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Critical Path Annual Report 2018


Evaporating Body, Multiplying Body Residency / Featuring Alan Schacher and WeiZen Ho / Image by Mike Legett


CONTENTS 4

Welcome Letter

6

Association Information

6

Responsible Entities

6

Committee Members

10

Organisational Structure and Key Responsibilities

11

Staffing

12

Principal Activities

12

Operating Result

12

2018 Artistic Program Funding

18

Programs Result

20

RESEARCH

22

RESPONSIVE PROGRAM

28

LABS & RESIDENCIES

30

DEVELOPMENT

32

RESIDENCIES

33

LABS & WORKSHOPS

36

OUT & ABOUT

38

RESEARCH

41

DEVELOPMENT

46

INTERCHANGE PROGRAM 2018

48

STUDIO PRESENTATIONS

51

CRITIQUE AND DISCOURSE

53

ASSOCIATE ARTIST

55

Financial Report Contents

56

Committee Members’ Report

57

Auditor’s Independence Declaration

62

Notes to the Financial Statements

80

Committee Members Declaration

82

Independent Audit Report

87

Additional Financial Information Disclaimer

88

Detailed Statements of Surplus or Deficit


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Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

Welcome

Critical Path’s Annual Report 2018 sets

local and regional artists have included

out the activities of the organisation in the last year, demonstrating the breadth

Su Wen-Chi (Taiwan), Skye Reynolds (Scotland), Khamlene Halsackda

and depth of the work that nurtures and extends the practice of independent

(Sweden), Louise Ahl (Scotland) and First Nations choreographer Emily

choreographers from our base in NSW across Australia and internationally.

Johnson (USA).

In 2018, Critical Path continued to expand its program in ways that reflect the significant diversity of artists, practice, location and socio-cultural settings that exist in the dance sector of the 21st century. New relationships have evolved into established partnerships which have provided an array of activity that has increased not only the outcomes of research and development for dance but expanded the platform for innovation and new ideas. Partnerships with NORPA in Lismore, Mirramu in Bungendore, Canberra, Catapult in Newcastle, Tasdance in Launceston and VITALstatistix in Port Adelaide have facilitated new and exciting collaborations with artists and communities. International practitioners visiting Critical Path and working with our

Across our annual curated and responsive programs of research and development we have seen a rich cohort of many NSW independent artists working in the Drill, as well as the involvement of interstate practitioners and partners. These artists represent the community of dance artists who are ready and willing to push boundaries of the artform that has undergone enormous evolution in recent decades, responding to the world around them, activating new technologies and driving ideas into unexplored territory. Our program has been enhanced by multiple project funds, gained by ourselves and in partnership In particular, we have felt the vital impact of support from Australia Council for the Arts, as well as support for discreet projects,


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through City of Sydney Council for the

Above all Critical Path has been invig-

2019 Hack Lab project and March Dance orated by our artists. We had 333 difevent and Woollahra Municipal Council ferent artists engage with us over the for the Acknowledging Country research project. Regional grants (in par-

year, in 515 interactions; ranging from one off workshops with international

ticular those from Regional Arts NSW) combined with international funds (from the UK, Sweden and Taiwan) to create local and interstate opportunities. The relationship with Blakdance has been strengthened again in 2018 with advice, funding and partnering across projects. The continued support of Create NSW (formerly Arts NSW) as our main funder is the foundation of our work as an organisation and our financial stability.

practitioners, to two week labs and residencies for small groups, space ‘grants’ and research room time for individual or small sets of artists. We continue to be a hub for creativity, innovation and knowledge exchange, a space that champions research and nurtures artists’ ongoing development.

Our director Claire Hicks continues to lead the organisation with endless energy and commitment to Critical Path’s vision and the artists it serves, representing us at numerous events internationally and at home. As a result, the expansion on the footprint and impact of our programs clearly validate the ‘critical’ nature of our work.

Shane Carroll Chair


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Association Information Registered Office & Principal Place of Business The Drill 1C New Beach Road Rushcutters Bay NSW 2011

Responsible Entities Auditors Mitchell & Partners, Chartered Accountants Public Officer Claire Hicks

Committee Members The Committee members of Critical Path Incorporated present their Report together with the financial statements for the year ending 31 December 2018 and the Independent Audit report, covering those financial statements. The following persons were committee members of Critical Path Incorporated during or since the end of the financial year.

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

The number of meetings during the year and the number of meetings attended by each member are as follows:


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D a te Ap p o i n ted

Da te of Ce s sa t i on

05- 09 - 14- 20- 08- 1 2A Fe b Ap r May Aug Oc t De c e n t i t le d

Susan Carroll (Chair)

15-05-17

10-04-18

1

1

Shane Carol (Deputy

02-01-17

Continuing

1

1

1

1

1

10-05-16

Continuing

1

1

1

1

1

24-02-14

15-05-18

1

1

1

29-2-2014

Continuing

1

1

1

1

1

Marcus Barker

05-02-18

Continuing

1

0

0

0

1

Thomas Kelly (Artist

08-08-16

09-04-18

0

02-01-17

Continuing

1

02-07-18

Continuing

B a ctual

2

2

1

6

6

1

6

6

3

3

1

6

6

1

6

3

1

0

Chair/Acting Chair/ Chair) Annabel Millet (Treasurer) Lesley Power (Secretary) Fenn Gordon (Acting Secretary)

Representative) Raghav Handa (Artist

0

1

1

0

0

6

3

0

1

0

0

1

5

2

Representative) Patricia Woods (Artist Representative)

A: Number of meetings the Committee Member was entitled to attend B: Number of meetings the Committee Member attended

Lesley Power has been the Association’s Secretary February 2014 until 31 July 2018. Fenn Gordon is Acting Secretary since 20 August 2018. Claire Hicks has been the Association’s Public Officer since June 2016. Details of Committee Member’ qualifications, experience and special responsibilities can be found in the following pages.


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SUSAN CARROLL Chair (until 9 April 2018) Susan has a professional background across Government, Law and the Arts. With substantial Senior Executive experience across the Commonwealth and high-level strategic advisory roles with the Department of Premier & Cabinet NSW, Susan has experience and expertise in strategic partnerships, policy development, government navigation and engagement.

SHANE CARROLL Acting Chair (until 19 August 2019) Chair (from 20 August 2018) Shane has worked in the arts sector as a performer, teacher, consultant, manager, researcher, advocate and advisor for around 40 years. Currently she supports artists through strategic initiatives to create viable careers, and contributes to arts advocacy, funding and policy development.

MARCUS BARKER Marcus Barker is the Chief Executive of the Sydney International Piano Competition. He has worked in the arts sector for over 20 years in Australia, the UK and the Republic of Ireland.


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FENN GORDON Fenn is an independent practitioner with her own company Tandem, working between Australia and New Zealand, specialising in strategic development, producing and international touring. She has worked as producer and strategic advisor with artists including the William Yang, Gavin Webber and Grayson Millwood (The Farm), Gravity & Other Myths, ILBIJERRI Theatre Company, and Nicola Gunn.

RAGHAV HANDA Artist Representative Raghav is an Australian choreographer and performer of Indian heritage with training in modern and Indigenous contemporary dance, with a solid history of performances across Australia and overseas.

PATRICIA WOOD Artist Representative Patricia is an independent dancer, choreographer and performer. Her work draws from choreographic and ethnographic process and takes multiple forms, including performance, radio transmission and text. She is also a teaching artist with Sydney Dance Company and a caretaker of ReadyMade Works

ANNABEL MILLET Treasurer Annabel is a UK qualified Chartered Accountant and a senior management consultant at PwC. She has extensive experience across the private and government sector, helping clients to manage their Finance functions through business design, strategy and transformation programs.

THOMAS E. S. KELLY Artist Representative(until 9 April 2018) LESLEY POWER Secretary (until 9 April 2018) Thomas is a performer, choreographer, and composer. He graduated from NAISDA Dance College in 2012. He is a proud Wiradjuri and Bundjalung man from QLD and NSW.

Lesley is a media, entertainment and arts lawyer. She is General Counsel of SBS and a member of their senior executive team.

Left: Emily Johnson Apocracy Lab / Bald Tree / Image by Cayleigh Davies


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Governing Committee In 2018 changes to the Committee are as follows: Susan Carroll was Chair of the Committee until 9 April when she stepped down. Shane Carroll was Acting Chair of the Committee from 10 April until 19 August when she was elected as Chair. Fenn Gordon became acting Secretary 20 August. Patricia Wood joined the committee in 12 December. Lesley Power and Thomas E. S. Kelly stepped down.

Organisational Structure and Key Responsibilities COMMITTEE

Goverance and strategic development

DIRECTOR

Artistic vision, company management and strategic development

FINANCIAL CONSULTANT

Financial advice and reporting

PROJECT MANAGERS Management of

GENERAL MANAGER

Management of Responsive Program,

projects and related

business administration, finance and

communications and

publications. Jan to Apr 2018

events

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

PROJECT COORDINATOR

ADMINISTRATOR

FINANCE OFFICER

projects including

general administration.

and accounts.

Interchange 2018

May to Dec 2018

May to Dec 2018

Coordination of specific

Office, project and

Finance administration

There were changes to staffing arrangements throughout the year, including temporary hires and changes to contracts. Please see next section for full details.


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Staffing In 2018, Claire Hicks continued in the role of Director (full time). Fabiana Serafim was on unpaid leave from 1 January to 15 July 2018 and resigned as Program Manager* on 5 September 2018. Laura Osweiler continued as General Manager** until 18 June 2018 when she went on sick leave. She returned in 14 October on a contract basis (1.5 days per week).

Rakini Devi, Projects Manager, 10 September to 15 December 2018 (3 days per week) Freya Ludowici, Project Coordinator, 2 July 2018 (3 days per week) Emily Anna Greig, Temporary Coordinator - Projects and Administration 2 January to 29 March 2018 (13 days) 3 April to 2 July 2018 (10 days) 19 November to 3 December 2018 (5 days)

Critical Path also continued to contract Karen Steains on a monthly basis as a financial consultant.

Emily Anna Greig, Temporary Finance Officer 8 July to 14 2018 October (1 day per week)

Jennifer Gardner, Temporary Administrator, 14 May to 14 October 2018 (3 days per week)

*part­–time (Three days per week) **part–time (Four days per week) ***contractor

Kate Maguire-Rosier, Temporary Administrator, 25 September 2018 (2.5 days per week)

ACTIVITIES OUTSIDE OF CRITICAL PATH Laura Osweiler co-produced the Austin Belly Dance Convention in the USA, June 2018 and curated the Contemporary Dance Series at Parramasala Festival 2018.

INTERNSHIPS In 2018 Critical Path had one intern: Sarah Elliott (BA/BEd (Secondary) – Dance with a Theatre and Performance minor UNSW) supported us during the KEIR Choreographic Award program from January to March.


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Principal Activities Critical Path is a choreographic research and development centre based at the Drill Hall, a large rehearsal space on the harbour in central Sydney, Australia. Our mission is to cultivate a program of research opportunities for choreographers and dance makers, nurturing diversity and excellence in a supportive critical environment which fosters creative risk-taking. With a distinct focus on research and innovation, we support Australian choreographers to incubate new ideas and experiments in our studio so that excellent new work can make it to our stages. We aim to nourish a genuinely independent dance company as they push the boundaries of existing practice in relation to local and international fields, enhancing the vibrancy of the Australian dance sector. We emphasise our role as a hub, a space for the independent artists to congregate, cross fertilise, debate, critique. A place connected into the broader arts sector through a host of partnerships.

Operating Result The net profit for the year amounted to $13,870 (2017 profit: $12,635). Critical Path has been serving the contemporary dance community for 13 years.

2018 Artistic Program Funding

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

In 2018, we continued to be supported by Create NSW (formerly Arts NSW) with triennial funding 2016-2018 (our majority funding), $280,000 per annum to cover the period January through to December each year. Critical Path continued its multi-year Interchange 2017-19 project; the total grant from Australia Council is $97,377. In addition the organisation embarked on 20182019 Australia Council project grant Our Place In Time ($99,988). Australia Council supported Critical Path with an International Development grant in partnership with Dancehouse for the Aus-Swiss Exchange ($4,951) and two


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International travel grants to AND+ Hong Kong ($2,000) and Ice Hot ($3,000). Woollahra Municipal Council supported Critical Path with a Cultural and Community Grant, for a small project ($5,000). In 2017, Critical Path partnered with Mirramu Arts Centre (Bungendore) to secure a Regional Arts Fund NSW grant of $20,000 a year for 2 years to deliver regional residencies with Indigenous artists as well as a guest artist from Taiwan.

Total non-grant income came to Critical Path generated income through donations of $10,498 (consisting of individual donations, monies from foundations, partnership contributions cash and inkind) and through casual hire of the Drill Hall raising $25,630. The hirers in 2018 included a mixture of larger rehearsal and development periods for subsidised artists/companies with independent makers and commercial arts activity. Woollahra Municipal Council also continue to offer Critical Path the Research Room at no hire cost to support our artistic program.

Other partners provided in-kind support or spent cash directly on joint pro-

Critical Path auspiced projects for

grams; Performance Space, Sydney Festival, University of New South Wales,

Mirramu Arts Centre (artistic partnership with Mirramu).

University of Sydney, NORPA, Catapult Dance, PYT | Fairfield and Dancehouse and Tanzhaus. Many international artists were supported by self- administrated international grants.

Below: NORPA / People in Motion / Image by Claire Hicks


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These combined funds allowed Critical Path to deliver:

9418 Online readership (including

475

digital documents, Facebook and newsletter recipients)

Total live audience at

1567

activities hosted by

Digital readership

Critical Path in 2018

(including reports, videos, e-journals)

515 Total artist participation

333 Individual artist participation

RESEARCH 211

Audience to RESEARCH sharings

89

Individual Artists participated in the RESEARCH Program

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

30 Research Programs: 10

Funded research projects (1 in partnership with Performance Space, 1 Mirramu. Blakdance and Performing Lines)

3

International funded research projects (1 in partnership with Dance Nucleus, 2 in partnership with Tanzhaus)


15

1

National funded research projects (in partnership with Dancehouse)

2

Regional funded research projects (both in partnership with Catapult)

3

Research Room residencies (2 with International Artists)

10

Space supported projects (3 with international artists, 2 in partnership with USYD)

5

Open studios

1

Workshop (in partnership with Catapult)

DEVELOPMENT 244 16 264

Individual Artists participated in our DEVELOPMENT Program Artists contributed to Critical Dialogues (also above) Audience to DEVELOPMENT sharings

31 Development Programs: 6

Artist development labs (1 curated by our Associate Adelina Larsson Artist, 3 with international artists in partnership with KCA, 2 in partnership with NORPA, 1 in partnership with Balletlab)

3

Workshops (1 in partnership with Performance Space, 1 in partnership with NAISDA)

1

2-Week-long lab with an international artist (in partnership with KCA)

1

Week long workshop (in partnership with PYT / Fairfield)

2

Short workshops (1 with international artist)


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Above: Dancing Sydney Archive Project / Featuring Dean Walsh / Image by Unknown Right: Catapult Studio Exchange / Featuring Angelyn Diaz, Alysha Fewster and Natasha Rogers / Image by Juny Boy Borja

31 Development programs (contin'd): 5

Residencies for International Artists (1 in partnership with TasDance, 1 partnership with Vitalstatistix, 1 in partnership with Mirramu)

2

Regional residencies (1 in partnership with Mirramu, 1 in partnership with BMEC, Orange

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

Regional Theatre, Cowra Civic Centre)

1

Sydney choreographic residence

2

Archive residencies for Australian artists

2

Editions of Critical Dialogues

6

Industry meetings


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PUBLIC PROGRAMS 25

Public Events

146

Artists participated in our Public Program

457

Audience members across Public Program

1567

Digital – content driven digital audience

25 Research Programs: 2

International sharings/presentations

5

Sharings/presentations by International artists

1

National sharing

4

Sharings partnered with other organisations and/or artist -led

7

Sharings/presentations artist-led

6

Public Talks (3 in partnership with KCA, 3 in partnership with Sydney Festival)


18

Programs Result 2017 43

33

DEVELOPMENT

RESEARCH

14 Public Events

PARTICIPANTS 135 259 262

AUDIENCE 638 1451

Audience to RESEARCH sharings DEVELOPMENT

Live plus 1480 partnership presentations Online

PUBLIC EVENTS

2018 31 DEVELOPMENT

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25 Public Events

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

RESEARCH

PARTICIPANTS 89 244 142

RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC EVENTS

AUDIENCE 475 1567

Live Online


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Residency Performance at USYD / Brianna Kell / Image by Unknown


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RESEARCH RESPONSIVE PROGRAM Research Residencies Space Grants Open Studio RESEARCH LABS & RESIDENCIES Independent choreographic artists and responding to their requests are at the centre of all we do. The Responsive Program emphasises the value of risk–taking for future choreographic development and seeks to give choreographers an opportunity to innovate their practices in an environment that promotes open discovery and experimentation. The program encourages self–directed and collaborative proposals that reflect the particular interests and goals of participating artists. Artists come from far and near. We have many artists working at the Drill throughout the year engaged in research on their own artistic practice. In the corner of the building (next to the kitchen), our Research Room artists work away exploring their ideas, reading, writing and inviting conversation. Critical Path also partnered with UNSW and USYD to offer residency spaces.

Left: Performance of We Make Each Other Up at The Drill Hall / Rhiannon Newton / Image by Gregory Lorenzutti


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NICK POWER - Elements Collective @ CUPO, QLD NIKKI HAYWOOD - UNSW RHIANNON NEWTON - Drill + UNSW + Dancehouse, VIC IVEY WAWN + MARK MAILLER ALAN SCHACHER + WEIZEN HO - UNSW VICTORIA HUNT BRUNO ISAKOVIC + ZVONIMIR DOBROVIC (Hungary) HANNAH WATERS - USYD BRIANNA KELL - USYD + Drill MATTHEW DAY RAKINI DEVI DEAN WALSH ANGELA GOH LAUREN BRINCAT + FRANCES BARBE KATINA OLSEN LIZZIE THOMSON ROS CRISP RAJNI SHAH AMRITA HEPI


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RESPONSIVE PROGRAM Research Residencies

NICK POWER Nick Power worked with dancers Aaron

to produce movement, sound and pho-

"Projekt" Lim, Samantha (Sammie D) Williams, Aron "Akorn" Mahuika, Benny

tographic image? How do we capture the different qualities and behaviours of

‘Bucho’ Garcia and renowned turntablist Keith "Total Eclipse" Bailey. They

vibrating materials and bodies to elicit affect: empathy, discomfort, reverie,

explored how the DJ can use the turntables as a musical instrument to create

wonder or perhaps heightened imaginative association in the audient/observer?

a new conversation with the dancers to see how the dancer and DJ respond to each other when the ‘conversation’ is

‘The time in residency at Io Myers allowed me to continue a thread of

taken to this new space.

thinking in relation to vibration as a foundational generative force, and to

‘We started to really play with layers – e.g.: getting Total Eclipse to produce an

elaborate, along with my collaborators Mark Cauvin, Heidrun Lohr and Hellen

abstract beat pattern, the dancer reacting to this and continuing to keep that

Sky, on a specific interest in the evolution of ideas….’

- Nikki Haywood movement going in silence, then Total Eclipse coming over the top with a synth soundscape….’ - Nick Power

RHIANNON NEWTON

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

NIKKI HAYWOOD All movement, sound, light and life itself begins with an energetic vibration, and extends the field of vibration beyond itself from moving cells to sound waves, from touch to radiating light. How do we shake out the embedded history inherent in living and non-living forms

Rhiannon Newtown worked in the Drill Hall, Research Room and at Io Meyers UNSW Creative Practice Lab to prepare for her 2018 Housemate Residency at Dancehouse and develop ideas, methodology and performance work ‘We Make Each Other Up’. She took a co-authoring approach with David Huggins, Amaara Raheem, Lizzie Thomson and Ivey Wawn and continued to collaborate


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with Megan Clune around the use of

specific to our purposes and began to

sounds produced by the electronic signals in plants.

help with understanding ideas of migration and identity production as spatial

‘If felt very useful to be able to under-

and choreographic. - Ivey Wawn and Mark Miller

take this research residency in co-ordination with the Housemate residency. This helped to make being an interstate resident at Dancehouse more viable.’ - Rhiannon Newton

IVEY WAWN & MARK MAILLER Ivey Wawn and Mark Miller began building a foundation for collaborative practice. They used their shared family history as material to consider how geopolitical forces impact human movement, by investigating the forgotten, lost and mistranslated parts of their family history as spaces of imaginative potential. ‘We set out with some already known information and used paper to situate these points in space, from there, trying to fill in or fill out points and gaps between points. This produced a particular way of engaging with space and being with information that felt really

ALAN SCHACHER + WEIZEN HO Alan Schacher and WeiZen Ho collaborated with Mike Leggett (experimental video & film) and Fausto Brusamolino (lighting design) on ‘Evaporative Body, Multiplying Body’. They researched ways in which the body can evaporate and multiply, change its very substance, transmute, relocate. Concepts like possession, ghosting, vibrational energy, reality and projection were examined physically and by means of augmentation in light, projection and media. Mediums employed will include screen or other surfaces, reflections and fog or haze. The work refers to transitional boundaries between life and death. Between spirit and sci-fi, scepticism, faith and superstition.


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VICTORIA HUNT Honouring and affirming her tribe’s claim to return her – Hinemihi o Te Ao Tawhito, an ancestor and ceremonial meeting house, currently under the control of the British National Trust – Victoria Hunt conducted research interrogating the collision of perspectives, guardianship of culture, prophesies, radical acts and inheritance. ‘We are our inheritance. We are our perspectives. We are our imagination. We are bearers of time and relationship. We come into being in the space in-between. We are because of each other. This research involves entering a creative mist. Within that mist are

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

thresholds of becoming, unbecoming, almost becoming and leaving. A place to witness and keep watch.’ - Victoria Hunt

Below: Ivey Wawn and Mark Mailler Responsive Research Residency at the Drill Hall / Featuring Ivey and Mark / Image by Freya Ludowici


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RESPONSIVE PROGRAM Research Room Grants

BRUNO ISAKOVIC + ZVONIMIR DOBROVIC Bruno Isakovic and Zvonimor Dobrovic used the Research Room as a Sydney base, connecting with and artists and curators here in NSW. Bruno presented a studio version of his work Denuded for a public audience.

Space Grants

HANNAH WATERS (Rex Cramphorn Studio, USYD) Hannah Waters researched her project A Rational Intuition, applying the systematic principles present in Jean Spencer’s constructivist artwork to a method of her own physical theatre composition. ‘I was able to formulate a definitive structure for the work: the project involves creating eleven different variations of one movement score, and I was able to take the time to figure out how to systematically approach each one of these variations, using the same rules for each one. This was a seminal breakthrough for me in terms of using my source material to construct the project

as a whole, and it was beneficial to me not only during the residency, but will also be incredibly important as I take this work further in the future.’ - Hannah Waters

BRIANNA KELL (Rex Cramphorn Studio, USYD) Brianna is fascinated by the idea of time as a construct – time itself a place permeable by interaction with sound, architecture and live action. She challenged her choreographic practice by utilising and interacting with new structures and technologies like film and projection. Shifting a linear direction and making fragments negotiate a timeline. To capture through film and photography intimate macro moments in the studio and then choreograph danced relationships to these captured themes. Critical Path was able to extend this USYD supported research by a further funded week, building on Brianna’s participation in research in 2017. ‘The residency was an enriching experience whereby I was able to reflect, explore, and develop new


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methodologies for my developing prac-

a heightened state of presence through

tice. I had not had the pleasure of creating in real time with musicians in my

embodying imagery, inhabiting sculptural forms and working with materials.

own projects and this added a palpable energetic force in the room.’ - Brianna Kell

ANGELA GOH Angela continued research of her new work Uncanny Valley, Girl by following/ unravelling threads from research begun during her Culture Lab residency at Arts House in Melbourne in 2017. Uncanny Valley, Girl explores a feminist cyber/socio-political imagination. She worked at distance with collaborators Holly Childs and Corin Illeto.

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

LAUREN BRINCAT + FRANCES BARBE During their residency, workshop and sharing, video and performance artist Lauren Brincat and performance-maker, Frances Barbe generated live and video material. Brincat’s approach used rulebased actions, ‘walking pieces’ and sculptural work in textiles. Barbe’s approach drew on Japanese butoh-based improvisation to cultivate creativity and

AMRITA HEPI Amrita spent time developing her Underbelly Arts show for children.

MATTHEW DAY Matthew Day researched the construction of a new choreographic diagram that supported his upcoming series of work Figures for Landscapes for seven dancers which migrates across multiple sites inhabiting a new environment each time it’s performed. Matthew focused his attention on the problem of how dancing and choreography are always entangled material-discursive phenomena and asked it another way: how is dancing always already choreographic? Developing tactics and technologies to move beyond and between the stubborn binaries of dance/choreography, subject/object, interior/exterior Matthew’s research is invested in the ontological ground of dancing processes.


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RESPONSIVE PROGRAM Open Studio

Throughout 2018, Critical Path made the Drill Hall available to choreographers working in an open studio format that encouraged the cross-fertilization of ideas and skills, whilst simultaneously having their own project interests.

PARTICIPATING ARTISTS LILY BONES RAYNEN O’KEEFE + LOC NGUYEN BONNIE COWAN RYUICHI FUJIMURA LUX ETERNA ANNALOUISE PAUL DEAN WALSH ERIC AVERY ROCHELLE HALEY + ANGELA GOH ALLIE GRAHAM ASHLEY WRIGHT + OMER BACKLEYASTRACHAN + RENATA COMMISSO JESS GOODFELLOW ZACHARY LOPEZ JULIAN DAY SARAH HOUBOLT

Right: Residency Performance at USYD / Brianna Kell / Image by Unknown


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RESEARCH LABS & RESIDENCIES

ACKNOWLEDGING COUNTRY | KATINA OLSEN & LIZZIE THOMSON Katina Olsen and Lizzie Thomson explored what it means to acknowledge Country. How do we consider the land we live and work on especially in regards to the County where Critical Path is based. How do our bodies acknowledge this place (here and now)? Katina and Lizzie spent time in the Drill Hall and Research Room, and the surrounding area, and their research with artists Tim Bishop and Vicki Van Hout and Matthew Doyle as cultural

involved in such a topic (and reality) will continue to challenge and confront me for the rest of my life…. I kept coming back to the fact that it’s surely better to continue trying to engage with Indigenous content and learn about Indigenous perspectives and Indigenous/non-Indigenous relations (and all that comes with this - politically, emotionally, ethically, etc.) even if making mistakes in doing so, then to not engage with it at all.’ - Lizzie Thomson

consultants.

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

‘Being able to solely focus how I can acknowledge a place, has now opened up a bigger pool of ideas to explore further and play with in future. In particular this residency gave me the chance to really sit and listen to other local artists and also a safe space to spend time practicing my own Kombumerri language to use in acknowledging country.‘ - Katina Olsen ‘Overall I would say that the residency was extremely challenging and confronting for me as a non-Indigenous Australian and that the complexities

ROS CRISP Rosalind Crisp was back at The Drill working with collaborators Vic McEwan, Peter Fraser and Andrew Morrish, sharing practice and exploring the issues of their ongoing project DIRt (Dance In Regional disasTer zones). Initiated in Orbost in 2017, DIRt draws artists and ecologists together to ask how dance and arts practice can embody, understand and connect to unfolding environmental devastation in East Gippsland. ‘It was a very special time for us and an important next step in the ongoing development of our DIRt


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project. I felt a kind of unconditional

Drill Hall researching and sharing. Their

space and unpressured time within which we could follow the flow of what

exploration ‘I don’t know how (to decolonise myself)’ share an urgent desire

emerged, for each of us individually, and to ask what it would mean to decolonise the body, when the body has been collectively. We were able to grow our materials in situ and take another step in tightly choreographed by colonial valresponding to the challenge of bringing ue-systems. They asked how colonisaour localised, regional work to urban au- tion lives within our very bodies, how it diences. And it allowed us to keep deep- dictates our patterns of movement, even physically shaping the body, before we ening our collaborative exchange.’ have begun to move. For each of the - Ros Crisp artists, this entwining of colonisation

RAJNI SHAH

and choreography takes a different form – so their questions sit in relationship to

each other, but are not the same as each In the third project supported by Critical other. Path and Performance Space’s joint experimental choreographic research residency. Rajni Shah with Alex Tálamo Below: Rajni Shah Development Residency / Artist and Victoria Hunt spent 3 weeks at the Alexandra Talamo / Image by Alexandra Talamo


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DEVELOPMENT RESIDENCIES LABS & WORKSHOPS

The Development Program offers the independent dance and choreography sector workshops, laboratories, master classes and exchanges for professional development. This program also provides opportunities for Australian dancers and choreographers, at different stages of their careers to support and learn from each other.

Left: Carmen et Error as part of the Adelina Larson Residency / Featuring Andrew Morrish / Image by Unknown


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RAKINI DEVI & DEAN WALSH ADELINA LARSSON + ANDREW MORRISH + NATE GILKES VANGELIS LEGAKIS - The Space Dance & Arts Centre + Drill RENATA COMMISSO ANANDAVALLI & VICKI VAN HOUT VICKY MALIN (UK) AND GABRIELA GREEN LUCY GUERIN ISHMAEL HOUSTON-JONES (USA) ESZTER SALAMON (DE) SU WENCHI (TW)


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RESIDENCIES

DANCING SYDNEY | RAKINI DEVI & DEAN WALSH

ANANDAVALLI & VICKI VAN HOUT

Working with project partners Erin

oped and shared their work-in progress of the interdisciplinary dance-theatre

Brannigan (UNSW), Julie-Anne Long (Macquarie), Amanda Card (USYD), Critical Path invited Rakini Devi and Dean Walsh to consider their own archive/ing. This research project seeks to address ephemerality - its potentials and its problems - by finding, creating and reinvigorating old and new, public and private dance archives: not only the kind that exist in ephemera, text and objects, but also those that are produced and maintained within/through the body dancing.

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

‘Discovering the body of work I have done is a different very valuable perspective of body of work.’ - Rakini Devi ‘This project has been a very interesting one to embark upon at this time in my 28 year dance/performance career / practice. Quite an unexpected milestone really, and reflection on past, present and future practice interests.’ - Dean Walsh

Anandavalli and Vicki Van Hout devel-

work, Serpent/s, on the mythological and contemporary significance of the serpent in Australian indigenous and Indian cultures. Anandavalli and Vicki Van Hout worked with dancers Glen Thomas, Shalini Parthiban, Henrietta Baird, Asha Mistry, Raghav Handa and Vineeta Menon visual artists Iqbal Barkat and Aimee Falzon and composer Aimee Falzon/Kurinji. This project build upon their intercultural lab work of 2017.


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LABS & WORKSHOPS

ADELINA LARSSON

RENATA COMMISSO (Space Grant)

Associate Artist Adelina Larsson devel-

Renata Commisso opened up her dance

oped her research project Carmen et Error. As part of her research, Adelina

practice through 3 days of research and workshops.

ran a 3-day workshop in collaboration with Andrew Morrish and Nate Gilkes

‘Opening up clas and my research to collaborators and the community of

that focused on improvisation, experimenting with a range of movement

Sydney was very helpful to myself in sharing and verbalising information as

and vocal scores. Carmen et Error is a choreographic research and creative development of a new choreographed

well as learning from them and what they could bring.’ - Renata Commisso

choral work which reprises Ovid’s tragic aetion – or origin story – of the diving bird, an unfinished episode in the Metamorphoses.

VANGELIS LEGAKIS (Space Grant) Vangelis Legakis held a lab for artists to study and work on his philosophy and practice Embodied Unity – an integration of Dance Styles, Chi Gong and energy work. In his approach to Contact Improvisation what is to dance Contact Beyond Contact, tactile senses were stimulated with energy work from Chi Gong and breathing practice to create deeper and more profound connections to create a create a group Contact Improvisation Network.

KEIR CHOREOGRAPHIC AWARD PUBLIC PROGRAM Critical Path and Carriageworks co-presented a series of workshops with guest judges as part of the KEIR Choreographic Award Public Program.

LUCY GUERIN Lucy Guerin in her ‘Inside and Out’ workshop, open to those with a dance practice, explored how we understand and frame renegade discoveries of the studio the making process into an initial concept for new work. Lucy also considered her own practice and history for a presentation/talk.


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ISHMAEL HOUSTON-JONES Ishmael Houston-Jones facilitated a

embodiment of singular or multiple his-

practical session and conversation engaging Critical Path’s 2018 themes of

tories in the body, and or the popular imagination, strongly interests me and

archive, memory and prediction. He discussed the curatorial process behind

aligns with some of the place/situated knowledge focused research I am cur-

‘Lost and Found’ and the relationship to decolonizing cultural access to history

rently doing. I believe the way information is transmitted through history by

and its expression. ‘The delivery gave me a lot to think about from the knowledge of his own practice which will

bodies, and where gaps in knowledge, biases, viewpoints and the thrust dominant/imperialist narratives affect this,

transfer within my own work. I really was grateful on his communication and

is critical research for dance/choreographic knowledges to be engaged in.’

passion.’ - Nicole Hector

- Rhiannon Newton

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

ESZTER SALAMON In the talking-exchange lab, Eszter Salamon presented some of her works from the ‘monument’ series; MONUMENT 0.5: The ValeskaGert Monument (2017), MONUMENT 0.4: Lores & Praxes (2017). These works were used to discuss archive and archiving not as fixing but as a transformative act of knowledge production and question archiving as an emancipation from the past as we know it, in order to intervene and redefine future. ‘Eszter's work on how history the making and

LIVE WORKS PARTNERSHIP SU WENCHI Critical Path collaborated with Performance Space (supported by Artspace) to bring Su WenChi (Taiwan) to Australia. During Liveworks she shared her experiences at the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland, and inspiration of the similarities that both the arts and sciences share in their approach to research and conceptual thinking. She used this material to translate scientific thought into choreographic form. WenChi then went on to a residency at Mirramu (see below).


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Top: Workshop at the Drill Hall / Lucy Guerin / Image by Unknown Left: Ishmael Houston-Jones in Rehearsal Practice at the Drill Hall / Featuring Ishmael / Image by Unknown


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OUT & ABOUT Outside of the Drill Hall, artists undertake research and creative development projects in other locations; at our partners’ spaces across NSW and internationally. Artists explored their own enquiries, shared space with other artists, and connected with the local communities. Critical Path partnered with a number of organisations to bring artist to NSW and send artists regionally, nationally and internationally. Director Claire Hicks spent time networking at Ice Hot in Iceland, Asia Network for Dance+ (AND+) and Producers' Network Meeting & Forum (PNMF) in Hong Kong, TPAM – Performing Arts Meeting in Japan, Australian Performing Arts Market (APAM).

Left: Nick Power during his Residency / Nick Power / Image by Benny 'Bucho' Garcia


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CARLY SHEPPARD + ERIC AVERY + KATIE LESLEY + JOEL BRAY + TAREE SANSBURY (Mirramu) CHAREMAINE SEET - Catapult ANGELYN DIAZ + ALYSHA FEWSTER + NATASHA ROGERS - Catapult + Drill ANGELA GOH - Tanzhaus + Dance Nucleus IVEY WAWN - Tanzhaus SU WENCHI + ADELINA LARSSON – Mirramu SUSAN BARLING + TANYA BROWN + VICKY VAN HOUT + ROSSLYN WYTHES - BMEC + Orange + Cowra RAYNEN O’KEEFE, IVEY WAWN + CLEO MEES + ANNA KURODA + ANGELA GOH + PATRICIA WOOD - PYT | Fairfield + Drill EBUBEUBA + NEDA TAHA + TASHA O’BRIEN + MAY TRAN + MARA KNEZEVIC - PYT | Fairfield + Drill EMILY JOHNSON (USA) - Vitalstatistix + Drill NAT CURSIO - Nopra IDIOT SAVANT (JP) + BELLOO CREATIVE - Nopra VICKY MALIN + GABRIELA GREEN - fLiNG Physical Theatre ESZTER SALAMON (DE) - Dancehouse ISHMAEL HOUSTON-JONES (USA) - Dancehouse BRIAN FUARTA + RYUICHI FIJIMORA - Dancehouse


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RESEARCH

BLAKDANCE & MIRRAMU CREATIVE ARTS CENTRE RESIDENCY Mirramu, BlakDance and Critical Path, in their second year of partnerships engaging First Nations Australian Artists, brought together Carly Sheppard, Eric Avery, Katie Lesley, Joel Bray and Taree Sansbury for a week long residency. The artists explored and shared where they find themselves in their practice now, their connections and responsibilities to community, and worked to explore how they represent their work (in text, image and when speaking about it) along with what they communicate with others. They were joined by young First Nations producer Jessica Corse from Bathurst.

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

‘It was a rare opportunity to have indepth, quality conversations with other Indigenous dance artists, which is great for me because I spend most of my time working in a whitefella context... I walked away with a greater clarity in how I talk about my practice. I managed to get some more insight into culturally appropriate ways of working. Despite, or rather because of, the fact that I paused thinking about my current work-in-development, I got on the plane after the residency and sketched out the work in full.’ - Joel Bray

‘Independent Aboriginal dance is a major cornerstone of this country, something that was stressed again and again in the conversations and workshops. The way in which we were engaged with critical path was very thoughtful and attention to how we articulate our practices was great as we guided through the necessary steps to start doing this from a very professional viewpoint.’ - Eric Avery

CATAPULT DANCE EXCHANGE Critical Path and Catapult Dance collaborated in two ‘studio exchange’ residencies to facilitate the movement of artists between the two organisations and between metropolitan Sydney and regional Newcastle.

ANGELYN DIAZ, ALYSHA FEWSTER & NATASHA ROGERS Following from their residency at Catapult Dance Angeline Diaz, Alysha Fewster and Natasha Rogers spent a week at the Drill Hall connecting with local artists and opening up dialogue


39

around their current practice and new

of anatomical and neurological con-

work ‘Hysteria.’ This was a project born from a collaboration between the three

nections between gesture in the hands with wrist articulations and larger body

artists exploring the constraints and wildness of femininity, both perceived

movements. In terms of my personal practice, I became cognizant of the

and raw. As women we take the opportunity to create a work that challenges

way every other language I’ve learned is overlaid in my body. I was able to repro-

and delves into contemporary and historical perceptions of female energy, and claim it as our own.

duce some interesting choreographic ideas from this experience.’ - Charemaine Seet

CHAREMAINE SEET

DANCE NUCLEUS

Charemaine Seet spent a week-long residency at Catapult Dance in Newcastle. ‘The intent of my project was to learn and improvise/play with multiple phrases of movement vocabulary from my own dialect group’s version of Chinese opera, Teochew Opera…. One of my main aims was to investigate the relationship between unconscious language acquisition, i.e. in childhood and the development of the aesthetics of body language, gesture and movement. To examine how this affects choreographic choices as an embodied experience. In meticulous examination of stylized gestural choreography in Teochew opera, I saw hints

Angela Goh went to Dance Nucleus in Singapore to network and share her work. ‘This exchange was a really great opportunity to connect with the dance and art community in Singapore. I have visited Singapore a lot to visit family so I am familiar with the city, but I had not yet had the opportunity to connect with the artistic community in Singapore. Dance Nucleus, in particular SCOPE was a good way to meet a lot of people working with dance and also in broader fields of art. Overall I would describe the experience as refreshing and exciting.’ - Angela Goh


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TANZHAUS EXCHANGE Angela Goh & Ivey Wawn travelled to

access to the innovations, ideas and

Switzerland to participate in a two-week opportunities dance is engaging with in the international context. residency at Tanzhaus Zurich as part of the Swiss-Australian Exchange program in partnership with Dancehouse,

‘I felt really well supported and cared for

Melbourne. These partnerships provided Australian independent dance

along the way. I also felt like I had a lot of freedom with how I wanted to spend

artists with a multiplicity of opportunities including the chance to expose their work to international audiences, to

the time and this luxury is so valuable. It makes room to be creative with how you are understanding and engaging with

identify potential new markets for their work and to create cross-cultural and

artistic practice and research in a super positive way.’

transnational creative networks. It also provided the artists and audiences with

- Ivey Wawn.

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

Below: Sharing at Dance Nucleus, Singapore / Angela Goh presenting / Image by Freddy Lai


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DEVELOPMENT

MIRRAMU CREATIVE ARTS CENTRE As part of the Interchange Program and

‘We share the studio and the kitchen

in partnership with Mirramu Creative Arts Centre Su WenChi (Taiwan) and

together, I have to say it is quite a new experience, in a way, to face an

Adelina Larsson spent time in residence. This is a two-year program between

artist alone for 11 days with only nature around, we reflects our thoughts on

Mirramu and Critical Path to support the many areas of our work and life, she development of connections between re-visits things through my gaze and the local community around Lake George (Weereewa) and regional & international artists. WenChi and Adelina

feeling on this place. I reflect my curiosity and ideas on what I saw and encounter in Australia. In art, and creation,

worked alongside each other sharing the residency space, engaging with

we share a lot, on our way of doing, perspective in dance, our experience,

each other, local artists and the broader community as part of their process.

process, how art links to life itself, we talked on politics, history, science,

Below: Public Sharing at Mirramu Creative Arts Centre / Su Wen Chi presenting / Image by Barbie Robinson


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residency, teaching…so much, and how

offer a framework for dance and cho-

fate brings us here together… ’ - Su WenChi

reographic research and development, as well as creating opportunities for

‘I got to understand her context as an

access to the resources of the Central West region to independent artists. The

artist and also the incredible history of dance artists from Taiwan that have

artists, supported by artist/facilitator Rakini Devi, explored three locations –

made their mark at Mirramu. After WenChi’s first studio session she came back and said that she had seen the

Bathurst, Orange and Cowra, connecting with BMEC, Orange Civic Theatre, Cowra Arts Centre. The artists reflected

poster of Elizabeth with the ‘mother of modern dance in Taiwan’ and explained

on their practice in response to the environment, networked with communities,

the whole political situation at that time as practicing artists. This was a very

and engaged with local places, such as Tanya’s family’s farm.

interesting moment for me. To see how the history of Elizabeth’s practice is the

‘I see the most positive contribution to

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

foundation for me meeting WenChi. Truly a beautiful moment.’ - Adelina Larsson

CENTRAL WEST NSW: REGIONAL PRACTICE LAB | SUSAN BARLING, TANYA BROWN, VICKY VAN HOUT & ROSSLYN WYTHES Tanya Brown, Susan Barling, Vicky van Hout and Rosslyn Wythes were invited to participate in a week-long regional practice lab, which aims to support more regional arts development and to

my process would be in the sharing. The sharing of others practice, I see as something that will now feed into mine. I also loved the opportunity to share the farm with the others. To share this place, this land, that is so dear to me, was truly special.’ - Tanya Brown

PLAYLIST – PEER ARTISTS Critical Path partnered with PYT | Fairfield to bring together five female and non-binary identifying peer artists


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working with choreography in Sydney

can underpin an embodied approach to

to engage with the company of PYT | Fairfield’s new project, Playlist. Raynen

theatre and provide different methodologies for performance making.

O’Keefe, Ivey Wawn, Cleo Mees, Anna Kuroda and Angela Goh, along with Critical Path artist board representative Patricia Wood connected with the Playlist company artists at PYT | Fairfield and at The Drill Hall. Playlist artists all from Western Sydney are EbubeUba, Neda Taha, Tasha O’Brien, May Tran and Mara Knezevic. This connection project provided a space for new dialogue and a space to reconsider creative and support relationships across the dance community.

NORPA INFORM partnership brings NORPA (Northern Rivers Performing Arts) and Critical Path together across two years to create a development space that will explore and extend dance theatre practice in the Northern Rivers region. The partnership aims to create a space for opening up ideas and broadening skills at the intersection of dance and theatre making. In 2018 two workshop-labs considered how dance and choreography

NAT CURSIO Guest artist Nat Cursio engaged for a week long lab with a group including some of NORPA’s Associate Artists, involved in the current creative development Wildskin and others connected to or living in the Northern Rivers region. The small group explored and play together for a week and includes NORPA’s Artistic Director Julian Louis and Associate Director Kirk Page.

BELLOO CREATIVE & IDIOT SAVANT In the second workshop-lab, NORPA, Critical Path and Belloo Creative teamed up to bring Tokyo-based company Idiot Savant.

fLING PHYSICAL THEATRE Critical Path in partnership with fLING Physical Theatre hosted Vicky Malin (UK) in Bega. With Gabriela Green, a


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regional independent dance artist and

Melbourne developing material for a

Dance Development Officer at fLiNG, Vicky worked with company Artistic

new solo. He explored ideas around the experience of failure, disappointment

Directors Rob McCredie and Gabrielle Rose on inclusive practice – focusing on

and frustration felt by artists in their creative pursuits as well as the con-

partner work, technique/training and composition. Vicky and Gabriela also

nection forged between performer and audience.

co-taught a workshop for fLiNGs inclusive dance group MoveMe of teenagers to young adults.

RYUICHI FUJIMURA

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

In partnership with BalletLab, VIC, Critical Path sent Ryuichi Fujimura to spend 5 days at Temperance Hall, Melbourne developing material for a new solo. He explored ideas around the experience of failure, disappointment and frustration felt by artists in their creative pursuits as well as the connection forged between performer and audience.

KEIR CHOREOGRAPHIC AWARD PUBLIC PROGRAM In partnership with BalletLab, VIC, Critical Path sent Ryuichi Fujimura to spend 5 days at Temperance Hall,

ESZTER SALAMON (DE) Critical Path sent for 2 weeks Patricia Wood and Dianne Busuttil to Replay a choreographic lab with public outcome at Abbotsford Convent led by Eszter Salamon assisted by Boglàrka Börcsök. During the lab, Eszter questioned the power of the gaze of the dancer and audience, and at the same time the performative body and asks what defines the communication between the one who dances and the one who watches?

ISHMAEL HOUSTON-JONES (USA) Critical Path supported Brian Fuarta and Ryuichi Fujimora to attend Ishmael Houston-Jones’s workshop ‘Them, Reloaded’ in Melbourne through bursary placement and flights. Through the process of reconstructing and


45

transmitting ‘Them’ to a younger generation of dancers, Houston-Jones excavated unregistered details about the work and the context in which it was originally created, in resonance with the Australian context, while uncovering powerful resonances with the present. ‘I understand that the choreography for ‘Them’ is highly scored improvisation, like many other works Ishmael has created. Improvised performance, (as opposed to improvisation as a tool to find materials), has been one of the main concerns in my practice for over a decade…. I am currently exploring new ways to create improvisation-based performance within a clearly defined structure, and am interested in Ishmael’s method of structuring his work with improvisation scores. - Ryuichi Fujimora

Right: IDIOT SAVANT @ NORPA / Participants in Workshop-Lab / Image by Claire Hicks


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INTERCHANGE PROGRAM 2018

Interchange is a five-year initiative that

deepened her practice of using visual

description for choreography and to began in 2014/15 and which focuses Critical Path’s programming on the value experiment with how visual description of intercultural exchange opportunities. can exist in and as choreography. In 2018 Critical Path hosed International artists Louise Ahl (SCT), Emily Johnson (USA), Su WenChi (TW) and Khamlane

‘Talking with these artists who didn’t know much about my work helped me

Halsackda (SE) in Australia.

to articulate myself around my work and practice, something that I always struggle to do. It was also nice and useful to

RESEARCH RESIDENCY | LOUISE AHL Louise Ahl (Glasgow-based artist originally from Sweden) had a residency, in partnership, at Tasdance where she spent time 2.5 weeks in Hobart and Launceston to led Gabriel Comerford

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

and Joel Fenton through movement experiments to test some new and existing visual descriptions. She subsequently spent time in the Research Room and then in the Hall, working with Angela Goh (picking up a relationship initiated by a visit to Critical Path in 2013). During her time with Critical Path, Louise continued her research into alchemy and how a choreographic process can learn from alchemical methods of repetition, distillation and refinement. She

do two very different studio showings at Tasdance and Critical Path. It was quite amazing to share my approach with the local community in Launceston, which had a cool spread of age (from child to 70+).’ - Louise Ahl

RESEARCH RESIDENCY | EMILY JOHNSON Emily Johnson undertook the lead artist role for an Adhocracy Residency with Vitalstatistix in Adelaide; developing her work Kinstillatory Mappings in Light and Dark Matter with a group of seven South Australian artists along with Critical Path bursary holders Caleena Sansbury (NSW/VIC) and Sinsa Mansell (TAS).


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The artists in the Vitals residency were

‘mother-daughter/ parent-child’ rela-

so keen to be part of an 'unbecoming' - a name / process we decided for

tionship as a starting point, they explored broader connotations of this

ourselves. We shared our individual methods of working and experimented

power dynamic and consider what metaphors are at play. They shared their

with one another's processes as we set to 'unbecome' systemic ways of working

work.

in (often) colonized frameworks and institutions. We spent a great deal of time outdoors and a great deal of time

‘We now have a more informed sense of our collaboration and how to support and challenge each other’s perspec-

talking. People danced who do not dance, people offered surprising things.

tives. We were open to sharing ideas in order to direct, experiment and com-

We did an extraordinary amount of work. I wanted the process to offer an

municate with each other. We were able to reflect on studio work during the

ongoing process that each artist could if wanted - tap into. And I believe we did

process and have continued to dialogue post-residency.’

that. We also created a set of relationships and memories that grow – a kinstillatory frame.’ - Emily Johnson

- Skye Reynolds

RESEARCH RESIDENCY | SKYE REYNOLDS + KHAMLANE HALSACKDA Skye Reynolds (Australian artist now based in Scotland) and Khamlane Halsackda (Sweden) began to develop a creative methodology for their new collaboration ‘HEN.’ Inspired by the


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STUDIO PRESENTATIONS & SHARINGS

A number of sharing presentations

stage of development and to engage

ran alongside or came out of research and development projects, includ-

with audience in a facilitated discussion. Local performer, choreographer and

ing Katina Olsen and Lizzie Thomson’s Acknowledging Country, Rajni Shah

filmmaker, Emma Harrison and dancer/ choreographer Brianna Kell shared new

experimental choreography residency, Rosalind Crisp’s DIRt, Vangelis Legakis’

solo works currently in development. First Run is facilitated by Brooke Stamp

UNITY SPACE AiR, Anandavalli and Vicki Van Hout’s Serpent/s and Lauren Brincat and Frances Barbe’s HEN. Some

and Rhiannon Newton. First Run was initiated through Lucy Guerin Inc. in 2008 and in Sydney First Run has been sup-

presentations took place in other locations, including Angela Goh & Ivey

ported by Critical Path and ReadyMade Works Studio since 2017.

Wawn at Tanzhaus in Switzerland, Angela Goh at Dance Nucleus in Singapore, Louise Ahl at Tasdance in Tasmania, Rhiannon Newtown at

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

Dancehouse in Melbourne and Playlist at PYT | Fairfield. Critical Path also hosted a number of public studio presentations including development projects First Run (led by Brooke Stamp & Rhiannon Newton) and On the Cusp

ON THE CUSP Curated by Karen Kerkhoven, On the Cusp offers independent dancers a space to perform. For Karen, it is creating an environment that is free of political restraints and giving back this freedom with its responsibility to the

creators in order to move the art form (curated by Karen Kerkhoven) and interand work forward….. and in doing so national artists Emily Johnson (USA) and opening exchange to new audiences Bruno Isakovic (HR) through the performance itself as the dialogue. The presentation at Critical Path had almost 40 participants.

FIRST RUN

First Run is a supportive platform for artists to share ideas and work at any


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ON THE CUSP Curated by Karen Kerkhoven, On the

under the pressure of a 'showing.' It was

Cusp offers independent dancers a space to perform. For Karen, it is cre-

something we had to consider deeply -as process is often usurped by the pres-

ating an environment that is free of political restraints and giving back this

ence of audience. I am proud of where we kept the focus and how we shared

freedom with its responsibility to the creators in order to move the art form

that with audience participants.’ - Emily Johnson

and work forward….. and in doing so opening exchange to new audiences through the performance itself as the di-

BRUNO ISAKOVIC

alogue. The presentation at Critical Path Bruno Isakovic’s studio presentation of had almost 40 participants. Denuded is a solo work about the body, movement and stillness, breathing and, most importantly, about a constant contact with the audience. The conThis year’s Adhocracy residency project frontation of the naked body and the sharing, Kinstillatory Mappings in gaze is the work’s driving force. Bruno Light and Dark Matter, was a new proexamines the physicality of this subject, cess-based work by Emily Johnson. The separate from the source of its meaning, work offered a framework for being in in a solo transformation ritual. Here the decolonial practices of embodiment, visible becomes a site for investigating

EMILY JOHNSON AND COLLABORATORS

site-responsive choreographic practices and their connection to land, and the radical relationships that are created through dance making and other forms of artistic activation. ‘It was a process based residency and we - as a group - were able to maintain the 'process' part of this even

the invisible and the potential relationships among those who are different. Denuded denotes anything not fitting our framework of rationality, and it opens up spaces to be filled with irrationality we all carry within us.


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Above: Prop Display in Louise Ahl’s Sharing at The Drill Hall / Unknown Hands / Image by Matt Cornell

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

Below: Adhocracy Residency / Emily Johnson with Collaborators at Hart's Mill / Image by Chelsea Farquar


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CRITIQUE & DISCOURSE

Two editions of Critical Dialogues,

that consider the politics of the absent

9 and 10, were released in 2018, and focused the relationship of ‘Visual’ Art

body, the body’s status in the context of live performance and the dynamics

and Dance and the absence of the body in choreography respectively. These

of group behaviour, particularly under contemporary tensions. To attend to the

publications provided a rich array of perspectives from local, national and in-

invisible systems as central players of the performance.

ternational dance communities. Multiple talks and forums also took place. Among ‘Guest editing the Critical Dialogues 'No these were three ‘Talking Dance’ talks, Body' was a great experience for me in created through Critical Path’s partnership with Sydney Festival and Keir

particular to curate a group of choreographers that have a broad range of prac-

Choreographic Awards Public Program.

tices that contribute interesting ideas to the conversations around the post body

CRITICAL DIALOGUES 9 + 10

practice.’ - Adelina Larsson

In Critical Dialogues 9 ‘The Nexus of Dance and Visual Art’, guest editor Lizzie Thomson engaged in experimentation across and between dance and visual art, with a focus on how these

At Carriageworks a series of three conversations between Sydney Festival

activities are providing space for questioning, and possibly expanding, artists’ practices. The result was resistance to the disciplinary categories of dance and visual art and resistance to the contributors’ practices being defined by these disciplines. Critical Dialogues 10 ‘No Body’, guest edited by Adelina Larsson, draws attention to practices

artists explored ideas about their performance works and broader practice. These ‘Talking Dance’ events were: State of Play, Personal Experience and Memoir & Autobiography. Participating were Narelle Benjamin, Danielle Micich (Force Majeure), Jo Lancaster & Simon Yates (Acrobat), Julie-Anne Long (Facilitator); Aoi

SYDNEY FESTIVAL: DANCING NOW


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Nakamura & Esteban Fourmi (AΦE),

disciplinary collaboration and arts de-

and Harriet Gillies & Roslyn Helper (Zin Partnership), Nat Randall (Facilitator);

velopment in relation to space and place. Critical Path also hosted Anna Cy

Jimi Bani (Queensland Theatre), Dan Daw, Ghenoa Gela, Laura Osweiler

Chan and invited senior female dance and choreography artists for an after-

(Facilitator).

noon of tea and discussion.

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

KEIR CHOREOGRAPHIC AWARDS PUBLIC PROGRAM In partnership with KEIR’s Public Program, Critical Path hosted talks with Lucy Guerin and Anna Cy Chan. ‘In Conversation with Lucy Guerin,’ Lucy spoke talked about her choreographic work, what has shaped it, how her interests have evolved over time and around how she negotiates the frame through which other people view her work. Does it matter how people from other places, histories, cultures and experiences outside our own context read the work we create? This opened into a broader discussion with the audience about making work in Australia. In a pre-show panel, Critical Path’s Director Claire Hicks spoke with Anna Cy Chan (Hong Kong) about international performance practice, cross


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ASSOCIATE ARTIST

ADELINA LARSSON As one our initiatives to build leadership capacity within the dance sector, Critical Path invites an independent choreographer, with experience of supporting other artists and initiating sector development projects, to be Associate Artist for up to two years. Adelina Larsson, continued her second year as Associate Artist. She is the founder and director of ‘Strange Attractor’, a choreographic development platform that offers infrastructure for independent artists to experiment and undertake artistic research. In 2018, following a break for ‘parental leave’, Adelina undertook her own research in a parallel residency with Su WenChi at Mirramu Creative Arts Centre. She also developed her research project Carmen et Error with Andrew Morrish and Nate Gilkes which included a development workshop. Adelina was also guest editor for an edition of Critical Dialogues.

Left: Andrew Morrish in Carmen et Error at The Drill Hall | Residency | Research & Development Programme | Image by Adelina Larsson


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Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

Cathy and Eric research at The Drill Hall / Scattered Objects / Image by Cathy Livemore


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FINANCIAL REPORT CONTENTS 56

Committee Members’ Report

57

Auditor’s Independence Declaration

58

Statement of Surplus or Deficit or Other Comprehensive Income

59

Statement of Financial Position

60

Statement of Changes in Equity

61

Statement of Cash Flows

62

Notes to the Financial Statements

62

1. General information and statement of compliance

62

2. Changes in accounting policies

62

3. Summary of accounting policies

70

4. Revenue

72

5. Cash and cash equivalents

73

6. Trade and other receivables

73

7. Other assets

74

8. Property, plant and equipment

75

9. Intangible Assets

76

10. Trade and other payables

76

11. Employee remuneration

77

12. Grant liabilities

77

13. Other liabilities

78

14. Leases

78

15. Related party transactions

79

16. Contingent liabilities and Assets

79

17. Subsequent Events

79

18. Member’s guarantee – Contribution in winding up

79

19. Charitable fundraising

79

20. Company details

80

Committee Members’ Declaration

81

Declaration by Committee Member as required by the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 (NSW)

82

Auditor’s Independence Declaration

83

Independent Auditor’s Report

87

Additional Financial Information Disclaimer

88

Detailed Statements of Surplus or Deficit


56

Committee Members’ Report Contributions in winding up The Association is incorporated under the Associations Incorporation Act 2009. If the Association is wound up, the constitution states that each member is required to contribute a maximum of $10 towards meeting and outstanding obligations of the Company at 31 December 2018, the total amount that members of the Association are liable to contribute if the company is wound up is $80 (2017: $80). Auditor’s Independence declaration A copy of the Auditor’s Independence Declaration as required under s.60—40 of the Australian Charities and Not–for–profits Commission act 2012 is included in page 51 of this financial report and forms part of the Committee member’s report.

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

Signed in accordance with the resolution of the Committee Members.


57

Auditor Independence Declaration AUDITOR’S INDEPENDENCE DECLARATION UNDER SECTION 307C OF THE CORPORATIONS ACT 2001 TO THE COMMITTEE OF CRITICAL PATH INCORPORATED

To the Committee Members of Critical Path Incorporated: As lead auditor for the audit of Critical Path Incorporated (A.B.N. 12 049 903 261) for the year ended 31 December 2018, I declare that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, there have been: (a) no contraventions of the auditor independence requirements of the Corporations Act 2001 in relation to the audit; and (b) no contraventions of any applicable code of professional conduct in relation to the audit. This declaration is in respect of Critical Path Incorporated and any entities it controlled during the period. MITCHELL & PARTNERS

Chartered Accountants

Sydney, NSW Dated this 26th day of March, 2019.


58

Statement of Surplus or Deficit and Other Comprehensive Income N OT E

2018 $

201 7 $

Revenue from ordinary activities

4

451,120

767,135

Other income

4

31,527

22,089

(96,618)

(111,690)

Administration and marketing expenses Amortisation expenses

9

(1,161)

(7,299)

Depreciation expenses

8

(9,509)

(10,907)

Employee benefits expense

11

(172,620)

(156,032)

(188,869)

(490,661)

13,870

12,635

-

-

13,870

12,635

-

-

13,870

12,635

Project expenses Surplus/Deficit before income tax Income tax expense Surplus/Deficit for the year Other comprehensive income for the year, net of income tax Total comprehensive surplus/deficit for the year

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

This statement should be read in conjunction with the notes to the financial statements.


59

Statement of Financial Position N OT E

ASSETS

2018 $

201 7 $

Current Cash and cash equivalents

5

748,051

347,100

Trade and other receivables

6

17,490

9,275

Other current assets

7

6,887

3,310

772,428

359,685

Current assets Non-current Property, plant and equipment

8

963

10,473

Intangible assets

9

-

1,161

963

11,634

773,391

371,319

Non-current assets Total assets LIABILITIES

Current Trade and other payables

10

77,199

88,597

Provisions

11

9,797

10,504

Grant liabilities

12

493,460

76,352

Income in advance

13

1,618

18,419

Current liabilities

582,074

193,872

Total liabilities

582,074

193,872

191,317

177,447

General funds - unrestricted

191,317

177,447

Total equity

191,317

177,447

Net assets Equity

This statement should be read in conjunction with the notes to the financial statements.


60

Statement of Changes in Equity Un re s tri c te d fu n d s $

Tot a l e q u i t y $

164,812

164,812

12,635

12,635

-

-

12,635

12,635

Balance at 31 December 2017

177,447

177,447

Balance at 1 January 2018

177,447

177,447

13,870

13,870

-

-

Total comprehensive loss / gain for the year

13,870

13,870

Balance at 31 December 2018

191,317

191,317

Balance at 1 January 2017 Surplus for the year Other comprehensive income Total comprehensive surplus for the year

Surplus / Deficit for the year Other comprehensive income

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

This statement should be read in conjunction with the notes to the financial statements.


61

Statement of Cash Flows N OT E

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

2018 $

201 7 $

Receipts from: - Client contributions

55,799

270,906

- Government grants

816,420

426,226

2,520

2,846

Payments to employees

(173,052)

(160,482)

Payments to suppliers

(300,736)

(555,518)

400,051

(16,022)

Purchases of plant and equipment

-

-

Purchases of intangible assets

-

- Interest income

Net cash provided by operating activities INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Net cash used in investing activities

(16,022)

Net change in cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of year Cash and cash equivalents, end of year

5

347,100

363,122

748,051

347,100

This statement should be read in conjunction with the notes to the financial statements.


62

Notes to the Financial Statements For the year ended 31 December 2018 Critical Path Incorporated

1. General information and statement of compliance The financial report includes the financial statements and notes of Critical Path Incorporated. These financial statements are general purpose financial statements that have been prepared in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards ­Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012. Critical Path Incorporated is a not-for-profit entity for the purposes of preparing the financial statements. The financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2018 were approved and authorised for issuance by the Committee members.

2. Changes in accounting policies 2.1 There are no new and revised standards that are effective for these financial statements 3. Summary of accounting policies

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

3.1 Overall considerations The significant accounting policies that have been used in the preparation of these financial statements are summarised below. The financial statements have been prepared using the measurement bases specified by Australian Accounting Standards for each type of asset, liability, income and expense. The measurement bases are more fully described in the accounting policies below.


63 3.2 Revenue Revenue comprises revenue from the sale of goods, services income, government grants, fundraising activities and client contributions. Revenue from major activities and services is shown in Note 4. Revenue is measured by reference to the fair value of consideration received or receivable by the Association for goods supplied and services provided, excluding sales taxes, rebates, and trade discounts. Revenue is recognised when the amount of revenue can be measured reliably, collection is probable, the costs incurred or to be incurred can be measured reliably, and when the criteria for each of the Association’s different activities have been met. Details of the activity-specific recognition criteria are described below.

Government grants A number of the Association’s programs are supported by grants received from Federal, State and Local governments. If conditions are attached to a grant which must be satisfied before the Association is eligible to receive the contribution, recognition of the grant as revenue is deferred until those conditions are satisfied. Where a grant is received on the condition that specified services are delivered, to the grantor, this is considered a reciprocal transaction. Revenue is recognised as services are performed and at year–end until the service is delivered. Revenue from a non-reciprocal grant that is not subject to conditions is recognised when the Association obtains control of the funds, economic benefits are probable and the amount can be measured reliably. Where a grant may be required to be repaid if certain conditions are not satisfied, a liability is recognised at year end to the extent that conditions remain unsatisfied. Where the Association receives a non-reciprocal contribution of an asset from a government or other party for no or nominal consideration, the asset is recognised at fair value and a corresponding amount of revenue is recognised.

Donations and bequests Donations collected, including cash and goods for resale, are recognised as revenue when the Association gains control, economic benefits are probable and the amount of the donation can be measured reliably.


64

Bequests are recognised when the legacy is received. Revenue from legacies comprising bequests of shares or other property are recognised at fair value, being the market value of the shares or property at the date the Association becomes legally entitled to the shares or property.

Interest income Interest income is recognised on an accrual basis using the effective interest method. 3.3 Operating expenses Operating expenses are recognised in surplus or deficit upon utilisation of the service or at the date of their origin. 3.4 Intangible assets Recognition of other intangible assets: Acquired intangible assets Website construction costs as well as acquired computer software licences are capitalised on the basis of the costs incurred to acquire and install the specific website and software.

Subsequent measurement All intangible assets are accounted for using the cost model whereby capitalised costs are amortised on a straight-line basis over their estimated useful lives, as these assets are considered finite. Residual values and useful lives are reviewed at each reporting date. In addition, they are subject to impairment testing as described in Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

Note 3.14. The following useful lives are applied:

- Database development: 25% - Software: 25% - 33% - Website: 33%


65

Above: Tasdance residency / Featuring Louise Ahl / Image by Gabriel Comerford

Subsequent expenditures on the maintenance of computer software, brand names and website are expensed as incurred. When an intangible asset is disposed of, the gain or loss on disposal is determined as the difference between the proceeds and the carrying amount of the asset, and is recognised in surplus or deficit within other income or other expenses.

3.5 Property, plant and equipment Leasehold improvements, plant and other equipment Leasehold improvements, plant and other equipment (comprising office furniture and equipment) are initially recognised at acquisition cost or manufacturing cost, including any costs directly attributable to bringing the assets to the location and condition necessary for it to be capable of operating in the manner intended by the Association’ management. Leasehold improvements, plant and other equipment are subsequently measured using the cost model, cost less subsequent depreciation and impairment losses.


66 Depreciation is recognised on a straight-line basis to write down the cost less estimated residual value of leasehold improvements, plant and other equipment. The following useful lives are applied: - Leasehold improvement: 20% - 25% - Plant and equipment: 15% - 33% In the case of leasehold property, expected useful lives are determined by reference to comparable owned assets or over the term of the lease, if shorter. Material residual value estimates and estimates of useful life are updated as required, but at least annually. Gains or losses arising on the disposal of property, plant and equipment are determined as the difference between the disposal proceeds and the carrying amount of the assets and are recognised in surplus or deficit within other income or other expenses.

3.6 Leases Operating leases Where the Association is a lessee, payments on operating lease agreements are recognised as an expense on a straight-line basis over the lease term. Associated costs, such as maintenance and insurance, are expensed as incurred.

3.7 Income taxes No provision for income tax has been raised as the association is exempt from income tax under Div 50 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997.

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

3.8 Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash on hand and demand deposits, together with other short-term, highly liquid investments that are readily convertible into known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value. 3.9 Employee benefits


67 Short-term employee benefits Short-term employee benefits are benefits, other than termination benefits, that are expected to be settled wholly within twelve (12) months after the end of the period in which the employees render the related service. Examples of such benefits include wages and salaries, non-monetary benefits and accumulating sick leave. Short-term employee benefits are measured at the undiscounted amounts expected to be paid when the liabilities are settled. Other long-term employee benefits The association’s liabilities for long service leave are included in other long-term benefits as they are not expected to be settled wholly within twelve (12) months after the end of the period in which the employees render the related service. They are measured at the present value of the expected future payments to be made to employees. The expected future payments incorporate anticipated future wage and salary levels, experience of employee departures and periods of service, and are discounted at rates determined by reference to market yields at the end of the reporting period on high quality corporate bonds that have maturity dates that approximate the timing of the estimated future cash outflows. Any re-measurements arising from experience adjustments and changes in assumptions are recognised in profit or loss in the periods in which the changes occur. The association presents employee benefit obligations as current liabilities in the statement of financial position if the association does not have an unconditional right to defer settlement for at least twelve (12) months after the reporting period, irrespective of when the actual settlement is expected to take place.

Post-employment benefits plans The association provides post-employment benefits through defined contribution plans. Defined contribution plans The association pays fixed contributions into independent entities in relation to several state plans and insurance for individual employees. The association has no legal or constructive obligations to pay contributions in addition to its fixed contributions, which are recognised as an expense in the period that relevant employee services are received.


68 3.10 Provisions, contingent liabilities and contingent assets Provisions are measured at the estimated expenditure required to settle the present obligation, based on the most reliable evidence available at the reporting date, including the risks and uncertainties associated with the present obligation. Where there are a number of similar obligations, the likelihood that an outflow will be required in settlement is determined by considering the class of obligations as a whole. Provisions are discounted to their present values, where the time value of money is material. Any reimbursement that the association can be virtually certain to collect from a third party with respect to the obligation is recognised as a separate asset. However, this asset may not exceed the amount of the related provision. No liability is recognised if an outflow of economic resources as a result of present obligation is not probable. Such situations are disclosed as contingent liabilities, unless the outflow of resources is remote in which case no liability is recognised.

3.11 Deferred income The liability for deferred income is the unutilised amounts of grants received on the condition that specified services are delivered or conditions are fulfilled. The services are usually provided or the conditions usually fulfilled within twelve (12) months of receipt of the grant. Where the amount received is in respect of services to be provided over a period that exceeds twelve (12) months after the reporting date or the conditions will only be satisfied more than twelve (12) months after the reporting date, the liability is discounted and presented as non-current. 3.12 Goods and Services Tax (GST) Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of GST, except

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office. In these circumstances the GST is recognised as part of the cost of acquisition of the asset or as part of an item of the expense. Receivables and payables in the statement of financial position are shown inclusive of GST. Cash flows are presented in the statement of cash flows on a gross basis, except for the GST components of investing and financing activities, which are disclosed as operating cash flows.


69 3.13 Economic dependence The association is dependent upon the ongoing receipt of Federal and State Government grants and community and corporate donations to ensure the ongoing continuance of its programs and fundraising. At the date of this report Management has no reason to believe that this financial support will not continue. 3.14 Significant management judgement in applying accounting policies When preparing the financial statements, management undertakes a number of judgements, estimates and assumptions about the recognition and measurement of assets, liabilities, income and expenses.

Estimation uncertainty Information about estimates and assumptions that have the most significant effect on recognition and measurement of assets, liabilities, income and expenses is provided below. Actual results may be substantially different. Impairment In assessing impairment, management estimates the recoverable amount of each asset or cash-generating unit based on expected future cash flows and uses an interest rate to discount them. Estimation uncertainty relates to assumptions about future operating results and the determination of a suitable discount rate. Useful lives of depreciable assets Management reviews its estimate of the useful lives of depreciable assets at each reporting date, based on the expected utility of the assets. Uncertainties in these estimates relate to technical obsolescence that may change the utility of certain assets. Long service leave The liability for long service leave is recognised and measured at the present value of the estimated cash flows to be made in respect of all employees at the reporting date. In determining the present value of the liability, estimates of attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation have been taken into account.


70 4. Revenue The Association’s revenue may be analysed as follows for each major product and service category: N OT E

REVENUE

2018 $

Donations Net grant income Projects income

201 7 $

10,489

6,909

399,312

524,842

38,799

232,538

2,520

2,846

451,120

767,135

25,630

21,009

5,897

1,080

31,527

22,089

482,647

789,224

2018 $

201 7 $

76,352

174,968

816,420

426,226

892,772

601,194

(493,460)

(59,383)

Investment income: - Interest

OTHER INCOME Rent received Sundry income

Total revenue and other income

4.1 Net grant income N OT E

Grants in advance – 1 January Grants received during the year

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

Less: Grants in advance – 31 December Unexpended grants – 31 December

Net grant income

(16,969) 399,312

(76,352)

399,312

524,842


71 4.2 Grants received in advance – 1 January N OT E

2018 $

201 7 $

Arts NSW – Project funding

4,143

7,428

Regional Arts NSW

2,207

19,999

53,033

147,541

Australia Council – Core funding / Project Funding Woollahra Council Community Grant

6,988

City of Sydney Cultural Grant

9,981 76,352

174,968

2018 $

201 7 $

225,025

202,552

59,118

77,448

- Core funding

22,230

800

- Project funding

62,845

97,377

Regional Arts NSW

22,206

-

Woollahra Council

6,988

6,988

900

-

City of Sydney Cultural Grant 2017/18

-

9,981

Austrade

-

15,080

Accessible Arts Grant

-

16,000

399,312

426,226

4.3 Grants received during the year N OT E

Create NSW - Core funding - Project funding Australia Council

Tasdance


72 4.4 Grants received in advance – 31 December N OT E

2018 $

201 7 $

280,000

-

Australia Council Interchange Project

25,912

-

Australia Council 2018 OPIT Grant

52,068

-

Australia Council Dance Board 2019

99,999

-

Australia Council Travel Grant

3,000

-

Woollahra Council Community Grant

7,500

6,988

City of Sydney Cultural Grant 2017/18

9,981

9,981

15,000

-

493,460

16,969

2018 $

201 7 $

Create NSW 2019 Grant

City of Sydney 2019 Grant 2019

4.5 Unexpended grants – 31 December N OT E

Arts NSW – Project funding

4,143

Australia Council – project funding

53,033

Regional Arts NSW

2,207

Woollahra Council Community Grant 2017/18

-

City of Sydney Cultural Grant 2017/18

59,383

5. Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents consist the following:

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

N OT E

2018 $

201 7 $

1,052

4,148

Short term deposits

746,999

342,952

Cash and cash equivalents

748,051

347,100

Cash at bank


73 Cash at the end of the financial year as shown in the statement of cash flows is reconciled in the statement of financial position as follows: N OT E

Cash and cash equivalents

2018 $

201 7 $

748,051

347,100

2018 $

201 7 $

6. Trade and other receivables Trade and other receivables consist the following:

CURRENT

Deposit paid

-

-

Net GST recoverable

-

-

17,490

9,275

17,490

9,275

2018 $

201 7 $

Trade receivables

7. Other assets Other assets consist the following:

CURRENT

General prepayments

3,313

-

Prepaid insurance

3,574

3,310

-

-

6,887

3,310

Prepaid worker’s compensation


74 8. Property, plant and equipment Details of the company’s plant and equipment and their carrying amount are as follows: Le a se h old i mp rove me n t s $ GROSS CARRYING AMOUNT

TOTA L 2018

Balance 1 January 2018

73,271

34,504

107,775

Balance 31 December 2018

73,271

34,504

107,775

DEPRECIATION AND IMPAIRMENT

Balance 1 January 2018

(63,725)

(33,577)

(97,302)

Amortisation/depreciation

(8,912)

(597)

(9,509)

Balance 31 December 2018

(72,637)

(34,174)

(106,811)

634

329

963

Le a se h old i mp rove me n t s $

Pla n t a n d e q u i p me n t $

TOTA L 201 7

Carrying amount 31 December 2018

GROSS CARRYING AMOUNT

Balance 1 January 2017 Additions Balance 31 December 2017 DEPRECIATION AND IMPAIRMENT Balance 1 January 2017

73,271

34,504

107,775

-

-

-

73,271

34,504

107,775

(54,870)

(31,525)

(86,395)

Amortisation/depreciation

(8,855)

(2,052)

(10,907)

Balance 31 December 2017

(63,725)

(33,577)

(97,302)

9,546

927

10,473

Carrying amount 31 December 2017

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

Pla n t a n d e q u i p me n t $


75 9. Intangible assets Details of the company’s intangible assets and their carrying amounts are as follows:

Da t a b a se d eve lop me n t $ GROSS CARRYING AMOUNT

Balance 1 January 2018

Balance 1 January 2018

$

$

4,811

26,916

38,727

7,000

4,811

26,916

38,727

(7,000)

(4,811)

Amortisation/depreciation Balance 31 December 2018

TOTA L 2018

-

Balance 31 December 2018 DEPRECIATION AND IMPAIRMENT

We b s i te

7,000

Addition

Sof t wa re

(7,000)

(4,811)

(25,755)

(37,566)

(1,161)

(1,161)

(26,916)

(38,727)

Carrying amount 31 December 2017

Da t a b a se d eve lop me n t $

GROSS CARRYING AMOUNT

Sof t wa re

We b s i te

$

$

TOTA L 201 7

Balance 1 January 2017

7,000

4,811

26,916

38,727

Balance 31 December 2017

7,000

4,811

26,916

38,727

DEPRECIATION AND IMPAIRMENT Balance 1 January 2017

(7,000)

(4,811)

(18,456)

(30,267)

Amortisation/depreciation

-

-

(7,299)

(7,299)

Balance 31 December 2017

(7,000)

(4,811)

(25,755)

(37,566)

1,161

1,161

Carrying amount 31 December 2017


76 10. Trade and other payables Trade and other payables recognised consist of the following:

N OT E

CURRENT:

2018 $

201 7 $

Accrued expenses

25,481

64,187

Net GST payable

25,120

(5,053)

PAYG withholding

7,848

7,724

165

1,000

5,649

2,787

12,936

17,952

77,199

88,597

Refundable deposits Superannuation payable Trade payables

11. Employee remuneration 11.1 Employee benefits expense Expenses recognised for employee benefits are analysed below:

N OT E

Annual leave provided Salaries and wages Superannuation contributions Workers compensation insurance

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

Employee benefits expense

2018 $

201 7 $

(707)

(4,450)

155,856

143,553

13,755

13,625

3,716

3,304

172,620

156,032


77 11.2 Employee provisions The liabilities recognised for employee benefits consist of the following amounts:

N OT E

CURRENT:

2018 $

Annual leave

201 7 $

9,797

10,504

9,797

10,504

2018 $

201 7 $

493,460

76,352

493,460

76,352

2018 $

201 7 $

1,618

18,419

1,618

18,419

12. Grants liabilities Grants liabilities can be summarised as follows:

N OT E

Grants in advance

13. Other liabilities Other liabilities can be summarised as follows:

N OT E

Income received in advance


78 14. Leases Operating leases as lessee The Group’s future minimum operating lease payments are as follows:

MINIMUM LEASE PAYMENTS DUE Wi t h i n 1 ye a r $ 31 December 2017

31 December 2018

1 to 5 ye a rs $

31,440

Af te r 5 ye a rs $

TOTA L $

-

-

31,440

-

-

-

15. Related party transactions The association’s related parties include its key management personnel and related entities as described below. Unless otherwise stated, none of the transactions incorporate special terms and conditions and no guarantees were given or received. Outstanding balances are usually settled in cash.

Transactions with related entities No remuneration is paid to Committee member or their related parties for acting as Committee members. From time to time Committee members who are also independent artists may be engaged in our Research and Development program and are renumerated under normal industry terms.

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

Transactions with key management personnel Key management of the Association are the Executive Members of Critical Path Incorporated’s Committee and members of the Executive Council. Key management personnel remuneration includes the following expenses: Total key management personnel remuneration 2018: $78,882 2017: $78,280


79 16. Contingent Liabilities and Assets No contingent liabilities and assets to report. 17. Subsequent Events No significant events have occurred since the end of the reporting period which would impact on the financial position of the Company disclosed in the statement of financial position as at 31 December 2018, or on the results and cash flow of the Company for the year ended on that date. 18. Members’ Guarantee - Contribution in winding up The Association is incorporated under the Associations Incorporation Act 2009. If the Association is wound up, the constitution states that each member is required to contribute a maximum of $10 each towards meeting any outstanding obligations of the Association. At 31 December 2018, the total amount that members of the Association are liable to contribute if the Association wound up is $110 (2017: $110). 19. Charitable fundraising The association holds an authority to fundraise under the Charitable Fundraising Act, 1991 (NSW) and conducts fundraising appeals throughout the year. Additional information and declarations required to be furnished under the Act are as follows: All funds raised from fundraising activities, net of direct costs, were applied to the association's normal operations. The association did not conduct any appeals in which traders were engaged. 20. Company details Critical Path Incorporated is a company limited by guarantee, incorporated and domiciled in Australia. The registered office and principal place of business is: The Drill, 1c New Beach Road, Darling Point NSW 2027


80

Committee Members’ Declaration Critical Path Incorporated In the opinion of the Directors of Critical Path Incorporated (‘the association’) (a) Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, including; (i) giving a true and fair view of the Association’s financial position as at 31 December 2018 and of it’s performance, for the year ended on that date, and (ii) complying with Australian Accounting Standards (including the Australian Accounting Interpretations) and the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Regulations 2013; and (a) there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Critical Path Incorporated will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable. ( Refer Note 3.13)

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

Signed in accordance with a resolution of the Directors:

SHANE CARROLL

Committee Member Sydney, NSW 6 May, 2019.


81

Declaration by Chair, Finance & Risk Committee in respect of fundraising appeals pursuant to the Charitable Fundraising (NSW) ACT 1991 Critical Path Incorporated I, Annabel Millet, Treasurer of Critical Path Incorporated, declare in my opinion: (a) the Annual financial report gives a true and fair view of all income and expenditure of Critical Path with respect to fundraising appeal activities for the financial year ended 31 December 2018; (b) the statement of financial position gives a true and fair view of the state of affairs with respect to fundraising appeal activities as at 31 December 2018; (c) the provisions of the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 and Regulations and the conditions attached to the authority have been complied with for the financial year ended 31 December 2018; and (d) the internal controls exercised by Critical Path are appropriate and effective in accounting for all income received and applied from any fundraising appeals.

ANNABEL MILLET

Treasurer Sydney, NSW 6 May, 2019.


82

Auditor's Independence Declaration AUDITOR’S INDEPENDENCE DECLARATION UNDER SECTION 307C OF THE CORPORATIONS ACT 2001 TO THE COMMITTEE OF CRITICAL PATH INCORPORATED

As lead auditor for the audit of Critical Path Incorporated (A.B.N. 12 049 903 261) for the year ended 31 December 2018, I declare that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, there have been: (a) no contraventions of the auditor independence requirements of the Corporations Act 2001 in relation to the audit; and (b) no contraventions of any applicable code of professional conduct in relation to the audit. This declaration is in respect of Critical Path Incorporated and any entities it controlled during the period. MITCHELL & PARTNERS

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

Chartered Accountants

Glenn Merchant CA

Partner Sydney, NSW 26 March, 2019.


83

Independent Auditor’s Report INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT TO THE MEMBERS OF CRITICAL PATH INCORPORATED A.B.N. 12 049 903 261 (an incorporated association)

Report on the Financial Statements Opinion

We have audited the financial report of Critical Path Incorporated (the association), which comprises the statement of financial position as at 31 December 2018, the statement of comprehensive income, statement of changes in equity, statement of cash flows for the year ended on that date, a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory notes and the committees’ declaration. In our opinion, the accompanying financial report of Critical Path Incorporated is in accordance with Division 60 of the Australian Charities and Not for Profits Commission Act 2012 and the Corporations Act 2001, including: • giving a true and fair view of the association’s financial position as at 31 December 2018, and of its performance for the year then ended ; and • complying with Australian Accounting Standards, Division 60 of the Australian Charities and Not for Profits Commission Regulation 2013, and the Corporations Act 2001.

Basis of Opinion We conducted our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Our responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Report section of our report. We are independent of the association in accordance with the auditor independence requirements of the Corporations Act 2001 and the ethical requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board APES 110: Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (the Code) that are relevant to our audit of the financial report in Australia. We have also fulfilled our other ethical responsibilities in accordance with the Code.


84 We confirm that the independence declaration required by the Corporations Act 2001, which has been given to the committee of Critical Path Incorporated, would be in the same terms if given to the committee as at the time of this auditor’s report. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion.

Key Audit Matters Information Other than the Financial Report and Auditor’s Report Thereon The committee members are responsible for the other information. The other information comprises the information included in the association’s annual report for the year ended 31 December 2018, but does not include the financial report and our auditor’s report thereon.

Our opinion on the financial report does not cover the other information and accordingly we do not express any form of assurance conclusion thereon. In connection with our audit of the financial report, our responsibility is to read the other information and, in doing so, consider whether the other information is materially inconsistent with the financial report or our knowledge obtained in the audit or otherwise appears to be materially misstated. If, based on the work we have performed, we conclude that there is a material misstatement of this other information, we are required to report that fact. We have nothing to report in this regard.

The Responsibility of the Committee for the Financial Statements

The committee members of the association are responsible for the preparation the financial report that gives a true and fair view in accordance with Australian Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

Accounting Standards, the ACNC Act, and the Corporations Act 2001 and for such internal control as the committee members determine is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view and is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. In preparing the financial report, the committee members are responsible for assessing the association’s ability to continue as a going concern, disclosing, as applicable, matters relating to going concern and using the going concern basis of


85 accounting unless the committee members either intend to liquidate the association or to cease operations, or have no realistic alternatives but to do so.

Auditor’s Responsibility for the Audit of the Financial Report

Our objectives are to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial report as a whole is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes our opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian Accounting Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of this financial report.

As part of an audit in accordance with the Australian Auditing Standards, we exercise professional judgement and maintain professional scepticism throughout the audit. We also: • Identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial report, whether due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal controls.


86 •Obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purposes of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the association’s internal control. • Evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates and related disclosures made by the committee. • Conclude on the appropriateness of the committee’ use of the going concern basis of accounting and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the registered entity’s ability to continue as a going concern. If we conclude that a material uncertainty exists, we are required to draw attention in our auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the financial report or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify our opinion. Our conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of our auditor’s report. However, future events or conditions may cause the registered entity to cease to continue as a going concern. We communicate with the responsible entities regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that we identify during our audit. We also provide the committee with a statement that we have complied with relevant ethical requirements requiring independence, and to communicate with them all relationships and other matters that may reasonably be thought to bear on our inde-

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

pendence, and where applicable, related safeguards.

Glenn Merchant CA

Partner Sydney, NSW 23 May, 2019.


87

Additional Financial Information Disclaimer CRITICAL PATH INCORPORATED A.B.N. 12 049 903 261 (an incorporated association)

The additional financial data presented in the following pages is in accordance with the books and records of Critical Path Incorporated (“our client�) which have been subjected to the auditing procedures applied in our statutory audit of the association for the year ended 31 December 2018. It will be appreciated that our statutory audit did not cover all details of the additional financial data. Accordingly, we do not express an opinion on such financial data and no warranty to accuracy or reliability is given. Neither the firm nor any member or employee of the firm undertakes responsibility in any way whatsoever to any person (other than our client) in respect of such data, including any errors or omissions therein however caused. MITCHELL & PARTNERS

Chartered Accountants

Glenn Merchant CA

Partner Sydney, NSW 23 May, 2019.


88

Detailed Statements of Surplus or Deficit Critical Path Incorporated For the year ended 31 December 2018 SCHEDULE 1 – General Operations

N OT E SCH INCOME Donations Net grant income Projects income

2018 $

201 7 $

10,489

6,909

399,312

524,842

38,799

232,538

2,520

2,846

25,630

21,009

5,897

1,080

482,647

789,224

(468,777)

(776,589)

13,870

12,635

Investment income: - Interest Rent received Sundry income TOTAL INCOME LESS: EXPENDITURE NET SURPLUS/DEFICIT

Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

The above UNAUDITED detailed statement of surplus or deficit should be read in conjunction with the disclaimer.


89 SCHEDULE 2 – General Operations

N OT E SCH EXPENSES Advertising and promotion

2018 $

201 7 $

10,503

14,712

(707)

-4,450

8,044

3,965

148

192

1,403

1,252

10,671

18,205

275

1,905

1050

1,874

Financial contractor

8,820

9,518

Insurance

3,907

4,008

Legal fees

-

350

1,096

2,522

127

131

188,869

490,660

50,226

64,654

Staff training

779

354

Subscriptions

172

313

Sundry expenses

169

-

Superannuation

13,755

13,625

Telephone and internet charges

2,350

2,248

Travel expenses

7,823

3,694

Worker’s Compensation

3,716

3,304

Wages and salaries

155,581

143,553

TOTAL EXPENDITURE

468,777

776,589

Annual leave provided Accounting fees Bank charges Computer supplies Depreciation and amortisation Employment expenses Entertainment

Office supplies Postage and stationery Project expenses Rent and overheads

The above UNAUDITED detailed statement of surplus or deficit should be read in conjunction with the disclaimer.


Critical Path 2018 Annual Report

90

Rajni Experimental Choreographic Research Residency / Burning Paper near Water / Image by Victoria Hunt


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