR Dans le respect d’une vision autochtone du monde, les membres du Conseil des Aîné-e-s et le Groupe de soutien aux femmes autochtones de Timiskaming envisagent un changement global des relations raciales inspiré par les expériences locales, la sagesse locale, les pratiques culturelles locales et les solutions locales. Maintenant que nous avons un premier Urban Thinkers Campus à notre actif, le Conseil des Aîné-e-s du district de Timiskaming, le Groupe de soutien aux femmes autochtones de Timiskaming et nos principaux partenaires, soit le Conseil d’administration des services sociaux du district de Timiskaming et la ville de Temiskaming Shores et ses dirigeants Dani Grenier-Ducharme et James Franks, organiseront chaque année un Urban Thinkers Campus. C’est dans une optique d’inclusion que seront examinés les besoins en matière de participation, en s’assurant que, quels que soient ses capacités, son âge, sa langue ou sa culture, personne ne sera laissé pour compte. Nous examinerons également les méthodes de suivi qui permettent d’obtenir une rétroaction régulière de la part des citoyens afin de tirer parti des meilleures pratiques en matière de réduction de la marginalisation. La carte visuelle du Urban Thinkers Campus du district de Timiskaming a été présentée au 9e Forum urbain mondial en Malaisie. L’objectif était de décrire le modèle Urban Thinkers Campus comme un outil d’engagement communautaire inclusif reproductible dans d’autres régions du monde.

À PROPOS DU GROUPE DE SOUTIEN AUX FEMMES AUTOCHTONES DE TIMISKAMING Le Groupe de soutien aux femmes autochtones de Timiskaming (en anglais : TNWSG) a été créé en 1995 par un groupe spécial de femmes des Premières Nations et de femmes métisses chargées de créer dans leur région des services culturellement adaptés aux femmes autochtones et à leurs familles. L’organisme a été constitué en société à but non lucratif en 1997 et, en 2005, il a créé deux centres d’apprentissage et de garde des jeunes enfants en propriété exclusive autochtone, l’un à Temiskaming Shores et l’autre à Kirkland Lake, dans le nord-est de l’Ontario. Au cours des 20 dernières années, le Groupe a conçu une vaste gamme de programmes et de services offerts par les centres Keepers of the Circle. Il a créé un Conseil des Aîné-e-s pour orienter les travaux et s’est associé à d’autres organismes autochtones de la région afin de créer un centre communautaire autochtone dont les activités vont au-delà des services d’apprentissage et de garde des jeunes enfants. Il a également piloté des consultations pour définir un ensemble de critères de compétences culturelles et linguistiques autochtones facilitant les relations interculturelles et les partenariats équitables.

CONTACT Arlene Hache 21 Scott Street Temiskaming Shores, ON P0J 1P0 https://unhabitat.org/urbanthinkers/

68


Gagnant Prix d’excellence Communautaire

CENTRE DE RESSOURCES COMMUNITYWISE

Changement organisationnel antiraciste

DESCRIPTION Le racisme peut être vécu de plusieurs manières. Le discours haineux ou l’intolérance entre individus est un indicateur de racisme interpersonnel, les pensées négatives d’une personne sur sa propre race sont un indicateur de racisme intériorisé et l’absence de droit de vote pour un groupe racialisé peuvent être considérées comme du racisme structurel. Une autre forme de racisme, celle sur laquelle nous désirions nous pencher, est le racisme organisationnel/institutionnel. Contrairement aux discours haineux ou à un déni manifeste de droits, les inégalités raciales au sein des organisations sont souvent peu visibles et peu quantifiables. Notre objectif était de comprendre le fonctionnement du racisme organisationnel et la manière dont il se manifeste pour élaborer un cadre de travail qui permettrait de s’attaquer aux problèmes soulevés. Étant donné que les individus appartenant aux communautés desservies par les organisations sont ceux qui subissent le plus d’influence de la part des politiques, de la culture et de la structure de ces organisations, nous avons créé AROC, un processus visant à donner voix aux individus racialisés et aux autochtones afin d’amorcer des changements organisationnels antiracistes. Nous nous sommes efforcés de consulter les membres de communautés racialisées avec lesquels nous avons utilisé un processus émergent permettant d’exprimer de nouvelles idées et de les concrétiser. La pression pour le statu quo est constante dans les organisations, mais nous avons développé nos compétences d’apprentissage et de réflexion en nous assurant de ne pas succomber au sentiment d’avoir « terminé » ou « fini » le travail. Dans notre travail antiraciste, nous avons toujours prôné une participation active en n’épargnant aucun effort nous permettant de progresser.

CONTEXTE AROC s’inspire de notre culture d’entreprise et de ses valeurs, dont l’aspiration première a toujours été d’être diversifiée, inclusive et équitable. Notre impression était que nous ne pouvions pas respecter ces mots en continuant d’utiliser les pratiques institutionnelles habituelles en matière de diversité et d’inclusion, car ces pratiques ne tenaient pas compte d’un obstacle majeur à la réalisation de ces objectifs : le racisme systémique. Nous nous sommes également inspirés des fondements de l’antiracisme qui exigent de parler des sujets qui nous mettent tous extrêmement mal à l’aise. Pour nous, l’inconfort était un signe que nous avancions dans la bonne direction. L’antiracisme nous demandait d’aborder les questions de pouvoir et de privilège afin de nous projeter au-delà des systèmes d’oppression transversaux, de lutter contre le racisme de manière individuelle en nous dépassant dans ce que nous avions déjà fait et d’intégrer une analyse intersectionnelle à nos travaux. Lorsque nous avons commencé notre travail, le contexte général s’est envenimé. Au Canada, le racisme faisait les manchettes, que ce soit l’enquête sur les femmes et les filles autochtones disparues et assassinées, l’islamophobie en réaction aux migrants et aux réfugiés musulmans ou la brutalité policière disproportionnée et le profilage subit par les hommes noirs. Ce contexte nous a également inspiré, mais pas toujours de façon positive. Chez AROC, nous prenons le temps de traiter les événements qui se déroulent chez nous, pour y compatir bien sûr, mais aussi pour créer des outils qui aideront les organisations à combattre le racisme de manière concrète et tangible.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT AROC est un processus intrinsèquement adaptable. Il nous a fallu examiner chaque secteur de notre entreprise — onze secteurs différents pour être précis, — et y apporter lentement des modifications pour lutter contre le racisme dans chacun d’eux. Nous avons adopté une politique d’équité en matière d’emploi, modifié le mandat de notre conseil consultatif, mis à jour notre politique en matière de changement organisationnel, élaboré une stratégie de communication externe et intégré des mesures d’équité dans notre service de collecte de données. Dans chaque cas, ces changements ont été difficiles à mettre en place, mais un changement organisationnel antiraciste demande une adaptation particulièrement difficile. Il ne s’agit pas simplement

69


Gagnant Prix d’excellence Communautaire

CENTRE DE RESSOURCES COMMUNITYWISE

Changement organisationnel antiraciste

de modifier les politiques et les procédures : chaque individu dans l’entreprise doit s’engager personnellement afin de comprendre son rôle et ses responsabilités à l’égard des changements apportés. Nous avons engagé des éducateurs externes en antiracisme, mais nous avons aussi régulièrement intégré de l’enseignement lors de nos réunions et de nos rencontres. Les efforts déployés nous rendent aujourd’hui en mesure de reconnaître plus facilement les inégalités raciales et de lutter contre elles. Nous avons une plus grande capacité de tolérance face aux taux élevés de tension et d’inconfort et nous parvenons plus rapidement à cerner les problèmes, à définir les actions à entreprendre pour les résoudre et à en tirer un enseignement. L’impact a également été significatif pour les membres de la communauté faisant partie de notre groupe consultatif. AROC a contribué chez eux à une meilleure prise de conscience de ce que signifie travailler de manière équitable au quotidien et à la manière dont le racisme se manifeste dans leurs propres organisations. Il leur a aussi permis d’avoir une plus grande confiance en eux lorsqu’ils doivent faire face au racisme sur le plan personnel et professionnel. Les membres du groupe consultatif ont également signalé une meilleure compréhension personnelle de leur identité raciale et avoir obtenu confirmation de ce que signifie entretenir ces idées dans une sphère organisationnelle.

VISION DE L’AVENIR Grâce à AROC, d’importants changements organisationnels ont été apportés. Pourtant, un objectif n’a pas été atteint : devenir plus responsable envers les communautés autochtones de la région du Traité No 7 où nous sommes situés. Bien que notre processus d’engagement ait permis de représenter les points de vue de plusieurs communautés (noire, racialisées, LGBTQ2 +, et immigrants), il a été inefficace pour canaliser les préoccupations autochtones. En raison de l’histoire spécifique du Canada et du contexte du colonialisme, le racisme anti-autochtone est différent de celui auquel sont confrontés les autres individus et communautés racialisés. Il nécessite donc son propre processus pour y remédier. À l’avenir, AROC tentera de répondre aux appels à l’action formulés dans le rapport de la Commission de Vérité et Réconciliation (CVR) afin d’apporter sa contribution au triste héritage des pensionnats et du colonialisme tout en s’assurant qu’en tant qu’entreprise, il assume une responsabilité continue envers les communautés autochtones. Nous désirons nous concentrer sur « la responsabilisation » plutôt que sur « la réconciliation » ou « l’indigénisation » afin de rester responsables tout en nous assurant que nos actions sont guidées par le leadership des Aîné-e-s et des membres des communautés autochtones du Traité No 7.

À PROPOS DU CENTRE DE RESSOURCES COMMUNITYWISE Le Centre de ressources CommunityWise est un centre communautaire à but non lucratif qui propose des espaces de bureau et communautaires inclusifs et abordables aux organisations locales et aux petits organismes à but non lucratif. Notre entreprise fournit une infrastructure de base (par exemple, accès Internet partagé, accès à une cuisine et à des équipements de bureau) aux organismes membres à but non lucratif. Nous soutenons environ 90 petites organisations locales dont le travail embrasse un large éventail de préoccupations sociales, environnementales et culturelles. Entre autres domaines, les organisations membres de CommunityWise travaillent au soutien de communautés ethnoculturelles, dans les services communautaires LGBTQ, les services autochtones culturellement adaptés, la réduction de la pauvreté et le développement économique communautaire, le soutien aux toxicomanies, la santé mentale et les arts communautaires. CommunityWise utilise un modèle de développement communautaire axé sur un cadre anti-oppression. En 2016, le Centre a lancé un processus d’engagement communautaire appelé Changement organisationnel antiraciste conçu pour lutter contre le racisme organisationnel dans le secteur sans but lucratif.

CONTACT Thulasy Lettner 223 12th Ave SW Calgary, AB T2R 0G9 http://communitywise.net/about/aroc-and-the-equity-framework/

70


Prix d’excellence 2018 Mention honorable Communautaire

CONSEIL PROVINCIAL DES SOCIÉTÉS CULTURELLES

Cellules créatives en théâtre communautaire

DESCRIPTION Le projet de Cellules créatives en théâtre communautaire qui présentait la pièce [É+IM] Migrant.e, permettait à la troupede théâtre communautaire multiculturelle qui en a découlé, la troupe Mathieu Da Costa, composée à la fois d'immigrant·e·s et d'Acadien·ne·s, de s'exprimer artistiquement à travers le théâtre. La pièce était un moyen d'intégration et d’inclusion pour les immigrant·e·s, mais aussi une façon de rendre la communauté acadienne plus conscientisée envers les immigrant·e·s en les sensibilisant à leur réalité.Le succès du projet réside dans le fait que les participant-e-s immigrant·e·s ont pu être mieux intégré·e·s et ont pu aussi prendre goût au théâtre communautaire et s'exprimer artistiquement. La communauté acadienne a aussi participé afin de mieux les inclure et ainsi favoriser le choix de rester au Nouveau-Brunswick. Nous avons reçu pour ce projet le Prix Soleil du Mouvement acadien des communautés en santé du Nouveau-Brunswick.

CONTEXTE Population vieillissante, exode, assimilation sont des défis pour les communautés francophones en situation minoritaire. Le Nouveau-Brunswick (N.-B.) a accueilli 7 155 personnes immigrantes entre 2006 et 2011. Seulement 12% d'entre elles ont le français comme première langue officielle et 4 % ont le français et l’anglais comme langue officielle alors que la population acadienne et francophone du N.-B. représente 32 % de la population provinciale. Bien que le N.B. accueille de plus en plus de personnes immigrantes d’expression française, le maintien de son équilibre linguistique demeure un défi de taille à surmonter. Il faut instaurer des mécanismes de rétention auprès des immigrant·e·s francophones nouvellement arrivé-e-s ici, afin de stimuler la croissance démographique auprès des francophones de la province. Et même s'il existe une proportion grandissante d'immigrant·e·s francophones ici, leur volonté de demeurer est fragile. La société d'accueil s'adapte-t-elle bien pour accueillir ces nouveaux et nouvelles arrivant-e-s ? Le degré de satisfaction repose sur les bienfaits des mécanismes de rétention en place qui se retrouvent souvent dans les différents centres d'accueil et d'intégration ou centres d’établissement de la province. Notre organisme a voulu contribuer de façon particulière et notoire à l’avancement du dossier de l’immigration francophone et surtout de la rétention des immigrant·e·s francophones par un projet structurant qui puisse servir de bonne pratique pour ses membres qui sont situés en région. Nous pensons que collectivement, nos objectifs seront atteints plus rapidement et pour plus longtemps. De plus, nous voulions empêcher que le discours sur l'immigration ne soit qu'instrumental, que ces personnes venues d'ailleurs ne représentent que des chiffres, des statistiques ou se traduisent en apport économique. En humanisant notre approche, nous atteindrons nos buts à plus long terme.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT Les résultats et effets du projet sont les suivants : • Les participant-e-s ont développé le goût pour le théâtre communautaire et l’expression artistique. • L’expérience a facilité l’inclusion des participant-e-s immigrant·e·s dans la communauté acadienne. • La société acadienne est plus inclusive et ouverte sur la réalité de l’immigration francophone. • La communauté d’accueil tout comme celle qui représente les néo-Acadien·ne·s a vécu une expérience culturelle enrichie.

71


Prix d’excellence 2018 Mention honorable Communautaire

CONSEIL PROVINCIAL DES SOCIÉTÉS CULTURELLES

Cellules créatives en théâtre communautaire

Cellules créatives en théâtre communautaire est une action culturelle visant à rapprocher les membres de la communauté immigrante d'abord entre eux, ensuite avec les membres des autres communautés. En mettant à contribution l'engouement pour le théâtre communautaire dans la communauté acadienne, nous assurons de mettre en relief toute la richesse des participant·e·s, peu importe leurs croyances, leurs appartenances et leurs allégeances.

VISION DE L’AVENIR Le CPSC a récemment déposé une demande de financement pour continuer le développement de Cellules créatives en théâtre communautaire dans le but de créer la suite, un acte 2 de la pièce [É+IM] Migrant.e.s. Cet acte discutera de la relation au pays d’origine avec les aîné·e·s immigrant·e·s et les enfants d’immigrant·e·s né·e·s au Canada. Nous allons également distribuer notre cahier de charges au sein de notre réseau.

À PROPOS DU CONSEIL PROVINCIAL DES SOCIÉTÉS CULTURELLES Le Conseil provincial des sociétés culturelles est reconnu pour son leadership dans le développement des arts, de la culture et du patrimoine dans toutes les régions acadiennes et francophones du Nouveau-Brunswick. Il soutient ses 17 organismes régionaux voués à l’action culturelle. Par son appui financier et autres, il leur permet d’offrir une programmation variée répondant aux besoins de la communauté acadienne et francophone, partout en province. Le CPSC développe et met en oeuvre des projets innovants et créatifs qui ont des retombées directes sur les sociétés culturelles et les collectivités dans lesquelles elles évoluent. Il assure un mentorat auprès de ses membres.

CONTACT Marie-Thérèse Landry Place de la Cathédrale 224 rue St-George Moncton, NB E1C 0V1 http://www.cpscnb.com/

72


Prix d’excellence 2018 Mention honorable Communautaire

CARREFOUR DE RESSOURCES EN INTERCULTUREL

Ateliers Êtes-vous de bonne rumeur?

DESCRIPTION L’atelier intitulé Êtes-vous de bonne rumeur? vise à défaire des rumeurs (préjugés) dans les contextes pluriethniques. De façon humoristique et ludique, cet atelier vous propose une réflexion sur ce sujet délicat. En traitant les préjugés comme des rumeurs, nous permettons aux personnes de nommer leurs préjugés afin de pouvoir les démystifier. Nous traitons autant des rumeurs sur la communauté d’accueil que sur des communautés culturelles. La formule de l’atelier est souple et s’adapte à tous les groupes d’âge. À la fin de cet atelier, les participants sont en mesure : de définir ce qu’est une rumeur et d’en identifier les caractéristiques ; de comprendre les effets de la rumeur sur tous : personnes des différentes communautés culturelles et de la communauté d’accueil; d’utiliser des moyens pour freiner les rumeurs en se basant sur des faits, des données (des statistiques, etc.) et en se posant des bonnes questions. Les ateliers sont offerts dans les écoles, centres communautaires, HLM, résidences pour ainés. L'évaluation montre des résultats très positifs, car les personnes sont outillées pour contrer des préjugés. Nous sommes en train de monter une formation afin de former des animateurs dans d'autres arrondissements de la Ville de Montréal.

CONTEXTE Nous sommes témoins de beaucoup de préjugés, de stéréotypes, et de discrimination à Montréal. Notre quartier est un quartier en évolution, avec une augmentation nette de personnes issues de la diversité. Cela créé parfois des actes d'incivilité et voir même de violence. Juste l'an passé, après l'attentat du Québec, la mosquée du quartier a été vandalisée. Le CRIC a toujours travaillé avec une vision interculturelle et d'éducation populaire dans le respect de tous et toutes. Nos actions sont toujours souples et visent à faciliter le pouvoir d'agir des personnes ainsi que la pensée critique. C'est dans cette perspective que, lors d'un colloque sur les Villes et Villages interculturelles à Montréal, la directrice a discuté avec Daniel Torres de la Ville de Barcelone. La Ville avait un programme municipal Anti-rumeurs, que le CRIC a adapté pour un contexte Montréalais. Entre autres, nous avons ajouté le volet des rumeurs sur les communautés culturelles et la communauté d'accueil les trois outils (reconnaitre les généralisations, les lunettes culturelles, et les bonnes questions), ainsi que la formule ateliers. Nous travaillons les rumeurs des participants et non des rumeurs d’ailleurs. En effet, la pratique a été reconnue comme une bonne pratique dans le guide du Conseil de l'Europe sur le programme anti-rumeurs.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT L'évaluation démontre qu'après l'atelier les personnes sont capables de reconnaitre une généralisation, de faire un exercice de centration afin de voir que leur perspective peut être erronée, de se poser des bonnes questions et chercher l'information. Elles arrivent aussi à reconnaitre que les rumeurs ont des impacts majeurs sur les personnes ciblées, et cela aide à les déconstruire et les arrêter.

73


Prix d’excellence 2018 Mention honorable Communautaire

CARREFOUR DE RESSOURCES EN INTERCULTUREL

Ateliers Êtes-vous de bonne rumeur?

VISION DE L’AVENIR En formant des personnes d’autres territoires pour qu’ils puissent intégrer et l’appliquer dans leur collectivité.

À PROPOS DU CARREFOUR DE RESSOURCES EN INTERCULTUREL « Le Carrefour de ressources en interculturel (CRIC) est un organisme autonome qui rassemble et développe des ressources dans le domaine interculturel, avec et pour les organismes, résidents et résidentes du quartier CentreSud, afin de favoriser le rapprochement interculturel entre toutes les communautés du quartier ». Les quatre mandats du CRIC SONT : • Mobiliser et influencer le quartier sur les enjeux interculturels collectifs par des moyens pouvant être : l’information, la sensibilisation, la représentation, la prise de position, les actions et les projets collectifs, l’implication citoyenne, etc. • Accompagner les organisations, en s’adaptant à leurs besoins, afin qu’elles favorisent l’inclusion des personnes issues de la diversité, par des moyens pouvant être : l’accompagnement des projets, le service conseil, la formation, le développement des outils, la référence, etc.

• Accompagner des familles issues de la diversité afin de favoriser leur inclusion à la société d’accueil.

• Documenter et analyser les enjeux interculturels du quartier par des moyens pouvant être : la documentation, l’échange d’expertises, les communautés apprenantes, les recherches, les études, etc. L'organisme a une très belle réputation, ayant été récipiendaire du Prix du Maire de Montréal en démocratie en 2015 et du Prix Bravo du conseil des commissaires de la CSDM en 2016.

CONTACT Veronica Islas 1-1851 rue Dufresne Montréal, QC H2K 3K4 https://www.criccentresud.org/

74


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Communautaire

Association chinoise de Cornwall/Conseil multiculturel de Cornwall et de ses districts

DESCRIPTION Ces deux organismes ont été créés pour améliorer les relations et encourager une bonne communication entre les communautés ethniques vivant dans la région de Cornwall et d’autres communautés ethniques. L’objectif est d’encourager ces communautés à faire de leur mieux pour se joindre à la communauté principale et de leur faire connaître la culture et les coutumes canadiennes afin qu’elles comprennent que toutes les communautés se ressemblent. Il est très important de vivre ensemble dans la paix et l’harmonie.

CONTEXTE Les circonstances ayant conduit à cette initiative sont ancrées dans le racisme systémique. Un jour, un homme d’affaires chinois qui souhaitait s’installer dans un quartier résidentiel « chic » de la région a suscité beaucoup de colère et de méfiance chez les résidents provoquant même une manifestation ouverte. Aujourd’hui, la situation s’est inversée. Notre initiative a été une inspiration et une véritable bénédiction. Aujourd’hui, les gens de toutes les communautés vivent côte à côte en parfaite harmonie et la méfiance a disparu.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT Pendant des années, nous avons organisé des festivals multiculturels où des personnes de toutes origines ethniques ont pu se mêler à la communauté principale et où chacun a réellement compris que nous sommes tous égaux. Aujourd’hui, les membres de toutes les communautés ethniques travaillent ensemble et forment un groupe uni.

VISION DE L’AVENIR Nous souhaitons continuer notre travail pour entretenir de meilleures relations raciales entre toutes les minorités ethniques, les membres des Premières Nations et les Canadiens ordinaires. Il est très important de se rappeler que le Canada est un pays d’immigrants provenant du monde entier.

CONTACT Mr. Sultan Jessa 9 Colbrook Crescent Cornwall ON K6H 6E4

75


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Communautaire

HORIZONS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATES INC.

Renforcer l’action : le rôle joué par les non autochtones dans le contexte de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation

DESCRIPTION Horizons Community Development Associates Inc. est une société de conseils axée sur la communauté. Formée en 2002, notre société donne le soutien nécessaire aux communautés pour atteindre leurs objectifs. Nous sommes spécialisés dans la planification, la recherche et l’évaluation, le développement communautaire et la gestion de projets. Basée en Nouvelle-Écosse et desservant le Canada atlantique, Horizons offre ses services auprès d’un large éventail de clients, notamment dans le secteur de la santé, mais aussi aux organismes gouvernementaux, aux collectivités des Premières Nations et à des organismes sans but lucratif. L’équipe d’Horizons s’est engagée à soutenir les non autochtones dans leur cheminement personnel vers une meilleure compréhension des enjeux liés à la Commission de vérité et réconciliation. Nous avons également créé des ressources internationalement reconnues pour mesurer la capacité communautaire et nous sommes un chef de file reconnu en matière d’initiatives visant à promouvoir la santé et la santé de la population. Ces démarches nous permettent de tirer parti des atouts de nos clients pour trouver des solutions créatives qui aideront les communautés à atteindre leurs objectifs. Notre pratique exemplaire consiste à faire participer les non autochtones à notre histoire commune avec les peuples autochtones. Elle est unique en ce sens que nous ne cherchons pas à informer les participants sur les peuples autochtones, nous leur apprenons plutôt le rôle que nous jouons dans la mise en place et le maintien de systèmes discriminatoires à leur égard. Ensemble, nous analysons la responsabilité qui nous incombe de rechercher la vérité et de prendre des mesures pour parvenir à la réconciliation.

CONTEXTE La réalisation et la mise en œuvre de ce cours reposent sur plusieurs principes fondamentaux inspirés par notre travail en cours avec les Premières Nations, les appels à l’action de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation et nos valeurs de justice sociale. Nous utilisons également nos travaux antérieurs avec les universités/communautés d’affaires/ municipalités/groupes confessionnels locaux pour agir en faveur de la réconciliation.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT Plusieurs mois après le cours, les participants nous rapportent voir le monde sous un angle différent et appliquer cette nouvelle compréhension à leur vie professionnelle et personnelle. Par exemple, non seulement réfléchissent-ils aux appels à l’action lancés par la CVR et à l’impact de ses politiques, décisions et affectations de ressources sur les peuples autochtones, mais également aux relations que nous entretenons avec ces peuples. Individuellement, ils font preuve de curiosité et de réflexion et s’engagent dans une formation continue.

76


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Communautaire

HORIZONS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATES INC.

Renforcer l’action : le rôle joué par les non autochtones dans le contexte de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation

VISION DE L’AVENIR Conjointement avec la municipalité du comté de Kings, des discussions ont été amorcées avec le ministère des Communautés, de la Culture et du Patrimoine de la Nouvelle-Écosse pour donner plus de ressources au cours et élargir ses groupes cibles.

À PROPOS DE HORIZONS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATES INC. Horizons Community Development Associates Inc. est une société de conseils axée sur la communauté. Formée en 2002, notre société donne le soutien nécessaire aux communautés pour atteindre leurs objectifs. Nous sommes spécialisés dans la planification, la recherche et l’évaluation, le développement communautaire et la gestion de projets. Basée en Nouvelle-Écosse, desservant le Canada atlantique, Horizons offre ses services auprès d’un large éventail de clients, notamment dans le secteur de la santé, mais aussi aux organismes gouvernementaux, aux collectivités des Premières nations et à des organismes sans but lucratif. L’équipe d’Horizons s’est engagée à soutenir les non autochtones dans leur cheminement personnel vers une meilleure compréhension des enjeux liés à la Commission de vérité et réconciliation. Nous avons également créé des ressources internationalement reconnues pour mesurer la capacité communautaire et nous sommes un chef de file reconnu en matière d’initiatives visant à promouvoir la santé et la santé de la population. Ces démarches nous permettent de tirer parti des atouts de nos clients pour trouver des solutions créatives qui aideront les communautés à atteindre leurs objectifs.

CONTACT Cari Patterson 2283 Gospel Woods Rd., RR #3 Canning, NS B0P 1H0 https://www.horizonscda.ca

77


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Communautaire

ASSOCIATION DES FEMMES IMMIGRANTES/IMMIGRÉES DE LA MUNICIPALITÉ D’HALIFAX

Mosaïque : Identité et liens avec la communauté

DESCRIPTION L’une de nos pratiques exemplaires consiste à utiliser l’art pour soutenir l’intégration des femmes immigrantes/ immigrées. Notre projet Mosaic: Identity and Community Connection a été développé pour étudier le point de vue des femmes immigrantes/immigrées sur la notion d’identité; créer une occasion pour les femmes et jeunes femmes immigrantes/immigrées de collaborer à la création d’une exposition d’art itinérante leur permettant de mieux définir leur identité et d’augmenter leur sentiment d’appartenance et leur lien avec la communauté; soutenir le développement de communautés accueillantes et inclusives dans la municipalité régionale d’Halifax; renforcer les capacités de l’IMWAH et lui permettre d’établir des relations avec d’autres organisations communautaires comme les galeries d’art, les librairies de musées et les cafés. Le succès rencontré par cette pratique constitue un autre moyen d’opérer un changement social et de faire en sorte que soient reconnues les contributions des femmes immigrantes/immigrées dans les communautés où elles se sont installées de manière permanente.

CONTEXTE Ce projet nous a été inspiré par le désir de créer une communauté accueillante pour les femmes immigrantes/immigrées. L’idée et le but du projet correspondaient aux objectifs de l’association, notamment son intérêt à ce que les femmes se fassent entendre au sein de mouvements plus importants qui visent l’amélioration du bien-être et de l’évolution des femmes de Kjipuktuk (Halifax) et son intérêt à rendre hommage aux contributions des femmes immigrantes/immigrées et à répondre aux défis et préoccupations qu’elles rencontrent. Mon intérêt personnel (Maria Jose Yax-Fraser) était de créer un milieu collaboratif où les femmes immigrantes/immigrées pourraient se questionner sur leur identité, leur sentiment d’appartenance et leurs liens avec la communauté.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT Ce projet a eu un impact personnel sur les participantes qui ont déclaré avoir eu accès à un espace répondant à leurs besoins en matière de santé psychologique et qui leur a permis d’explorer leurs capacités artistiques, de discuter de problèmes affectant leur vie quotidienne et de créer une communauté. Certaines participantes sont allées plus loin dans l’exploration de leurs talents artistiques et ont diffusé leurs connaissances sur leur lieu de travail. Le projet contribue à rendre les communautés plus accueillantes en sensibilisant les citoyens aux contributions des femmes immigrantes/ immigrées dans différentes sphères de la vie sociale, économique et politique.

VISION DE L’AVENIR Cette pratique prometteuse nous incite à poursuivre ce travail artistique avec les femmes immigrantes/immigrées. Nous espérons pouvoir exporter ce projet dans d’autres communautés des Maritimes afin de faire la promotion de l’intégration et d’améliorer l’accueil des communautés. Comme indiqué dans le rapport One Nova Scotia, le racisme et la discrimination constituent des obstacles à la bonne intégration et au maintien des nouveaux immigrants en NouvelleÉcosse. Grâce à ce projet, l’IMWAH a établi des partenariats avec d’autres organisations dont l’objectif est de faire de la Nouvelle-Écosse une province plus inclusive.

78


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Communautaire

ASSOCIATION DES FEMMES IMMIGRANTES/IMMIGRÉES DE LA MUNICIPALITÉ D’HALIFAX

Mosaïque : Identité et liens avec la communauté

À PROPOS DE IMMIGRANT MIGRANT WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF HALIFAX L’IMWAH est une organisation sans but lucratif qui encourage la diversité culturelle. Elle a été créée en 2012 et enregistrée en 2013 auprès du registre des entreprises Joint Stocks. Elle accueille des femmes et jeunes femmes immigrantes/immigrées de la municipalité régionale d’Halifax. Son objectif et sa mission sont de répondre aux défis que ces femmes rencontrent, de rendre hommage à leur contribution et de répondre à leurs préoccupations et besoins particuliers. Notre mandat à orientation sexospécifique consiste à donner un soutien adapté aux projets générés par des femmes ou qui s’adressent à elles. Nous avons quatre objectifs :

• Permettre aux femmes immigrantes/immigrées de se faire entendre au sein de mouvements plus importants qui visent à l’amélioration du bien-être des femmes haligoniennes et à leur évolution.

• Sensibiliser l’ensemble de la communauté à la condition des femmes et jeunes femmes immigrantes/immigrée et prendre leur défense.

• Répertorier et évaluer les situations qui affectent les femmes et jeunes femmes immigrantes/immigrées.

• Présenter à la communauté les projets, les initiatives et les contributions de ces femmes.

CONTACT Maria Jose Yax-Frasner 99 Braemar Dr. Dartmouth, NS B2X 2B5

79


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Communautaire

ASSOCIATION INTERCULTURELLE DU GRAND VICTORIA

Projet de formation sur l’application We Speak Translate

DESCRIPTION Le projet We Speak Translate est une collaboration unique en son genre entre Google Translate et l’Association interculturelle du Grand Victoria (en anglais : ICA), en Colombie-Britannique, qui utilise l’application Google Translate pour faciliter la réinstallation des réfugiés et l’intégration des nouveaux arrivants dans les communautés. Le projet We Speak Translate s’attaque au principal obstacle à l’intégration des nouveaux immigrants — la langue — en réorientant l’usage d’un outil technologique pour qu’il devienne un symbole de l’accueil des communautés et favorise la diversité et l’inclusion. Le projet implique de former des intervenants, des organisations et des institutions communautaires à l’application Google Translate. À l’issue d’une formation gratuite de 45 minutes, les participants reçoivent un autocollant We Speak Translate, symbole visible de leur engagement en faveur de la diversité et de la communication par delà les barrières linguistiques. L’application Google Translate devient ainsi une plate-forme commune de communication tandis que les nouveaux arrivants développent leurs compétences en anglais. Depuis le lancement du projet en avril 2017, plus de 2000 membres et intervenants ont reçu une formation à Google Translate dans le cadre du projet We Speak Translate.

CONTEXTE Partout dans le monde, les flux migratoires forcés et volontaires n’ont jamais atteint un tel niveau. On estime à 65,6 millions le nombre de personnes déplacées dans le monde, dont 22,5 millions de réfugiés (HCR, aperçu statistique, 2017). Selon le recueil de statistiques sur la migration et l’envoi de fonds de la Banque mondiale, le nombre total d’immigrants s’élevait à 215,8 millions en 2011. Malheureusement, l’immigration et la réinstallation des réfugiés peuvent alimenter un ressentiment des citoyens envers les migrants et engendrer une peur de la différence qui aboutit à la discrimination, aux tensions intercommunautaires et au racisme. Pour y réagir, les communautés, les entreprises, les organisations et les institutions ont besoin d’occasions pour démontrer leur appui aux nouveaux immigrants et aux réfugiés. Ainsi, en octobre 2016, la coordonnatrice de l’intégration communautaire de l’Association interculturelle du Grand Victoria, Kate Longpre, M.A., a proposé le projet We Translate à Google Translate. L’objectif était de s’attaquer au principal obstacle à l’intégration : la langue. Kate s’intéressait également à la façon dont la technologie pouvait être utilisée pour faciliter la réinstallation de réfugiés dans des pays d’accueil comme le Canada. L’idée que Google, l’une des plus grandes entreprises du monde, autorise que son produit et son image deviennent un outil symbolique pour l’amélioration des relations raciales était passionnante. D’autre part, les intervenants communautaires cherchant à créer des collectivités accueillantes pour les nouveaux arrivants ont manifesté un vif intérêt pour le projet. Kate a concrètement canalisé ces énergies en créant un outil, symbole visible d’intégration et d’engagement envers la diversité.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT Depuis le lancement du projet We Speak Translate en avril 2017, plus de 2000 membres de la communauté et intervenants à travers le Canada ont reçu une formation à Google Translate dans le cadre du projet. Une formation a été donnée aux Partenariats locaux en matière d’immigration (PLI), dans des organismes d’aide à l’établissement des immigrants, des bibliothèques, des centres de loisirs, des organismes de services sociaux, des universités, des centres de santé publique, des musées, des banques, etc. Ce projet a démarré à Victoria, en Colombie-Britannique, mais l’intérêt s’est manifesté

80


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Communautaire

ASSOCIATION INTERCULTURELLE DU GRAND VICTORIA

Projet de formation sur l’application We Speak Translate

à l’échelle du pays et ailleurs dans le monde. La formation We Speak Translate est désormais offerte via webinaire. Les communautés et les villes ayant suivi la formation We Speak Translate se montrent aujourd’hui plus accueillantes envers les réfugiés réinstallés et les nouveaux immigrants. « Lorsque je vois un autocollant We Speak Translate affiché sur une fenêtre, je suis convaincu que les gens désirent discuter avec moi et apprendre à mieux me connaître. » — Ibrahim Hajibrahim, réfugié syrien réinstallé

VISION DE L’AVENIR Notre vision d’avenir pour le projet We Speak Translate est qu’il continue à se répandre dans d’autres pays. Kate espère que le succès du projet pilote incitera Google Translate et Google à diffuser We Speak Translate sur une échelle plus large. Google est l’une des sociétés les plus connues au monde : son soutien à un projet aidant à faire tomber les barrières linguistiques et favorisant la diversité et l’intégration envoie un message puissant.

À PROPOS DE L’ASSOCIATION INTERCULTURELLE DU GRAND VICTORIA L’Association interculturelle du Grand Victoria offre des services aux nouveaux arrivants immigrés et réfugiés, notamment des services d’établissement et d’intégration, de traduction et d’interprétation, des cours d’anglais, de l’encadrement, des conseils et de l’aide à la recherche d’emploi, du jumelage avec des bénévoles et des services de soutien par les pairs. Nous organisons également des activités d’information et de sensibilisation dans la communauté, notamment grâce à des programmes artistiques et des ateliers de développement communautaire portant sur l’antiracisme, le multiculturalisme, la réceptivité à la diversité, l’immigration et les droits de la personne. L’Association interculturelle du Grand Victoria met les liens culturels en lumière à travers les arts communautaires. Fondée en 1971 en tant qu’organisation productrice du FolkFest, l’Association a évolué au fil des ans et adopté plusieurs stratégies qui lui ont permis de devenir un instrument d’élaboration et d’appui à une communauté canadienne accueillante pour les nouveaux arrivants. L’Association interculturelle du Grand Victoria est une société sans but lucratif qui : • Encourage la réceptivité, la valorisation et le respect des personnes de toutes cultures dans notre communauté en mutation. • Aide les nouveaux arrivants à s’installer dans la région du Grand Victoria et facilite leur intégration et leur pleine participation à la société. • Défend les droits de la personne, quelle que soit la culture. • Encourage la sensibilisation culturelle par la promotion d’événements publics multiculturels au sein du Grand Victoria.

CONTACT Kate Longpre 930 Balmoral Road Victoria, BC V8T 1A8 http://www.icavictoria.org/community/we-speak-translate/

81


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Communautaire

SNOWLAND OUTDOOR CLUB (SLOC)

Faire participer les nouveaux immigrants à la société canadienne par le sport

DESCRIPTION De nombreux immigrants arrivent au Canada en se heurtant à la barrière linguistique. Ils subissent un choc culturel et peuvent avoir des difficultés à s’intégrer dans la société canadienne. Snowland Outdoor Club utilise des activités sportives et des activités de plein air, en particulier le ski alpin et la planche à neige, pour aider la communauté chinoise à s’intégrer à la culture canadienne, à s’habituer aux conditions météo et à découvrir les paysages canadiens. Cette pratique familiale propose des cours de ski/planche à neige aux enfants et encourage les parents qui n’ont jamais fait de ski à acquérir cette nouvelle compétence afin de pouvoir rejoindre leurs enfants sur les pentes. Nous offrons des cours gratuits « Maman, papa, venez skier avec moi » de même que des analyses techniques sous forme d’enregistrements vidéo et des démonstrations données par des instructeurs du club. Beaucoup de parents ont exprimé leur emballement lorsque, pour la première fois, ils ont réussi à se lever sur leurs skis et à skier avec leurs enfants (plutôt que de rester au salon à s’inquiéter pour leur sécurité). Cette pratique propose également des activités estivales, comme le barbecue annuel des membres dans des aires de conservation, le camping en groupe dans des parcs provinciaux et la randonnée sur plusieurs sentiers pédestres. Les activités de plein air organisées tout au long de l’année ont permis aux membres de s’intégrer plus facilement aux traditions canadiennes et de rendre leur quotidien plus agréable.

CONTEXTE Les activités de plein air, en particulier les activités de neige, sont un élément important du mode de vie canadien. L’objectif principal de notre organisation est d’aider les immigrants et leur famille à s’intégrer à la culture canadienne et à profiter des magnifiques paysages canadiens grâce à des activités de plein air. De nombreux immigrants affirment que l’hiver au Canada est trop long et qu’ils se sentent parfois déprimés. De nombreux parents ont déclaré que leurs enfants avaient commencé à pratiquer des sports d’hiver dans leur école ou avec leurs amis, mais ils ne savaient pas comment les accompagner dans leur choix. Comme nous travaillons avec plusieurs instructeurs de ski/planche à neige, nous avons décidé de donner des cours aux enfants. Nous avons également proposé des cours gratuits pour parents débutants, « Maman, papa, venez skier avec moi », afin qu’ils puissent commencer à goûter au plaisir de ces activités et au bout du compte accompagner leurs enfants sur les pentes.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT Directement ou indirectement, le projet a rejoint environ 1200 familles d’immigrants chinois en offrant plus de 500 heures d’enseignement de ski/planche à neige, 2 à 3 excursions de ski par hiver, 2 à 3 séjours de camping par été, des barbecues annuels, des tournois de badminton toute l’année et des discussions quotidiennes sur le site WeChat avec trois groupes distincts. Le projet a aidé plus de 10 personnes à devenir instructeurs canadiens de ski/planche à neige, près de 100 familles à faire du ski et du camping et de nombreuses personnes à aimer les activités de plein air.

82


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Communautaire

SNOWLAND OUTDOOR CLUB (SLOC)

Faire participer les nouveaux immigrants à la société canadienne par le sport

VISION DE L’AVENIR Nous allons continuer à faire progresser notre projet en y ajoutant plus d’activités de plein air. Ce projet serait un excellent modèle à utiliser avec d’autres groupes d’immigrants.

À PROPOS DU SNOWLAND OUTDOOR CLUB (SLOC) Le Snowland Outdoor Club (SLOC) forme une organisation sans but lucratif à charte fédérale (ONBL) depuis août 2016. Ce sont les bénévoles qui dirigent le club, le bénévolat étant une des valeurs fondamentales canadiennes. Le club a attiré plus de mille familles qui désiraient faire du ski, de la planche à neige et d’autres sports de plein air. La principale méthode de communication du club est la plate-forme multimédia mobile WeChat qui permet de répondre rapidement aux demandes des membres et de communiquer avec eux lors d’événements. Le SLOC s’est également associé à l’Alliance des moniteurs de ski du Canada (CSIA) afin de pouvoir offrir des périodes d’entraînement aux membres du club. En moins de deux ans, plus de 10 bénévoles du SLOC ont obtenu leur certificat et sont devenus instructeurs de ski/planche à neige. L’un des instructeurs a écrit une série d’articles en chinois afin de promouvoir le ski dans cette communauté, notamment « Skier en toute sécurité », « L’équipement nécessaire pour faire du ski », « Comment se préparer à faire du ski lorsqu’on est débutant », « Les avantages de faire du ski » et « Devenir un professionnel du ski ». Ses articles ont attiré et encouragé de nombreuses personnes à venir faire du ski. La Technical Standards and Safety Authority (TSSA), en collaboration avec le conseil d’administration de l’AMSC, a récompensé cet instructeur en le nommant unique récipiendaire du TSSA Safety Award of Year (2018) pour son excellence dans la promotion de la sécurité sportive et d’un mode de vie sain.

CONTACT Jiao Jiang 60 Murellen Crescent Toronto ON, M4A 2K5 http://www.snowlandclub.org/

83


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Médias

THE MOSAIC INSTITUTE

18Qs – UofMosaic

DESCRIPTION L’objectif du projet 18Qs (18 questions) est d’animer des réunions où les interactions entre participants permettent d’éliminer les stéréotypes et les obstacles interpersonnels qu’ils peuvent avoir en fonction de leur apparence ou de ce qu’ils disent. Nous faisons asseoir deux ou trois personnes face à face et leur demandons de se poser 18 questions. Ces 18 questions ont été conçues pour apprendre à faire connaissance de manière non superficielle. Elles abordent en profondeur des sujets qui révèlent la véritable humanité de chacun. Par exemple, elles explorent les aspirations et les motivations des participants, les stéréotypes créés par les médias et par la société qui pourraient les faire souffrir et les enseignements qu’ils ont pu tirer de leurs expériences passées. Le but de ces questions extrêmement personnelles est de définir les catégories pertinentes utilisées afin de nous juger entre nous. En répondant à ces questions, les participants réalisent que, peu importe qui ils sont, toutes les expériences sont importantes, et que tous, nous sommes des êtres complexes. C’est ce qui fait le succès des 18Qs – il s’agit d’une plateforme émotionnelle où s’échangent des interactions profondément humaines.

CONTEXTE Nos recherches et les projets que nous avons mis en place nous ont montré que les préjugés ne sont souvent causés que par la crainte de ceux qui sont différents de nous, que ce soit par la couleur de la peau, la religion, le statut d’immigrant, le sexe ou la race. Cette crainte se justifie et se perpétue ensuite à travers les stéréotypes et les points de vue adoptés par les médias et la culture populaire. Nous savons pertinemment que nos différences sont en réalité l’un de nos plus précieux atouts. Elles sont source de créativité et de prospérité et devraient être appréciées et valorisées. Elles sont le fondement de notre humanité. La notion de diversité fait déjà l’objet d’une analyse serrée de rentabilité; les entreprises les plus diversifiées sont celles qui sont les plus rentables. Il est maintenant temps d’aller plus loin et de créer une initiative qui fera que les gens apprécient leurs différences, même au-delà des raisons de prospérité – ces différences ayant une valeur intrinsèque.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT Le projet 18Qs existe depuis peu, mais les réactions ont été formidables. Le fait que le projet ait d’abord été lancé sur des campus avec de jeunes universitaires pour ensuite être reconnu par des plateformes plus conséquentes comme Walrus Talks et Diversity and Inclusion témoigne de son succès. Dans tous les cas, le projet 18Qs a eu un impact sur les participants. Au moins l’un d’entre eux a appris quelque chose sur un autre qu’il ne connaissait pas auparavant et, dans de nombreux cas, les participants ont fait la connaissance de personnes qu’ils n’auraient jamais rencontrées personnellement. Nous pensons que l’un des éléments permettant d’instaurer des changements systémiques est de réunir des individus entre eux. Même si le projet 18Qs ne servait qu’à faire changer l’opinion d’une seule personne, ce serait un pas dans la bonne direction. En élargissant la portée du projet 18Qs afin d’atteindre les influenceurs et les décideurs, nous pensons qu’il aurait une vraie capacité à provoquer des changements, tant individuels que systémiques.

84


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Médias

THE MOSAIC INSTITUTE

18Qs – UofMosaic

VISION DE L’AVENIR Comme mentionné précédemment, nous souhaitons que le projet 18Qs devienne viral. Nous voulons renforcer, en nombre et en importance, le partenariat que nous avons avec les participants. Nous demandons à tous ceux qui participent de ne pas hésiter à poser les questions à d’autres connaissances et à demander à celles-ci de poser les questions à leurs amis. Nous proposons également le projet 18Qs à un certain nombre d’entreprises et de médias. Au cours de l’année prochaine, nous espérons également augmenter le nombre de campus de notre confrérie UofMosaic et ainsi atteindre de nouveaux groupes de jeunes universitaires.

À PROPOS DU MOSAIC INSTITUTE Le Mosaic Institute se consacre à combattre le racisme et à casser les préjugés. À travers nos discussions, nos recherches et nos programmes, nous espérons aider la société à voir au-delà des stéréotypes raciaux, des préjugés et des catégories restrictives qui paralysent trop souvent notre humanité. Au cours des dix dernières années, nous avons travaillé avec plusieurs communautés, des élèves du secondaire et des étudiants universitaires à cultiver le respect et la dignité entre les différentes cultures et communautés et, dans de nombreux cas, à surmonter les conflits et à améliorer les relations humaines. Aujourd’hui, ce qui est toléré en société change de plus en plus. On remarque plus de cas d’intolérance dangereuse et une prévalence accrue de la gêne, mais surtout de la peur. Dans un tel contexte, nous cherchons des solutions qui viendraient souligner que nos différences ne sont pas à craindre, mais qu’elles sont plutôt une source de créativité, de respect et de prospérité. Plusieurs de nos initiatives et de nos programmes ont été conçus pour remplir ce mandat, parmi eux, on retrouve : • UofMosaic Undergraduate Fellowship : 20 boursiers de 10 universités créent une initiative sociale nationale. • Next Generation : un programme pour le secondaire qui fait la promotion d’une génération allant au-delà des préjugés. • The Mosaic Stories : des histoires vécues de Canadiens qui ont surmonté les horreurs de la haine racontées à travers des textes + des vidéos + des créations orales.

CONTACT Ashkay Sharma 2 Bloor Street West, Suite 3405 Toronto, M4W 3E2 http://www.mosaicinstitute.ca/18qs-take-the-challenge/

85


Gagnant Prix d’excellence Éducation

UNIVERSITÉ DE VICTORIA (UVIC)

Une injustice flagrante

DESCRIPTION Soutenu par une subvention de partenariat du CRSH, Landscapes of Injustice (LOI) est un projet qui s’échelonne sur une période de sept ans et qui porte sur l’expropriation des Canadiens d’origine japonaise dans les années 1940. Des dizaines de personnes, d’universitaires, de leaders communautaires, de professionnels de la muséologie, d’enseignants, de programmeurs et d’étudiants, ainsi que 17 partenaires institutionnels travaillent ensemble à se demander comment cette expropriation s’est produite, qui en a bénéficié et comment elle a été oubliée avant de revenir dans nos mémoires. Le projet LOI soutient l’intégration de la recherche, l’engagement communautaire et la mise en place de ressources. À partir de 2014, des enseignants, des conservateurs et des membres de la communauté ont apporté leur soutien et aidé à orienter la recherche. Aujourd’hui, le collectif veut s’adresser aux enseignants du secteur public. Ses publications ont modifié la compréhension scientifique des années 1940 au Canada et les méfaits complexes et permanents de l’expropriation. Dorénavant, LOI désire faire participer les étudiants et le public. Cette violation des droits de la personne et des libertés civiles au nom de la sécurité, l’expropriation des Canadiens d’origine japonaise, est une précieuse leçon historique.

CONTEXTE Ce projet nous a été inspiré lorsqu’un questionnement partagé s’est posé sur l’expropriation et qu’est apparue une conviction commune que cette période de l’histoire avait toujours sa raison d’être. En 2011, le dirigeant et directeur de notre projet, Jordan Stanger-Ross, s’est rendu au Musée national Nikkei à la recherche de documents d’archives pouvant l’aider à comprendre l’expropriation. Là-bas, il a découvert une institution, un personnel et une communauté qui ne trouvaient aucune réponse à leurs propres questionnements sur l’expropriation. Pourquoi avait-on vendu les propriétés des Canadiens d’origine japonaise étant donné que ces ventes n’aidaient en rien à la sécurité des personnes? Comment avait-on légalisé cette violation de la citoyenneté? Qui avait profité de ces ventes? Alors que nous assistons aujourd’hui à un regain d’intérêt pour le recoupement de prétendus problèmes de sécurité, d’immigration et de racisme, les membres fondateurs du collectif estiment que l’histoire de l’expropriation est trop importante et trop énorme pour n’être racontée que par un simple individu ou une seule institution.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT Notre projet a un impact direct sur les étudiants qui y participent. Nicole Yakashiro s’est jointe à nous en tant qu’étudiante de premier cycle à l’Université de Toronto. Sa famille a rarement discuté de l’internement. Après avoir travaillé sur Landscapes of Injustice, elle écrit que le projet « m’a ouvert une porte d’entrée dans les communautés étudiantes et militantes canadojaponaises... qui m’ont fourni, en tant que yonsei, un lieu où je pouvais commencer à me comprendre ». Camille Haisell a pris connaissance de notre projet dans un module de cours de l’Université de Victoria: « [Landscapes of Injustice] a changé ma vie de manière significative... renforcé ma confiance dans les recherches universitaires en tant que facteur d’influence pouvant amorcer des changements réels et convaincants dans le monde... [et] m’a envoyée sur un parcours universitaire que je n’aurais jamais imaginé prendre ». Des recherches approfondies, impliquées dans une communauté et antiracistes sont une source d’inspiration à la fois pour les membres de la communauté touchés par le racisme et pour les étrangers qui prennent connaissance de ce passé historique pour la première fois. Avec nos programmes d’enseignement public, nous espérons propager largement ces effets transformateurs.

86


Gagnant Prix d’excellence Éducation

UNIVERSITÉ DE VICTORIA (UVIC)

Une injustice flagrante

VISION DE L’AVENIR Notre projet est maintenant dans une phase décisive. Cet été, à travers le Canada, les enseignants élaboreront leurs plans de cours. Nos archives numériques et nos sites web narratifs seront conçus. Notre exposition itinérante, déjà réservée à Vancouver, à Victoria, à Toronto et à Halifax, en est à l’étape de l’interprétation et de la commercialisation, à la recherche de lieux de présentation à travers le pays. Notre premier livre, Witness to Loss, est déjà épuisé et a été sélectionné pour le Prix du livre de l’Institut Wilson d’une valeur de 10 000 $; nous avons également signé un contrat pour la publication de deux autres livres. Une revue scientifique de premier plan, le Journal of American Ethnic History, publiera cet été un numéro spécial consacré à nos recherches. Dans ce contexte, la reconnaissance de la Fondation canadienne des relations raciales contribuera à mieux faire connaître cette période de l’histoire au public et à établir des liens avec les musées, les enseignants, les conseils scolaires et le public.

À PROPOS DE L’UNIVERSITÉ DE VICTORIA L’Université de Victoria est l’une des principales universités polyvalentes au Canada, avec des antécédents exemplaires de recherches dans les domaines autochtone et communautaire. Dans son cadre stratégique, l’université a pris l’engagement de s’impliquer localement et globalement et de promouvoir le respect et la réconciliation. L’université de Victoria réalise ces objectifs grâce à son soutien exemplaire au projet Landscapes of Injustice (jugé excellent par le comité de sélection des experts du CRSH) et à son leadership dans d’autres recherches de type communautaires. L’objectif de l’Université de Victoria est de devenir l’université de recherche canadienne qui intègre le mieux ses travaux de recherche aux possibilités d’apprentissage et à une contribution à la vie réelle afin d’assurer un avenir meilleur à la population et à la planète.

CONTACT Jordan Stanger-Ross c/o University of Victoria PO Box 1700 STN CSC Victoria, BC V8W 2Y2 http://www.landscapesofinjustice.com/

87


Prix d’excellence 2018 Mention honorable Éducation

UNIVERSITÉ DU QUÉBEC À MONTRÉAL (UQÀM)

Les jumelages interculturels pour réduire le racisme et pour valoriser le vivre-ensemble

DESCRIPTION Les jumelages interculturels sont des activités obligatoires d’échange et d’apprentissage réunissant des personnes immigrantes apprenant le français (dans ce cours de communications orale et écrite, phonétique, grammaire et lecture) et des francophones étudiant en enseignement, counselling de carrière, psychologie, travail social et communication. Son succès repose d’abord sur le travail de collaboration qui a eu un effet structurant : au moins 50 maîtres de langue, professeurs et personnes chargées de cours de sept départements inclus dans trois facultés ont travaillé ensemble dans collégialité. Son succès se repose aussi sur la notion de réciprocité lorsque les francophones et les personnes immigrantes se rencontrent : depuis 2002, plus de 15 000 jumelles et jumeaux se sont rencontrés. De part et d’autre, ils partagent un but commun qui est celui de développer les compétences de communication interculturelles afin de construire une société égalitaire, équitable et inclusive.

CONTEXTE L’origine du projet de jumelage repose sur un constat. Il y a plus de 15 ans, les immigrants qui étaient inscrits dans un programme d’apprentissage du français disaient à leurs enseignants qu’ils avaient peu ou pas de contact avec les étudiants francophones de l’université. Pourtant, ils partageaient le même pavillon, les mêmes locaux et avaient accès aux mêmes services. Par ailleurs, nous avions constaté que les étudiants francophones inscrits dans différents programmes étaient peu ou pas sensibilisés aux défis rencontrés par les immigrants et à la nécessité de les intégrer dans des réseaux francophones. Delà, l’idée de travailler à transformer la culture des programmes universitaires concernés en encourageant les étudiants de se rencontrer afin d’apprendre à e connaître.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT Les effets de jumelages interculturels tant du point de vue des immigrants que celui des francophones sont saisissants. Année après année, les francophones ont appris à reconnaître les types, les causes et les méfaits des préjugés et de la discrimination, à devenir empathiques à l’égard des groupes minoritaires, racialisés et stigmatisés, à diminuer leur sentiment relativement à la menace identitaire, mais aussi à augmenter leur sécurité linguistique et sociale. Pour leur part, les personnes immigrantes ont eu de nombreuses occasions de pratiquer la langue dans le cadre de plusieurs jumelages au cours de leur formation en français. Elles ont par ailleurs découvert la culture de leur société d’accueil, développé des compétences linguistiques et interculturelles tout en remettant en question les préjugés qu’elles avaient envers les individus de cette société. Les jumelages leur donnent confiance et les incitent à tisser des liens d’amitié avec des individus d’autres communautés que la leur.

VISION DU PROJET L’équipe se projette dans l’avenir par la mise en place d’un nouveau groupe de recherche, de documentation et d’action sur les jumelages interculturels (GReJI), qui réunit des collaborateurs de différentes institutions, notamment les universités, les cégeps, les commissions scolaires, les écoles et les groupes communautaires. Nous visons à ce que les francophones, les anglophones, les allophones et les autochtones puissent avoir la possibilité de se rencontrer et de partager des activités et des projets. Nous planifions aussi monter un site présentant du matériel pédagogique, des capsules audiovisuelles et des témoignages.

88


Prix d’excellence 2018 Mention honorable Éducation

UNIVERSITÉ DU QUÉBEC À MONTRÉAL (UQÀM)

Les jumelages interculturels pour réduire le racisme et pour valoriser le vivre-ensemble

À PROPOS DE L’UNIVERSITÉ DU QUÉBEC À MONTRÉAL (UQÀM) L’UQÀM se distingue par la qualité de l’encadrement pédagogique de ses enseignant, l’importance accordée à la formation pratique, le service d’accueil des étudiants étrangers et l’animation de la vie sur le campus. Dynamique et innovatrice, l’UQÀM offre plus de 300 programmes rattachés à l’École des sciences humaines. Grâce aux succès remportés par ses professeurs et ses étudiants, l’UQÀM se classe parmi les grandes universités de recherche au Canada, notamment en sciences humaines, en sciences naturelles, dans le domaine de la santé sociale ainsi qu’en création. Ses chercheurs sont rassemblés dans près d’une centaine d’unités de recherche caractérisées par l’interdisciplinarité. Dans de nombreux secteurs où elle œuvre, l’UQÀM connaît un rayonnement international. Pour faciliter les échanges de chercheurs et la circulation des étudiants, l’UQÀM a établi des ententes avec plus de 450 partenaires dans une soixantaine de pays sur les cinq continents, sans compter les liens créés par son appartenance à des réseaux universitaires internationaux.

PERSONNE À CONTACTER Myra Deraîche Université du Québec à Montréal, Faculté de communication C.P. 8888, succursale Centre-ville Montreal, QC H3C 3P8

89


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Éducation

LABORATOIRE DE DÉVELOPPEMENT DU DR KANG LEE, INSTITUT D’ÉTUDES PÉDAGOGIQUES DE L’ONTARIO (IEPO)

Diminuer les préjugés raciaux pendant la petite enfance

DESCRIPTION Au cours des dix dernières années, notre objectif a toujours été d’améliorer le milieu de vie et l’environnement social des minorités racialisées et de travailler à l’établissement de relations raciales harmonieuses. En collaboration avec des chercheurs de l’Ontario et de l’étranger, nous avons constaté une émergence précoce du racisme dès l’âge de 3 ans, beaucoup plus tôt que ce qui avait été prédit. Les résultats de nos recherches démontrent qu’il est possible de mieux faire comprendre en quoi consiste le racisme dans la société et de renforcer la réponse collective aux questions liées à l’équité raciale et à des relations raciales positives. Pour lutter contre le racisme chez les jeunes enfants, nous avons mis au point des programmes de formation sur la prise de conscience de l’individuation, l’exposition aux contre-stéréotypes et la communication interpersonnelle. Notre équipe interdisciplinaire teste et perfectionne ces programmes de formation afin qu’ils puissent être largement diffusés dans les établissements d’enseignement préscolaire en Ontario et ailleurs.

CONTEXTE Les démarches antiracistes ciblent principalement les préjugés raciaux clairs, le racisme explicite. Elles négligent cependant les préjugés raciaux subtiles, des préjugés sociaux inconscients et omniprésents dont l’action est pernicieuse. De tels préjugés existent même chez les enfants et apparaissent dès l’âge de 3 ans. Les préjugés raciaux cachés ont des conséquences personnelles et sociétales négatives considérables qui touchent tous les domaines de la vie humaine et provoquent des risques accrus pour la santé physique et psychologique de ceux qui en font l’objet. Tous les efforts visant à réduire les préjugés raciaux cachés chez les adultes ont dans l’ensemble échoué. Cet échec montre à quel point il est urgent de créer un programme d’intervention fondé sur des données factuelles qui permet de faire diminuer les préjugés raciaux cachés chez les individus les plus susceptibles de changer — les enfants d’âge préscolaire. Malheureusement, il n’existe aucun programme de ce genre. Mes recherches visent à combler cette importante lacune.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT Au Canada, cette initiative est la première recherche systématique fondée sur des données factuelles qui vise à élaborer, tester et perfectionner un programme de réduction des préjugés raciaux cachés dans le cadre de l’enseignement préscolaire. En tirant parti de nos recherches en laboratoire qui étudient les effets de la formation individuelle sur les préjugés raciaux cachés chez les jeunes enfants, nous proposons une adaptation de ce programme novateur aux éducateurs et éducatrices de la petite enfance, directement sur le terrain (p. ex., dans les espaces éducatifs). Il s’agit d’une première mondiale qui nous permettra d’évaluer la faisabilité et la durabilité réelles du programme lorsque des chercheurs qualifiés ne pourront être présents pour aider les éducateurs et éducatrices de la petite enfance. De plus, le programme a été prévu pour contrer les effets à court et à long terme en vue de réduire le racisme sur une longue période. Cette initiative permettra également d’effectuer un examen exhaustif des théories sur la manifestation et le développement des préjugés raciaux cachés durant la petite enfance (c’est-à-dire l’hypothèse des blocs conceptuels vs les représentations sociales). Cet examen aidera à la compréhension des causes développementales à la base des préjugés raciaux cachés et apportera un soutien théorique à notre programme de réduction des préjugés chez les enfants (c.-à-d., la formation à l’individuation).

90


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Éducation

LABORATOIRE DE DÉVELOPPEMENT DU DR KANG LEE, INSTITUT D’ÉTUDES PÉDAGOGIQUES DE L’ONTARIO (IEPO)

Diminuer les préjugés raciaux pendant la petite enfance

VISION DE L’AVENIR Nous collaborerons avec une équipe interdisciplinaire de psychologues, d’économistes, d’éducateurs et d’éducatrices de la petite enfance et de défenseurs de politiques pour développer, tester et perfectionner un programme novateur de réduction des préjugés raciaux pouvant être largement diffusé dans les établissements d’enseignement préscolaire en Ontario et ailleurs. Notre initiative comprend également un plan novateur de mobilisation du savoir qui impliquera non seulement des chercheurs spécialisés dans le développement cognitif provenant de différentes parties du monde, mais également d’autres parties prenantes telles que les éducateurs et éducatrices de la petite enfance, les défenseurs des politiques concernant les éducateurs et éducatrices de la petite enfance, les économistes, ainsi que d’importants établissements de formation des enseignants. L’engagement à différents niveaux de ces parties prenantes permettra une large diffusion des résultats obtenus et de l’outil pédagogique qui en résultera. Avec l’appui de ces intervenants, nous serons en mesure de réaliser les principaux objectifs de ce programme de recherche qui sont de réduire le racisme, de favoriser l’intégration et l’harmonie sociales et de faire du Canada une société véritablement multiculturelle.

À PROPOS DE L’IEPO Le Dr Kang Lee est chercheur principal au Laboratoire de développement du Dr Kang Lee. Il a obtenu une chaire de recherche du Canada (Institut des études de l’enfance Dr Eric Jackman, psychologie appliquée et développement humain, IEPO/Université de Toronto). Le laboratoire du Dr Lee a largement contribué à notre compréhension du développement des préjugés raciaux et des catégorisations sociales dans la reconnaissance des visages et leurs effets sur les préjugés raciaux. Au cours des vingt dernières années, le laboratoire du Dr Lee a utilisé des méthodes comportementales de neuroscience pour étudier ce développement sociocognitif, ce qui a mené à de nouvelles découvertes concernant l’âge auquel les préjugés raciaux prennent forme. L’IEPO est reconnu comme un chef de file mondial en enseignement et en apprentissage, ainsi que dans la recherche en formation continue. Considéré comme l’une des plus importantes facultés d’éducation axées sur la recherche en Amérique du Nord, l’IEPO fait partie intégrante de l’institution d’enseignement supérieur de l’Université de Toronto au Canada. L’IEPO s’est engagé à améliorer le bien-être social, économique, politique et culturel des individus et des communautés, tant à l’échelle locale, que nationale et internationale, grâce à un leadership en matière d’enseignement, de recherche et de sensibilisation.

CONTACT Miao Qian 252 Bloor Street West Toronto, ON M5S 1V6 http://www.kangleelab.com/

91


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Éducation

FACULTÉ DE TRAVAIL SOCIAL, UNIVERSITÉ DU MANITOBA

Dialogue intergroupe

DESCRIPTION Le dialogue intergroupe est une expérience d’apprentissage dirigée qui rassemble des individus de deux groupes sociaux ou plus sur une période de temps déterminée. Les dialogues intergroupes comprennent généralement 14 à 16 personnes, réparties de manière égale entre deux groupes sociaux différents, qui s’engagent à se rencontrer sur une période de temps déterminée (généralement 10 à 14 semaines). Ils sont dirigés par deux animateurs issus des groupes invités. L’une des composantes essentielles du modèle de dialogue intergroupe est la nécessité d’offrir systématiquement une formation et une assistance aux animateurs. Dans des établissements postsecondaires, des résultats positifs significatifs ont été constatés lors d’un projet pluriannuel de recherche interuniversitaire portant sur l’efficacité de programmes de dialogues intergroupes utilisant la pédagogie critique et dialogique. Les participants ont déclaré avoir une meilleure compréhension des différents groupes identitaires, de meilleures relations avec eux et une plus grande volonté à contester l’oppression. La pédagogie utilisée dans le dialogue intergroupe, qui aborde sur une période de temps déterminée les aspects cognitifs et affectifs de l’apprentissage des participants, et qui est dispensée par des animateurs formés, semble avoir influé sur ces résultats positifs. Bien que de nombreuses leçons puissent être tirées de l’expérience et de la recherche menées aux États-Unis, le modèle de dialogue intergroupe canadien a été élaboré pour répondre aux besoins particuliers du contexte local et en particulier à la nécessité de réconcilier les peuples autochtones et non autochtones. Depuis 2012, je forme des étudiants diplômés et des membres de la communauté à organiser des dialogues intergroupes sur le campus de l’Université du Manitoba et dans la communauté de Winnipeg.

CONTEXTE Les 21 et 22 mai 2013, deux professeurs du programme de relations intergroupes de l’Université du Michigan ont donné un atelier de deux jours à l’Université du Manitoba à plus de 40 participants de l’Université et de la ville de Winnipeg. Les objectifs de l’atelier étaient de présenter aux participants la philosophie du dialogue intergroupe et de développer certaines compétences. La ville de Winnipeg est aux prises depuis longtemps avec une fracture sociale entre ses citoyens autochtones et non autochtones. Ce problème a été décrit de façon dramatique en 2015 dans un article du magazine MacLean’s qui affirmait que Winnipeg était la ville « la plus raciste » au pays. Cette étiquette tristement célèbre a incité de nombreux citoyens à chercher des moyens de résoudre ce problème, mais dans la pratique, les solutions se sont avérées difficiles à trouver. Le projet de dialogue intergroupe à l’Université du Manitoba et au sein de la communauté est né lors de mes études de doctorat où je me suis familiarisé avec le programme de relations intergroupes de l’Université du Michigan, effectif depuis plus de 25 ans. Le programme de RIG offre annuellement un cours de DIG à 1 000 étudiants de premier cycle et obtient des résultats très convaincants.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT Au cours des cinq dernières années, le programme a été très bien reçu par les étudiants de l’UM et les membres de la communauté qui ont souligné son efficacité à créer des espaces de discussion intergroupes pour aborder les sujets difficiles.

92


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Éducation

FACULTÉ DE TRAVAIL SOCIAL, UNIVERSITÉ DU MANITOBA

Dialogue intergroupe

VISION DE L’AVENIR Ce projet m’a permis de devenir membre de la Table sectorielle sur la participation des Autochtones et des nouveaux arrivants par l’entremise du Conseil de planification sociale — Partenariat en immigration de Winnipeg (IPW). Cette table sectorielle spécifique vise à répondre à la principale priorité du programme IPW qui consiste à « renforcer les liens entre les communautés autochtones et les nouveaux arrivants en créant de nouveaux débouchés et en améliorant les pratiques existantes qui misent sur l’apprentissage et la compréhension des autres cultures et le soutien interculturel ». À l’heure actuelle, la Table sectorielle sur les Autochtones et les nouveaux arrivants s’emploie à répertorier les organisations et le soutien financier qui permettraient de mettre en place les premières mesures de formation pour organiser des dialogues intergroupes communautaires avec des animateurs participants.

À PROPOS DE LA FACULTÉ DE TRAVAIL SOCIAL DE L’UNIVERSITÉ DU MANITOBA L’objectif de la Faculté de travail social de l’Université du Manitoba est de contribuer à un monde prônant la diversité et où n’existe aucune grave inégalité. La mission de l’Université du Manitoba est de préserver et de communiquer des connaissances qui contribuent au bien-être culturel, social et économique de la population du Manitoba, du Canada et du monde.

CONTACT Cathy Rocke c/o University of Manitoba 521 Tier Building Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2

93


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Éducation

LES AMIS DU CENTRE SIMON WIESENTHAL

De la compassion à l’action

DESCRIPTION Le projet Compassion to Action est un outil de formation professionnelle conçu pour les leaders canadiens influents qui désirent en apprendre davantage sur l’Holocauste et utiliser les préceptes appris pour lutter contre les manifestations croissantes d’intolérance et de haine dans notre société. Connaitre les raisons qui ont mené au plus grand génocide de l’histoire de l’humanité, réfléchir à la manière dont il aurait pu être évité et appliquer au monde complexe d’aujourd’hui les leçons apprises aideront les professionnels à poser un regard critique sur les problématiques qu’ils rencontrent dans leurs tâches quotidiennes. En fournissant aux dirigeants un contexte historique aux deux maladies que sont la haine et l’intolérance (comme l’antisémitisme) et en les encourageant à opérer des changements, nous pensons qu’ils partageront leurs nouvelles connaissances avec leur communauté et seront prêts à s’engager dans une lutte contre toute forme de haine. Des professionnels de divers domaines, invités à venir faire part de leurs connaissances aux participants, lancent une discussion avec eux sur l’importance historique des événements pour ensuite les encourager à transmettre ces connaissances aux générations futures.

CONTEXTE Avi Benlolo, président et directeur général du Centre des amis de Simon Wiesenthal pour les études sur l’Holocauste (FSWC), a été l’instigateur du projet Compassion to Action. Bien que Compassion to Action ait été inspiré par des survivants de l’Holocauste comme Simon Wiesenthal et Max Eisen et par la nécessité de perpétuer leur héritage, Avi était également conscient de la vague montante d’antisémitisme, de racisme et de toutes les formes de haine et d’intolérance dans la société. Au cours des soixante-dix dernières années, malgré la multitude de documents conservés par les nazis et venant témoigner de leurs crimes, la négation de l’Holocauste et le révisionnisme continuent à sévir partout dans le monde, y compris au Canada. En fait, les statistiques sur les crimes haineux au Canada ont été stupéfiantes et montrent que la fin de la Seconde Guerre mondiale en 1945 n’a mis un terme ni à l’antisémitisme ni au racisme. Compassion to Action vient répondre à cette haine et à cette intolérance. Ce programme montre les conséquences directes de la haine et de l’intolérance lorsqu’elles ne sont pas contrôlées. Le programme offre un espace de discussion et les moyens nécessaires pour créer une communauté en dehors d’un secteur professionnel, d’une province ou d’un territoire. Les décideurs peuvent y discuter des enjeux auxquels ils sont confrontés et faire part des succès qu’ils ont obtenus dans leurs professions respectives. Les enseignements tirés de l’histoire servent à guider les participants et à créer des outils qui les aideront à accomplir leur travail.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT L’influence du programme Compassion to Action continue de s’étendre. Depuis son lancement en 2010, plus de 150 chefs de police, directeurs de l’éducation, administrateurs de conseils scolaires, surintendants, présidents de conseils d’administration, politiciens et chefs d’entreprise ont pris part au programme. Voici un exemple de changement individuel attribuable au programme Compassion to Action : • Helena Karabela et Anthony Quinn, administrateurs du conseil scolaire du district catholique de Halton, ont participé au programme Compassion to Action en 2016. Ils ont mis sur pied une initiative qui, chaque année, reconnait officiellement la Journée internationale du souvenir de l’Holocauste dans leurs écoles. Helena et Anthony ont partagé avec un groupe d’élèves les connaissances reçues lors de leur participation au programme. Helena a également invité plusieurs fois Max Eisen, survivant de l’Holocauste, à venir témoigner dans les écoles.

94


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Éducation

LES AMIS DU CENTRE SIMON WIESENTHAL

De la compassion à l’action

VISION DE L’AVENIR Le programme Compassion to Action continuera d’être prioritaire pour le Centre FSWC. Comme le souhaite Avi Benlolo, l’héritage de Simon Wiesenthal et des survivants de l’Holocauste continuera d’être diffusé à travers le pays. Les réactions provenant des provinces autres que l’Ontario sont très favorables et nous continuons notre sensibilisation en soutenant le travail de nos anciens participants. Viendra un temps où notre programme sera présenté dans chaque province et chaque territoire au Canada. Chaque tournée se rendra alors dans les principaux sites du pays tout en courtisant les nouveaux musées et sites commémoratifs. Le programme ne perdra jamais de sa pertinence et impliquera la fine pointe de la recherche concernant l’Holocauste. Le secteur du programme qui connaitra la plus forte croissance est son incidence. Au fur et à mesure que les participants au programme amorcent des changements dans leur domaine respectif, ils font part de leurs succès. De nouvelles idées et initiatives prennent forme et les nouveaux participants peuvent compter sur celles-ci pour augmenter la portée et les impacts des enseignements tirés de l’Holocauste et de la connaissance des droits de l’homme. L’objectif du programme Compassion to Action est de devenir un catalyseur de changements systémiques solides et positifs dans l’ensemble du pays et dans tous les secteurs d’activité.

À PROPOS DES AMIS DU CENTRE SIMON WIESENTHAL POUR LES ÉTUDES SUR L’HOLOCAUSTE (FSWC) Les Amis du Centre Simon Wiesenthal pour les études sur l’Holocauste (FSWC) est la plus importante fondation juive de défense des droits de l’homme au Canada. Elle touche directement plus de 100 000 personnes chaque année et plus de 500 000 personnes en périphérie. Le centre FSWC s’est engagé à lutter contre le racisme et l’antisémitisme et à promouvoir les principes canadiens de tolérance, de justice sociale et de valeurs démocratiques dans le cadre de programmes de sensibilisation et d’éducation, notamment dans le cadre d’ateliers comme Freedom Day, Spirit of Hope Benefit, Tools for Tolerance, Compassion to Action et l’atelier Tour for Humanity reconnu internationalement. Le centre FSWC est affilié au Simon Wiesenthal Center, une organisation juive internationale de défense des droits de l’homme basée à Los Angeles, qui a remporté deux Oscars, a construit deux musées de la tolérance (avec un troisième en construction à Jérusalem) et qui est une ONG reconnue par les Nations Unies, l’UNESCO, l’OEA, l’OSCE, le Conseil de l’Europe et le Parlement latino-américain.

CONTACT Melissa Mikel 902-5075 Yonge Street Toronto, ON M2N 6C6 http://www.fswc.ca/

95


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Éducation

HARMONY MOVEMENT

Race et racisme : donner voix aux jeunes

DESCRIPTION Race and Racism: Igniting Student Voice est un programme interactif de leadership étudiant qui invite les jeunes à analyser de manière critique le concept de race au Canada. Le programme est fondé sur des modèles d’apprentissage expérientiel et développé en collaboration avec des partenaires éducatifs. Le contenu permet aux élèves d’analyser les notions d’identité, de discrimination et de revendications à partir de conférences d’une journée et d’ateliers de deux ou trois jours dont les objectifs sont communs, mais distincts. Les conférences d’une journée réunissent jusqu’à 100 élèves que l’on engage dans un processus de pensée critique qui suscite des débats animés. Les participants y démystifient le rôle des médias et le concept de race et y définissent les changements qu’ils souhaiteraient voir appliqués dans leur école. Les ateliers de deux ou trois jours rassemblent intentionnellement des groupes de 30 étudiants racialisés. On leur offre d’abord le temps et l’espace nécessaires pour instaurer une confiance mutuelle et explorer l’identité personnelle de chacun, puis on les invite à s’engager dans une discussion plus approfondie sur l’ambiance qui existe dans leurs écoles et les possibilités d’expression qu’on y offre. À partir de ces discussions, ils élaborent des plans d’action précis qui leur permettront d’amorcer un changement social dans leur milieu scolaire. Des forums de discussion servent au suivi de ces activités en offrant du soutien aux groupes et en donnant l’occasion aux élèves d’améliorer les compétences acquises et de réfléchir aux meilleurs moyens de mettre en place les plans établis. Les trois formats du programme partagent un seul et même objectif, donner voix aux jeunes et offrir aux élèves racialisés un espace où partager leurs expériences, exprimer leur opinion et acquérir les compétences nécessaires pour soulever des questions génératrices de changements.

CONTEXTE Le mandat de Harmony Movement a toujours été de confronter les attitudes qui font obstacle à l’intégration sociale. Depuis sa création, l’organisme a toujours mis l’accent sur le racisme, le sexisme, l’homophobie, l’islamophobie et d’autres formes d’oppression systémique dans ses programmes scolaires. À ce titre, les conférences et les ateliers du projet Race et racisme sont une nouvelle occasion d’élargir notre mandat en invitant les jeunes à faire une analyse plus complète des relations raciales au Canada. Lorsque le gouvernement provincial a offert un apport financier aux programmes scolaires luttant contre le racisme, Harmony Movement organisait déjà, depuis plus de dix ans, des ateliers antioppression. Pour nous, ce fut cependant l’occasion d’adapter notre contenu au milieu scolaire afin d’y organiser des discussions sur la race et l’intersectionnalité qui feraient avancer le débat dans son ensemble. Parallèlement, nous avons poursuivi notre collaboration avec les écoles, les groupes communautaires et le gouvernement de l’Ontario à la mise en œuvre du plan stratégique triennal de lutte contre le racisme de l’Ontario.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT Le premier objectif de nos conférences et de nos ateliers est de provoquer un changement individuel. Pour de nombreux élèves racialisés, notre programme est souvent la première occasion de s’engager dans un processus interactif qui leur permet d’analyser en profondeur et en toute sécurité ce qu’ils expérimentent ou ont expérimenté face au concept de race. Ensuite, au deuxième jour de l’atelier, les jeunes sont invités à réfléchir à l’impact que peut avoir leur voix et à ce qu’ils souhaiteraient voir changer. Conjointement avec les animateurs, les élèves établissent alors des plans d’action précis qui visent à opérer un changement social. La collaboration postprogramme entre le personnel de Harmony Movement, les éducateurs scolaires et les élèves permet d’implanter les plans d’action établis, de s’assurer de leur évolution et d’obtenir une rétroaction continue. Par le passé, des élèves ont développé des initiatives réussies, comme la Red Dress

96


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Éducation

HARMONY MOVEMENT

Race et racisme : donner voix aux jeunes

Campaign ou la campagne de peintures murales, pour lutter contre la discrimination et promouvoir l’intégration. Un autre groupe d’élèves a organisé une visite d’une journée chez des avocats spécialisés en immigration et des organisations communautaires afin de se familiariser avec les défis sociaux que rencontrent les nouveaux arrivants et de s’informer sur les moyens dont ils disposent pour éliminer certaines de ces barrières sociales.

VISION DE L’AVENIR Nous espérons étendre notre portée à travers tout le pays et augmenter notre impact sur les jeunes racialisés afin qu’ils deviennent des acteurs de changement tant au niveau individuel que collectif. Nous recueillerons une plus grande quantité de données qualitatives pour nous guider lors des prochaines étapes — étapes qui seront définies en fonction des expériences vécues par les jeunes racialisés dans nos écoles et nos communautés et par ce qu’ils désirent exprimer. À travers l’enseignement prodigué, nous chercherons également à attirer plus de sympathisants chez les jeunes et les éducateurs afin d’opérer des changements systémiques et de faire en sorte qu’ils se maintiennent. Enfin, nous continuerons à enrichir le contenu de notre programme selon les besoins en constante évolution du paysage sociopolitique et veillerons à rester une ressource progressiste et respectée de l’apprentissage transformationnel.

À PROPOS Harmony Movement est un organisme à but non lucratif qui encourage tous les Canadien•e•s à valoriser la diversité et à s’engager envers une société juste et bienveillante. Créé en 1994, l’organisme lutte contre l’intolérance interraciale et toutes les formes de discrimination qui font obstacle à une société harmonieuse. Harmony Movement offre des programmes de sensibilisation à la diversité dans les écoles, les centres communautaires et les lieux de travail en Ontario. Ses programmes, dirigés par des jeunes, offrent aux élèves un espace de réflexion critique sur les stéréotypes, la diversité et l’intégration et les aident à établir des plans d’action grâce à du contenu interactif. Les élèves sont invités à analyser et à contester des concepts sociaux et culturels, puis à se servir du débat pour apporter des changements concrets. Au printemps 2018, Harmony Movement a commencé à offrir ses programmes au-delà de l’Ontario dans le cadre d’un projet national intitulé Voices of Canadian Youth.

CONTACT Roz Espin 85 Scarsdale Road, No. 303 Toronto, ON M3B 2R2 http://www.harmony.ca/

97


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Éducation

PROJET D’ÉTUDES SUR LA MIGRATION ET LA DIASPORA, UNIVERSITÉ DE CARLETON

Exode : mouvement, culture, individus

DESCRIPTION Ce projet collaboratif aide les élèves du secondaire de la région de la capitale nationale à étudier les liens entre la migration, la diaspora et la diversité canadienne, tels qu’ils se reflètent dans les arts et la culture. Les étudiants sont invités à assister à des cours de maître, donnés par des auteurs, des artistes en création orale et des chorégraphes internationaux de renom, dans lesquels ils ont l’occasion de jouer un rôle, de développer des compétences en improvisation, de faire une recherche de personnages et d’étudier des genres littéraires. Ils participent à des groupes et à des ateliers de lectures postcoloniales et décoloniales dirigés par des professeurs affiliés au projet d’études sur la migration et la diaspora de l’Université de Carleton. À partir des compétences et des connaissances acquises lors de ces cours de maîtres et de ces ateliers, les élèves utilisent le théâtre, la chanson, la poésie, la prose, le récit et les formes d’art diasporique africain pour créer un spectacle commémorant la Journée mondiale des réfugiés et la Journée internationale pour l’élimination du racisme. Le projet poursuit l’objectif stratégique de l’Université de Carleton qui vise à assurer la prospérité mondiale en créant des collectivités durables. Il tire sa force de l’excellence et de l’expertise d’instituts partenaires comme l’Université d’Ottawa (et son colloque international, interdisciplinaire et bilingue sur la migration, la représentation et les stéréotypes), le Conseil scolaire du district d’Ottawa-Carleton, le Partenariat local pour l’immigration d’Ottawa, le festival House of Paint Arts et le Centre d’amitié autochtone d’Ottawa. En 2019 et 2020, le projet s’étendra afin de répondre aux demandes des partenaires de Toronto et de Vancouver ainsi qu’à celles du volet d’apprentissage par l’expérience du nouveau programme de maîtrise en études sur la migration et la diaspora de l’Université de Carleton.

CONTEXTE Le projet d’études sur la migration et la diaspora (MDS) permet à l’Université de Carleton d’être reconnue à Ottawa et d’y occuper, au-delà du campus, une position de précurseur dans les milieux de recherche, de politique de recherche et de praticiens. Nos recherches et nos analyses portent sur des questions ayant un impact sur de nombreux enjeux importants pour le gouvernement, les organisations non gouvernementales, les organisations culturelles et le grand public, enjeux qui vont des réfugiés syriens aux changements climatiques. Nous continuons à établir des relations à l’échelle nationale et internationale, en créant des liens avec des chercheurs, des experts, des activistes, des organisations communautaires diasporiques et des centres de migration. Nous nous sommes engagés dans le projet « Exode : mouvement, culture, individus » à la suite de discussions et d’expériences menées auprès d’élèves du secondaire, d’étudiants de la première cohorte de baccalauréat en études mondiales et internationales et de collègues d’Ottawa et du conseil scolaire du district d’Ottawa-Carleton. Nous désirions ardemment offrir un soutien pratique aux mesures antiracistes mises en place dans la région et voulions offrir des espaces susceptibles d’alimenter une réflexion éclairée sur les termes clés et les idées importantes qui affinent et augmentent nos capacités à communiquer entre groupes ethniques et culturels. Nous avons pu compter sur la personne recrutée au MDS en juillet 2014, qui possède une vaste expérience dans le domaine des applications d’enseignement supérieur au Royaume-Uni et aux États-Unis auprès de minorités ethniques et d’étudiants non traditionnels (en tant que directeur du Access Scheme à l’Université d’Oxford et celui de professeur au poste Ida B Wells-Barnett sur l’étude de la diaspora africaine et noire). Cette personne a joué un rôle de premier plan dans le cadre du Forum national du Commonwealth étudiant et du Plan d’action de la jeunesse noire de l’Ontario au Canada.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT Le projet réunit les arts, les sciences sociales et les affaires publiques pour augmenter notre compréhension mutuelle des phénomènes associés à la migration et aux diasporas. Il réunit des membres du corps professoral, des étudiants et des praticiens qui améliorent le processus d’élaboration des politiques

98


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Éducation

PROJET D’ÉTUDES SUR LA MIGRATION ET LA DIASPORA, UNIVERSITÉ DE CARLETON

Exode : mouvement, culture, individus

Il rassemble des études portant sur la migration et la diaspora afin d’aborder : • les liens multinationaux et transnationaux entre les communautés de migrants et les diasporas et les pratiques qu’on y met en œuvre. • les relations entre l’État-nation, les agents non étatiques et les structures économiques, culturelles, sociales et politiques transnationales. • les processus par lesquels les migrants mobilisent l’action sociale et politique dans les sociétés d’installation et de départ et y expriment leurs identités transnationales et diasporiques pour lutter contre le racisme et les hiérarchies raciales. Il étudie également l’aspect humain derrière les statistiques pour fournir des outils aux étudiants et leur donner la confiance nécessaire pour aborder des questions sensibles comme les traumatismes, le racisme et l’identité selon un académisme rigoureux, créatif et éthique.

VISION DE L’AVENIR Nous prévoyons ajouter deux dates de présentation pour les spectacles issus des ateliers et des cours de maître (l’une coïncidant avec la Journée des droits de l’homme et l’autre pendant la semaine d’orientation dans les universités). Nous ajouterons de nouveaux ateliers avec des cinéastes de renom et nous enregistrerons et monterons les performances créées pour les partager avec des collègues nationaux et internationaux du domaine des études sur la migration et la diaspora et de domaines connexes tels que les études en matière de performance, en éducation et en pédagogie. Nous prévoyons également étendre notre réseau d’enseignants de niveau secondaire dans la région de la capitale nationale et créer un programme national avec des partenaires de l’Université de York et de l’Université Simon Fraser qui travailleront avec des étudiants de la région du Grand Toronto et de Vancouver.

À PROPOS DU PROJET D’ÉTUDES SUR LA MIGRATION ET LA DIASPORA Le projet d’études sur la migration et la diaspora porte sur les implications sociales, économiques, culturelles et politiques liées au mouvement et à l’installation transnationale des individus. Le projet a été lancé en 2011 avec le soutien du Bureau du vice-président à la recherche et au développement international et a reçu un Prix Carleton University Building Connections en 2015 pour ses activités sur le campus, ce qui a eu un impact durable sur la recherche et l’enseignement. Le projet MDS a reçu en 2012 une subvention de 400 000 dollars sur sept ans du Groupe Banque TD qui a permis de créer une bourse d’études supérieures annuelle et d’organiser des dizaines d’événements nationaux et internationaux rassemblant des représentants des gouvernements, des entreprises, des universités et de la société civile. De plus, en 2012, le projet Metropolis, un réseau de recherche international composé de chercheurs, de décideurs et de groupes communautaires, a installé son secrétariat à l’Université de Carleton et participé activement au projet MDS. En 2015, sous l’égide du projet MDS, le premier programme d’études de premier cycle en migration et diaspora au Canada a vu le jour grâce à la création d’une spécialisation en migration et études de la diaspora au programme de baccalauréat en études mondiales et internationales. En 2017, le projet MDS a également reçu une chaire de recherche en lois et politiques sur les réfugiés, instituée à compter du 1er juillet 2018 au département de droit et études juridiques. En 2019-2020, le projet compte tirer parti de la collaboration interdisciplinaire fructueuse entre l’enseignement et la recherche qui a fait de Carleton un pôle mondial d’études sur la migration et la diaspora pour offrir le premier programme canadien de maîtrise en études sur la migration et la diaspora.

CONTACT Daniel McNeil 1125 Colony By Drive Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6 https://www.carleton.ca/mds/

99


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Éducation

VILLE DE TRURO, NOUVELLE-ÉCOSSE

Rassemblement contre le racisme

DESCRIPTION Chaque année, entre le 21 mars, Journée internationale pour l’élimination de la discrimination raciale, et le dernier jeudi de mai, journée du Rassemblement contre le racisme, on informe les élèves des écoles participantes sur le racisme, les stratégies antiracistes, l’égalité, le respect des autres et l’importance d’accepter ce qui nous distingue les uns des autres. En 2010, grâce au plein appui de la ville de Truro, des services de police de Truro, de la Première Nation de Milbrook et de son chef Bob Gloade, ainsi que des entreprises et du secteur privé, ce rassemblement a réuni quelques centaines de participants. Au fil des années, le Rassemblement a pris de l’ampleur. Il rejoint aujourd’hui des écoles de toute la région et des membres de tous les groupes et événements culturels. Après une marche des participants, le Rassemblement est inauguré par l’hymne national, suivi du chant d’honneur traditionnel Mi'kmaq et de "Lift Every Voice and Sing". L’engagement pris par le Rassemblement contre le racisme est ensuite lu en anglais, en français et en langue micmaque. Cet événement a permis à Truro de devenir l’une des meilleures communautés où résider au Canada, tel que souligné dans les nouvelles nationales.

CONTEXTE En 2009, Ian McLeod, responsable de la Cobequid Family of Schools, a obtenu la bénédiction du conseil scolaire régional de Chignecto Central pour créer un comité dont l’objectif serait de sensibiliser le public au racisme toujours présent dans notre société. Il a été décidé de créer un rassemblement à Truro, en Nouvelle-Écosse, au printemps 2010. Le comité de planification était dirigé par M. McLeod, des éducateurs, des élèves et des étudiants du Cobequid Educational Centre (aînés), de la Truro Elementary School et du Truro Junior High School. Le comité comprenait également des enseignants, des travailleurs de soutien aux élèves et des membres de l’administration et de la collectivité, avec une participation majeure provenant de la communauté africaine de la Nouvelle-Écosse et de la Première Nation de Millbrook. Il a en outre été décidé que les élèves et étudiants piloteraient cette initiative sous la direction de Ian McLeod avec l’appui total des conseils scolaires et des écoles. La ville de Truro, qui a pleinement soutenu le Rassemblement contre le racisme, a signé une proclamation selon laquelle le dernier jeudi de mai serait consacré « Journée du Rassemblement contre le racisme ».

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT Le Rassemblement contre le racisme a débuté en 2010 avec seulement quelques centaines d’élèves et d’étudiants participants. Aujourd’hui, il peut compter sur quelques milliers de participants venus d’écoles de toute la région et de tous les groupes et événements culturels.

VISION DE L’AVENIR Notre vision pour l’avenir est de continuer à développer le programme du Rassemblement et d’aider à éliminer le racisme dans notre communauté.

À PROPOS DE LA VILLE DE TRURO La ville de Truro est située dans le centre de la Nouvelle-Écosse et compte plus de 12 000 habitants. Le maire de la ville de Truro est actuellement M. W. R. Mills.

CONTACT Raymond Tynes 695 Prince Street Truro, NS B2N 1G5 https://www.truro.ca/

100


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Éducation

DESCRIPTION

PROFESSEUR WILLIAM CUNNINGHAM, UNIVERSITÉ DE TORONTO

Modifier la façon dont nous percevons les autres

Dans mon laboratoire de neurosciences sociales, nous avons adopté une approche de l’auto-catégorisation et de la catégorisation sociale dans laquelle la ou les auto-catégorisations existantes sont construites à partir de représentations identitaires relativement stables, stockées dans la mémoire (comme l’importance de l’identité sociale chez un individu) et formées à partir d’un traitement perceptuel et évaluatif itératif et interactif. Cette méthode décrit ces processus en utilisant différents niveaux d’analyse qui permettent de relier les effets de l’auto-catégorisation et de l’identité sociale à la perception et à l’évaluation. Nous estimons que, dans un groupe arbitraire, l’auto-catégorisation peut supplanter les effets transversaux et plus marqués d’une catégorisation sociale sur la perception et l’évaluation sociales. Pour supprimer les préjugés raciaux, l’influence par le haut de l’auto-catégorisation représente une stratégie puissante centrée sur l’antécédent qui permet d’éviter la plupart des limites d’une stratégie centrée sur l’émotion. Notre travail consiste donc à comprendre comment ces préjugés s’incarnent et sont utilisés, en accordant une attention particulière à la manière dont on peut les réduire en modifiant les objectifs et les contextes. Cette recherche a été utile pour trouver de nouveaux moyens de lutter contre les préjugés en construisant une identité collective commune.

CONTEXTE Je suis professeur de psychologie à l’Université de Toronto. J’enseigne les sciences sociales et cognitives avec des affectations conjointes en psychologie clinique et à l’école de gestion. J’ai une formation en psychologie sociale et cognitive. Mon approche scientifique a d’abord été fondamentale – l’étude de l’inconscient –, mais j’ai rapidement compris qu’il était essentiel d’étudier plus profondément le fonctionnement du racisme et des préjugés. Mon principal questionnement a été : pourquoi existe-t-il encore des préjugés chez l’individu alors qu’il se dit prêt à ne plus en avoir? L’étude des processus inconscients peut-elle nous aider à mieux comprendre ce fait? C’est à partir de cette réflexion que s’est déroulé tout le programme de recherche. Ce travail de recherche s’inspire de la théorie de l’identité sociale en psychologie sociale. Il est effectué en association avec mon conseiller de thèse, Mahazarin Banaji, et en collaboration avec mes étudiants extraordinaires, en particulier Jay Van Bavel.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT Pendant un certain temps, notre travail s’est effectué à l’Université de Toronto, mais nous collaborons aujourd’hui avec des groupes de formation sur la diversité et des groupes qui s’intéressent aux préjugés (comme la FCRR) afin de diffuser vers le public ce que nous avons appris des sciences fondamentales. Nous espérons ainsi pouvoir mettre en place de meilleures interventions.

VISION DE L’AVENIR Nous collaborons actuellement avec des groupes de formation sur la diversité au développement de nouveaux outils pour mesurer les préjugés et tirer parti des valeurs communes de la société. Avec ces outils, notre objectif est de travailler directement avec le gouvernement canadien avec lequel nous avons commencé à établir des liens.

CONTACT Professeur William Cunningham 100 St. George Street Toronto, ON M5S 3G3 https://canlabuoft.wordpress.com/prejudice/

101


Gagnant Prix d’excellence Gouvernement/Public

SERVICE CORRECTIONNEL DU CANADA

Comité sur l’équité en emploi et diversité

DESCRIPTION Le comité sur l’équité en emploi et diversité (CEED) du Service correctionnel du Canada (SCC) agit à trois niveaux : national, régional et local. Lancé en 2010 par Don Head, agissant à l’époque en tant que commissaire, le comité a été créé afin de constituer un environnement de travail inclusif et un effectif solide valorisant la diversité. Pour augmenter la diversité et améliorer l’intégration au sein du SCC, il fallait d’abord que le comité national sur l’équité en matière d’emploi et de diversité (CNEED) conseille le comité exécutif du SCC sur ces questions. C’est le mandat du CNEED qui définit les objectifs, les rôles, les responsabilités et les relations hiérarchiques du CEED dans toute l’organisation. Le CEED s’est engagé à créer et à maintenir des milieux de travail libres d’obstacles, évaluables et inclusifs, selon les principes de la Loi sur l’équité en matière d’emploi et de la Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne, et en travaillant sur quatre axes stratégiques : l’éducation, l’engagement personnel, la responsabilité individuelle et le partage de l’information. Chacune de nos six régions dispose d’un CEED régional dirigé par un président nommé par la haute direction. Les comités régionaux encouragent les initiatives d’équité en emploi et diversité (EED) sur les lieux de travail, consultent les groupes désignés en matière de diversité et accroissent la visibilité de l’EED par le biais de communications, de projets, d’occasions d’apprentissage et d’événements. Chaque site dirige un comité local, composé de membres du personnel bénévoles, qui fait la promotion des activités d’EED, diffuse l’information pertinente et établit un calendrier des dates commémoratives en impliquant le personnel et les groupes d’équité aux projets d’EED. Aux trois niveaux, chaque comité agit à la fois seul et en partenariat avec les autres afin d’éradiquer les stéréotypes racistes et les pratiques préjudiciables et d’amorcer des discussions franches sur la nature diversifiée du Canada.

CONTEXTE S’étant engagé à respecter les principes de la Loi sur l’équité en matière d’emploi et de la Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne, le SCC s’est donné l’obligation d’identifier et d’éliminer les obstacles que rencontrent les membres de quatre groupes visés par les mesures d’équité en matière d’emploi (EE) : les Autochtones, les minorités visibles, les personnes handicapées et les femmes. En 2010, des politiques et des initiatives du SCC reconnaissaient la diversité, mais aucun plan d’action cohérent ne desservait les employés ou les délinquants dans le respect de leurs contextes culturels. Les employés des quatre groupes EE ont été associés pour superviser les consultations et le processus de planification stratégique. Le plan d’action stratégique qui en a résulté offrait une approche globale favorisant un milieu de travail inclusif où les employés comprenaient les enjeux liés aux préjugés, aux stéréotypes, aux privilèges et au racisme. En 2018, le CEED dispose désormais d’une présence nationale, régionale et communautaire dans tout le pays, aide à informer sur les politiques et à améliorer les pratiques des ressources humaines en matière de gestion de l’information, d’apprentissage et de développement. De plus, le CEED veille à ce que l’effectif du SCC soit un reflet de la population canadienne, de la disponibilité sur le marché du travail et de la population carcérale.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT Les comités du CEED sont des éléments essentiels qui garantissent que les politiques et les processus du SCC reflètent les besoins des membres des groupes visés par les mesures d’équité en matière d’emploi et que le SCC reconnait la valeur rattachée à un effectif diversifié qui respecte les principes des lois et des politiques canadiennes multiculturelles. Au cours de la deuxième phase de son plan stratégique, le CEED a fait connaître les préoccupations globales de ses employés en organisant divers événements commémoratifs lors de dates clés nationales, a soutenu la communauté LGBTQ2 et organisé des débats avec le service des ressources humaines et d’autres services et intervenants. Le CEED est maintenant invité à commenter l’évolution de la plupart de ses politiques pour s’assurer qu’elles restent inclusives et reflètent notre nature multiculturelle. La plus importante mesure prise pour améliorer notre perception mutuelle a été la formation sur les compétences culturelles, obligatoire pour tout le personnel du SCC. En créant un système de mesure régulier de sa main-d’œuvre, le SCC a réussi à accroître sa représentation dans les groupes EE, à mobiliser ses employés, à les sensibiliser à l’inclusion et à la diversité et à obtenir une responsabilisation de la part de tous les employés.

102


Gagnant Prix d’excellence Gouvernement/Public

SERVICE CORRECTIONNEL DU CANADA

Comité sur l’équité en emploi et diversité

VISION DE L’AVENIR Notre vision pour l’avenir du CEED consiste en un renforcement de sa présence au sein du SCC et dans l’ensemble du gouvernement fédéral. En 2017, le Groupe de travail conjoint syndical-patronal sur la diversité et l’inclusion dans la fonction publique du Conseil du Trésor du Canada a publié son rapport après des mois de consultations internationales avec des fonctionnaires. Bon nombre des recommandations énoncées dans le rapport ont déjà été mise en place au SCC, nous positionnant en tant que leader en matière de diversité et d’inclusion. Le CEED a déjà été sollicité par d’autres ministères pour partager ses expériences et fournir une expertise. Ces ministères comprennent le CRTC, le Secrétariat du Conseil du Trésor, l’Agence du revenu du Canada et le ministère des Pêches et Océans. En quelques années, le CEED a accompli énormément au sein du SCC. Le comité a permis la formation de personnel du SCC au sein des groupes EE, mobilisé des intervenants, formé les employés du SCC, communiqué des cas de réussite en matière d’inclusion et de diversité et exigé de tous ses employés qu’ils s’engagent individuellement à créer un milieu de travail respectueux et inclusif. En 2018, le CEED a cotisé pour que le SCC devienne membre du Centre canadien pour la diversité et l’inclusion. Cette adhésion a permis au SCC d’offrir une formation gratuite sur la diversité à tous ses employés. Notre prochaine étape consiste à réorganiser notre plan stratégique afin de tenir compte des changements législatifs apportés et de mettre la barre plus haute en ce qui concerne l’équité en matière d’emploi et le perfectionnement du personnel.

À PROPOS DU SERVICE CORRECTIONNEL DU CANADA Le Service correctionnel du Canada, en tant que composante du système de justice pénale et dans la reconnaissance de la primauté du droit, contribue à la sécurité publique en incitant activement et en aidant les délinquants à devenir des citoyens respectueux des lois, tout en exerçant sur eux un contrôle raisonnable, sûr, sécuritaire et humain. Le SCC reconnaît qu’il existe un nombre disproportionné de délinquants appartenant à des groupes ethnoculturels particuliers, tels que les Afro-Canadiens et les communautés autochtones. Le SCC reconnaît également que le racisme vécu par ces groupes contribue de manière significative à leur niveau élevé d’incarcération. Le SCC a mis en place plusieurs pratiques préconisées par le CEED pour lutter contre les préjugés raciaux et aider les délinquants ethnoculturels à réintégrer leur communauté. Entre autres : • L’utilisation de l’histoire sociale des Autochtones pour mieux comprendre la situation et les difficultés de nos délinquants autochtones. Une approche similaire pour les délinquants noirs est en cours. • Des interventions efficaces et adaptées à la culture des délinquants issus des Premières nations, des Métis et des Inuits et un soutien à leur réinsertion sociale. • Des interventions efficaces et rapides pour répondre aux besoins des délinquants en matière de santé mentale. • Des relations fructueuses avec divers partenaires, y compris le comité consultatif ethnoculturel national et les comités ethnoculturels régionaux, un groupe de bénévoles formés de citoyens qui conseille le SCC sur les relations raciales. • L’embauche des Aîné-e-s autochtones et de chefs religieux pour répondre aux divers besoins spirituels des délinquants.

CONTACT Dr. Manju Varma 340 Laurier Avenue West, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0P9 http://www.csc-scc.gc.ca/careers/003001-2200-eng.shtml

103


Gagnant SECTION DIVERSITÉ ET INCLUSION, GOUVERNEMENT DU MANITOBA Prix d’excellence Gouvernement/Public

Stratégie de diversité et d’inclusion du gouvernement du Manitoba

DESCRIPTION La Stratégie de diversité et d’inclusion du gouvernement du Manitoba (en anglais : MGDIS) est le cadre et le plan d’action qui pilotent les efforts de promotion en matière de diversité et d’inclusion au sein du gouvernement du Manitoba. Approuvée en 2014 après un examen approfondi des meilleures pratiques actuelles, des analyses de données organisationnelles et de vastes consultations avec les parties prenantes, la Stratégie MDGIS constitue une mise à jour des efforts antérieurs – la poursuite de certaines activités antérieures, des modifications à d’autres, ainsi que de nouvelles initiatives permettant de combler les lacunes identifiées. En particulier, la Stratégie a permis de modifier les approches précédentes : 1) En se concentrant sur les statistiques de représentation afin d’inclure les mesures qui visent à créer une culture de l’inclusion en milieu de travail. 2) En se concentrant sur quatre groupes désignés d’équité en matière d’emploi afin de mieux faire connaitre les nombreuses facettes de la diversité et de l’intersectionnalité et en reconnaissant que tous les employés font partie de la même « diversité ». 3) En favorisant une meilleure prise de conscience de l’impact positif de la diversité et de l’inclusion sur les compétences, l’engagement et l’innovation. La Stratégie a été bien reçue par la haute direction et les autres parties prenantes, en partie parce qu’elle favorise une vision large de la diversité et de l’inclusion qui se veut significative et applicable à tous dans l’organisation.

CONTEXTE Depuis plus de 30 ans, le gouvernement du Manitoba déploie des efforts pour soutenir la diversité dans la fonction publique. Plusieurs mesures, comme une politique de discrimination positive, ont été prises dans ce sens au début des années 1980. La Stratégie MGDIS a été initiée en 2013 afin de réviser la précédente stratégie de diversité de la fonction publique provinciale mise en place en 2008. Il a été reconnu qu’une analyse plus approfondie, des consultations et des approches actualisées étaient nécessaires pour progresser vers une fonction publique qui intégrerait entièrement les groupes minoritaires. Par exemple, les repères ayant servi d’objectifs de représentation pour les groupes d’équité en matière d’emploi étaient devenus désuets compte tenu de la croissance importante des peuples autochtones et des minorités visibles dans l’ensemble de la population provinciale. De plus, il a été constaté que l’accent mis sur la diversité — en intégrant des employés de diverses communautés à la fonction publique — était insuffisant. Dans une organisation où règne la diversité, il était également nécessaire de favoriser l’inclusion afin que les employés puissent travailler ensemble de manière cohérente, respectueuse et productive.

104


Gagnant SECTION DIVERSITÉ ET INCLUSION, GOUVERNEMENT DU MANITOBA Prix d’excellence Gouvernement/Public

Stratégie de diversité et d’inclusion du gouvernement du Manitoba

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT Nous avons constaté que la représentation des employés dans les groupes d’équité en emploi continuait d’augmenter dans l’ensemble du gouvernement. De plus, lors de nos deux dernières enquêtes périodiques (une en 2013, avant la publication de la Stratégie MGDIS, et une autre en 2015), où nous demandons aux employés s’ils estiment que leur ministère apprécie la diversité et s’ils sont traités avec respect au travail, des améliorations concernant ces deux mesures ont été remarquées, tant globalement que dans tous les groupes d’équité en emploi. Ces indicateurs, ainsi que d’autres indicateurs moins quantifiables, montrent que nos efforts pour créer un service public provincial plus diversifié et inclusif portent leurs fruits. Nous croyons que cela se traduit par une fonction publique qui comprend mieux les besoins des Manitobains en matière de diversité et qui peut mieux y répondre.

VISION DE L’AVENIR Il est prévu de réviser la Stratégie MGDIS et de procéder aux mises à jour jugées nécessaires, après cinq ans de mise en œuvre, soit en 2019.

À PROPOS DE LA SECTION DIVERSITÉ ET INCLUSION DU GOUVERNEMENT DU MANITOBA La Section diversité et inclusion (en anglais : DIU) fait partie de la Commission de la fonction publique du Manitoba, le ministère responsable de la gestion des ressources humaines au sein du gouvernement du Manitoba. La Section DIU est un service centralisé responsable des initiatives pangouvernementales visant à faire progresser la diversité et l’inclusion (DI) sur le lieu de travail, et qui offre du soutien aux ministères dans le cadre de leurs propres activités. Les fonctions de la Section DIU consistent à administrer les programmes de recrutement, de stage et de perfectionnement des employés, en particulier en ce qui concerne les membres des groupes désignés d’équité en matière d’emploi; à mettre au point et à assurer la formation et l’apprentissage des employés sur des sujets liés à la DI; et à fournir un soutien aux groupes de ressources pour employés faisant partie de groupes démographiques confrontés à des obstacles à la pleine intégration.

CONTACT Sam Grande 935-155 Carlton Street Winnipeg, MB R3C 3H8 http://www.gov.mb.ca/govjobs/government/emplequity.html/

105


Prix d’excellence 2018 COMMISSION ONTARIENNE DES DROITS DE LA PERSONNE Mention honorable Communautaire

Module d’apprentissage électronique de la CODP - Dénoncez-le : racisme, discrimination raciale et droits de la personne

DESCRIPTION Le 21 mars 2018, lors de la Journée internationale pour l’élimination de la discrimination raciale, la Commission ontarienne des droits de la personne (CODP) a publié le document intitulé Dénoncez-le. Dénoncez-le est le dernier ajout à la série de modules d’apprentissage en ligne de la CODP. Ce nouvel outil pédagogique interactif a été conçu pour sensibiliser le public à l’histoire et aux répercussions du racisme et de la discrimination raciale et pour promouvoir une culture des droits de la personne en Ontario. Les concepts et la théorie utilisés s’appliquent partout au Canada et le module a attiré l’attention d’organismes de défense des droits de la personne autant sur la côte ouest que sur la côte est. Dénoncez-le s’inspire de la politique de la CODP en matière de prévention du racisme et de la discrimination raciale qui mise sur des exemples pratiques pour encourager le dialogue sur l’exclusion, la discrimination et le harcèlement fondés sur la race. Le module est également une excellente ressource sur les lieux de travail puisqu’il a été conçu pour venir s’ajouter aux programmes de formation en matière de diversité et d’intégration déjà mis en place en entreprise. Il convient également aux jeunes de 12 ans et plus et contient des révisions, des contrôles des connaissances et des mises en situation. Tous les membres de la fonction publique de l’Ontario (@ 65 000) auront l’occasion d’accéder à cette formation dans le cadre de notre politique interne contre le racisme.

CONTEXTE La CODP développe depuis plusieurs années une série de cours électroniques en ligne avec modules interactifs et webinaires. Ce cours électronique est un travail d’équipe auquel ont participé toutes les directions de la CODP. Le contenu s’inspire du travail de la CODP sur le racisme, notamment de sa politique et de ses lignes directrices en matière de racisme et de discrimination raciale. Les mises en situation décrivent des expériences vécues. « Le racisme et la discrimination raciale sont omniprésents et sont une réalité permanente pour de nombreux Ontariens et Ontariennes. C’est inacceptable ». « Avant de pouvoir stopper la discrimination raciale, il nous faut comprendre ce qu’est le racisme et comment il viole les droits de la personne. Dénoncez-le est une étape dans l’identification, la compréhension et l’élimination du racisme et de la discrimination raciale. » [Renu Mandhane, commissaire en chef de la CODP]

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT Le mandat de la CODP est de dispenser une éducation publique et les modules d’apprentissage en ligne sont une des façons d’y parvenir. La formation en ligne permet à la Commission d’atteindre un plus large public. Nous fournissons des copies pour les organisations/entreprises qui possèdent leur propre système d’apprentissage interne. Nous avons pu constater que le module était devenu un outil pédagogique important, autant pour la formation en entreprise que pour le perfectionnement professionnel.

106


Prix d’excellence 2018 COMMISSION ONTARIENNE DES DROITS DE LA PERSONNE Mention honorable Communautaire

Module d’apprentissage électronique de la CODP - Dénoncez-le : racisme, discrimination raciale et droits de la personne

VISION DE L’AVENIR En nous appuyant sur votre programme de meilleures pratiques, nous allons appliquer les connaissances acquises lors du développement de ce cours électronique à la prochaine génération d’outils pédagogiques basés sur le code.

À PROPOS DE LA CODP La Commission ontarienne des droits de la personne (CODP) est l’organisme de surveillance des droits de la personne de l’Ontario. Elle se concentre sur la prévention de la discrimination avant qu’elle ne prenne racine et l’élimine lorsqu’elle survient. Son travail consiste souvent à identifier la discrimination systémique et à l’éliminer. La CODP se sert de son mandat pour mieux faire comprendre – et respecter – les lois sur les droits de la personne qui protègent de la discrimination. Le rôle de la CODP dans le système des droits de la personne de l’Ontario consiste à protéger, à promouvoir et à faire avancer les droits de la personne. La Commission s’efforce de faire en sorte que chaque personne comprenne ses droits et ses responsabilités en vertu du Code des droits de la personne de l’Ontario et qu’elle puisse défendre ses droits, ceux de ses amis, de sa famille, de ses voisins et de sa communauté.

LA CODP : • Éduque le public afin que chacun puisse comprendre ses droits et ses responsabilités. • Définit des politiques en matière de droits de la personne et favorise des mesures de redressement dans l’intérêt du public. • Travaille à faire diminuer ou à résoudre les tensions et les conflits dans les communautés. • Fait de la sensibilisation et de l’éducation, et s’associe avec des groupes d’intervenants. • Intervient dans les tribunaux et les cours de justice dans l’intérêt du public. • Intente ses propres procédures judiciaires sur des problèmes systémiques d’intérêt public. • Intente parfois des poursuites lorsqu’une loi nécessite d’être clarifiée. • Offre des conseils au gouvernement et propose des modifications dans des domaines comme l’éducation, les services policiers, les services correctionnels et la réglementation en matière de logement.

CONTACT Dora Nipp 180 Dundas Street, West 9th floor Toronto, Ontario M7A 2R9 http://www.ohrc.on.ca/en/learning/elearning

107


Gagnant Prix d’excellence Médias

SINKING SHIP ENTERTAINMENT

Auditions pour la diversité

DESCRIPTION Sinking Ship fonctionne selon un principe fondamental : les enfants doivent « le voir pour le vivre ». Pour être plus précis, nos différents auditoires méritent de se voir fidèlement et authentiquement représentés à l’écran. Indépendamment de la vision de l’auteur pour ses personnages, Sinking Ship organise des auditions à l’aveugle sur le plan du genre et de l’ethnie, ce qui garantit l’absence de parti pris lors du choix de la meilleure personne pour tenir un rôle. Dans le cas de séries comme Annedroids, Odd Squad Et Dino Dana, nous veillons à ce que tous les enfants soient représentés. Tout en mettant l’accent sur la diversité à l’écran, Sinking Ship se préoccupe également de la diversité derrière la caméra, s’assurant que toutes ses équipes, du développement à la postproduction, sont composées d’ethnies et de genres différents.

CONTEXTE Cette initiative n’a été inspirée par aucun événement particulier. La devise de notre entreprise a toujours été que les enfants ont besoin de « le voir pour le vivre ». La problématique que nous cherchions à résoudre était la représentation : nous voulions que tous les enfants du monde puissent s’identifier à nos personnages et qu’ainsi se révèle chez eux l’amour du STIM (Sciences, Technologie, Ingénierie, Mathématiques), le contenu pédagogique de nos séries. Nous nous efforçons de veiller à ce que tous les enfants de ce pays merveilleusement diversifié puissent se voir représentés de manière positive.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT L’impact de cette initiative s’est généralisé. Les enfants du Canada, mais aussi ceux du monde entier, peuvent aujourd’hui se projeter dans les personnages de nos émissions, de Odd Squad aux Annedroids en passant par Dino Dana. Cette représentation leur permet d’établir un lien concret avec le sujet abordé et d’élargir leurs horizons afin de mieux réaliser leur potentiel. Mais au-delà de la simple représentation de personnages ethniquement diversifiés, celle-ci est présentée dépourvue de tout stéréotype aux enfants des communautés majoritaires.

VISION DE L’AVENIR Notre plan pour l’avenir est de continuer à plaider pour une représentation égale dans le cadre de tous nos projets, à la fois sur les écrans et en dehors des écrans. Tout au long de notre croissance, ces principes de représentation resteront l’une des valeurs fondamentales de notre travail et nous espérons inciter d’autres acteurs du milieu à faire de même.

À PROPOS DE SINKING SHIP ENTERTAINMENT Sinking Ship Entertainment est une société de production, de distribution et de production interactive plusieurs fois récompensée par un Emmy® Award. Depuis son lancement en 2004, Sinking Ship a produit plus de 500 heures de contenu diffusées dans plus de 200 pays à travers le monde. La société s’est rapidement imposée grâce à ses séries originales et novatrices de grande qualité accompagnées d’expériences interactives. En 2016, Sinking Ship Entertainment s’est retrouvée au troisième rang du classement Kidscreen Hot 50, qui recense toutes les entreprises de production pour enfants au monde, au septième rang du classement Kids Distribution et au septième du classement Kids Interactive. Sinking Ship a également été nommée première entreprise de production pour enfants en 2016 par le magazine Playback Magazine Canada. Internationalement, la société a remporté 12 prix Daytime Emmy® et divers autres prix internationaux, notamment des prix Canadian Screen, des prix Youth Media Alliance, des prix Fan Chile, des prix Parents Choice, le prix Shaw Rocket et le Prix Jeunesse International. La société basée à Toronto compte plus de 125 collaborateurs et, outre la production, exploite un VFX et un studio interactif.

CONTACT Rikki Cohen 1179 King Street West, unit 302 Toronto, ON M6K 3C5 www.sinkingship.ca

108


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Médias

JAM3

À l’est des Rocheuses

DESCRIPTION East of the Rockies est un récit expérimental de réalité augmentée écrit par Joy Kogawa, aujourd’hui âgée de 83 ans, l’une des figures littéraires les plus connues et les plus talentueuses du Canada. L’histoire se déroule pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Yuki, la narratrice, est une jeune fille de 17 ans dont la famille est forcée de quitter son domicile pour aller vivre dans le camp d’internement de Slocan. Yuki et sa famille tentent alors de rendre leur vie au camp supportable et aussi normale que possible. Les utilisateurs suivent l’histoire en tapant du doigt sur l’écran et en le balayant, ou en inspectant et en zoomant sur des éléments clés. Chaque interaction active une narration à la première personne lue par Anne, la petite-fille de Joy, et qui met en valeur un aspect différent de la vie dans le camp tel que relaté dans le journal de Yuki. East of the Rockies utilise la plus récente technologie de réalité augmentée pour mettre ce récit percutant entre les mains des utilisateurs.

CONTEXTE Le projet a débuté avec Joy Kogawa, auteure, poète et activiste bien connue, membre de l’Ordre du Canada et de l’Ordre de la Colombie-Britannique, ainsi que de l’Ordre du soleil levant du Japon. Joy est également une ancienne internée du camp d’internement canadien-japonais de Slocan, en Colombie-Britannique. Obasan, le roman de Kogawa, est le plus important récit concernant ce chapitre de l’histoire canadienne. Puissant et passionné, Obasan raconte, à travers les yeux d’un enfant, l’histoire émouvante des Canadiens d’origine japonaise pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Nous désirions éduquer le cœur et l’esprit des gens, et répandre la bonne volonté. Aussi pieux qu’il puisse paraître, cela a toujours été le souhait de East of the Rockies. Bien qu’il s’agisse d’un récit mêlant douceur et amertume, nous restons convaincus qu’il sera bien reçu par les jeunes. La technologie utilisée est comme un cheval de Troie. Elle permet d’amener les mots et les idées de Joy dans l’esprit des jeunes d’aujourd’hui. Tout au long du développement du projet, Kogawa a travaillé en étroite collaboration avec Jam3 et elle continuera d’être au centre des ressources pédagogiques que nous développons.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT En utilisant les nouveaux médias et les plus récentes technologies pour relater des récits d’importance, nous aurons assurément une influence sur les élèves du secondaire, au Canada et dans le monde entier. En collaboration avec l’Office national du film du Canada et Joy Kogawa, nous élaborons actuellement un programme pédagogique national qui permettra à un nouveau public de découvrir l’histoire de l’internement des Canadiens d’origine japonaise.

VISION DE L’AVENIR Nous allons continuer à donner l'exemple et soutenir East of the Rockies. Nous espérons que, dans les années à venir, le programme pédagogique en cours sera offert dans les écoles secondaires du Canada et incitera les jeunes non seulement à en apprendre davantage sur l’internement des Canadiens d’origine japonaise mais aussi sur les circonstances qui y ont mené. Nous voulons encourager la pensée critique de la prochaine génération afin que l’histoire ne se répète pas.

À PROPOS DE JAM3 Jam3 est un studio de design et d’expériences interactives reconnu internationalement. Nous créons de meilleures façons de vivre des expériences inoubliables ayant un impact durable.

CONTACT Jason Legge 325 Adelaide St. West Toronto Ontario, M5V 1P8 www.eastoftherockies.com

109


Gagnant Prix d’excellence Jeunesse

STEM FELLOWSHIP

Programme de stages et de mentorat STIM pour

DESCRIPTION Le programme de stages et de mentorat STIM pour l’autonomisation offre aux élèves du secondaire des possibilités d’apprentissage par l’expérience et de mentorat dans plusieurs domaines STIM (Science, Technologie, Ingénierie, Mathématiques). Nous cherchons à autonomiser les élèves issus de communautés traditionnellement sous-représentées dans les STIM, y compris les étudiants défavorisés sur le plan socioéconomique, les étudiants autochtones, les réfugiés et les immigrants récents. Pendant cinq jours, au cours des vacances du mois de mars, notre programme de stages permet à des élèves de faire l’expérience de la recherche scientifique dans un laboratoire universitaire. Encadrés par des stagiaires postdoctoraux ou des étudiants diplômés, les jeunes stagiaires effectuent des recherches de pointe dans un domaine précis, ce qui les aide à mieux comprendre en quoi consiste le métier de chercheur et comment se déroule un processus de recherche scientifique. Notre programme de stages est actif depuis mars 2015 et a aujourd’hui étendu sa portée aux élèves des régions métropolitaines de Vancouver, de Calgary et du Grand Toronto. Les élèves participants ont travaillé dans des domaines de recherche tels que la biomécanique, les changements climatiques, la rhéologie, la nanotechnologie, la stimulation cérébrale, les cellules souches, la bio-informatique, l’innovation énergétique, la prévention des maladies, l’immunologie des greffes et bien d’autres. Notre programme de mentorat associe des élèves du secondaire à des étudiants universitaires de premier cycle en fonction de leurs domaines d’intérêt mutuels. L’objectif est de stimuler l’élève du secondaire à explorer les STIM en matière d’éducation postsecondaire et de possibilité de carrière ou d’autres opportunités.

CONTEXTE Comme étudiants de premier cycle, nous avons pu constater que, même si la diversité augmente dans les STIM, un long chemin reste à parcourir avant que tous les étudiants puissent en croiser d’autres qui étudient dans leur domaine et qui soient issus de leur milieu culturel ou de leur communauté. Nous désirions nous attaquer à ce problème à la base en offrant aux élèves du secondaire des occasions de rencontrer ces chercheurs et d’en tirer un enseignement. Actuellement, les élèves du secondaire reçoivent peu d’information concernant la carrière de chercheur dans le domaine des STIM et, malgré les connaissances théoriques reçues en classe, ils sont rarement exposés aux applications réelles découlant de ces connaissances. Nous voulions offrir des occasions pratiques aux élèves où ils pourraient véritablement expérimenter le processus de recherche et communiquer avec des professionnels du domaine.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT Notre initiative aide les élèves du secondaire à établir des liens avec des chercheurs et des étudiants universitaires susceptibles de les guider dans leur recherche d’opportunités et de carrières dans le domaine des STIM. Grâce au programme de stages, les élèves se familiarisent avec le processus de la recherche scientifique et apprennent comment les chercheurs ont façonné leurs activités professionnelles actuelles à partir de leurs expériences passées et de leurs objectifs premiers. Les commentaires recueillis auprès des élèves en fin de stage ont démontré que l’expérience avait été concluante. En constatant que, dans un contexte de recherche scientifique, des chercheurs aux personnalités distinctes et issus de cultures différentes arrivent à bien travailler ensemble, les élèves ont amorcé une réflexion sur la façon dont euxmêmes pourraient s’intégrer à un tel contexte. Ceci est révélateur d’un changement individuel chez les élèves qui cherchent ensuite à partager avec leurs pairs leur expérience du quotidien d’un laboratoire universitaire. Nous brisons ainsi les stéréotypes liés à la carrière scientifique et provoquons un changement systémique. Le programme de mentorat, quant à lui, répond aux questions des

110


Gagnant Prix d’excellence Jeunesse

STEM FELLOWSHIP

Programme de stages et de mentorat STIM pour

élèves concernant le STIM, les encourage à se consacrer pleinement à leurs centres d’intérêt, ou leur ouvre des portes qui les aident à définir leurs centres d’intérêt. L’initiative permet aux artisans du changement de la prochaine génération d’étudiants en STIM de préparer leur avenir.

VISION DE L’AVENIR En plus d’élargir le programme de stages et de mentorat à d’autres communautés à travers le Canada, nous étudions actuellement la mise en place de projets s’adressant aux étudiants autochtones, en particulier un hackathon qui aura lieu cet automne dans le métro de Vancouver. Dans le cadre de cet événement, les élèves seront invités à recenser les problèmes importants de leur communauté et à créer des solutions permettant de les résoudre. Lors de cette journée, des élèves autochtones des écoles secondaires du Lower Mainland, en Colombie-Britannique, collaboreront en groupes avec des mentors provenant de diverses disciplines, notamment la science des données, l’ingénierie, la médecine, les études autochtones, les sciences sociales et les arts. Le hackathon se terminera par la présentation des solutions proposées par les élèves et les juges donneront leurs commentaires dans l’espoir de faire progresser ces idées et de les concrétiser. Notre objectif est de donner aux élèves autochtones les moyens d’utiliser les STIM, en particulier la science des données, pour amorcer un changement dans leur communauté.

À PROPOS DE STEM FELLOWSHIP STEM Fellowship est une organisation nationale sans but lucratif, dirigée par des étudiants et dont l’objectif est d’enrichir le parcours académique des étudiants en sciences, technologie, ingénierie et mathématiques (STIM) par le biais de programmes, de concours et d’ateliers. Nous publions notre propre revue d’origine source ouverte à comité de lecture via Canadian Science Publishing et nous organisons le concours Big Data Challenge : un concours de recherche longitudinale axé sur le mentorat où les étudiants analysent des données importantes sur les problèmes socioéconomiques ou environnementaux dans leurs communautés. Notre mission est d’utiliser le mentorat et l’apprentissage par l’expérience pour donner aux artisans du changement de la prochaine génération d’étudiants en STIM, des compétences indispensables en matière de recherche, de science des données, de recherche fondamentale et de rédaction scientifique.

CONTACT Megan Chan http://www.stemfellowship.org/stempowerment-mentorship/andstemfellowship.org/internships/

111


Pratique exemplaire 2018 Jeunesse

CANADIAN CULTURAL MOSAIC FOUNDATION

Festival des arts contre le racisme

DESCRIPTION L’événement annuel de la Fondation Canadian Cultural Mosaic Foundation, le Festival des arts contre le racisme est un festival national des arts qui se déroule à travers le Canada. Chaque année, l’organisme jeunesse organisateur invite une ville différente à accueillir le Festival et à s’engager par les arts à lutter contre le racisme. Au cours des dernières années, les organisateurs ont mis sur pied des ateliers, des diffusions ininterrompues de 48 heures de films antiracistes, des soirées de poésie, des défis peinture, des concours de photographie et d’art numérique et bien plus. Tous ces événements ont permis aux communautés hôtes de se rassembler, d’en apprendre davantage sur le racisme et sur la façon dont on peut l’éliminer ensemble au travers des arts. Il s’agit d’un festival annuel national qui a lieu en février et en mars et qui se déroule chaque année dans une ville différente. L’objectif est d’amener les citoyens à lutter contre le racisme par le biais des arts. En 2016, l’événement a eu lieu à Calgary, en 2017 à Edmonton, en 2018 à Winnipeg et en 2019 à Vancouver.

CONTEXTE L’idée de ce festival nous a été inspirée par la culture et les valeurs de notre organisme. Nous cherchions un moyen d’inciter les Canadiens ordinaires à engager le débat sur le racisme tout en faisant quelque chose d’intéressant. C’est ici que les arts sont entrés en jeu. Il est difficile de parler du racisme. Ce festival était un moyen de traiter du sujet dans la communauté de manière unique et amusante — l’idée d’un Festival des arts contre le racisme était née.

FACTEURS DE CHANGEMENT Les résultats ont été incroyables. Chaque année, l’événement s’améliore et prend de l’ampleur. À chaque édition, le taux de participation augmente. Les œuvres créées sont également largement diffusées. Des instituts et de nombreuses personnes nous ont dit avoir beaucoup appris grâce à cet événement et désiraient organiser des événements similaires dans leur communauté pour mieux la sensibiliser

VISION DE L’AVENIR En organisant ce Festival, nous en apprenons chaque année davantage. Nous nous associons à des partenaires communautaires travaillant pour la jeunesse avec lesquels nous cherchons les meilleurs moyens d’adapter le Festival pour la ville hôte. Nous continuerons à tirer parti de nos expériences afin d’améliorer l’événement.

À PROPOS DE LA FONDATION CANADIAN CULTURAL MOSAIC La fondation Canadian Cultural Mosaic Foundation (en anglais : Canadian CMF) est un organisme sans but lucratif dirigé par de jeunes bénévoles engagés. Notre objectif est d’améliorer les relations raciales au Canada et d’atténuer le racisme en établissant une compréhension culturelle par le biais de l’éducation multiculturelle, de la technologie et des arts. En première ligne des campagnes de sensibilisation et du multiculturalisme, notre fondation collabore souvent avec des communautés ethniques à l’élaboration de projets. Nous avons commencé en 2009 à Calgary en tant que groupe multiculturel composé d’étudiants bénévoles de niveau postsecondaire. Le groupe a été officiellement enregistré comme organisme à but non lucratif en 2015. Notre siège social se trouve à Calgary, mais nous travaillons à l’échelle nationale. Nous visons à éduquer les Canadiens afin d’atténuer le racisme et de promouvoir le multiculturalisme. Nos valeurs sont le multiculturalisme, l’intégration, la collaboration, l’éducation et l’amour.

CONTACT Iman Bukhari 6420 Crowchild Trail SW Calgary T3E5R5 http://www.canadianculturalmosaicfoundation.com/anti-racism-arts-festival.html/

112


Profile for CRRF-FCRR

2018 Best Practices Reader  

Excellence and Innovation in promoting positive race relations in Canada

2018 Best Practices Reader  

Excellence and Innovation in promoting positive race relations in Canada

Profile for crrf-fcrr
Advertisement