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Volume Volume 80 80 ll Issue Issue 3 2 ll 02.16.18 11.10.17 ll 801 801 Niblick Niblick Rd. Rd. Paso Paso Robles, Robles, CA CA ll Paso Paso Robles Robles High High School School

De donde somos Crimson analiza quĂŠ estados mexicanos tienen influencia cultural en PRHS

p. 13

the work of the heart Theodore Wagner plants the seeds of knowledge in students of PRHS and over seas in mission work

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NO MEANS NO the culture of sexual misconduct


|News

1,100 COMPETE IN REGIONAL SKILLSUSA Bearcat participation eclipses other regional schools at Feb. 3 competition by Gabriella Clayton, Reporter

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aso Robles greeted more than 1,000 students on Feb. 3, 2018 to compete in the Regional SkillsUSA competition. More than 70 different competitions took place as many students had their career trades judged on the spot by professionals from the community. Competitors came from San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Kern, Kings, Tulare, Fresno, Monterey, San Benito, and Santa Cruz counties in hopes that they had what it takes to bring home the gold in Regionals and advance to State competition this April in Ontario. 200 Bearcats competed in live and demonstrative competitions all day and are awaiting results as of press time. SkillsUSA is a foundation that works with high school and college students to lead them to success as worldclass workers. SkillsUSA works in all different fields of the workplace: photography, welding, automotive, wood shop, cabinet making, engineering, robotics, culinary and more. Senior Roxanne Romero competed in Mobile Electronics installation under auto teacher Greg Boswell. She said that competitions make her “feel super accomplished because Madison Harris, 12 you work all year, and these Roxanne Romero, 12 advisors really help you out. They are role models for you.” Romero leads also as the PRHS SkillsUSA Club President and competed in Skills last year. Senior Madison Harris competed Saturday in her third SkillsUSA Regional, this time in First Aid CPR and Job Interview under teachers Shelby LaMendola and Brenda Matthysse. “Competition was really amazing. I’ve done it for a couple years now and every year is different. I am so nervous beforehand but once I’m doing it I say ‘OK, this is my time and I know my stuff. Let’s go,” Harris said. Construction teacher and SkillsUSA regional coordinator Randy Canaday believes that the path of Skills leads to success with more benefits to the modern day world. “Career technology education is important in the high school and college levels,” Canaday said. He explained that more and more people are lacking the knowledge of construction and medical terms. He cited North Carolina’s need for 3,000 jobs in one industry alone. SkillsUSA competition is encouraged and pursued in PRHS through 15 career technical ed course pathways. SkillsUSA will grant job awareness and opportunities for all students.

02 NEWS | Crimson Newsmagazine | 02.16.18

PLUMBING THE DEPTHS (top right) : PRHS Senior

Christian Fay participates in the plumbing competition. Top competitors at the regional level will move on to the state SkillsUSA competition in Ontario.

SHOCKER (center left) : A SkillsUSA contestant

competes in the electrical wiring competition. The regional competition at PRHS had over 70 contests.

FIRE BENDER (center right) : A SkillsUSA contestant adjusts her flame for welding. PRHS had 200 students registered to compete in SkillsUSA regionals this year. NAILED IT! (bottom left) : A SkillsUSA contestant works in the

carpentry contest. Around 1,100 contestants came to PRHS on Saturday, Feb. 3 to show their skills.

SKILLED (bottom right) : A regional SkillsUSA contestant in the cabinet making competition. Contestants came from as far as Fresno, Santa Barbara and Santa Cruz to compete at PRHS.

Photos by Elise Scheiffele and Camden Tucker


News|

DAY OF WOMEN MARCHES IN Locals rally in downtown San Luis Obispo for women’s rights A

by Kaya McCasland Co-Health Editor

s the sun shone down on San Luis Obispo, both women and men of all ages, shapes, and colors stood together and were united with signs and positivity in the Mission Plaza to support the Women’s March on Saturday, Jan. 20. “We are here because it is so important that people realize that our voices need to be heard (for women) and to add our voices to the other millions who want a change,”said Carol Athey, who is a local Paso Robles resident. Last year on Jan. 21, the Women’s March captivated the world as 81 countries held rallies to support women’s rights and equality in all forms. The United States was the leader of the marches and was estimated to have held 408 marches all over the country. Now a year later, the march is back on with more than a million people in attendance nationwide. This year, as the rally took place a year after the inauguration of President Donald Trump, anti-Trump protesters were present at the march gave speeches, made signs, and chanted political statements. But despite being a major topic in the Women’s Marches, the president had nothing but supportive words as he tweeted out: “Beautiful weather all over our great country, a perfect day for all Women to March. Get out there now to celebrate the historic milestones and unprecedented economic success and wealth creation that has taken place over the last 12 months. Lowest female

WOMEN’S RIGHTS(above) : Attendees of the women’s march rally in San Luis Obispo’s Mission Plaza hold up signs advocating gender equality and protesting president Donald Trump. The rally was held on the one-year anniversary of Trump’s inauguration. unemployment in 18 years!”— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 20, 2018. Also, as the sensational #MeToo movement takes the nation under its powerful wing, women unite to stand against unwanted sexual advances and to support others who

have struggled with it. “This is my line...and it has been crossed. From this point on I will not tolerate sexual harassment, racism, sexism, ageism any isms or ists. I am here to represent women and how empowered we are and how we will not stand

for this type of behavior anymore,” said San Luis Obispo resident Kim Wells. Actress Natalie Portman also spoke of the movement as she gave a powerful speech at the march in Los Angeles. “I opened my first fan mail to read a rape fantasy that a man had written me,” Portman said. “I understood very quickly, even as a 13-year-old, that if I were to express myself sexually, that I would feel unsafe. And that men would feel entitled to discuss and objectivity my body.” Portman was one of the many actresses who gave speeches at the LA march, some of whom were Viola Davis, Scarlett Johansson, and Olivia Munn. Hollywood has been emblazoned in the media for women standing up against high profile male celebrities. This created and fueled the #MeToo movement. “The biggest factor for me for attending the Women’s March was equality. I believe everyone deserves equality, everyone deserves to be treated the same because we are all equal,” said sophomore Sara Metzler, who attended the Women’s March in San Luis Obispo. As women look towards the future, they start to see a new beginning for themselves and everyone around them, fighting with all they have for their rights and their equality.

RENDON WINS POETRY OUT LOUD Senior Guillermo Rendon wins PRHS Poetry Out Loud competition, senior Kaitilin Pressley wins runner up

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by Emily Olsen, Circulation Manager

WOOING THE AUDIENCE (above) :

Poetry Out Loud winner Guillermo Rendon (right) and runner up Kaitlin Pressley pose after their victory. Rendon recited “The Time I’ve Lost by Wooing,” while Pressley recited “Domestic Situation.”

s Senior Guillermo Rendon stood on the stage with a spot light beaming down on him, he passionately recited “The Time I’ve lost in Wooing” by Thomas Moore and wooed the judges. His performance earned him the winning crown of the 2018 Poetry Out Loud (POL) contest. Twenty-One brave students stood before a panel of judges to recite poems ranging from their love of food, to relationships and to broken hearts. This year’s MC, modern world history and government teacher Geof Land, stood in front of the red curtain on stage in between each poem, and gave notable facts, giving the judges panel enough time to score the last reciter. The judges panel consisted of six teachers and

administrators here at PRHS, and the event was organized by English 2 Honors teacher Anne Domenic, who also acted as the prompter in case the reciter forgot a line. Senior Kaitlin Pressley fervidly recited “Domestic Situation” by Ernest Hilbert, and touched the judges with emotions, earning her the runner up spot. Rendon will now move on to the San Luis Obispo County competition held on Feb. 9, 2018. If Rendon is not available to attend, Pressley will have the opportunity to attend in his place to represent PRHS. Rendon will compete against 10-15 other competitors and must prepare two poems to recite for the County Competition. The winner from there will move on to the State Level Competition.

Photos by Camden Tucker

02.16.18 | Crimson Newsmagazine | NEWS 03


|News |News

New courses

by Ally Connolly, Reporter There are several new developments coming to PRHS, including the offering of five new courses: Science Academy 3, AP Environmental Science, EAP Senior Math, Pop Music Performance, and Music History. All of these courses are primarily put in place as alternatives for subjects already existing at the school.

AP Environmental Science

Pop Music Performance

Aquatics complex funding passed

PRJUSD board approves 2 new pools in 6-1 vote as part of $7.2M project

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by Mason Seden-Hansen, Managing Editor

he Paso Robles Joint Unified School District Board of trustees approved funding at a Jan. 23 regular meeting for the PRHS aquatics complex’s two pools, clearing the final hurdle for construction to begin in April. The board voted 6-1 to approve the first stage of the aquatics complex funded by Measure M bond funds and community donations. “[This] is a great milestone for PRJUSD. This conversation started in 1991...it’s time to put our kids on the map and give them a chance to compete at state and national levels,” PRJUSD superintendent Chris Williams said. The new pools will be a great boon to PRHS swimming, diving, and water polo teams, and it would be of the caliber to host state and national championships for aquatics sports in the coming seasons. “We’re planning to have bodies in the water by January of next year,” Williams said. The measure relies on $5.7 million of funding from the measure M bonds, which were passed in the 2016 general election, and some $750,000 in community donations already raised. The district is hoping to raise another $1,750,000 to complete all phases of the project, including expanded bathrooms and a changing room. The project has taken no money from the PRJUSD general fund, according to Williams. Matt McClish, a PRJUSD board trustee appointed on Oct. 30, 2017, and 7-year board trustee Tim Gearhart, each pledged at the meeting to donate $1000 and $100, respectively, to the effort just before the measure was passed. Chris Bausch, a 5-year Board trustee, voted against the measure, citing concerns about raising enough money to be able to complete the complex, and suggested that the approval be delayed until all funding had been secured. “I recognize that we desperately need an aquatics complex at the high school… [but] I’d really like to see these pledges before we start any construction costs... Is there a problem with delaying [the approval] other than we wait another year?” Bausch said. Williams assured Bausch that funding promised by local businesses and small donations would be enough to receive the necessary funding in by the time of the groundbreaking ceremony on Apr. 9. “We assure on my paycheck and my families that the money will be raised,” Williams said. 7-year Board trustee Field Gibson also replied, “I feel comfortable with what I know about who’s stepping up [to donate]...I’m not willing to wait another year, I’m not willing to wait another six months, the time is now to get it done.” The passage of the item was celebrated by approximately 50 PRHS swimming, water polo, and diving athletes, as well as their parents and coaches, who clapped and cheered when the measure was passed. The board approved the purchase of two pools custom-made in Italy, currently the fastest pools in the world. One pool is a 50 meter by 25 yard competition-sized pool, while the other is a 56 foot by 75 foot community training and warm-up pool.

04 NEWS | Crimson Newsmagazine | 02.16.18

As one of two alternatives to band, Pop Music Performance is a course intending to sharpen a student’s music skills as they learn to perform with and for their peers. “It functions as a bunch of little rock bands. It’s a very cool class. All the students in the course will perform with each other in different situations. They can be writing their own music or covering tunes that are out there,” said Kevin McDonald, the band teacher and prospective teacher of the two new music courses. Any student of any musical level is welcome, as there will be training according to each person’s skill set. The course has several goals in growing students’ skills and teaching them to perform before and with their peers. “My goals for the students at the beginning will be that they come with a positive attitude, that whatever their skill set is, if they come in excited about making music and working with their peers in a teamwork environment. My goals for over the course of the year would be that they would expand their musicianship, pushing themselves out of their comfort zone,” McDonald said.

EAP Senior Math EAP Senior Math is intended to prepare students for the Early Assessment Program, that they might not have to take intermedial math in college. It is also an alternative to Pre-Calculus for seniors. Yet, there is still a desire for even more alternatives for students pursuing vocations. “I personally would like to see more alternatives for students in pathways such as AG or CTE. I really do believe we should expand our offerings instead of Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2, and Pre-calculus. These courses don’t fit all students, particularly those who aren’t going to go directly into a university,” said Clark Kerr, who has taught math classes at Paso High for 29 years.

AP Environmental Science is intended to educate another generation of students about human impact on ecosystems. There is a broad range of sciences studied in this course. “It encompasses many topics, so there would be some chemistry and some physics, quite a bit of biology and ecology then there’s also a lot of social science involved in environmental science. There’s politics and economics, and there’s psychology. It’s just very holistic and broad, and that’s the neat thing about environmental science...it’s not focused on one particular thing,” said Mark Dimaggio. However, there are two major differences between the new AP Environmental Science course and the existing GEO course. GEO is dual enrollment course, meaning that, even if one takes it in high school, they will still receive college credit. GEO involves a large outdoor component of backpacking, hiking, and an end-of-the-year trip to Zion National Park, which is not a part of AP Environmental Science’s curriculum.

History of Blues, Jazz, Rock, and Pop This alternative to Pop Music Performance is a class designed more for students who would rather not perform, but love music. There will be a focus on class discussions and critical thinking, as well as a large amount of time spent on the actual of listening of different music styles. “This is designed to give [students] an outlet in order to better understand music that they love without the pressure of a performance looming over their head. It’s for students that really love music but have anxiety about performing...or students that feel like they could get up on stage but would rather learn more about the music itself,” McDonald said. “It is for students that want a music class but don’t necessarily want to perform or learn an instrument.”

Science Academy 3

The intention of Science Academy was to combine multiple standards into a single science course. “The goal was to take the new standards, the next generation science standards that had been put forth by the government, and to rework our system come up with a new course that fits those standards,” according to Susanna Real, who is going on her third year of teaching at Paso High as a teacher of Science

Graphic courtesy of PRJUSD

Academy 1. Science Academy 3 was developed to expand on the previous years of coursework, but is adapted more toward students who are drawing nearer to graduation. “It has more independent projects, and it’s geared more toward the last few years of high school with students doing things independently and helping them develop better skills,” Real said.


Editorial|

It starts young THE OBJECTIFICATION OF WOMEN BECOMES NORMALIZED IN A SEXUALIZED SOCIETY

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ormalization of sexualizing and objectifying women begins at a young age, meaning that boys are taught to conduct themselves with this mindset and girls are expected to live to please men. Subtly sexist ideas can become ingrained in the mindsets of children, which can easily bloom into the normalization of sexualization. It begins with young boys being raised on the concept that they are stronger, and somehow inherently better than their female peers, and escalates to a point at which men feel they can take advantage of women for no reason other than wanting something from them, with or without consent. In the past century, the common perception of women has evolved from frail, delicate, and dainty to a hyper-sexualized view that offers unrealistic and damaging expectations of what the average woman should be. This view puts pressure on women to constantly meet impossibly high standards to be taken seriously, respected, or simply feel worthy. A study on everyday sexism by social psychologists, 94% of undergraduate women faced sexual comments and actions toward them at least once every semester. These experiences are prevalent even at PRHS, and though they may at times go unnoticed or be dismissed as harmless, they can have a tremendous impact on the girls who face it. “When you’re being sexualized, you can talk all you want, yell at the top of your lungs, but you really don’t have a voice at all,” Junior Rita Chase, a victim of objectification who actively stands against this behavior towards herself and others, said. Generation after generation, men have been raised on the same sexist ideals, and the result is over 150 countries with an actively sexist law, every minute 28 young girls forced into marriage before they are ready, and one in three women experiences physical or

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newsmagazine

Editor in Chief

Valeria Cisneros Carmesi

Managing Editor

Kathryn Varian Photo Essay Mason Seden-Hansen News

PR Director

Catalina Magnuson

Business Manager Hayley Lacy

Editors

Elise Scheiffele Opinion/Editorial Sarah Jagger Sports Jessica Jagger Sports Loretta Burke People Ysabel Wulfing People Brighton Garrett Pop Culture Tyler Dunn Review Kaya McCasland Health Karina Neumann Health Phoebe Corgiat Environment Eric Contreras Carmesi Emily Mowery Web Director

sexual violence. Young women face greater risk of being raped or becoming a victim of domestic violence than cancer, automobile accidents, malaria, or war, according to Global Citizen, a social action platform. Although this most heavily affects women, men face consequences caused by these stereotypes as well. The normalization of inappropriate behavior misleads males to believe that there is little fault in lacking respect and an understanding of the opposite sex. Additionally, men can face the same assault that women do, but it is often brushed off because of the common view of women. Within the last couple decades, a societal enlightenment has begun as women are standing up and demanding the treatment they deserve. However, young girls often cannot comprehend the bias they face, leaving it up the adults and teenagers to change their own behavior to create an influence for young boys being raised in a sexist society. “To fight the issue of being sexualized is hard, but I’ve tried to own my sexuality the best I can, because when you do, no one can take it away from you,” Chase said. Though issues remain, this liberating way of thinking has spread worldwide, and as thoughts become actions, and there’s been tremendous progress within the last century. However, in a broader sense, this progress isn’t enough. The general view of women has been demeaning, overly sexualized, and altogether unrealistic within the past decades of “progress.” We have run out of patience, we are tired of the so called harmless jokes, and we will not longer put up with the sexism and sexualization we were raised on. It’s time for a change, and it is the women who faced sexualization at a young age who are going to make it.

Student journalism at PASO ROBLES HS Reporters

Gabriella Clayton Ally Connolly Madi Coons Calynn Long Campbell Long McKensi Keller Madison Funke

Circulation Manager Emily Olsen

Adviser

Jeff Mount

Photography Director Camden Tucker

Art Director Emma Corippo

Illustrators Casey Dumong Trevor Jaureguy

Business Team George Dominguez

Facebook

www.facebook.com/ crimsonnewsmagazine

Website

www.crimsonnewsmagazine.org

Email

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Crimson, an open forum for the exchange of student ideas, is an independently funded newsmagazine produced by the journalism class at Paso Robles High School. Crimson reflects the majority opinion of the staff and does not necessarily reflect the views of Paso Robles High School, its faculty, administration, or students. All stories, graphics, typesetting, and layouts are completed by Paso Robles High School students. We are happy to talk with you further about our content, subscriptions in U.S. Mail, and advertising —Crimson Staff on our pages.

02.16.18 | Crimson Newsmagazine | EDITORIAL 05


|Opinion

No Sugar Coating

Covering

Between a rock and a hard place

Dress code insinuates sexualization of female students

by Elise Scheiffele, Op-Ed Editor

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here comes a time in every girl’s youth where she is introduced to the horrors of rape culture. Whether it be learning what catcalling is, knowing how to hold your keys between your fingers as means of protection, or being told to cover up, a woman knows that she must always be careful. When I was in middle school, I would witness some of my more mature looking friends getting catcalled by older guys. We knew that it was degrading and wrong, so the girls would shake it off when it happened to them. As aware and informed about rape culture as I was, deep down I was jealous of the friends who were just openly sexualized in front of me. I felt embarrassed to be thinking I wasn’t pretty enough to be catcalled. I felt scrawny and ugly, and frankly, not good enough. This is the problem with rape culture. It’s put into our minds as women, by women that we are more than just a sex object and should not back down to misogyny. But by men, for the past hundreds of years, an object is all we’ve ever been. It’s a constant worry to women whether we’re pretty enough, not if we’re smart or strong enough. Even in the 21st century, parents worry about their daughters’ physique more than their intellect. Seth Stephen-Davidowitz, an OpEd writer for the New York Times, conducted a Google search study on concerns of parents about their children. “...My study of anonymous, aggregate data from Google searches suggests that contemporary American parents are far more likely to want their boys smart and their girls skinny,” StephenDavidowitz suggested. His study also shows that parents are two and a half times more likely to search “Is my son gifted?” than that question for a daughter. Stephen-Davidowitz continues to go over how it’s more typical for parents to worry about their daughters’ weight or beauty than her intelligence and their sons’ intelligence or stature. This world we live in has created a double standard which shames women for their beauty but also shames them for lacking it. Women don’t want to feel caught between a double standard, I can attest to that personally. I am not just another pretty face. I am more than what lies on the surface.

by Sarah Jagger, Sports Co-Editor

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emale students have made a long standing argument against the dress code due to its bias against female dress. Males face restrictions of hats, inappropriate text or graphics on their shirts, and sagging; but female clothing is prohibited of a much less offensive sort -- tank tops, shorts, and dresses. These rules set an unfair standard, and they insinuate a sexual objectification of female body parts, such as shoulders and backs, that shouldn’t be held against girls who want to wear these items. Most female students who wear tank tops or shorts are not exposing any thing strictly inappropriate. The problem isn’t what female Bearcats are wearing, but how others are viewing them in those clothes. One Bearcat wisely wrote, “It feels like they just assume people are going to be sexualized if they wear things like [spaghetti straps and shorts], which, in itself, seems to be sexualizing in the first place.” The dress code is certainly impacting students and frequently calls their clothing too sexy. From those surveyed, 26 percent of female students had been dress coded at least once, and 49 percent were cited for revealing clothing. According to administration, 62 percent of dress code offenders this year were females. In past years, the percentage of female offenders has ranged from 55 to 65. Assistant Principal Dan Sharon reported that the top three violations of the dress code were bare midriff, inappropriate content on shirts or other clothing, and inadequate length of shorts. “The purpose of the dress code is to ensure students are prepared for success in college, career, and community. College recruiters, business employers, and community service organizations value appropriate and professional attire; first impressions are often based on appearance.” Certain aspects of the dress code do make sense. It is important to dress appropriately for the occasion, such as at a professional job or interview. See-through fabrics and excessive arm holes are revealing in ways that are inappropriate for school. Gang affiliated attire and masks should not be worn at school. However, banning shorts shorter than where a student’s fingertips rest or tank tops with straps thinner than an inch not only implies that female students are sexualized, but that girls are meant to proactively prevent boys from being distracted from their educations. Students can just as easily get distracted by male dress. Or the weather. Or noise. An assumption has been made that females will be more distracting or less respected than males when wearing skimpier clothing. There’s the assumption too that “boys will be boys,” and that they have no control over themselves, so girls

06 OPINION | Crimson Newsmagazine | 02.16.18

must keep them focused by wearing shirts that cover our shoulders. But the reality is that most male students can focus on their school work, no matter the clothing around them. This has been proven for months, as female students wearing skimpier clothes slip by teachers and security and cause no noticeable distraction in class. If girls are expected to resist their urges and focus during class, boys should be held up to the same standards. As many have stated on social media, girls do not dress for boys. We dress for ourselves, for comfort, and for confidence. For most high school girls, this means wearing shorts or a tank top, not anything that actually explicitly revealing. However, there is the matter of the letter vs the spirit of the law. By the letter, certain short lengths are prohibited, as well as certain sleeve lengths. By the spirit, it can be interpreted that these guidelines are meant to prevent students from revealing their chest or butt. On hotter days, many students dress according to the spirit of the law, wearing clothing that isn’t explicitly revealing, but does technically violate the dress code. By updating the dress code to be more specific as to what it is advocating against, students would be allowed to wear clothing that they already wear, without the fear of being told to change because their clothes contradict the letter of the dress code. Failed dress code enforcement is very revealing. Students regularly slip through teachers and security in tank tops and shorts without causing disturbance. Why enforce the dress code in that aspect? Class continues. No problems of focus arise. Someone may get just as distracted by looking out the window as by someone else’s outfit; either way, it’s a matter of not focusing on school work rather than on what someone is wearing. This is not an argument against the dress code as much as an argument against what it insinuates. Times have changed. We’ve made progress in gaining equality and respect for women, so school rules should reflect it. It is time to drop the “boys will be boys” ideology. It’s time that we adjust the dress code to recognize cultural norms. It’s time to permit females feel comfortable in. The intention of a dress code is to protect students and maintain respect for students and the school. But how are we supposed to gain respect from rules that disrespect our freedom? How are we supposed to feel protected when the dress code implies that females must protect males’ supposed distractibility? We need to adjust the dress code to prohibit clothes that are explicitly revealing, rather than clothes that have the slight potential to be.


People|

Spicing up the American Experience

Italian foreign exchange student Beatrice Carniato teaches us about real italian food by Catalina Magnuson, PR Director

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riginating from the Roman Empire, Italian cuisine has evolved through the centuries. Foreign exchange student, Beatrice Carniato, from Treviso, Italy brings a more traditional taste to American pizza. “American-Italian food is fattier and full of oils. Plus the ingredients [Americans] use are different, so the taste is obviously different [from traditional Italian food], “ said Carniato. Other than her friends and family, Carniato misses the Italian food. “I don’t exactly miss only one thing since I like everything—maybe Tiramisu and real pizza,” she said. Carniato learned how to make her traditional pizza from her dad when she was in elementary school. “It’s something that I learned how to do from my family, not a professional,” Carniato said. The pizza she made has french fries as a “traditional topping — it’s how I learned to make pizza,” she said.

INGREDIENTS DIRECTIONS Always add slowly to make sure there’s not too much.

1

Add the mozzarella, chopped up into little cubes.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Put the yeast in a bowl with two cups of hot water and mix until completely dissolved.

Add enough to cover the pizza.

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3

2 Italians like to put tuna and onion but Carniato’s favorite is with BRATWURST & FRENCH FRIES.

In a bigger bowl, mix the flour, olive oil, salt and sugar. Add a little bit of the yeast water into the dry mixture, then mix it with a spoon. When there’s no more water in the flour, add some more of the yeast. Keep slowly mixing until

8

Add your favorite toppings. If adding french fries and bratwurst, cook them beforehand.

you have no more yeast water.

4

Cover the bowl with a kitchen towel, making sure no air can go inside, and let stand for at least 30

9

After decorating and customizing your pizza, place in the oven for 15 minutes.

minutes.

JUST A LITTLE SAUCY SAUCY(Left) : Carniato begins to add the

first of many layers to her homemade pizza. Tomato sauce was popularized in Italy after Queen Margherita fell in love with the dish. Photos by Catalina Magnuson

5

Place the dough on a tray sprinkled with flour and roll it out with a rolling pin.

Start spreading the tomato sauce all over the dough. After, drizzle the pizza with olive oil and mix it through the tomato sauce.

6

Take out of the oven when it looks golden brown. Check the lower side of the dough to make sure that it’s fully cooked.

10

Watch Bea make her pizza on crimsonnewsmagazine.org


|People

Theodore Wagner plants the seeds of knowledge in students of PRHS and overseas in mission work by Calynn Long, Reporter

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wenty-one years after beginning his career, Theodore Wagner has lived his life through his strong faith, love of unique cultures, and his love of serving others through his job and mission work. He will also whip out his violin and elegantly entertain his math classes at the drop of a hat. Students and administration praise Wagner for his many successful strategies and student testimonies in the math classroom. “He’s really great at teaching things in a simple manner, which makes the struggles of Precalculus more bearable” Jeremy Hunt, 10th grade Precalculus student, said. He’s got just as many for his mission work in countries such as Bulgaria, Peru, and Mexico. “I have worked with Mr. Wagner for almost two years. Mr. Wagner has made a great impact on our school through his positive and enthusiastic attitude and his amazing content knowledge. He also has done a great job in providing guidance for students in the after school math tutoring lab who need additional support,” Principal Eric Martinez said.

08 PEOPLE | Crimson Newsmagazine | 02.16.18

Wagner chairs the mathematics department at PRHS and currently teaches honors Precalculus, Avid 9, and Algebra 2. It’s a steady pursuit of meaning and quality in his classroom for him and for his students. “I would much rather ask a student how they should approach a problem rather than simply tell them how to do it. I also like to allow students to work in pairs and groups whenever it makes sense. Some of my favorite days in teaching are when students work together to solve a difficult problem in which they need to apply multiple skills in order to find the solution. It’s really satisfying to hear quality

conversation about math,” Wagner said. With such a love of math everyday, his style inspires. Living until eighth grade in Glendora, California, a suburb of Los Angeles, Wagner moved to San Luis Obispo County and Atascadero High School. He graduated in 1990, continuing his educational path with his teaching credentials from Cal Poly. During his college career in 1992 Wagner toured and served in Bulgaria for three weeks shortly after the Berlin Wall had come down. “I graduated highschool and had been in college for a few years and decided I wanted to go overseas to do mission work wherever I could. So I connected with a organization that was going to Bulgaria to share the gospel and sharing the bible with the people there,” Wagner explained.


People|

STRONG BONDS: A student raises her hand while Wagner teaches locals about chemistry bonds. Wagner also taught math while working as a missionary in Peru.

NEVER TOO SLOW : Wagner holds up a sloth in a local Peruvian zoo. Sloths sleep up to 20 hours a day and are classified as two-toed sloths or three-toed sloths.

Wagner has since been to Mexico multiple times with churches such as Atascadero Bible Church and churches in the area of Paso. “We help out in orphanages, build houses. I’ve done that a couple times-- to just be a person with a hammer and helping out anyway that I could, ”Wagner said. From 2002 to 2003 Wagner continued his mission work with Wycliffe Bible Translators and went down to Pucallpa, Peru. Their goal was to go down there to help out with the bible translating efforts. In Peru, Wagner admitted he is not a linguist, so he did not actively participate in the translating but instead he began teaching math to the children of missionaries and children of families who have come from other countries and wanted to be taught by credentialed teachers. “I really wanted to support the effort because I wanted people there to be able to read the Bible for themselves so that they could understand what it says and make an informed decision about its claims. The best way I thought for this to happen was for people to have the Bible in their own language, since so many people in Peru don’t speak Spanish,” mentioned Wagner about his passion for the efforts in Peru.

When Wagner is not teaching or in the mission fields he also is a family man who enjoys spending time with his wife and two daughters and having fun being out in nature on the central coast, especially hiking and going to the beach. In his spare time he likes playing violin or guitar and enthusiastically following

soccer teams like European teams and the Champion’s League. Continuing to have passions outside of the classroom has allowed Wagner to enjoy life. “I am passionate about finding the truth about fundamental questions of life: How did we get here? Who are we? and Where are we going? I think it’s important that we have conversations

about these topics, but it is becoming less common in a world where so many people would rather stare at a device than talk with another human being,” Wagner said. WIth his experience of teaching comes the joy of teaching students through the years and expanding their education. But don’t doubt that Wagner will ever be bored in this adventure that is called life. “I have thoughts of going overseas again and teaching in another country like I did in Peru, maybe assisting families working as missionaries. I might also get a degree in philosophy, theology, or apologetics and work at a church. I can also see myself volunteering as a math tutor. I don’t plan on ever being bored,” Wagner said. “Mr. Wagner is a great teacher and person. He truly cares about his students and their success. He is always willing to support his students and challenge their understanding to maximize their math foundations. We are lucky to have Mr. Wagner as a Bearcat Faculty Member,” Martinez said. Who knows when Wagner will leave PRHS, but, when he does, a legacy of teaching will continue to inspire the teachers and students through his service of faith and education.

Total Miles:

11,226.3

San Luis Obispo, CA to Bulgaria

San Luis Obispo, CA to San vicente, MX

339.3

6,635

mi. Wagner toured and served in Bulgaria for three weeks shortly after the Berlin Wall had come down.

San Luis Obispo, CA to Pucallpa, Peru

4,252

mi.

mi.

Three trips to Mexico with multiple churches such as Atascadero Bible Church. He has helped build houses and teach orphans.

2002-2003

Traveled with Wycliffe Bible Translators to Pucallpa, Peru. The group helped with bible translating efforts. Wagner taught math and science to the locals .

NOT SO BASIC : Wagner stands

next to a cabinet filled with an assortment of chemicals that he utilized as a science teacher. Luckily, “I didn’t blow anything up,” he said. Photos Courtesy of Ted Wagner

Graphic by Loretta Burke & Ysabel Wulfing

02.16.18 | Crimson Newsmagazine | PEOPLE 09


|People

The Busy Bee Brysan Pesenti buzzes his way into making homemade honey. by Kaya McCasland, Health Co-Editor and Emily Olsen, Circ. Manager

A

dorned in a sweatshirt, jeans, boots and a veil, sophomore Brysan Pesenti is suited up as he sets off to collect honey from the hives he owns in Paso Robles. The tradition started when his great grandpa, Raymond Pesenti Sr., saw a stray beehive in his front yard and decided to make some honey out of it. It was then taken up by Pesenti himself who joined the Templeton 4-H beekeeping group when he was just nine years old. As Pesenti got older, he made beekeeping more than a hobby, it became a business, giving it its own label, Brysan’s Honey, and selling it for $120 per gallon. Running a business may be hard for some people, but Pesenti manages it as he juggles a full school course load of honors classes and extracurricular activities, not to mention being a dedicated Varsity tennis player. “He is actually one of the most experienced on the team, he could potentially be my number one. I realize he is juggling multiple schedules with his bees, and his other animals, and he is an excellent player and I hope he steps up and leads the team,” says Varsity Tennis Coach, Laura Clows. Pesenti also takes care of other animals, and has numerous other responsibilities than his business. Pesenti learned everything from his great grandpa about the trade in honey making. And when his great grandpa died, he was dedicated to make his honey the best

brand it could be. “He passed away three years ago. It just made me notice what he gave me and what he taught me. I think it’s a tradition because his dad did it too and I plan on teaching my children it,” said Pesenti. Honey making actually isn’t as complicated as one may think. Brysan, who collects honey once a week with his eight hives, explains the process with ease. “So you get the honey out of the hive and it’s still capped with wax so you scrape it off and you spin it with an extractor which has a little crank in it and the honey just flows out of it,” explains Pesenti. For Pesenti, the hardest part about bee-keeping is giving the bees enough space to thrive. “The stinging is not what I worry about. The hardest part is giving them room,” said Pesenti, “if you don’t give them enough room then they’ll leave “and there goes all your honey...you’ll lose everything.” Pesenti will continue with beekeeping and plans to teach his kids in the future, keeping the family tradition going.

BROOD BOX (bottom left) : Presenti keeps his bees in nine seperate boxes which can hold thouseands of bees in each. BUNCH O’ BEES (above middle): Hundreds of bees cling onto a divider where they store their honey. CHECK UP (top right): Presenti checks to make sure his bees look healthy and their honey production. SMOKING GUN (far right): Brysan smiles for the camera while holding the smoker which calms the bees.

10 PEOPLE | Crimson Newsmagazine | 02.16.18


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02.16.18 | Crimson Newsmagazine | ADS 11


|Health

Gender gap gains new fuel National “Pink tax” proves that women’s items cost more W

omen are rumored to be expensive, and new research proves this as true. The “pink tax,” as it’s known, is the extra charge women pay for certain products or services Research from the New York City Department of Consumer Affairs states that products for women and girls cost 7 percent more compared to products for boys. Women have to pay more in brand stores and in online retail. They often fetch less money as a seller, according to the findings. Similarly, women pay 7 percent more for toys and accessories, 4 percent more for children’s clothing, 8 percent more for adult clothing, 13 percent more for personal care products, and 8 percent more for senior/home health care products. Yet women on average continue to earn less than men, according to the Institute for Women’s Policy Research. In 2015, female full-time employees made only 80 cents for every dollar earned by men making a gender wage gap of 20 percent. This pay gap makes it harder to pay for equally priced products, let alone prices that are increased. If change continues at the same pace of the past fifty years, it will take 44 years, until 2059, for women to finally reach pay equality. For women of color, the rate of change is even slower, with Hispanic women not reaching equality until 2233

12 HEALTH | Crimson Newsmagazine | 02.16.18

by Loretta Burke, People co-editor

and black women will have to wait until 2124—although the wage gap closing is predicted to be 16 years earlier in the year 2043. “If women are making less and then at the same time also being charged more for the same kind of products, that’s really a travesty” said Julia Menin, former commissioner of NYC’s DCA. The academic journal “Science Advances” published a study showing that on average eBay products sold by women fetch lower prices than the same products sold by men, even when the sellers’ reputations are equal. This gap is on average 80 cents from a woman to a dollar of a man’s price. The State of California released a study in 1994 that estimated that women paid an annual “gender tax” of about $1,351 for the same services as men.

THE PINK TAX HOW MUCH MORE DO WOMEN PAY FOR THESE THINGS?

Personal care Apparel toys

13% 4% 7%

annual “gender tax” of about $1,351 for the same services as men. SOURCE: NEW YORK CITY DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS

“Brands are conscious that women shoppers are more discerning and they’re willing to pay more for the products they love,” said marketing and branding expert Mike Jackson last year on CNBC. But the store isn’t the only place that discriminates women by a price increase. Dry cleaners are yet another place women will pay more for the same service. Men’s shirts cost an average of $2.86 to be cleaned and women’s cost $4.95. Adding to that list is home mortgages, hair cuts, and cars. But there are instances when women pay less then men. “Ladies night” at a bar for example, is when women get in free but men pay admission is one of them. Car insurance is another: Men pay an estimated $15,000 more over their lifetime for car insurance than women do, according to insurance comparison site CoverHound.com. “I don’t see this going away anytime soon, because the dialogue in our culture is that men and women are different — we call each other the ‘opposite sex,’” said Nicholas Guittar, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of South Carolina Lancaster. He also pointed out pricing differences don’t bother Americans enough for people to rebel against them. “Gendered pricing disparities will persist despite the presence of increased gender equality in society.”


De donde somos

Carmesi|

Crimson analiza qué estados mexicanos tienen influencia cultural en PRHS por Mason Seden-Hansen, Editor de Administración y Eric Contreras, Editor de Carmesi

Leyenda

Menos de 35 Menos de 20 Menos de 15 Menos de 5 Menos de 2

Los 10 Primeros Estados 1. Michoacon 2. Jalisco 3. Sinaloa 4. Guerrero 5. Oaxaca

6. Guanjuato 7. Durango 8. Colima 9. Hidalgo 10. Baja Cali.

* En porcentajes

Durango Baja California

Sinaloa

Guanajuato Hidalgo

Jalisco

Colima Fotos etiquetadas para reutilizar

Michoacan

Gue rre ro

Jalisco

Oaxaca

Michoacan

Comida popular del estado: Morisquete Atracción turística popular: Zoológico Guadalajara

Comida popular del estado: Enchiladas morelianas Atracción turística popular: Lago de Pátzcuaro

M

ichoacán es el noveno estado más grande de México, con una población de alrededor de 4,5 millones personas. “Siento Michoacán es más basado en la cultura, comparado con áreas como la ciudad de México... es moderno... pero se centra en la cultura más que en la tecnología,” sophmore y descendiente de inmigrantes de Michoacana, Carlos Zaragoza dijo. Michoacán es conocido por sus

Todas las fotos en la página se toman con permiso para reutilizar

celebraciones, “en [la ciudad de] San Juan, hay una tradición llamada Danza de los Kúrpites, donde la gente se viste de máscaras y vestidos, es tan extraño, pero nos encanta”, la sophmore Michelle Anastasio dijo. Michoacán tiene comida distintiva, “la comida sabe diferente allí, es todo casero, una vez que tenía una tortilla hecha con frijoles negros, y era púrpura”, Zaragoza dijo.

J

alisco es el cuarto estado más poblado de México, con 7,8 millones personas. “Es muy edificante, hay mucha gente feliz.. es uno de los “Estados de oro”, tiene mucho: playas, iglesias, desiertos, pirámides, lo tiene todo... Creo que eso es lo que atrae a la gente.” senior y descendiente de inmigrantes Jaliscan, Víctor Rodríguez dijo. Jalisco es el hogar de la segunda ciudad más grande de México, Guadalajara.

UN ESTADO DE ORO (arriba) : Con ser el segundo

estado más grande de México, Jalisco viene con muchas atracciones. Sus playas, iglesias y desiertos atraen a muchos turistas.

SU BELLEZA (la izquierda) : El estado de Michoacán se centra en su cultura ancestral. A los Estados les encanta celebrar su historia.

02.16.18 | Crimson Newsmagazine | CARMESI 13


|Carmesi

MI VERDADERO AMOR M

por Ysabel Wulfing, Editora de Personas

i más grande amor y yo, nos conocimos cuando tenía 4 años de edad. Yo era un poco demasiado tímida para formalmente reunirme con él en el momento. El era atrevido y misterioso. No lo entendia por supuesto, no tenía educación formal en sus caminos, pero todavía mi amor creció por este misteriosa identidad desconocido que me hablaba en versos y poemas. No fue hasta el día en que el me susurró la palabra “azul” mientras giraba mi crayón azul, cuando mi destino estaba sellado como un amante desafortunado. Su voz se ofreció a ser una alternativa a mi color favorito. Mi alegría no podría ser contenida. Yo cantaba la palabra “Azul” mientras bailaba con mi oso de peluche y escribía la palabra en mi dibujos frenéticas de pre escolar. No aprendí su nombre

hasta que mis padres me introdujeron a él un año más tarde. Se me sentó y me dijo: “Esto es Español”. Estaba fascinada, mi risa apenas contenida. ¡Mi amor tenía nombre! Fueron a decirme que iba a estar matriculado en una escuela llamada Georgia Brown Elementary, dónde Español iba a ser en cada lado de mi. Estaba absolutamente eufórica. Y entonces inmediatamente nervioso. ¿Qué pasa si no le gustaba me como me gustaba? ¿Qué pasa si él se reía de mi acento gracioso? ¿Qué pasa si crecí a nunca realmente entenderlo? Mis preocupaciones infantiles fueron puestos en la bahía como nuevas palabras se deslizaron de sus labios y continué a ser celebrada, fascinado por la fluidez de un lenguaje que se caracteriza en gran medida por su gente.

continued on crimsonnewsmagazine.org in the Carmesi section Photo has been modified

60 79 % millones

Son muchas las ventajas de ser bilingüe

de personas en los Estados Unidos hablan un idioma diferente al ingles en casa

1

de cada

de las personas que alguien que es bilingue es mas atractivo y mas inteligente

5

estudiantes en todo el pais proviene de un hogar en el que se habla otro idioma

los empleadores prefieren a candidatos bilingues

UNA CARRERA A LA RESIDENCIA El Salvadoran immigrants scared with possible deportation threats

M

por Cambell Long, Reporter

#SAVETPS (arriba) : Simpatizantes del grupo de Salvadorenos se reunió para protestar por la anulación del estatus temporal protegido. Los simpatizantes incluyen familias y aliados de las personas afectadas por la situación.

14 CARMESI | Crimson Newsmagazine | 02.16.18

ás de 200.000 el salvadoreños en el programa de estatus temporal protegido (TPS) están teniendo que competir para encontrar una manera de permanecer en los Estados Unidos por 2019 o tendrán que ser enviados de vuelta a su país lleno de violencia. El TPS dio residencia provisional a los migrantes salvadoreños después de un terremoto de 2001. El Salvador fue cerrado de golpe con un terremoto de 7,6 magnitud que causó 944 muertes y 5.565 heridos en 2001.Después de este desastroso evento en marzo de 2001, Presidente Bush concedió al salvadoreño inmigrantes TPS, otorgándoles ciudadanía temporal. La Secretaria de seguridad nacional, Elaine Duke, anunció su decisión de terminar el TPS para el Salvador el 8 de enero de 2018. Duke creía que el Salvador ha sanado y los residentes están seguros para regresar. Esto le da a los inmigrantes 18 meses o hasta el 9 de septiembre de 2019 para salir, obtener una tarjeta verde, o ser deportado. Muchas personas/familias no tienen ningún

deseo de volver a el Salvador, ya que es una parte del llamado “triángulo del Norte”, que se compone de Guatemala, el Salvador y Honduras. Según el Telegraph UK, el triángulo del Norte ha sido nombrado los lugares más mortíferos que no son una zona de guerra. Se registró que hubo 81,2 asesinatos por 100.000 personas en 2016, lo que se calcula para ser más de 5.200 personas que murieron allí ese año. Además, las pandillas empezaron a localizar a el Salvador como la pandilla MS-13 más conocida; una banda criminal internacional que se originó en Los Ángeles, California, pero más tarde se extendió a diferentes países como el Salvador. La actividad de las pandillas en el país ha erosionado la cultura y ha traído un efecto negativo a la comunidad, resultando en la falta de querer vivir allí. A medida que la póliza llega a su fin en 2019, la mayoría de los inmigrantes salvadoreños no están seguros acerca de su lugar en Estados Unidos. La mayoría tratará de obtener la ciudadanía, la tarjeta verde o, lamentablemente, será enviado de vuelta a su país.


The Culture of Sexual Misconduct|

No means no A movement now asserts the belief that women are not objects to be exploited or sexualized by Emma Corippo, Art Director and Valeria Cisneros, Editor-in-Chief

A

s a young girl, she was raped by one of her dad’s friends. Alex felt too uncomfortable to speak up about it. For years, she stayed quite. Finally, she spoke

up. But it was too late to do anything. “This is actually happening and you need to be able to...talk to someone about it and be heard.” Alex said. At school, Alex has been slut shamed and cat called, without people knowing what has happened to her. “I’ve watched it happen to a lot of girls too...I see it almost everyday.” For thousands of years, women have been treated the same. Men pressed against them, touched them, and hurt them, without waiting for an answer. They have been treated like objects, small playthings only useful for one purpose. Many are ashamed to tell their story, often too afraid to speak up. Some were paid, or forced to keep quiet. In their lifetime, 1 in 6 women will be raped according to RAINN. For men, it’s 1 in 10. Out of every 1,000 sexual assaults, only 310

are reported to the police. The disturbing culture behind sexual assault and harassment has finally been recognized -but it’s just getting started. We have collected sexual misconduct by the numbers. We’ve looked at what constitutes sexual consent--and what doesn’t. We’ve summarized recent events across the nation in the #TimesUp Movement, the support celebrities and Americans have shown for those who have been sexually assaulted. The hashtags #MeToo and #TimesUp have provided a platform for those who have kept silent and can now be heard. A spotlight shines on persons who believed that sexual assault or sexualization of females was accepted in our culture or endorsed in our movies, TV shows, magazines, and screens.

Understand and join the movement that asserts the belief that women are not objects to be exploited and sexualized.

Art by Emma Corippo

02.16.18 | Crimson Newsmagazine | THE CULTURE OF SEXUAL MISCONDUCT 15


What is

|The Culture of Sexual Misconduct

The Culture of Sexual Misconduct|

consent? What means “yes” and what means “no”

E

by Elise Scheiffele, Opinion and Editorial Editor

verybody’s heard “no means no.” But there are more ways not to consent to and to prevent a sexual act than simply saying a two-letter word. Sometimes, saying no means saying nothing at all. Only “yes” means “yes.” University of Michigan Policy & Procedures on Student Sexual and Gender-

Based Misconduct and Other Forms of Interpersonal Violence defines consent as “a clear and unambiguous agreement, expressed outwardly through mutually understandable words or actions, to engage in a particular activity.” Consent has to be clear and can change any time during an activity.

Consent should not be assumed by the following: Body language/appearance: the way somebody dresses or acts absolutely does not determine his or her consent. Dating or relationships: simply because two people in a relationship have previously had sex does not mean they are consenting to have sex again. Marriage: married couples cannot opt out from giving consent. Marital rape is just as serious as any other type of rape. Previous activity: Just because you’ve done it before, doesn’t give permission to do it again. Lack of resistance or passivity: saying nothing is saying no. Incapacitation: alcohol or drug consumption can render a person incapable of giving consent. These are also used as weapons to target individuals and then used as an excuse by perpetrators to defend their actions. The Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN) offers a hotline and plenty of information for people seeking help. Consent can be reinstated or taken away at any time during an activity, and should always be respected. Examples of positive consent can be: Saying “Is this OK?” when changing the degree of sexual activities. Explicitly agreeing to something; saying “yes” or “I’m open to trying.” Using physical cues. Things like assuming to acknowledge “no,” making assumptions, and anything that is not one of the three bullet points above are not consent.

If you’ve experienced sexual assault, you’re not alone. To speak with a trained professional, call the completely confidential National Sexual Assault Hotline at 800.656.HOPE (4673) 16 THE CULTURE OF SEXUAL MISCONDUCT | Crimson Newsmagazine | 02.16.18

SIGN OF STRENGTH: Two women stand in unison

voicing their opinons. For two years in a row, womens marches have taken place on January 20.

Design and art by Kathryn Varian

02.16.18 | Crimson Newsmagazine | THE CULTURE OF SEXUAL MISCONDUCT 17


|The Culture of Sexual Misconduct

SURVIVORS: Women and men march in unison at a

womens march. The event took place exactly one year after Trump’s inauguration.

Time’s up for sexual misconduct The movement against rape culture in Hollywood grows

B

by Jessica Jagger, Sports CoEditor

reeding the #MeToo platform followed by the recent #TimesUp movement, Hollywood has become a source of support and activism against sexual assault in entertainment. Hollywood has long since been aware of such assaults, but no movement against them has been quite as strong. “I think this movement is a great way to educate people and make the sexual abuse epidemic more evident in our culture because it has been hidden for so many years,” Senior Leah Pollock said. The movement began with the hashtag “me too”, as public figures, both men and women, revealed sexual assault that had previously been kept silent, and reached its peak at the Golden Globes on Jan. 7, where attendees wore black to show their support for those who have faced sexual assault, as well as sporting golden pins reading “Times Up”. Ironically, many of the men who wore these pins, such as James Franco and Aziz Ansari, have been accused of the same assault they were standing against in front of the cameras. Every 98 seconds, one person becomes a victim of sexual assault in the United States alone, according to RAINN (Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network). A substantial percentage of this assault has been recently exposed in entertainment, beginning with Harvey Weinstein’s excommunication from Hollywood society. His scandal began on Oct. 5, 2017 with the publishing of allegations against him by over 50 women, including Gwyneth Paltrow, Angelina Jolie, and Lupita Nyong’o in the New York Times and within three days, he was fired from his own company. This quick action indicated a positive and effective start of the movement. However, the results have greatly slowed since this scandal.

Design and art by Kathryn Varian

Both men and women have stepped forward as victims of assault since October 2017, earning equal amounts of backlash and applause. Controversy arises as widely loved directors, actors, and public figures continue to find work in Hollywood and actors continue to work with those known to have committed sexual assault, while victims who have come forward are criticized for seemingly false accusations. Generally only 2 to 7 percent of accusations are false, according to the National Sexual Violence Resource Center, though one false accusation has the power to demerit the entire movement, causing real cases of assault to be dismissed. For example, in director Woody Allen’s highly scrutinized court case in the 90s, a large amount of evidence indicated that Allen has molested his adopted daughter, Dylan Farrow, however, public opinion was split. The testimonies of Mia Farrow, mother, and several babysitters aligned, and many of Allen’s claims were found contradictory or not credible, however, seven-year-old Dylan’s account was also found to be inconsistent, and Allen was not harshly punished for the allegations, but custody of Dylan was altered. Despite this scandal, which greatly damaged public view of Allen, major actors such as Steve Carell, Blake Lively, Kristen Stewart, Owen Wilson, Alec Baldwin, and nearly 100 other well known figures have worked with him, many of whom took the job after accusations against him arose. Reese Witherspoon, who is actively supporting victims and standing against assaulters, summed up the movement, “We’re here to stand up for all women and men who have been silenced by abuse and harassment and discrimination within their industries.”

18 THE CULTURE OF SEXUAL MISCONDUCT | Crimson Newsmagazine | 02.16.18


The Culture of Sexual Misconduct|

SEXUAL Misconduct BY THE NUMBERS BY STATE

CHILDREN AND TEENS PERPETRATORS

13%

Design by Kathryn Varian

RATE 141.9 78.1 73.3 71.8 71.7 64.2 58.9 58.8 55.4 52.1

99% WALK FREE 11%

80% A PARENT 6.0% OTHER RELATIVES 5.0% “OTHER” 4.0% UNMARRIED PARTNERS OF A PARENT

63,000 CHILDREN A YEAR ARE VICTIMS OF SEXUAL ABUSE

TOP 10

1. ALASKA 2. DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 3. NEW MEXICO 4. MICHIGAN 5. ARKANSAS 6. COLORADO 7. NEVADA 8. SOUTH DAKOTA 9. MONTANA 10. NEBRASKA

OF WOMEN WHO ARE RAPED ATTEMPT SUICIDE

CALIFORNIA HAS THE MOST FORCIBLE RAPE CASES REPORTED IN THE UNITED STATES

13,702

CASES EACH YEAR

MINORS THAT HAVE BEEN

SEXUALLY ABUSED

AT THE HANDS OF AN ADULT 1 IN 9 GIRLS 1 IN 53 BOYS

OF REPORTED RAPISTS

OF GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

EXPERIENCE RAPE OR SEXUAL ASSAULT

98 SECONDS SOMEONE IN THE U.S. IS

EVERY

FORCIBLE RAPE RATE PER 100,000 INHABITANTS

SEXUALLY ASSAULTED

02.16.18 | Crimson Newsmagazine | THE CULTURE OF SEXUAL MISCONDUCT 19


|Environment

One disaster after another

Petition at PRHS Students at PRHS attempt to ban styrofoam in north county by Gabriella Clayton, Copy Editor

T

he rolling hills of Paso Robles covered in voluminous, chartreuse green and mulberry red-colored grapes are pleasing to the eye, no doubt. But with the increasing situation of expanded polystyrene foam, commonly known as “styrofoam,” and its contamination of the Earth, we could potentially kiss our beautiful atmospheric feeling of home goodbye. Seniors Gavin Hughes and Mason Seden-Hansen decided to put Paso under their own microscope and came to the conclusion that they were not in favor of what they saw. Overall, 112 California cities have banned to some extent the use of styrofoam, inspiring Seden-Hansen and Hughes to make a difference of the greater area of Paso Robles-making it 113 cities. Two cities in San Luis Obispo County have already banned the use of styrofoam in order to save their environment and keep their waterways clean, including Pismo Beach and San Luis Obispo. With Paso Robles having the second highest population of any city SLO county, banning the use of styrofoam would make an immense impact towards the community. With the help of Modern World History and Government teacher Geof Land, Seden-Hansen and Hughes have decided to take it upon themselves to ban the commercial

use of styrofoam through the city of Paso Robles. Through the assistance of their own clubs, Wilderness and Progressive club, the dream of making Paso a styrofoam-free community is becoming a reality. The two seniors plan to rally community support by spreading information about styrofoam and the dangers involved with it. Styrofoam is not recyclable in San Luis Obispo. Styrofoam put into landfills slowly degrades into mini sand sized molecules which can easily be blown all around the environment. The tiny minerals can easily be blown into the Salinas River that will eventually flow into the ocean. Sea creatures often mistake the small debris of styrofoam for food, resulting in them consuming styrene, a neurotoxic and carcinogenic chemical. These chemicals can then enter the bodies of humans who eat contaminated seafood. Seden-Hansen and Hughes are in the process of completing phase one of their journey, aiming for the signatures of a thousand Bearcats in order to prove that the issue is acknowledged by others as well. Writing a letter of suggestion is the next step, in hopes that the Paso Robles Mayor, Steven W. Martin and the city council will approve of the movement for Seden Hansen and Hughes to successfully ban styrofoam.

Montecito, California gets slammed with mudslide by Campbell Long, Reporter

A

s the state of California cleans up from the recent mudslides, they remember the 21 lives of children, students, young adults, middle aged executives, retirees, and immigrants from all over the world that were killed. Sixty homes destroyed and over 600 homes were damaged within a couple hours of a horrific mudslide. Montecito, California, the town hit the hardest in Santa Barbara county, was where all the devastation occurred. California was still recovering from major fires when the mudslides hit. A total of 9,054 fires burned 1,381,405 acres in the state total. The destroyed vegetation from the wildfires and the ground softening contributed to making the mudslide possible. With the fire taking all of the nutrients and stability of the land, it is easy

for mudslides to have a major effect. Rapidly moving water and debris caused broken electrical, water, gas, and sewage. Highways and railroads were disrupted and Highway 101 was even shut down; however, it was reopened Sunday, Jan. 21. Officials are making progress on the cleanup and hope residents may return to their homes by the end of the month, according to Associated Press. Of the 21 lives lost, all were Montecito residents and ranged in age from 3 to 89 years old. The Montecito Inn payed tribute to these victims by shining a bright light for the week of Feb. 5 to 12, according to KSBY Channel Six. In a post on its Facebook page, the Montecito Inn writes, “Our desire is that it will act as a beacon of light to bring hope to our community in a time of darkness.”

EVERLASTING BAD NEWS: Styrofoam negatively affects the environemtn polluting the oceans, air and soil. Styrofoam is here to stay. It takes 500 years to decompose. Forever on this planet it living longer than humans

20 ENVIRONMENT | Crimson Newsmagazine | 02.16.18

Art by Kathrn Varian


Environment|

Fighting the Fire The largest fire in California history gathers firefighters from all over the state and surrounding states by Brighton Garrett, Pop Culture Editor

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he record breaking Thomas Fire in California that burned for 40 days, concluded on Jan. 12, 2017 relieving the residents of Ventura and Santa Barbara County. The smoke did not reach Paso, but with the fire’s perimeter being just over 115 miles from PRHS our firefighters did join in fighting the fire alongside 8,500 others. Paso Robles Fire Department is part of the Master Mutual Aid System which provides assistance to emergency situations that are unable to mitigate the emergency

with local resources. “Paso Robles sent 4 firefighters on one fire engine and one Battalion Chief who was responsible for a strike team of fire engines (A strike team consist of five fire engines)” said Jonathan Stornetta, the Interim Fire Chief for Paso Robles Fire Department. With the air quality being unbearable, dry winds to fight, and a dry vegetation the fire was hard to control. “A fire like the Thomas Fire is not a common fire. The Thomas Fire set a record for the largest fire in California history. There

are many large fires throughout California every year. This year alone there were 9,054 vegetation fires in California that burned over 1,381,405 acres. In October alone, these fires caused over $9.4 billion dollars in damage,” said Stornetta. The Thomas Fire alone burned 281, 893 acres, 2,362 being local property. Residents losing homes and being evacuated dispersed throughout the state trying to find refuge. Some surrounding public schools were closed for five weeks or longer including Santa Barbara Unified School District,

Ventura Unified School District, Santa Paula Unified School District, Ojai Unified School District, and Mupu Elementary School District. Paso Robles firefighters were on the fire for 18 out the 40 days total the fire was burning. California received help from all over the state to mitigate the emergency. It was a devastating fire for those in and around it and will cost the state over $287 million to recover.

8,500 Firefighters

Cause:under investigation

Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties

281,893 Acres 40 Days

1,063

Structures Destroyed Graphics by Brighton Garrett and Kathryn Varian

64% Federal 35% State

2 Deaths

11 School

Districts Closed

$

1%

Local

287 Million

02.16.18 | Crimson Newsmagazine | ENVIRONMENT 21


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Pop Culture|

NEW SECTION

Pop culture Culture belongs to the youth Young generations are the most influential deciding the mass media

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by Brighton Garrett, Pop Culture Editor

op culture is the voice of the young: the mass media’s anthem. “Being older makes you wiser” is a well known cliche. The old love it, but the young, not so much. Maybe it is because the old fear the young being wiser or vice versa. Yet the young decide what is popular. All generations of teenagers and young adults are shape shifting culture; they decide how their culture is perceived. They are the designers of popular culture. Pop culture is anything that is popular in the mass media and is generally directed towards youth. It is the upcoming civilization. Most popular items in all categories (music, books, movies, fashion, games, media, etc) cater to the young: the ones who decide that Kim Kardashian is famous, Drake’s album is number one, Snapchat is a necessity, and scrunchies come back. “American culture belongs to the young,” The New Yorker writer George Packer said in 2013. The young generation, which many of the readers belong to, should know about the attitudes, ideas, perspectives, and trends in mass society, therefore Crimson Newsmagazine has decided to create a new Pop Culture section to cover what is popular among the masses and how it affects them. Popular culture influences what foods are eaten, media that is used,

clothes that are worn, games that are played, music that is listened to, and much more. Culture is what makes the world unique. Because the topic is so extremely broad, Crimson Newsmagazine has refined it to pop culture with an intent to cover trends on the rise whether it be fanny packs becoming a fashion staple or the updated version of Snapchat. Acknowledging what is currently popular is important . Culture creates a sense of community and belonging. It is also fun and entertaining; trends become popular because people enjoy them. Crimson Newsmagazine wants to cover reality in our society and what people will enjoy. “Popular culture appeals to people because it provides opportunities for both individual happiness and communal bonding,” Tim Delaney from Philosophy Now said. Crimson Newsmagazine replaced the world section, which we thought lost relevance to local Bearcats to the pop culture section. This opened a multitude of new topics to be covered. It is going to be an entertaining and sometimes hard hitting section. Pop culture will explore lives and habits. There is no one better to write about a culture that belongs to the youth than the young. A section for trend setters, go getters, and favored entertainers. It is time for the changes in society to be covered. Pop culture belongs to the influencers: Bearcats.

Winter fashion

Models sport trendy winter outfits from Kahunas

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by Brighton Garrett, Pop Culture Editor

rimson partnered with Kahunas Surf and Skate Shop in a winter clothing photo shoot. The six models were dressed in articles from the store and then photographed. The outfits provide options for clothes to wear in PRHS’s winter. They pair with recent trends such as colored pants, mixed textures, and layering. The style is predominantly bohemian surfer. This is a new addition to the pop culture section giving a snippet of what the section will be covering. A video of the event will be released on crimsonnewsmagazine.com.

SEE MORE ON NEXT PAGE

ALL GIGGLES (right) : Hailey Silveira and Garrett LaBarreare pose for their group shot. They sport their outfits with confidence. Photos by Camden Tucker

02.16.18 | Crimson Newsmagazine | POP CULTURE 25


|Pop Culture

Winter fashion Models sport trendy winter outfits from Kahunas SLEEK SWEATER (right): Polished in the Patagonia off country sweater and Hurley Perry I.S. shirt underneath, Declan Lewin spices up his look from average to snazzy. The Volcom Varta pants in a dark color contrast his lighter top. Also, layering his outfit effortlessly adds warmth.

BOHEMIAN BLUE (above): Model Sara Metzler wears the Billabong sitting pretty romper paired with piper hat in grey. To make the outfit warmer you can pair it with a jacket or tights underneath.

PATAGONIA PLAID (right): Dressed in the w’s fjord flannel, Patagonia nano vest, and Volcom straight jeans Elizabeth Salvia is ready to face the cold mornings and warm afternoons. Layering her outfit makes it easy to change into a cooler or warmer outfit when needed.

Facing the reality: winter fashion

by Brighton Garrett, Pop Culture Editor and Phoebe Corgiat, Environment Editor

The essentials of winter fashion that could tie your whole outfit together

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inter fashion essentials could make or break your outfit. Trying something new might just bring your whole outfit together. The everyday fashion of an average high school student is jeans, vans, t-shirt, and any jacket. Colored pants would convert a dull outfit into a lively and put together ensemble. Generally, colored pants are known to be bright and vibrant, but there are plenty of variations that would fit every outfit for both males and females. It is smart to stick to warm colors that match

the season. Crazy colors in the winter are not a smart decision. A crazy snow jacket is better than a small crop top in the winter. But if you don’t want to look like you are preparing for below zero temperatures, layering is an alternative way to be warm, yet still cute. There are many different ways to wear your favorite shirt ever in the winter. A lightweight sweater over a long sleeve is perfect for taking on the day. Add a scarf, beanie, boots, vest or jacket to transform your not so

warm outfit into winter wonderland attire. Making a come back from the 80’s, scrunchies are new and improved. Best friends to watch out because their spot will be replaced by an amazing hair elastic. Scrunchies are not the bland, black hair tie you wear on your wrist that ruins pictures, they are the picture ready accessories that can be worn on your wrist or in your hair. There are many different patterns, textures, and styles to choose from. The point of them is to avoid creases from your ponytails.


Pop Culture|

BEARING BROWN (right): Garrett LaBarreare (9) wears a simple look in the Volcom L/S flannel OP in brown and Volcom slim straight jeans giving a classy casual look while keeping warm. Later in the day sleeves can be rolled to effortlessly cool the look.

MIXING AND MATCHING (right): Wearing the Pata jean jacket over the velour cami paired with the super stoned ankle pants in purple is model Hailey Silveira (9). Mixing textures adds a new element to any outfit, easily spicing it up. A jean jacket is a staple that can look cute with almost anything.

Unfortunately that is not always the case. Sometimes they leave a crease that makes you so mad you almost want to throw it away. But definitely do not, this small but amazing fashion piece is essential to your look either on your wrist or in your hair. Men’s clothing is similar but very unique as well. Looking clean is a very important aspect of your appearance. Having neat, ironed, and properly fitting clothes will influence your look in a positive way. Our day can be jump started by how prepared we are, putting in

PRICELESS PATTERNS (above): Raegan Lomanto (12) wears the Maria top with the super stoned ankle pants in mustard. Mixing a colored pant with a neutral patterned top gives a bright cheery vibe contrasting winter tones. Photos by Camden Tucker

a little effort can make a difference. A belt is a smart decision, no one wants to see your Ethika underwear. I know that they are so awesome but they definitely aren’t as cool as pants. While males don’t have as many options as females in the accessory department, there are plenty of options. Females have the luxury of choosing from jewelry, scarfs to headwear, and bags. Hats, socks, and bling are accessory options for guys. Please match your accessories with outfits!

It is important to stay consistent with silver, gold, and rose gold. They do not all go with every outfit but with a select few. Accessories are a great way to jazz up your look. Set your alarm five minutes earlier to add accessories, do your hair, and coordinate your outfit in order to see results you will definitely want. These tips are great for an everyday look, fashion comes with individuality, dress to express yourself. —by Phoebe Corgiat

02.16.18 | Crimson Newsmagazine | POP CULTURE 27


|Review

Movie Review

Welcome to the Circus

The greatest showing of a con

by Brighton Garrett, Pop-Culture Editor

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SOAKING IT IN (above) : Barnum (Hugh Jackman)

soaks in the limelight after a successful performance. His childhood dream becomes a reality.

Editors Note: The Greatest Showman was Michael Gracey’s Directorial debut

he circus is a place for misfits to fit, unhappy to be happy, begins to crave upper society’s attention. imaginative to overtake, and phony to be real. Such a circus Carlyle’s love interest, Anne Wheeler, a young, colored, trapeze arrives in the musical The Greatest Showman, directed by artist played by Zendaya Coleman, unites two former Disney stars. Michael Gracey, illustrating the life of P.T. Barnum, the true American Their age difference was a little off-setting, but the chemistry, showman. undeniable. In their duet “Rewrite the Stars” the two performed a P.T. Barnum-- showman, businessman, politician, founder of trapeze dance with a litany of stunts backed the touching song about The Barnum and Bailey Circus-- is the original con man behind writing their own destiny for a forbidden love. A breathtaking moment in famous words: “There’s a sucker born in every minute.” His creativity scenes was a recurring component launching the movie to greatness. breathtakingly exceeds the fathomable. However, strategically placed songs assisted the movie perfectly Barnum is an ambitious, imaginative risk taker determined to without resembling an overwhelming music video. Mixing the right help outcasts find a place to feel loved. The movie dodges con man amount of pop music to classic musical tones added the perfect characteristics when Barnum proves to a critic the happiness of a musical element. Creativity and talent travels beyond classic acting, circus is real, even if the show is not traditional. Barnum is depicted singing, and dancing put into a traditional movie musical giving the true as insightful- not an untrustworthy phony- yet, his conniving ways essence of a performance. shine through at times. The themes: living one’s dreams and being one’s self no matter the The opening scene starts with lights on Barnum as he leads you circumstances and ,most importantly, letting one’s creativity run wild into his circus. The thuds of his cane beating to the beat of the song are captured in Gracey’s choice of anthem for the movie: “This is me” begin along with chills that won’t go away until the final scene. sung by Keala Settle, a bearded woman in the circus. It is the message Hugh Jackman stars as P.T. Barnum bringing a known face in of the circus. Broadway talent to the movie. His powerful voice adds an inspiring The film displayed something rare for the screen: a whole circus tone to all songs making you want to listen to the whole soundtrack performance. The Greatest Showman is truly impactful, delivering the on repeat. inescapable joy of the American circus with its classic phoniness and Barnum’s business partner and young ringmaster, Phillip Carlyle real happiness. (Zac Efron), is an elite nonconformist director avoiding societies Online Reviews: normality. Barnum convinces Carlyle in the song (“The Other Side”) Crimson Score: 5/5 to take a risk joining his circus.The song and scene have perfect 55% 8.0/10 choreography with beats matching sounds in the bar setting, portraying an upbeat business deal and kindled friendship between the two men. The song is a turning point for Barnum, as well: he

Coco es Perfecto

Oscar-Worthy

Pixar’s Coco charms audiences with beautiful story, visuals, and score

The beautiful Golden Globe winning film , Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri storms into Oscar season with no sign of slowing down

by Mason Seden-Hansen, Managing Editor

by Tyler Dunn, Review Editor

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ith the 90th annual Academy Awards is coming around the corner, it is becoming more and more likely that, after being nominated, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri will win for best picture. It tells the story of Mildred Hayes, who, frustrated at her town’s inability to solve her daughter’s murder, boldly paints three signs directed at the police chief William Willoughby just right outside of her town of Ebbing, Missouri. Revolving around stellar writing and acting, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri is truly one of the best of 2017. With a stunning six nominations and four wins at the Golden Globes, including: Best Motion Picture: Drama and Best Screenplay. The film also picked up Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture: Drama for Frances McDormand’s incredible performance as Mildred Hayes, as well as Sam Rockwell winning Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role for his portrayal of Officer Dixon, a morally unjust commanding officer with a quick temper who gets into trouble often. Proving to be a films of 2017, Three Billboards showcases a true dramatic experience full of incredible dialogue and emotion, as well as a great score to top it all off. Writer/Director Martin McDonagh’s phenomenal screenplay is one of the greatest of the decade, and Frances McDormand’s stellar acting in this cinematic masterpiece is sure to make her the frontrunner for best actress. All in all, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri is without-a-doubt a major contender to win best picture at the Academy Awards, and well deserving so. Portraying the brilliant directing skills of McDonagh and a stunning main cast of Frances McDormand, Sam Rockwell, and Woody Harrelson (William Willoughby), this film is definitely recommendable, and easily one of my favorites of 2017.

Crimson Score: 5/5

Online Reviews:

8.3/10

28 REVIEW | Crimson Newsmagazine | 02.16.18

93% PHOTOS CURTESY OF IDMB

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he beauty of Disney-Pixar’s Coco, winner of the Golden Globes’ Best Animated Feature award, cannot be overstated.The animated film is a celebration of Mexican culture, family, and tradition, and a story of the integration of all of these into modern society. Its stunning visuals are only overshadowed by its loveable characters, and its moving and inspiring plot. Coco proved that the magic of Disney is not only alive and well, but reaching new heights, and it left me beyond charmed and pleased. Coco follows the story of a boy, Miguel, who has a musical passion when his family has banned music. While they want him to follow in their footsteps as a shoemaker, he wants to become a great guitarist. So he follows his passion and his idol, Ernesto De La Cruz, to the land of the dead, where he connects with his ancestors and is reminded of the value of family and tradition, as well as following your dreams. Coco is the perfect mix of all the good elements of modern and classic disneypixar. The movie’s stunning, cutting edge visuals and multiculturalism show the new tricks modern disney has in its toolbox, while its loveable characters, wholesome values and heartwarming stories. The pillars of classic disney, are at their peak. In perfect disney fashion, the plot mixes charming elements children will love and deep moral quandrums and plots that will leave the adults thinking, all in a visually impressive package. As a musical, Coco shines just as bright: it has an exceptional score with several wonderfully catchy songs, such as “Remember Me,” that were in my head long after I’d left the theater. I’m hard pressed to find anything wrong with this movie, but it’s very easy to find elements to praise. Coco is a true gem, clearly one of, if not the, best animated feature disney and Pixar have released, and anyone would be well-served to watch it.

Crimson Score: 5/5

Online Reviews:

8.6/10

97%


An Eerie Anthology

TV Reviews

Review|

Black Mirror continues to impress into season four

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by Camden Tucker, Photography Director

et in a future only minutes away from now, Charlie through any human in their path. It’s just another “man Brooker’s Black Mirror is the perfect show to vs. technology” message, and the forty minute episode unnerve you and make you wonder if this is has only a few lines of dialogue and lacks emotion in the future of humanity. After the show’s third season its writing. Episode five depends solely on its action amazed fans and added a few cult classic episodes to scenes and doesn’t have a world-shattering moment. its impressive roster, the release of six new episodes was This soporiferous episode is amazing if you’re looking for greatly anticipated. Season four was released something to fall asleep to. on Dec. 29 and is the series debut after And then we have episodes like “USS becoming a Netflix exclusive after Calistor”. This features a vibrant previously airing on British Channel depiction of an introverted boss who 4 network for its first three seasons. runs a gaming company. While For those who haven’t seen the meek on the outside, when out show, (I recommend you do) it’s of the spotlight he imports the a modern version of “The Twilight consciousness of his employees Zone” with each episode featuring a into his game, “Infinity”, where new technology, which humans take he becomes a sadistic abuser. CROCODILE TEARS (top): Episode three’s antihero Mia advantage of, manage to screw up, and He demands they roll play as stares into the camera and breaks down after an ruin others’ lives. his favorite Star Trek-esque show accidental murder leads into a string of intentional ones. With this season’s roll out, its easy to tell on a spaceship replacing the USS the series has strayed away from its normal path of Enterprise. This was the first episode of the dark material and even managed to include a few hopeful season and ranks number one best as well. The dialogue endings. This may be because season three fan favorites is witty and laugh-out-loud funny, but also manages to Crimson Score: 4/5 “San Junipero” and “Nosedive” ended on a happy-ish note, maintain a suspenseful and interesting story line. which people absolutely loved. The season is spectacular, Black Mirror season four is one you can binge in a day and I loved most of the season, but episodes “Metalhead” and think about for weeks. The episodes are fresh and and “Crocodile” are just sub-par. Metalhead is a black and chock full of amazing storylines. Even with the two weak Online Reviews: white post apocalyptic thriller that follows Scottish actress episodes, the amazing ones make up for it. The beauty Maxine Peake through a desolate wasteland chased by in their storyline and ideas is something TV hasn’t seen 8.9/10 96% robotic terrier sized “dogs” who shoot and stab their way in a while.

Black Mirror is Available on: NETFLIX

Back at the Ranch

The Ranch becomes a success on the binging list

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by McKensi Keller, Reporter he Ranch is a controversial show that Netflix nobody. Presented with characters such as Rooster, aired on April 1, 2016. The show represents Colt’s brother (Danny Masterson), his father Beau (Sam a family with problems and bumps in the Elliot), and his mother (Debra Winger), all contribute to road and how they overcome the issues portrayed to Colt’s new life. Not to mention them. The producer, a surprise visit from his ex-girlfriend, Abby (Elisha Don Reo, has also Cuthbert). produced shows Overall, this comedy depicts a family which such as The Golden goes through many ups and downs, ending Girls, Blossom, each episode on a major cliffhanger. The and Two and a Half Ranch is a relatable TV show that people in Men. Reo has been this small town, including myself, are able to FAMILY LAUGHS (bottom): The Bennet family laughs and thinks nominated for Emmys connect with and it is also able to give you about old memories together while drinking to their family for multiple shows and a good laugh. This sitcom was something traditions. The Ranch has released two seasons so far. switched from a writer I could put on and know that I will be in love to eventually become a by the first ten minutes. Reading deep into producer. family matters, The Ranch grabs your attention Crimson Score: 4/5 The sitcom portrays a rancher’s son and manages to keep it as you’ll be on the edge of your who comes home to help his father run the family seats at the end of each episode. ranch after his football career failed. Many problems Critics were surprised by the strong performances come up from the past for leaving his family for 15 and sensitivity the show presents. Despite getting 58% Online Reviews: years to pursue a semi-pro football career. Things on Rotten Tomatoes, Netflix renewed a second part, have changed since Colt Bennet, (Ashton Kutcher), released on Dec 15, 2017. Gaining a delightful reaction 7.6/10 58% has left his hometown of Garrison, Colorado. Being a from viewers, the show intends to release a third part legend 15 years ago has shifted to being a tolerable to The Ranch to be launched in 2018.

The Ranch is Available on: NETFLIX

Layout by Trevor Jaureguy, Graphic Designer

Photos by IMDB

02.16.18 | Crimson Newsmagazine | REVIEW 29


|Sports

Soccer scores a sensational season Girls Soccer continues season with their eye on returning to CIF by Calynn Long, Reporter

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ith a 14-6-3 overall record and a 9-4-1 league record and no home games lost, the overtime game in a 3-4 loss, a 0-2 loss against Atascadero, and once again in a shattering varsity girls soccer team has had quite an exciting season. The team started off their 0-8 loss against rival San Luis Obispo. season undefeated in league with a surprising win against San Luis Obispo High school at a “With being a captain, it’s important to treat everyone equally and continue to push home game, and continue to defeat opponents. everyone to their fullest potential, because if anyone doesn’t give it 110% on the field, it can Their coaching staff consists of Dillion Simoulis, head coach, and Steve Pugh, assistant affect the rest of the game,” Serna said. coach. After their shattering loss to San Luis Obispo, due to many starting players out for either “Without a good relationship and mutual respect between sickness or injuries, the team continues on with the season. the player and the coaches, I don’t think success is possible,” “We still have a lot going for us. SLO was just one game. Simoulis said. We defeated them at our home game and they defeated us They are creating a The varsity girls soccer team has 19 girls on the team with at their home. They are ranked 19 in the state so I think going 11 Juniors, six Seniors and only two Sophomores, Marissa 1-1 against them is pretty good. As of now we are only team to culture that will define Ezzell and Jordan Bullard. This team has returning players defeat them this season! Our main goal is to finish second in bearcat soccer for that allow for a team dynamic that compares to no other. league and make a run in CIF,”said Simoulis. “They are a wonderful group of girls! They have a lot of No matter the game, each player on the team helps try to many years to come. respect for each other and this is something I see on and off complete a task that all teams desire at the end of each game: the field. They are creating a culture that will define Bearcat a victory. Dillon Simoulis, coach soccer for many years to come. I am very proud of what they Even though the hopes of winning league is gone, the girls have accomplished so far and look forward to what is to are still playing for a chance to make it to CIF. come,” Varsity coach Simoulis said. “As a team, we have to hold our ground, keep our heads up On this team there are many strong players that contribute to the team during the game, in each and every game we play, and continue to play Bearcat soccer,” Serna said. such as Madison Wineman with four goals this season, and Giselle Zatarain with 10 goals. No other sport, including the boys team, has had the amount of success they have had “As a team we realize our strengths and weaknesses. During practices we work on in the competitive Southern Section league this winter season. No matter how tough the stretching the field and movement off the ball to create gaps within the opponents defense opponents have been for this soccer team, they have seemed to come back with a fighting for an opportunity at the goal”, Alexis Serna, Senior Captain and Keeper said. spirit, which has earned them a spot in CIF. Averaging two goals per game, the girls have only lost four league matches this season, in a tough match against Arroyo Grande, resulting in a 2-0 loss. Then losing in a nail biting

30 SPORTS | Crimson Newsmagazine | 02.16.18

1 THREADING THE NEEDLE: Left Midfielder

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Junior Madison Wineman weaves around opposing players. She has made four goals this season and made six assists. 2 RACE TO THE GOAL : Junior Midfielder Ryann Coffey dashes to keep the ball from AG defense. Coffey has played on Varsity for two years. 3 BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION : The team swarms Wineman after she scores a goal on her birthday. The Bearcats played against Arroyo Grande and beat them out 2-1.

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Photos by Camden Tucker


Winter sports review

Sports|

How PRHS winter athletics did this year by Madison Funke, Photographer

Boys Soccer

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Overall: 15-5-6 League: 9-4-1

s the season begins to wind down, the Paso Robles High School boys Varsity soccer has been dominating Overall 15-5-6 and 9-4-1 in league. Senior Victor Rodriguez, the captain and goalkeeper with 115 saves, has been on the varsity team since his freshman year, and is now leading his team to this success. “The team has been doing exceptional this year. Before it seemed as if we were not connecting in the right way, but the chemistry between the guys has gotten much better, ultimately leading to our success so far this season,” said Rodriguez, who has seen the team grow this year. The Bearcats’ best game was a win (2-0) against SLO, ripping their opponent of their undefeated record and #12 rank in the country. Rodriguez’s success this season has payed off, as he committed to play for Cal Poly on Tuesday, Feb. 6.

PASSING THE BALL : Senior Ramon Torres passes the ball to a teammate. This game was the twelfth win for PRHS Boys Varsity Soccer.

Boys basketball

Overall: 7-13 League: 5-8 Breaking tradition, the boys beat Mission Prep High at home, something even their coaches in high school couldn’t do. “We are family,” Team captain Anthony Napoli said, who saw the chemistry between players grow. Seniors Jaedon Lyon and Sebastian Galsim are the team’s top scorers. Galsim has scored 365 points and Lyon has scored 82.

BLOCKING A BASKET : Braden Waterman leaps to stop an incoming ball from his opponent. Waterman is one of three freshmen on the team.

Girls Waterpolo

Overall: 17-11 League: 3-5 The girls’ best game was against Arroyo Grande, the lady Bearcat’s rival, which they won 8-7. Junior Mackenzie Raymond, the team captain, was amazed by her teammates. “We had a great season. For such a young team we worked very well together and really built up to be a really good team,” said Raymond.

THROWING FOR THE WIN: Sophomore Tatiana Smeltzer scans the pool for an open player or a chance to score. This game marked the tenth win for the team.

Photos by Camden Tucker and Madi Coons

Girls basketball

Overall: 11-13 League: 5-9

The girl’s best game was in December against SLO High School. “Our team worked hard for that win and didn’t give up when things weren’t going our way.” said Junior Kimberly Buchanan, who has played varsity basketball for three years. Key players are Junior Jayden Loewen and Freshman Hailie Abel, both captains that hit threes.

WORKING ON DEFENSE: Sydney Meneses raises her arms in attempt to defend her basket. She is the teams’ senior point guard.

Wrestling

Overall: 4-2 League: 4-2

Boys varsity wrestling had an exciting match when Sophomore Dylan Maduena beat his opponent in the last ten seconds of the match. Senior Justin Clays believes wrestlers work harder than any other group of athletes on campus. Junior Kyle Miller is undefeated in league.

GOING HEAD TO HEAD: Wrestling is a very physically demanding sport, and hours of training go into each match. PRHS has only one team: varsity boys.

02.16.18 | Crimson Newsmagazine | SPORTS 31


|Sports

Technically speaking: passing with senior Sebastian galsim Focus

Galsim locks his eyes onto the target of his shot as he drives to the rim.

Aim

As he aims, Galsim pictures the ball going in the basket. This improves the accuracy of his shot or pass.

Strength

Form

Utilizing a two footed jump to maintain balance after embracing contact, he braces himself for the pass.

To keep the defender from getting the ball, Galsim shields the ball. He pulls his hands out of reach of his opponents.

Photos by Camden Tucker and Madi Coons

About Sebastian

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enior Sebastian Galsim has been playing basketball since he was six years old. Since then, it has been his dream to play high school basketball. Galsim is now one of 13 boys on the PRHS Boys Basketball team. He and his teammates have earned seven overall wins and five league wins this season, placing them sixth in league. The team practices every day after school, and Galsim gets extra training from shooting hoops at Centennial gym or in his own driveway. “My favorite part about basketball is getting the chance to play with the same kids I’ve played with since elementary school,” said Galsim, who has been on the varsity team for three years. Galsim has been named a key player by his teammates, especially on offense. “Sebastian does a great job scoring offensively and gives us opportunity to go on scoring runs,” said Senior Anthony Napoli, one of the five seniors on the varsity team. Galsim has scored 365 points for the Bearcats this season, with 83 of those being free throws.

32 SPORTS | Crimson Newsmagazine | 02.16.18

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