Issuu on Google+

COMMUNITY

SPORTS

MINISTRY

A popular United Way project is under way to collect toiletries and other personal care items that will be donated to homeless women and children. 3

Up until just over a week ago, Columbia High’s girls basketball team had never won a game in the state playoffs. My, how things have changed. 8

DeKalb Police officers and members of a men’s ministry will meet in a flag football game to bring police and the community together to address crime and other issues. 9

Boxes show we care

Copyright © 2009 CrossRoadsNews, Inc.

Dubious record put to rest

March 7, 2009

Friendly competition

Volume 14, Number 45

www.crossroadsnews.com

Hillandale hospital losing maternity, neonatal services By Jennifer Ffrench Parker

South DeKalb women will no longer have the option of delivering their babies close to home at De­ Kalb Medical at Hillandale. Effective April 17, DeKalb Medical is eliminating Hillandale’s maternity and special care nursery services. Women will now have to go to its North Decatur Road hos­ pital for deliveries. Cheryl Iverson, DeKalb Medi­ cal’s vice president of business development and marketing, said Thursday that cutting maternity service from the 100-bed hospital is part of the hospital’s efforts to re­ focus services on the community’s

health disparity needs and pref­ erences. “We would love to offer all these things but we have got to manage re­ sources to the Cheryl Iverson community as a whole,” she said. “We intended to offer the services at Hillandale but the volume just wasn’t there.” Instead, Iverson said the system will focus on strokes, cancer and heart disease at Hillandale. News of the impending loss of the maternity and neonatal services saddened many South DeKalb resi­

dents. Juanita Baranco, whose grand­ son Thomas was born at Hillandale three years ago, said her family has always had phenomenal service at the Lithonia hospital. “I really, really hate to see that go,” she said. “All hospitals have to have a certain number of paying patients. That’s one of the things that has hurt them.” The $65 million hospital, which opened on July 18, 2005, is just four months shy of its fourth an­ niversary. Since opening, it has struggled to attract paying patients who often leapfrogged over it to larger metro Atlanta hospitals, and to DeKalb

Medical’s own state-of-the-art Women’s Center that opened in January 2007. The net effect is that the Hil­ landale hospital – which opened after a 35-year fight to build it – was often left with a disproportionate number of uninsured and nonpaying patients. Maternity and neonatal inten­ sive services were linchpin services that helped DeKalb Medical win state approval for the Hillandale hospital over rival Tenet Health System in February 2002. Tenet had wanted to build a hospital on Mall Parkway overlooking the Mall at Stonecrest. Iverson said they spoke with the

state about their decision to elimi­ nate maternity service and there are no penalties to face. She said the decision could not be helped because Hillandale never got the volume of deliveries that it expected. “We didn’t hit the projections in terms of volume,” she said. “Women chose the Women’s Center two-toone over Hillandale. The volume of deliveries that we expected just never materalized.” DeKalb Medical’s feasibility study for Hillandale had projected 2,300 deliveries a year. Iverson said that in 2008, it had 1,225 deliveries. Please see HOSPITAL, page 2

DeKalb’s 8.5 percent jobless rate is highest in 36 years By McKenzie Jackson

When LeTichia Nelson of Stone Mountain lost her four-year ad­ ministrative position at Blue Links Corp. in Atlanta in January, she had no idea that she would help swell DeKalb’s unemployment rate to the all-time high of 8.5 percent. Nelson, who is in her 20s, is one of 32,942 DeKalb residents now out of work – the highest number since the Georgia Department of Labor began counting in 1973. On Tuesday, she was at the DeKalb Career Center on Cov­ ington Highway searching the job postings for anything that will use her skills in accounting, customer service and administrative work. Nelson had one word for the job market. “Terrible,” she said. Sheila Hightower, the career center’s manager, said January’s official statistics reflect what they have been seeing at the center since January 2008. “I haven’t seen it this bad in a very long time,” said Hightower, who has been with the Labor De­ partment for 29 years and at the DeKalb center since 1995. “It’s re­ ally disheartening to see.” Hightower said that the men and women filing for unemploy­ ment insurance and taking training classes began growing a year ago and has increased every month since. Statewide, January’s unemploy­ ment rate, the latest available rate, climbed to 8.6 percent with 412,770 out of work. Nationwide, more than 11.6 million or 7.6 percent of Americans are unemployed. The unprecedented increase in

McKenzie Jackson / CrossRoadsNews

DeKalb Career Center instructor Crystal Rucker teaches a class on resume writing and job search to jobseekers at the Covington Highway center in Decatur Wednesday. The center offers three classes daily for up to 40 people each, and with DeKalb’s unemployment rate at 8.6 percent, they are always full.

Georgia unemployment numbers prompted Georgia Labor Commis­ sioner Michael Thurmond to pro­ claim the state in “officially sailing in uncharted economic waters.” But while times are difficult, Thurmond said they are not hope­ less. “All Georgians must work together to meet and overcome

these unprecedented challenges,” he said. William Harris, a graphic artist, lost his eight-year job at Eller Media in Atlanta more than a year ago. “It’s been rough, “ he said Tues­ day while using the computers at the career center. “The jobs I do find I’m qualified for, but some things I don’t know. “

To combat his lack of knowl­ edge, Harris, who has been free­ lancing to make money, said he is working toward going back to school to refresh his skills. Hightower said it is difficult for job hunters like Harris and Nelson because the number of unem­ ployed workers greatly outnumbers the number of job openings.

She recommends that jobseek­ ers identify their skills that are transferable and explore their op­ tions, including getting trained to do new things. The DeKalb Career Center of­ fers daily training in job searches and resume writing, and posts Please see JOBLESS, page 2


2

CrossRoadsNews

Community

March 7, 2009

“I just pray every day. I leave it up to God. If you don’t pray, if you don’t have faith you don’t have nothing.”

Hillandale to focus on strokes, heart disease HOSPITAL,

from page

1

Another 2,000 women from the nine Lithonia, Stone Mountain and Decatur Zip codes served by the hospital, went to the North Decatur campus to deliver their babies. Baranco, who supported De­ Kalb Medical’s bid to build the Lithonia hospital, said she has used it for emergency services for herself as well. “I have never had a bad expe­ rience at Hillandale,” she said. “I know they do a good job. It was my daughter-in-law’s second child and she and my son said it was one of the best experiences for them. I do hope it will return. I hope we can stop it from leaving.” Delyphne Lomax, a longtime member of the Hillandale hospi­ tal’s Community Advisory Board, said she is disappointed to see the hospital’s services cut, but that it is a sound decision. “When we saw the numbers, it made sense,” said Lomax, who attended the hospital’s briefing for advisory members Thursday morning. “Many women are still using the North Decatur center. It’s a brand new state-of-the-art center. It’s sad, yes, but from a financial standpoint it had to happen. I would rather not have maternity than not have a hospital.” Julia Hunter Jones, who worked for more than 20 years to get the hospital built and was its first administrator, said she was not surprised at the news because of

“It’s sad, yes, but from a financial standpoint it had to happen. I would rather not have maternity than not have a hospital.” Delphyne Lomax, Hillandale advisory board member

the critical state of all of the state’s hospitals. “It’s not just Grady,” she said. “It’s scary right now. Given this economy, it makes sense. There is a state-of-the-art Women’s Center nine miles away and mothers are going to the newer center. In dif­ ferent economic times, both centers would flourish.” DeKalb Medical’s management met with Hillandale physicians late Thursday to update them on the changes. Iverson said they will be work­ ing with obstetricians to notify women who are scheduled to de­ liver babies after April 17. She said that the North Decatur campus will be offering special tours to those women ahead of their delivery dates. Iverson said the Women’s Cen­ ter features a warm, spa-like décor similar to the Hillandale campus and includes a mother-baby bou­ tique and lactation center, educa­ tional space and a bistro. To offset the loss of the mater­ nity service, Iverson said the Hillan­ dale hospital will gain a pediatric emergency center, and services for

strokes, cancer and heart disease, illnesses that disproportionately affect South DeKalb residents. She said the Hillandale hospital sees a lot more children than ex­ pected for after-hours and weekend urgent care, and the pediatrics emergency room will open adjacent to its ER by the fall. At press time, details were murky about cost of the new ser­ vices and when they would begin. Iverson said the cost and opening date will be determined later by the board. A $5.7 million Cancer Center being build by Dr. Dale McCord, will open at the Hillandale campus this summer. It will offer radia­ tion and chemotherapy treatment for prostate and other kinds of cancers. Radiation oncologists Sasha Hyatt and David Holladay, who have expertise in treating prostate cancer with intensity modulate radiation therapy (IMRT), will locate there. To support the new emphasis on heart disease, Dr. Timothy Milner, a vascular surgeon, will relocate from North Decatur to Hillandale. Iverson said she understands that they cannot address strokes, cancer and heart disease without dealing with diabetes, so they will also offer diabetes education. “We will look at what else we need to do,” she said. “We will beef up screenings and education programs to get people educated and treated.”

McKenzie Jackson / CrossRoadsNews

Job seekers pore through listings on the computers at the Department of Labor’s Career Center on Covington Highway.

Search for jobs continues JOBLESS,

from page

1

upcoming job fairs. Kimberly Carver, who super­ vises the center’s re-employment services, said the classes, which are offered three times a day, are always full to capacity. During a class with 30 job­ seekers on Wednesday morn­ ing, instructor Crystal Rucker discussed writing resumes that grab the attention of employers, making business cards that list their job skills, and dressing ap­ propriately. She also reminded the men

and women to search for jobs outside DeKalb. Rucker said that employers will be hiring soon. “I believe they will,” she said. “They are just trying to stay afloat right now.” Ashley Leggett, who drove from Riverdale to use the services at the DeKalb Career Center on Tuesday, said she is hoping that the economy turns around soon. “I just pray every day,” said Leggett, who has been jobless since last August. “I leave it up to God. If you don’t pray, if you don’t have faith, you don’t have nothing.”

E d u c a t i n g & E m p owe r i n g O u r Co m m u n i t y

& Present

Small

B usiness &

the 2009

expo

April 25, 2009 • Noon - 5 p.m. The Small Business/Best of East Metro Expo provides a unique opportunity for businesses to network with each other and with potential customers and suppliers under one roof at the Mall at Stonecrest. The Expo is ideal for professionals, home-based, women-owned and other businesses.

Winners of the 2009 “Best of East Metro” Readers Choice Awards will be recognized during the Expo!

* Call Now for Economic Stimulus Special! $350 to ParticiPate * Participants will receive a SuperCard ad to be published in our “2009 Small Business / Best East Metro” Special Section in the April 18 issue of CrossRoadsNews (add $250 for 4-color).

Participants also receive: n 8-foot table w/ two chairs during the Small Business/Best of East Metro Expo n Name listed in promotional advertising in our April 4, 11, and 18 issues n Two meal tickets

Deadline: March 13, 2009 • Expo Date: April 25, 2009 Limited number of spaces, available on a first-come, first-served basis. Call 404-284-1888 to confirm your space. www.crossroadsnews.com


3

CrossRoadsNews

March 7, 2009

Community

Since its inception in 2005, the Shoebox Project has provided more than 25,000 shoeboxes for homeless women and children. United Way Women’s Legacy is collecting shoeboxes filled with toiletries to donate to homeless women and children.

Shoebox drive under way Indiv iduals, communit y groups and companies can pack, decorate and donate shoeboxes filled with toiletries for homeless women and children through Mother’s Day. The Shoebox Project spon­ sored by United Way Women’s Legacy will deliver the donated toiletries to 61 homeless shel­ ters across the 13-county region served by United Way. Last year the project, which is in its fourth year, collected more than 9,100 shoeboxes with new unopened items including sham­ poo, soap, lotions, deodorant, toothbrushes and toothpaste. Since its inception in 2005, the Shoebox Project has provided more than 25,000 shoeboxes for homeless women and children, who make up a third of metro Atlanta’s homeless population. Women’s Legacy director Nat­ alie Evans says the project is just one way the community can help meet the basic needs of homeless women and children. Shoeboxes can be dropped off

Pack your shoebox with: n Travel size shampoo n Travel size soap n Travel size lotion n Deodorant n Toothbrush and paste n Hair comb/brush n Sun protector n Lip balm n Adhesive bandages n Antibiotic ointment n Hand towel n Warm socks n Tampons n Panty liners n Travel size hand sanitizer n Travel size tissue pack n Travel size baby wipes n Non-alcoholic mouthwash n Travel size water bottles n Rain poncho n Re-sealable zipper storage bags n Prepaid phone cards

at any United Way office through April 10. For more information visit unitedwayatlanta.org/wo­ menslegacy or call 2-1-1 or 404614-1000.

McKenzie Jackson / CrossRoadsNews

The Georgia Department of Transportation says the $54.8 million Memorial Drive/I-285 bridge replacement project is nearly 75 percent complete.

Bridge project should be finished this fall The revamped Memorial Drive/I-285 interchange will be finished by fall. GDOT spokesperson Mark McKinnon said work on the $54.8 million project is 71 percent com­ plete and should be finished by Oc­ tober – 10 months after its original completion work. The mile-long project, which began in summer 2006, was sched­ uled to be finished last December, but was pushed back because of problems relocating some of the utilities. The project will alleviate con­

gestion on the busy business cor­ ridor. It includes construction of two overpass bridges, widening of Memorial Drive to three lanes in both directions, and widening and extending the entrance and exit ramps onto I-285. Sidewalks, pe­ destrian crosswalks and bike lanes are also being constructed. The project also includes re­ locating George Luther Drive and installing a closed circuit television traffic monitoring system. Last week, construction crews were working on the substructure underneath the the second new

overpass bridge. McKinnon said the substructure work will continue into late summer. “They also have to add concrete pavement at the tops of all the ramps,” he said. McKinnon said workers will begin adding concrete to the southbound on-ramp in a week and that will take three to four weeks to complete. Workers also have to install new curves, gutters and sidewalks on the south end of Memorial Drive. New traffic signals will be installed at the interchanges and other signage and road markings will be added.


4

Community

CrossRoadsNews

March 7, 2009

Robinson was caught on the store’s surveillance video stealing an unspecified amount of money and 14 lottery tickets.

Multiple charges lead to 50 years in prison 2346 Candler Rd. Decatur, GA 30032 404-284-1888 Fax: 404-284-5007 www.crossroadsnews.com editor@crossroadsnews.com

Editor / Publisher Jennifer Parker General Manager Curtis Parker

of rape, one Torius Nagel Johnson is going to count of aggra­ prison for 50 years on a multitude vated sodomy of charges. and one count DeKalb Superior Court Judge of robbery. Robert Castellani sentenced the On June 21-year-old Decatur resident on 18, 2008, John­ Feb. 13 after he plead guilty to two son broke into counts of burglary, two counts of a 33-year-old aggravated assault, one count of ag­ Torius Johnson woman’s Deca­ gravated battery, one count of false imprisonment, two counts of ag­ tur home and viciously attacked gravated sexual battery, one count her for two hours. He bit, choked,

repeatedly punched her in the face and sexually assaulted her. He also slammed the woman’s head through a window and stole her purse before leaving. Johnson, who lived a few doors from the victim, was arrested after a canvass of the neighborhood. The victim’s purse was found in his house and his DNA was found in the victim’s sexual assault kit.

Staff Writers McKenzie Jackson

Former police officer sentenced in thefts

Advertising Sales Cynthia Blackshear

Former DeKalb Police Detec­ tive Anthony A. Robinson was sentenced to three years probation on Feb. 19 for stealing cash and lottery tickets from a convenience store last summer. Superior Court Judge Gregory Adams also ordered Robinson to pay $300 restitution and complete 250 hours of community service after he pleaded guilty to one count of violation of oath of public of­ fice. Robinson, 40, was caught on the store’s surveillance video steal­

CrossRoadsNews is published every Thursday by CrossRoads­News, Inc. We welcome articles on neighborhood issues and news of local happenings. The opinions expressed by writers and contributors are not necessarily those of the publisher, nor those of any advertisers. The concept, design and content of CrossRoads­N ews are copyrighted and may not be copied or reproduced in whole or in part in any manner without the written permission of the publisher.

Advertisements are published upon the representation that the advertiser is authorized to publish the submitted material. The advertiser agrees to indemnify and hold harmless from and against any loss or expenses resulting from any disputes or legal claims based upon the contents or subject matter of such advertisments, including claims of suits for libel, violation of privacy, plagiarism and copyright infringement. We reserve the right to refuse any advertisement.

L CA S! OCAL S! O L D L ICE O O RV G SE www.eastmetromarket.com

ing an unspeci­ fied amount of money and 14 lottery tickets, valued at $20, from the Citgo Food Mart on Moreland Av­ Anthony Robinson enue in Conley, while he and a team of officers from the police de­ partment’s vice unit were executing a search warrant at the business on July 5, 2008. The video showed him standing

PRISM to discuss projects PRISM will take a look at upcoming projects for the non­ profit Keep DeKalb Beautiful and MARTA during its March 12 meeting. Speakers include Keep DeKalb Beautiful director Amber Greer Weaver and coordinator Laurene Hall, as well as MARTA com­ munity outreach planner Dean L. Neblett. Weaver and Hall will discuss water conservation, the Great

American Clean-Up initiative, bus stop adoption and recycling. Neblett will provide an over­ view of MARTA’s services in DeKalb County. The meeting, which starts at 7 p.m. will be at St. Timothy United Methodist Church, 5365 Memo­ rial Drive in Stone Mountain. For more information, con­ tact state Rep. Michele Henson at michelehenson@earthlink.net or 404-296-1442.

behind the counter holding a clear plastic evidence bag, which con­ tained an undetermined amount of money. While he was sealing the evidence bag with red tape, he reached in with his right hand and removed money and put it in the front pocket of his jeans. The tape also showed Robinson stealing lottery tickets and placing them into a folder he was carry­ ing. No other detectives were in­ volved in the crime or had prior knowledge of Robinson’s actions.

Man gets 18 years in boy’s death Herbert Gerald Warren of Lithonia is going to prison for up to 18 years in the death of his girlfriend’s 4-year-old son. Warren, 34, pleaded guilty to voluntary manslaughter and cruelty to children shortly before lawyers were to begin selecting jurors for his murder trial. DeKalb Superior Court Judge Clarence Seeliger also gave him five years for cruelty to children to run concurrently. Warren had claimed that Jaydin Martin fell off a home bar stool and hit his head at their Lithonia residence on Jan. 2, 2006. When the unconscious child was transported to the hospital, a doctor found multiple injuries to his head and his body covered with bruises. An autopsy also revealed numerous injuries that were inconsistent with Warren’s statements.

Clocks move forward Sunday People who want to be on time Sunday should remember to set their clocks forward before going to bed Saturday night. Daylight Saving Time begins at 2 a.m. Sunday and will end Nov. 1 this year. Established to reduce energy use by extending daylight hours, the modern concept for daylight saving time is thought to have originated with Benjamin Franklin. In 1784, in a whimsical letter to a French journal, he said that people could save thou­

sands of francs by waking up earlier during the summer, thus using fewer candles at night. Early attempts to imple­ ment daylight saving time in the United States were not popular. It became an annual fixture in the United States only after an oil embargo by OPEC in 1973. Daylight-saving time now starts on the second Sunday in March through the first Sunday in November.

Quick Read Shoebox drive under way

3 Free cell phones for low and income families

Individuals, community groups companies can pack, decorate and donate shoeboxes filled with toiletries for homeless women and children through Mother’s Day.

Bridge project should be finished this fall

3

The revamped Memorial Drive/I-285 interchange will be finished by fall. GDOT spokesperson Mark McKinnon said work on the $54.8 million project is 71 percent complete and should be finished by October.

Masjid to offer breast cancer exams, information 5 Uninsured women can get free mammograms and breast exams on March 8 at the Masjid An Nur in Lithonia.

Columbia girls make 6 basketball history

Nearly 500,000 Georgia low-income families can get free wireless cell phones as part of a government-supported program.

Financial literacy workshop 6 Adults who are struggling with their finances can register to attend a March 26 financial literacy workshop hosted by the Partnership for Community Action.

Historic figures come to life in school’s ‘wax museum’ 7 When students dropped change into a bowl at DeKalb School for the Arts at Hooper Alexander last week, African-American history came to life.

Champions crowned in Stimulus funds to help with DeKalb 8 health care costs 5 Two South DeKalb teams and a wrestler Georgia is getting $339.6 million from President Barack Obama’s $15 billion Federal Medical Assistance Percentage funding.

grabbed championships in February, including Stone Mountain Middle’s girls basketball team and Champion’s boys team.

8

A little over a week ago the Columbia Lady Eagles (22-7) had an 0-7 all-time record in the state playoffs. Fast forward a week and they have two playoff wins and a chance to advance to the Class AAA Final Four. All they have to do is knock off the Carrollton Lady Trojans (29-2) on March 7 at the Northwest Georgia Trade & Convention Center in Dalton.

Covington church giving away clothes 9 Families who need clothes can find plenty at a March 14 children’s clothing giveaway at the City of Refuge Christian Church in Covington.

Flag football game brings police, community together 9 DeKalb police officers and members of Stronghold Christian Church’s “Men of Standard” ministry will go head-to-head on the gridiron on March 14, in the inaugural “Community of One” flag football game.

Circulation Audited By

index to advertisers Budah Graphics............................................... 6 CDC Federal Credit Union................................ 6 Corner Stone Leadership Academy.................11 Cost Plus World Market....................................3 CRAM Academy...............................................11 CrossRoadsNews Small Business Expo..............2

CrossRoadsNews Summer Camp Expo........... 12 DeKalb Convention & Visitor’s Bureau..............5 DeKalb Co. Purchasing & Contracting Div.......11 DeKalb Co. Schools/Office of School Impr.......7 DeKalb Co. Schools/Public Relations................7 DeKalb Co. Schools/Parent Resource Center....8

Douglas J. Flanigan Law Firm..........................11 Ella’s Caring Hands Adult Day Care................. 9 Felicia V. Anderson, CPA LLC........................... 6 H & M Insurance..............................................11 Legendary, LLC................................................ 6 MBC Group, Inc...............................................11

Rainbow Park Baptist Church........................... 9 Saint Philip AME Church.................................. 9 Tab Contracting...............................................11 Will Wilson Insurance...................................... 6 Windsong Music Group....................................5


March 7, 2009

Wellness

5

CrossRoadsNews

“We have certain culturally things that encroach upon or well-being, so we educate them on the religion and show them the difference between culture and religion.” Alisha Hasan, clinical director of Essential Living for Muslim Women Breast Health Initiative, teaches women how to selfexamine their breasts.

Masjid to offer breast cancer exams, information Uninsured women can get free mammo­ grams and breast exams on March 8 at the Masjid An Nur in Lithonia. The 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. event is hosted by the Essential Living for Muslim Women Breast Health Initiative to educate women on breast cancer. Safiya Adbul Khaaliq, the initiative’s executive director, said women will get infor­ mation on breast cancer and breast lumps. “We give them as much information as possible so they will be equipped to take care of their breasts and share the information with other family members,” she said. Khaaliq said the women will also be

taught the proper way to do a self-breast examination and check for breast abnor­ malities. “Muslim women have this taboo about even touching their bodies, let alone touch­ ing their breasts,” Khaaliq said. “So that becomes a challenge for us. We have certain culturally things that encroach upon our well-being, so we educate them on the reli­ gion and show them the difference between culture and religion.” Breast cancer affects one in eight women in the United States. Each year about 40,480 women die from breast cancer but as of 2008, more than 2.5 million had survived

the disease. Khaaliq said the event is open to women of all faith and race and that their com­ munity health advisors, who are trained in breast health education, can teach women from all cultures. “In the Muslim culture, there are Paki­ stani, Somali, Nigerians, Kenyans,”she said, “We try to get a Muslim woman from each of those communities to spread the education in their language and in English.” Masjid An Nur is at 1996 South Stone Mountain-Lithonia Road in Lithonia. For more information, visit www.elmw. com or call 404-441-7029 or 770-365-2277.

Stimulus funds to help with health care costs Georgia is getting $339.6 million from President Barack Obama’s $15 billion Fed­ eral Medical Assistance Percentage funding (FMAP). The funds, which provide the federal match for Medicaid, will help pay for health care for families hit hard by the country’s Barack Obama economic crisis. After a Feb. 23 meeting with Obama and other governors in Washington, Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue said the federal mon­ ey “enables us to use state dollars for other Sonny Perdue things.” More than 49 million Americans rely on Medicaid for health care coverage and the FMAP funds could help 20 million more Americans get coverage. Obama told governors that the plan will help en­ sure that they won’t have to cut essential services that Americans rely on now more than ever. “That means that by the time most of you get home, money will be waiting to help 20 million vulnerable Americans in your states get health coverage,” he said. “Children with asthma will be able to breathe easier, seniors won’t need to fear losing their doctors, and pregnant women with limited means won’t need to worry about the health of their babies.”


6

CrossRoadsNews

Finance

SafeLink Wireless service will provide eligible low-income households a free cell phone, mobile access to emergency services and 68 minutes of free air time.

Free cell phones for low income families Nearly 500,000 Georgia lowincome families can now get free wireless cell phones as part of a U.S. government-supported Life­ line program. On Feb 9, TracFone Wireless Inc. launched SafeLink Wireless to distribute the cell phone service in Georgia. It said SafeLink Wireless service will provide eligible low-income households a free cell phone, mo­ bile access to emergency services and 68 minutes of free air time monthly for one year.  Jose Fuentes, TracFone’s gov­ ernment relations director, said qualified low-income individuals will have the same access to cell phones. “The SafeLink Wireless service offers low-income families acces­ sibility, freedom and the security in knowing that should an emergency occur, wherever they are, they will stay safe and stay connected,” he said.

Eligible households include those receiving Medicaid, food stamps, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LI­ HEAP), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Section 8 housing, or a Senior Citizen En­ ergy Low Income Discount Plan offered by the local gas or power company. The Federal Communications Commission  created the Lifeline program in 1984 and worked to update the service after Hurricanes Katrina and Ike and the Sept.11, 2001 destruction of the World Trade Center. It is part of the Low Income Program of the Universal Service Fund administered by the Univer­ sal Service Administrative Co. to ensure that quality telecommu­ nications services are available to low-income customers at afford­ able rates. More than 1,700 carriers are

eligible to provide the program but TracFone says it is the first pre-paid company to offer it on cell phones. The Lifeline program is funded from telecommunications carriers contributions to the USF, collected in part from the Universal Service Charge billed to cell phone users. Instead of discounting the user’s monthly bill, SafeLink applies the USF subsidy to free wireless minutes.   The company, which has more than 10 million cell phone sub­ scribers, says all but 13 rural Geor­ gia counties are eligible for the free phone service. It said the 13 ineligible counties have not responded to requests for certification. All metro Atlanta counties, including DeKalb, which together have 449,983 eligible lowincome households, are eligible. For more information, visit www.tracfone.com or call Cecilia Santana at 646 326 7956.

headline goes here like this and that & then headline goes here like this and that

with

driving the

discount Now is the time...

We’ve arranged exclusive deals on new cars from GM and Chrysler to help get America moving again.

cash incentives and rates as low as

3.9%* APr**

to take advantage of this limited-time offer, call or visit us today! 404-325-3270, option 3 • CDCFCU.com

You Can

JOIN

March 7, 2009

If you live, work, worship, attend school, or volunteer in portions of DeKalb, Fulton, or Gwinnett Counties, you’re eligible for membership!

We Do Business In Accordance With The Federal Fair Housing Law And The Equal Credit Opportunity Act.

*Applicants must qualify under normal underwriting guidelines. Rates may vary depending on loan and credit history. Rate is 3.9% based on 36-month loan term. An active CDC FCU checking account is also a requirement in order to be considered for our lowest rates. Rates and terms are subject to change. **APR = Annual Percentage Rate.

Financial literacy workshop Adults who are struggling with their finances can register to attend a March 26 financial literacy work­ shop hosted by the Partnership for Community Action. The workshop, titled “What You Don’t Know About Your Mortgage and Credit Cards Could Shock You,” will take place at 6 p.m. at PCA’s DeKalb office, 815 Park North Boulevard, Clarkston. The deadline to register is

March 23. Jeff Shirley, a licensed financial planner, will lead the workshop. He is president of Shirley Inter­ national, Inc. and has worked with individuals and families for more than nine years to build financial security. Participants will get a copy of “How Money Works.” For more information and to register, call program manager Vonda Echols, at 404-929-2453.


March 7, 2009

Youth

7

CrossRoadsNews

“We get to share history with kids throughout the school and it gives the school the possibility to get to understand different black figures.”

Coins bring historic figures to life in magnet school’s ‘wax museum’ By McKenzie Jackson

When students dropped change into a bowl at DeKalb Elementary School for the Arts at Hooper Alexander last week, AfricanAmerican history came to life. Historical characters like former slave, abolitionist and women’s rights activist Sojourner Truth, politician and civil rights activist Shirley Chisholm, Motown singers, The Supremes, tennis superstars Venus and Serena Williams, and inventor and scientist Ben Carson began telling their stories. They were among 30 figures from U.S. history in the Decatur school’s one-day “Wax Museum.” Students from Dr. Melanie Beaver’s sixth- and seventh-grade Discovery Learning classes, dressed like the characters and sat still as wax figures until coins were put in the bowls at their tables. The money will benefit a community charity. The students’ depictions were part of the classes’ black history project. Students got to select influential AfricanAmericans for the project, but were not al­ lowed to portray well-known figures such as Martin Luther King Jr., Harriet Tubman or Barack and Michelle Obama. “A lot of kids know about those African Americans so I asked them to select someone that were not as well known,” said Beaver, who has taught at the elementary magnet school for the arts for four years. She said students also had to write two essays about their figure, create a timeline of the person’s life, and prepare a one-minute monologue for their museum presentation in the media center. Throughout the day on Feb. 26, students from all grade levels at the school visited the stations and learned about the characters. Thomas C. Powell, the school’s principal,

Discovery Learning class student Talecisa Cistrunk dressed as former slave, abolitionist and women’s rights activist Sojourner Truth during her class’ wax museum project.

said the wax museum was both fun and educational. “We get to share history with kids throughout the school and it gives the school the possibility to get to understand differ­ ent black figures,” he said. “It’s also a good

learning experience for those who are the wax figures.” Throughout the day, at the drop of a coin, sixth-graders Tiffani Hull, Aeshalon Carter and Yasmine Bailey became The Supremes, singing verses from the popular 1960s musi­

cal group’s chart buster, “Stop in the Name of Love.” They also provided short biographies of Diana Ross, Mary Wilson and Florence Ballard. Ditto for seventh-grader Kaiden Hill, who portrayed actor Bill Cosby, producer and actor of the 1980s sitcom “The Cosby Show.” He recited Cosby’s signature “J-E-LL-O” line, of course. At coin drops, 13-year-old Marcus Wil­ son lifted his dyed-blond head from a book to spout fiery lines about the black man. Beaver said that with your eyes closed, “you would think Malcolm X was speaking.” Marcus wore a dapper suit just like Malcolm X, the African-American Muslim minister, public speaker and human rights activist. “I tell kids about who his parents were, what he believed in, what he did in prison, and why he changed his last name,” he said. Eleven-year-old Autumne Sneed dressed as civil rights activist Daisy Bates because she felt she resembled the Little Rock, Ark., newspaper publisher and journalist from the 1940s and ’50s. “I didn’t know anything about her before I did the project,” Autumne said. “I just saw that she was a journalist and that is something I’m really interested in. I thought it would be nice to learn about someone new.” Janetta Hill, a seventh-grader, always recognizes former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice on television, but did not know her personal story. She educated herself and other students on Rice’s friendships, ability to play the piano and history-making achievements. “When they come to see me a lot of my friends try to make me laugh,” she said, “but I just stay in character and tell them about her.”


8

Sports

CrossRoadsNews

March 7, 2009

“It was a rough win, but we pulled through and played as a team. We knew this would be our last game if we lost, so we pulled it together.”

Columbia girls make basketball history with first-round playoff win By McKenzie Jackson

A little over a week ago the Columbia Lady Eagles (22-7) had an 0-7 all-time record in the state playoffs. Fast forward a week and they have a 2 playoff wins and a chance to advance to the Class AAA Final Four. All they have to do is knock off the Carrollton Lady Trojans (29-2) on March 7 at the Northwest Georgia Trade & Convention Center in Dalton. Coach Chantay Frost said that the winless playoff record is history in her team’s mind. “We are feeling pretty good,” she said. “These have been tough teams that don’t lay down so we feel pretty good. We have been taking it one game at a time.” The Lady Eagles, a No. 2 playoff seed, beat fourth-seeded Hart County (18-12) 62-59 on March 3 to advance to the playoffs’ third round. Destinee Smith, one of the Eagles’ starting forwards, scored 21 points to lead Columbia to their second straight home playoff victory. The Lady Eagles advanced to the second round of the playoffs on Feb. 27 by beating the third seeded Cartersville Canes (12-14) 37-28. Frost said that her girls have played better each round and expects the team to play well against the Lady Trojans, a No. 1 seed. “I expect them to play hard and leave it one the floor,” she said. “Whatever we do we got to play hard with no regrets. As long as we do that win, lose or draw we

Columbia’s Akila McDonald, who scored key baskets and had nine blocks, including three blocks on one possession, in the Lady Eagles’ first postseason win.

McKenzie Jackson / CrossRoadsNews

are okay.” The Lady Eagles win over Cartersville wasn’t pretty, but it was historic. Columbia’s last playoff appearance was in 2004, when they were beat 53-46 by Rockdale County in the first round. Columbia’s

history of playoff failures didn’t matter after the victory over Cartersville. Destinee Smith, sophmore, said the win was great. “It is just beautiful,” she said. Frost didn’t tell her players that they had made school history until

after the final buzzer. The team then began celebrating and the crowd joined them shortly afterwards, when a school official announced the accomplishment over the public announcement system.

The game started with scrappy play by both teams, marked by turnovers, fouls and badly missed shots. The Canes took a 15-12 lead with over six minutes left in the second quarter, but the Lady Eagles jumped ahead 19-17 at halftime when Smith hit a three-pointer with seven seconds left. The Lady Eagles began to slowly pull away at the start of the third quarter, and held leads of three, five and seven points. Frost said her team settled down. “Once they did the things they know how to do, like defense, they were okay,” she said. With 2:30 left in the fourth quarter, 6-foot-4 center Akila McDonald hit one of many wide open shots under the basket to give the Lady Eagles a 33-26 lead. A few moments later, while on defense, the junior blocked three Cartersville shots on one possession. McDonald, who had nine blocks during the contest, said the game was one of the few she had played well in. “I just stepped for my team,” she said. “I knew that this was the last game if we didn’t win and we wanted to pull it out.” Mecca Frost, one of Chantay Frost’s two daughters on the team, said the win was big. “It was a rough wing, but we pulled through and played as a team,” said Mecca, who starts in the Columbia backcourt with her sister Zuri Frost. “We knew this would be our last game if we lost, so we just pulled it together.” Clarkston High senior Terrance Gaddy defended his Georgia AAA wrestling title and finished the season undefeated.

Champions crowned in DeKalb Two South DeKalb teams and a wrestler grabbed championships in February. On Feb. 14, the Stone Mountain Middle School girls basketball team and Champion Theme Middle School boys basketball team captured titles at Columbia High School. Then on Feb. 21, Clarkston High senior Terrance Gaddy won his second consecutive AAA state wrestling crown. Stone Mountain beat Miller Grove Middle 34-26 despite a scoreless third quarter and a three-point halftime deficit. Yactavia Hickson scored a game-high 12 points to lead the Lady Pirates, while Danielle Clark added 10 points. Taj Shamsid-Deen led the Champion Middle Chargers with 22 points en route to their 41-35 win over Freedom Middle School. Chargers Daniel Morrison and Daniel Ezechkwue each contributed seven points. Jonathan McCrary led Freedom Middle School with 17 points. Gaddy, who wrestles in the 171-pound weight class, pinned Lafayette High’s Will Gilbert at the 1:55 mark of the first period of his championship match at the Arena at Gwinnett Center to cap a 41-0 undefeated season. Gaddy scored two points early in the

Stone Mountain Middle School’s girls team won the county title.

match, and after a restart he forced Gilbert’s shoulders to the mat for the victory. Four other South DeKalb wrestlers, including three from Tucker High, reached the finals in their weight class. Tucker’s Melchisdeac LaVergne (135 pounds), Stephen Starks (140) and Carey Cloud (145) captured AAAA silver medals, and Southwest DeKalb’s Dequan Warner, a two-time state champion, finished second in the 125-pound division.


9

CrossRoadsNews

March 7, 2009

Ministry

“If we want to solve issues with crime in our community, we all need to work hand-in-hand with those that are here to protect us.” DeKalb Police are practicing for their “Community of One” matchup against members of Stronghold Christian Church’s “Men of Standard” Ministry.

Covington church giving away clothes Families who need clothes can find plenty at a March 14 children’s clothing giveaway at the City of Refuge Christian Church in Covington. During the noon to 3 p.m. event, families will be able to select from new and lightly worn clothes collected by the church’s Martha Ministry, a free clothing giveaway ministry started by City of Refuge pastor Ronnie C. White Sr. City of Refuge is at 2185 Washington St. in Covington. White said the ministry is a Ronnie White no-brainer. “With so many people in in dire straits now and not able to afford even thrift store prices, why not collect clothing and set them out free to anybody who can use them,” he said. “We want to make sure you and your family are clothed.” The giveaway includes popular brands like Carter, American Girl, Aeropostale, Wrangler and Arizona for boys and girls. Boys’ sizes range from 2T to 20 husky, as well as small men’s shirts, and, for girls, misses size 4 to 8, and large junior shirts. The church also has a lot of clothing in women’s and plus sizes. “The community blessed the ministry with these clothes, so we want to bless the people of the community,” White said. For more information, call the church at 404-933-9970.

Flag football game brings police, community together By McKenzie Jackson

DeKalb police officers and members of Stronghold Christian Church’s “Men of Standard” ministry will go head-to-head on the gridiron on March 14, in the inaugural “Community of One” flag football game. The Lithonia-based church and the DeKalb County Police Alliance are hosting the 1 p.m. charity football game at Hallford Stadium to bring the community and public together to solve issues of crime. Church founder and senior pastor Ben Gaither has been in

Ben Gaither

Sherry Gaither

law enforcement for more than 20 years, first with the Sheriff ’s Office and with the Police Department. He is also a DeKalb Police chaplain. The goal of the “Community of One” initiative is to promote

4 0 4 - 2 8 4 - 18 8 8 f o r Ra te s & I n f o r m a t i o n

community involvement and demonstrate the faith community’s support for law enforcement. Dr. Sherry Gaither, who copastors the church with her husband, said the game is important. “If we want to solve issues with crime in our community, we all need to work hand-in-hand with those that are here to protect us,” she said. “This game will be catalyst to promote awareness and show as a community of one, we can overcome adversity,” Proceeds from the event will benefit the nonprofit DeKalb Police Alliance, which provides

additional resources to aid DeKalb police officers in performing at their highest level, promote community partnership, reduce crime and attract qualified officers. Admission is $5 in advance and $10 at the gate. Children 12 years and under are free. Tickets can be purchased at Stronghold Christian Church, 724 Rock Chapel Road, Lithonia, or any DeKalb Police precinct. Hallford Stadium is at 3789 Memorial College Ave. in Clarkston. For more information, visit www.strongholdcc.net or call 770322-9010.


10

CrossRoadsNews

March 7, 2009

One-order, one-invoice, multi-newspaper placement service! Reach more than 15 million households served by over 1,020 suburban and community newspapers around North America and Canada. 25-word ad starts at $240 weekly. Discount Contact Rates Available. For more information, call 404-284-1888 Adoptions PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching birthmothers with families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7. Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6298.

Own a Mattress Sanitizing Business. Earn $200+hour. Cash in on Green movement. Dry, Chemical-Free process removes dust mites and allergens. New to USA. Key areas available. Call 1-888-999-9030 or visit www. Hygienitech.com

*Police Impounds for Sale!* Honda Accord 2000 only $600! Chevy Lumina 1999 only $1000/ obo! Hondas, Toyotas, Nissans & More from $500! For Listings 800-366-0124 ext. L213

$$ ABSOLUTELY EARN $500-$3500 POSSIBLE DAILY!! Simply return phone calls. NO SELLING. NO PRODUCTS. NOT MLM. Call Now for more information and learn how to get started today!! 1-888-248-1617 www. arichplan.com

DONATE YOUR CAR to SPECIAL KIDS FUND. Help Disabled Children With Camp and Education. Non-Runners OK. Quickest Free Towing. Free Cruise/Hotel Voucher. Tax Deductible. Call 1-866-448-3254.

WHAT RECESSION? My income jumped 20% in January!! We’re growing like crazy & seek fun, honest, hard-workers with entrepreneurial desire and leadership skills. Work from home. PT / FT 800-605-8675

$500! HONDAS & TOYOTAS FROM $500! Buy Police Impounds & Repos! Acuras, Nissans, Chevys & more from $500! For Listings 800-366-0124 ext. L215

Ever Wanted to Own Your Own Life? Looking for Right Opportunity to Earn BIG? Your “Weight” is Over! Earn a Fortune While Losing Your “WAIST”...Literally. 3 Patents-Pending! THIS PRODUCT WORKS ON EVERYONE! 1-866-288-5766

Autos

Business Opportunities 100% RECESSION PROOF! Do you earn $800 in a day? Your own local candy route. Includes 25 Machines and Candy. All for $9,995. 800-893-1185 (Void in SD & MD) WHAT RECESSION? Our company is growing like crazy & seeks hard workers with entreprenurial desire & leadership skills. Work from home PT/FT call (516)632-9929 or email fferrante1@optonline.net **Are You Making $1,500.00 + PER WEEK? ALL CASH VENDING! Incredible Income Opportunity! Snack-soda... Minimum $8K To $40K Investment Required. Excellent Quality Machines. 800962-9189

Entrepreneurs, Income Opportunity Seekers: Thousands in Cash Delivered to your door. For more information, send Self Addressed Stamped Envelope to: Charles rogers 15420 S. 36th Place Phoenix, AZ 85044-6673 Earn up to $500 Daily. A Real Business Home-Based. Low Start-up. Financing Available. Simple Part-Time or Full-Time. Free Report: Dry Tech Promo # CL24157 8920 Quartz Ave. Northridge, CA 91324. 1-818576-0388 www.drytechsystems. com

Education & Training AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved

program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing Available. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (888) 349-5387. HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Fast Affordable & Accredited. FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-5326546 Ext. 96 www.continentalacademy.com Attend College Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Computers, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 800-488-0386 www.CenturaOnline.com Peacekeeping Taskforce/ Bodyguards. Overseas/USA $113/220k+ possible. Protect Overseas Workers 3-90 Day tours Military/security/Police helpful. Not Required. 18+ 1-615-885-8960 ext 782 www. BodyGuardTrainingUSA.com

Employment Opportunities Earn $500.00 weekly assembling Angel Pins in the comfort of your home. No experience required. Paid weekly. Simple and fun! Call 1-413-303-0474 or visit www.angelpin.net EARN $1000’s Weekly. Mailing Brochures! Weekly pay + Bonus. Guaranteed Opportunity! Start Today! 1-866-960-9834 Code 701 $600 Weekly Potential$$$ Helping The Government PT. No Experience, No Selling. Call: 1-888-213-5225 Ad Code E. Void in Maryland and South Dakota. $384 DAILY! No experience required! Data entry positions available Now! Internet access needed! Income is Guaranteed! Apply today! www.datamoney. net

Government Jobs- $12-48.00/hr. Full Benefits/Paid Training. Work available In areas like Homeland Security, Law Enforcement, Wildlife & more! 1-800-320-9353 Ext 2002 Mystery Shoppers Needed. Earn up to $150 per day. Undercover Shoppers needed to Judge Retail & Dining Establishments Experience Not Required. Call Now 1-877-218-6211 DATA ENTRY PROCESSORS NEEDED! Earn $3,500-$5,000 Weekly Working from Home! Guaranteed paychecks! No Experience Necessary! Positions Available Today! Register Online Now! www.DataCashNow.com

Financial $$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! AS seen on TV. Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500$500,000++ within 48/hrs? Low rates. APPLY NOW BY PHONE! 1-888-271-0463 www.cash-forcases.com IRS Tax Problems? FREE Consultation if you owe 10k+ Settle for Less - Eliminate Penalties, Interest Charges & Tax Liens 800-393-7630

Health & Fitness PHENTERMINE, Xanax, Carisoprodol and more. Doctor Consultation included. Shipped FedEx 1-4 days. www. BESTBUDGETRX. COM 1-866-683-5744 AAA Affordable Health Care. Plans as little as $69.95 for single & $89.95 for family per month. For more info please call toll free 866-925-1830. ONLINE PHARMACY Buy Soma, Ultram, Fioricet, Prozac, Buspar $71.99/90 $107/180 Quantities, PRICE INCLUDES PRESCRIPTION! Over 200 meds $25Coupon Mention Offer:#31A31. 1-866-491-2712. tri-pharmacy.net

Help Wanted Help Wanted Earn Extra Income, assembling CD cases from home. Start immediately, No experience necessary. 1-800-405-7619 ext 1395 www.easywork-greatpay. com ASSEMBLE MAGNETS & CRAFTS FROM HOME! Yearround Work! Excellent Pay! No Experience! Top US Company! Glue Gun, Painting, Jewelry & More! TOLL FREE 1-866-8445091, en espanol

Misc. For Sale GET A NEW COMPUTER Brand Name laptops & desktops Bad or NO Credit - No Problem smallest weekly payments avail. its yours NOW- Call 1-800-618-3765 * REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL!* Get a 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting under $20. FREE Digital Video Recorders to new callers, SO CALL NOW. 1-800-699-7159

Email not sending? Printer not printing? Can’t fix it yourself? Call My Computer Works your personal Help Desk. Fast, safe and secure help day or night: 888-375-8686.

Motorcycles/RVs Wanted 1985 & Newer Used Motorcycles & select watercraft, ATV & snowmobiles. Free Pickup - no hassle cash price. 1-800-963-9216 www.sellusyourbike.com Mon.-Fri. 9am-7pm

Real Estate BUY HUD Homes from $199/mo! 4bd 2ba only $350/mo! 3bd 2ba only $199/mo! More Home from $199/mo! 5% dn, 15yrs @8% apr! for Listings 800-366-0142 ext. T252 3bd 2ba HUD Home only $200/ mo! 4bd 2ba Home only $325/ mo! Priced to Sell! 1-4bd Foreclosures from $10k! 5%dn, 20yrs @8%apr! For Listings 800-3660142 ext. T253 North Carolina Mountains. Warm Winters/ Cool Summers. E-Z Financing Available!! NEW! E-Z Finish Log Cabin Shell. 1344 Sq. foot/1.7 acres $89,900 828-2479966 code 45 Great deals on FSBO. Looking for your winter home away from home? www.privatesalepartners. com

Timeshares

A NEW COMPUTER NOW!!!! Brand Name laptops & desktops Bad or NO Credit- No Problem Smallest weekly payments avail. Its yours NOW- Call 800-317-7891

SELL/RENT YOUR TIMESHARE NOW!!! Maintenance fees too high? Need Cash? Sell your unused timeshare today. No commissions or Broker Fees. Free Consultation. www.sellatimeshare.com 1-866-708-3690

Miscellaneous

Wanted To Buy

GET A NEW COMPUTER Brand Name laptops & desktops Bad or NO Credit- No Problem Smallest weekly payments avail. its yours NOW- Call 1-800-640-0649

CASH FOR GOLD We buy Gold, Silver, Plat. Get Cash NOW! Highest Payouts - Satisfaction Guaranteed 877-652-3025

Reader Notice As a service to you – our valued readers – we offer the following information: This newspaper will never knowingly accept any advertisement that is illegal or considered fraudulent. If you have questions or doubts about any ads on these pages, we advise that before responding or sending money ahead of time, you check with the Attorney General’s Consumer Fraud Line and/or the Better Business Bureau. They may have records or documented complaints that will serve to caution you about doing business with those advertisers. Also be advised that some phone numbers published in these ads may require an extra charge. In all cases of questionable value, such as promises or guaranteed income from work-at-home programs, money to loan, etc., if it sounds too good to be true –­ it may in fact be exactly that. This newspaper cannot be held responsible for any negative consequences that occur as a result of you doing business with any advertisers. Thank you.

Got Flyers?

Let us deliver your flyers for only 5¢ apiece. Our circulation is audited by

www.cvcaudit.com

Call Call 404-284-1888 404-284-1888 for for details. details. Local News. Loyal Readers. We Deliver!

Sponsored by CrossRoadsNews.com


11

CrossRoadsNews

March 7, 2009

MARKETPLACE RATES Place your MarketPlace line ad here – up to 20 words for $25. Additional words are $3 per block of five words (maximum 45 words). Boxed Ads (with up to 3 lines bold headline): $35 plus cost of the classified ad. Send ad copy with check or credit card information and contact phone number (if different from ad) to MarketPlace, CrossRoadsNews, 2346 Candler Road, Decatur, GA 30032, or e-mail to marketplace@crossroadsnews.com. Our deadlines are at noon on the Thursday one week prior to publication, unless otherwise noted.

Marketplace BUSINESS FOR SALE Home Based Education Business. $20K . Manage tutors from Home. Highly successful franchise. For Info call Dana Hansen 800-434-2582 or email dana@ clubztutoring.com

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES Need Extra Income? March -Free Membership--Website--Own Hours. Low Energy, Cholesterol, Joint Problems, Menopause, Etc. All natural product, ground floor opportunity. 404-288-8381. As seen on tv! Earn $100 $1,000 per month Work From Home This is a REAL Program! 24-hr recorded info: 618-3557461

COMPUTERS Computer & laptop repair. Diagnostic fee $35. We come to you. Spyware, virus removal, & wireless network. www.Jonatech. net. (678) 918-4445 Jonatec.

Contractors/Construction Total Maintenance Repair and Remodeling heat-airconditioning, water heaters, electrical repairs, plumbing repairs, bathroom renovations and ceramic tile. Call Joe at 404-217-6460 Need Quality Home Improvement Services? Call Rob at 404-207-2875 or 678-4101728 for a free estimate. GA Licensed & Insured. www. atmconstructors.com

EVENTS & SEMINARS Price High’s Annual Breakfast will be held March 21@ 9:00 a.m. @ the Georgia International Convention Center (Tickets $30 parking $5). For details contact Anthony Love@ 404-202-3726. Alumni from 1970-1987 are invited to attend monthly meetings held @ Straight Life Church every 2nd Saturday @ 10:00 a.m.

FOR RENT/LEASE Single room for rent in Decatur. $100 weekly. Private entrance. Utilities included. 404-408-9125 or 404-244-9372 Stone Mountain Home For Rent. 4 Bed/3 Bath. Main Street Sub. Must See!! Fresh Paint, 2-Car Garage, Near Schools & Marta. $950/month. 770-653-5687. A must see! Gym for rent at Straight Life Church of God Pentecostal, Inc., 4228 Glenhaven Dr., Decatur, GA 30035. The gym space is great for church services, sports practices, wedding receptions, and much more. Please contact Denise Head for details @ 404-289-6069 or 678642-9870. 3bd, 2ba, wash & dry .$795 month. $600 security deposit & $20 application fee. Requirements: 32K- 42K/year income. Single, Couple or Sec 8. Call (770) 306-8087 Share a beautiful 4 bedroom 2 1/2 bath house near Flat Shoals

/Decatur. Not on bus line. $150 per week. Call Eugene 404-9185676.

FORECLOSURE RELIEF Bank Foreclosures. $50,000 and below--All Areas. Stop Renting. Nena Strickland. 404-202-3410.Century Homes Realty.

LANDSCAPE/LAWN CARE Lawn Care Early Bird Special $99.00 per month. Landscape: Maintenance, Design, Installation, Vegetable Garden. Senior Citizens Discount. Call 770-5931382

LOANS & MORTGAGES Loans for churches, restaurants, day care centers, multi-family properties, office buildings, and other commercial properties. Purchases or refinancing. All credit considered. Closings as quick as 7 days. www.thesamuelgroupinc. com. 404-870-9070.

MOVERS Gideon Movers, Inc. Moves & Deliveries, In-house Moves; Loading & Un-loading. Free on-site Estimate. (404)241-8899. gideonmovers@comcast.net

PUBLIC NOTICE 1963 Chevy C10 to highest bidder. Black. Need restoration. VIN# 3C144A129856 (no plate). Bidding starts 3/9/09 10 am ends 12 pm. Minimum 75% cash deposit required for highest bidder. Abandoned car removed from Dacula & currently located in Lithonia. Call 770-657-7161 to set up time for inspection.

Request for Proposals DeKalb County Government requests qualified individuals and firms with experience in project management, preliminary design/design and construction management services to submit proposals for NEIGHBORHOOD STABILIZATION PROGRAM (NSP) IMPLEMENTATION (RFP No. 09-500104). A copy of the Request for Proposals is available on the county website at the following address: http://www.co.dekalb. ga.us/purchasing/index.htm and at DeKalb County Purchasing and Contracting Department, The Maloof Center, Room 202, 1300 Commerce Drive, Decatur, Georgia 30030 (telephone number 404/371-6400) Proposals will be received at the above address until 3:00 pm on March 31, 2009

Pre-Proposal Conference and Site Visit: A mandatory pre-proposal conference and site visit will be held at 10:00 a.m. on March 11, 2009 at Decatur Library Auditorium, 215 Sycamore Street, Decatur, Georgia 30030. Interested responders are strongly encouraged to attend and participate in the pre-proposal conference and site visit. For information regarding the pre-proposal conference and site visit, please contact Joseph Patterson at 404-371-6243. Questions: All questions concerning the project shall be submitted to the Director of Purchasing and Contracting, The Maloof Center, Room 202, 1300 Commerce Drive, Decatur, Georgia 30030, in writing no later than 5:00 pm on March 20, 2009. Questions received by the Director of Purchasing and Contracting after this date will not receive a response. Addenda: Request for Proposals are available on the County’s website and all addendums issued for this project may be found on DeKalb County’s website, www.co.dekalb.ga.us/purchasing/ index.htm. LOCAL SMALL BUSINESS ENTERPRISE ORDINANCE It is the objective of the Chief Executive Officer and Board of Commissioners of DeKalb County to provide maximum practicable opportunity for all businesses to participate in the performance of government contracts, including Local Small Business Enterprises (LSBE), Minority Business Enterprises (MBE) and Women Business Enterprises (WBE). The County’s Schedule of Local Small Business Enterprise Participation, Minority Business Enterprise and Women Business Enterprise Opportunity Tracking Form (Exhibit A) and Letter of Intent to Perform as a Subcontractor or Provide Materials or Services (Exhibit B) are included in the Request for Proposal, along with sample report forms (Exhibit C). The current DeKalb County List of Certified Vendors is included as Exhibit D. For details relative to DeKalb County’s Local Small Business Enterprise Ordinance, contact the Contract Compliance Division at contract@co.dekalb. ga.us or 404.371.4795. The County reserves the right

to reject any and all proposals, to waive informalities, and to readvertise. DeKalb County Department of Purchasing and Contracting Kelvin L. Walton, Acting Director

Request for Proposals DeKalb County Government requests qualified individuals and firms with experience in project management, preliminary design/design and construction management services to submit proposals for NEIGHBORHOOD STABILIZATION PROGRAM (NSP) IMPLEMENTATION WITHIN “THE MUNICIPALITIES OF DEKALB COUNTY, EXCLUDING THE CITY OF ATLANTA” (RFP No. 09-500105). A copy of the Request for Proposals is available on the county website at the following address: http://www.co.dekalb. ga.us/purchasing/index.htm and at DeKalb County Purchasing and Contracting Department, The Maloof Center, Room 202, 1300 Commerce Drive, Decatur, Georgia 30030 (telephone number 404/371-6400) Proposals will be received at the above address until 3:00 pm on April 7, 2009 Pre-Proposal Conference and Site Visit: A mandatory pre-proposal conference and site visit will be held at 10:00 a.m. on March 18, 2009 at Decatur Library Auditorium, 215 Sycamore Street, Decatur, Georgia 30030. Interested responders are strongly encouraged to attend and participate in the pre-proposal conference and site visit. For information regarding the pre-proposal conference and site visit, please contact Joseph Patterson at 404-371-6243. Questions: All questions concern-

IT’S TAX TIME RIGHT NOW!!! We prepare taxes in a comfortable environment providing personalized attention ensuring each customer understands their returns.

• Over 10 years of Tax Preparation Experience • Previous Years Tax Preparation • Drop Off Service (3-day turn around) • By Appointment Only • Excellent Customer Service

EVENING & WEEKEND HOURS

770-484-4800

MBC GROUP INC. 6886 MAIN STREET LITHONIA, GA 30058

Please Call Today

Fax: 1-866-593-7797

Email: mbcgroupinc@yahoo.com

ing the project shall be submitted to the Director of Purchasing and Contracting, The Maloof Center, Room 202, 1300 Commerce Drive, Decatur, Georgia 30030, in writing no later than 5:00 pm on March 27, 2009. Questions received by the Director of Purchasing and Contracting after this date will not receive a response. Addenda: Request for Proposals are available on the County’s website and all addendums issued for this project may be found on DeKalb County’s website, www.co.dekalb.ga.us/ purchasing/index.htm. LOCAL SMALL BUSINESS ENTERPRISE ORDINANCE It is the objective of the Chief Executive Officer and Board of Commissioners of DeKalb County to provide maximum practicable opportunity for all businesses to participate in the performance of government contracts, including Local Small Business Enterprises (LSBE), Minority Business Enterprises (MBE) and Women Business Enterprises (WBE). The County’s Schedule of Local Small Business Enterprise Participation, Minority Business Enterprise

and Women Business Enterprise Opportunity Tracking Form (Exhibit A) and Letter of Intent to Perform as a Subcontractor or Provide Materials or Services (Exhibit B) are included in the Request for Proposal, along with sample report forms (Exhibit C). The current DeKalb County List of Certified Vendors is included as Exhibit D. For details relative to DeKalb County’s Local Small Business Enterprise Ordinance, contact the Contract Compliance Division at contract@co.dekalb. ga.us or 404.371.4795. The County reserves the right to reject any and all proposals, to waive informalities, and to readvertise. DeKalb County Department of Purchasing and Contracting Kelvin L. Walton, Acting Director

SERVICES Quik Action Plumbing Company. Plumbing Repairs. 770.948.7988

TUTORIAL SERVICES Experienced college sophomore. Tutoring in Spanish, History, English and Test Preparations (SAT/PSAT, Military, CLEP, etc). Lorraine 770-241-8736.

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE COUNTY OF RICHMOND, STATE OF GEORGIA IN RE: PETITION OF WILLIE H. EDWARDS, JR. AND ALICE EDWARDS, FOR THE ADOPTION OF A MINOR CHILD, RAQUEL SASHA EDWARDS, DOB: May 19, 1993.

) ) ) ADOPTION NO ) ) ) 2008-RCA-0075 ) ) ) )

TO: RONALD WHITE, the alleged Biological Father of the minor child, RAQUEL SASHA EDWARDS. You are hereby notified that a Motion To Terminate Parental Rights has been filed in the Richmond County Superior Court on the above-captioned child. Pursuant to Official Code of Georgia Annotated Section 19-8-10, 19-8-11, 19-8-12, and other pertinent laws, you are advised that you will lose custody rights to this child, and you will neither receive notice of, nor be entitled to object to the custody and adoption of the child, unless, within thirty (30) days of your receipt of this notice, you file an Answer to this Petition pursuant to O.C.G.A. 19-7-22, and give notice in writing of the filing of such Petition to this Court and to the attorney listed below. You must prosecute the action to Final Judgment. You are further advised that if you intend to object to this Petition, you must file an Answer to the within thirty (30) days in the Superior Court of Richmond County, Georgia. You are urged to immediately retain legal counsel to assist you in this matter. You should contact the attorney for Petitioner, Helen W. Yu, 3540 Wheeler Road, Suite 509, Augusta, Georgia 30909, telephone: (706) 736-3020, for further information. All notices to or correspondence with the Petitioner and copies of all pleadings or proceedings you may file in any Court in regard to the above-referenced Child should be served upon him. Dated this 5th day of February, 2009. 3540 Wheeler Road, Suite 509 Augusta, Georgia 30909 GSBN: 783555 (706) 736-3020

Elaine C. Johnson Clerk Of Superior Court Richmond County, Georgia Helen W. Yu

*Term and Conditions apply. See our website, www.vmcsatellite.com for details. Prices, packages and programming subject to change or cancellation without notice. Cinemax and HBO promotions available with installation of certain designated DISH Network Satellite Systems packages and subscriptions to and maintenance of Autopay with Paperless Billing during the contract term, see www.vmcsatellite.com for details. Standard pricing applies after expiration of the promotional periods. Available on in the continental USA for new, first-time DISH Network residential customers. All service marks and trademarks used are the registered marks of their respective owners, all rights reserved. DN 03/09


12

CrossRoadsNews

March 7, 2009


CrossRoadsNews, March 7, 2009