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Cherry Creek High School 9300 E. Union Ave. Greenwood Village, CO 80111

Journal The Union St.

May 2018

Vol. 3 Issue 5

Seniors earn over $15 million in scholarships On pages 6-9


IN THIS ISSUE.... USJ STAFF

NEWS

Missing Goose........................3 Teacher March........................4 STUDENT LIFE

Senior Insights.......................5 The Lost Boy...........................5 FEATURES

Senior Scholarships............6-9 ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

PUBG vs Fortnite............10-11 SPORTS

Where Are They Now?.........13 Girls’ Tennis..........................13 OPINIONS

Growing Up..........................14 Letter From The Editor........15 CSMA 2018 Best of Colorado Awards Won by USJ Staff 1st place: Breaking Sports Coverage Editorial Cartoon 2nd place: Alternative Coverage Single Page Design Sports Action Photo 3rd place: Breaking News Coverage Lifestyle Coverage Critical Review Environmental Portrait

Editor Emeritus Cameron Barnard

Layout Editor Emilee Shoff-Olson

Editor-in-Chief Gracie Lordi

Graphics Editor Ben Sampson

Student Life Editor Valerie Lombogia

Advisor Yoni Fine

A&E Editor Eliza King

Staff Writers William Anderson Addy Dodd Da’Nazjah Dorsey Camden Lashlee Skyler Matteson Ashley Miller Oliver Molberg Giovanni Machado Michael Ragnow Nikita Sluchak Christopher Tekavec Susan Zeng

Opinions Editor Jacob Ginsberg-Margo Sports Editor Brison Owens Photo Editor Ana George

Purpose The Union Street Journal is a student publication distributed to the students, faculty, and staff of Cherry Creek High School. The paper serves as an information source and a two-way communication forum for both the school and community. Opinions expressed do not necessarily represent the views of Cherry Creek High School or the Cherry Creek School District. Letters to the editor Letters to the editor are accepted and can be submitted via email to new.creek.usj@gmail.com Letters cannot be anonymous and they may be edited for clarity.

Find more stories at unionstreetjournal.com

@creekusj 2

May 2018


NEWS

No me gooseta: the bird debacle

Beloved mascot “Ryan Goosling’s” movement through the CCSD BY: MIKE RAGNOW Staff Writer Attentive student eyes may have noticed a plastic goose, dressed in a bright green safety vest, nestled in the rocks outside the band room door on the North side of the Fine Arts building this February. Ryan the Goose became a symbol: a mascot and rallying point for the Cherry Creek Marching Band and the school as a whole. A few weeks ago, Ryan the Goose went missing. Band director Tim Libby FLYING HIGH: Ryan believes the goose Creek High School. showed up over a decade ago in a CCHSBPA (Cherry Creek High School Band Parents Association) fundraiser. “We don’t know where the goose came from,” Libby said. “The marching band parents had a garage sale many years ago, and people brought items to sell. It appeared in the band room on the shelf in the percussion cabinet.” Ryan flew the coop of the band room after Libby received his gift from the Senior members of the Marching Band: a deep clean of the room. When the percussion cabinet was cleansed of the random assortment of clutter, including everything from a metal swordfish to a Cleveland Browns themed pair of Converse, Ryan was the only thing that was saved. Band director Sara Wynes had requested that the goose specifically be

May 2018

“One of the highlights was when it laid eggs around Easter,” she said, referring to the plastic eggs that appeared around Ryan. The Troubadours have a special affinity with the goose according to Harrison. “I don’t really know how to start it. It was a bit of a ‘meme’ if you will,” senior Bryan Paul said. “It’s just kind of been a running joke between us and the band kids.” Hours after COURTESY OF GREENWOOD VILLAGE POLICE DEPARTMENT the first “in Goosling spent a brief amount of time on the roof of Cherry remembrance” poster went up, a picture of Ryan nesting on the removed from the band room. “Mrs. Wynes found it a little frightening,” roof of Campus Middle School surfaced. After a few weeks of radio silence on Libby said. the bird, it showed up in an unexpected Ryan was then placed outside by the place: as a prop in Campus Middle School’s band. Senior Michael Zamora draped it in production of The Adams Family. the “CCHS PIT” safety vest so that every“I’m not sure how the goose got to us, one would be aware of its roots. but it was in the gym when we were lookA lot of students have noticed the iming for props so we thought we would put pact Ryan has had on the student body. it to use, ” said Tegan Palmer, the director “The goose to me is just a random plastic of the show and choir director at Campus. goose that’s just there but makes everyone’s day,” freshman James Dwyer said. “Surpris- “It was used as a humorous example of a petting zoo bird when Wednesday enters ingly, it also means a lot to the choir kids. Even the teacher made jokes with him from saying the line, ‘Mom, Dad, I shot dinner.’” As of May 3, Ryan the Goose is still at time to time.” “It was just funny,” choir teacher Sarah Campus, in the safety of their prop closet, but there are still high hopes among the Harrison said. “We left it alone - we just band and choir that one day, this wild watched it.” goose chase may be over. Harrison remembers an anecdote about Ryan coming off of Spring Break this year.

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NEWS

Schools close while teachers march on Capitol to save PERA BY: CAMERON BARNARD Editor Emeritus While the school day at Cherry Creek High School was canceled on Friday April 27, the State Capitol was engulfed in redclad protesters gathering on the steps in the hot Spring sun. Most educators’ eyes are on Colorado Senate Bill 200, which currently sits in a senate conference committee. The bill deals with rebalancing the Public Employees’ Retirement Association (PERA). Currently the PERA system is not in a sustainable state and is taking down with it Colorado’s credit rating. The modified version of the bill by the House had added a yearly $225 million ongoing direct payment to PERA, making up for the money-losing program. It also reduced the retirement age from 65 years old to 60. At the Capitol, people stood en masse chanting “education is a right; that is why we have to fight” and “enough is enough.” Dedicated teachers brought signs, some joking with slogans like WTF (where’s the funding), and others saying, “We’re just trying to teach.” The crowd gathered in the Civic Center during the morning, where there was a podium set up for activists to speak out. Everyone from the event organizer to a student mom, and even a student were able to speak on the podium.

Governor John Hickenlooper also made an appearance at the Civic Center podium, echoing his dedication to fixing PERA. “I realize that we will never ever be able to maintain a strong economy without having a great education system, and I know that having a great education system requires great teachers, and great teachers deserve to get paid,” HickenPHOTO BY CAMERON BARNARD looper said. The Colorado education sys- THE STEPS: Teachers gathered on the front steps tem is one of the least funded in of the state Capitol building in the afternoon the country. giving speeches and calling for PERA reform. In addition to protesting the proposed changes to PERA, proclassrooms, citing underfunded schools testers sought increased teacher who didn’t have any access to computers. pay and increased classroom funding. “When teachers are funding their own According to Great Education Colorado, classrooms as opposed to districts and Colorado is ranked 50th out of all 50 states taxpayers funding those things, you’re not in teacher wage competitiveness. having to reach into your own pocket to The demonstration gathered teachers buy supplies and paper, ” Mydans said. “It from across the state. impacts how you create your lesson plans “I’m wanting to be here in solidarity for when you have less funding. ” my friends and coworkers who are super Though the Cherry Creek School underfunded and to increase people fundDistrict isn’t nearly as underfunded and ing in the state of Colorado and the equity underpaid as other schools. over zip code lines,” said Sarah Mydans, The district most recently used some a teacher for Boulder Valley Community of the money from the Bond and Budget Montessori School. override 3A and 3B to purchase 1,408 new Colorado is $2,162 Dell laptops for classrooms at Creek. below the national average The Cherry Creek School District has spending per pupil in the second highest average teacher salary k-12 according to Great in the state with $71,711 in the 2017-18 Education Colorado. The school year. spending had continu“Cherry Creek is a very fortunate disously dropped with the trict; Brighton is not the same situation,” passing of TABOR and Mydans said. “Those kids don’t have the Colorado Amendment 23, same opportunities that you guys do. We now facing an all time low. want it to be fair for everyone.” This is the farthest below Yet Creek teachers are dependent on the national average that and affected by PERA. Colorado has since before Colorado Senate Bill 200 was voted into 1970. the hands of the Senate conference comPHOTO BY CAMERON BARNARD Some speakers at the mittee on May 2, where they are deciding A SEA OF RED: Protesters wore red and chanted protests called for equal on what provisions to keep or discard. “Red for Ed” as they marched on the state Capitol. access to technology in

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May 2018


STUDENT LIFE

The best and worst of Creek

According to seniors BY: BEN SAMPSON Graphics Editor We asked four students in the class of 2018 what the best and worst parts of their experience at Creek was. This is what they said: *PHOTOS AND GRAPHIC BY BEN SAMPSON

Spring play: the origin of Peter Pan BY: GIOVANNI MACHADO Staff Writer Creek’s spring play, The Lost Boy, tells the real story of J.M. Barrie, the author who wrote Peter Pan. The play shows the creative process inside Barrie’s head and all the drama he lived through that inspired him to write the famous story. The cast of the show included 11 actors, which is a much smaller number than the last show which included 45 actors. For director James Miller, that was far from a problem. “I like to have a smaller cast every year because it helps the actors to create a different environment, and it helps to create one-on-one attention with the actors,” Miller said. Freshman Austin McBrian, who played the roles of Davie, Barrie’s younger brother, and Peter Pan, agrees. “You get to know more people, and there is more bonding,” McBrian said. The Lost Boy was McBrian’s second play, which made him more confident about his performance.

May 2018

“Once you get used to everything, you have more control over it, but I still get a little nervous,” McBrian said. McBrian is happy with the result of the

PHOTO BY GIOVANNI MACHADO

IMMERSED ACTORS: Freshmen Caetano De Sa, JT Brazile, and Audrey Graves were a part of the spring play, The Lost Boy.

rehearsals and also the actors’ skills. “[The rehearsals] are going well, and we are doing quite well,” McBrian said. The play brought some funny moments, but the focus of the play was mainly dramatic and mature themes such as death and family drama. Miller believes that despite the young cast and such a dramatic story, the actors did an excellent job. “There are some intimate moments, and the actors, being 15 years old, have struggled with it sometimes,” Miller said. “But they have been working hard. We’ve made this a safe place to work and explore, and they have risen above it. I think that the community and their families will be really proud about it.” The play showed April 26-28, however, Miller invites all students to watch the plays coming up next year. “The ticket is always just $10 per student, and $15 for adults,” Miller said. “It is always a safe space for all the family and all students of Creek.”

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CREEK SCHOLARSHIPS

Cherry Creek High School Scholarship Report OPTIN AKRAMI Lamont School of Music Scholarship University of Denver JORIS U. ALAWOE President’s Leadership Class University of Colorado Boulder Juli Annne Perry Scholarship Beyond the Mark Foundation Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona TAYLOR M. ARCHER Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona MARY E. ASCHERMAN Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona GABE R. AUSTIN Athletic Scholarship Men’s Baseball Metropolitan State University at Denver CAMERON A. AZARI Presidential Scholarship Pace University Dean’s Scholar University of Denver Arts & Humanities Gold Scholarship University of Colorado Boulder Merit Scholarship University of Colorado Denver Merit Scholarship University of San Francisco Merit Scholarship The New School BETTY U. BAI Trustee’s Scholarship Calvin College Mosaic Award Calvin College Legacy Award Calvin College Howard Hughes Medical Institute Scholarship Calvin College Bishop Evans Scholarship Notre Dame Club of Denver SYDNEY A. BECKETT Dorothy Walker Scholarship The LEAD Foundation Elks Most Valuable Student The Englewood Elks Troop BRETT P. BENEDETTI Chancellor’s Award University of Colorado Colorado Springs CU Esteemed Scholars Award

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University of Colorado Boulder Dean’s Scholarship Augustana College Presidential Scholarship Beloit College LINDSEY C. BENKELMAN UA Scholar and Engineering Scholarship The University of Alabama RedHawk Excellence Scholarship Miami University of Ohio Dean’s Scholarship Indiana University Merit Scholarship Clemson University Old Gold Scholarship and Business Community Scholars Award University of Iowa Green & Gold Scholarship Colorado State University President Joseph A. Sewall Award University of Colorado Boulder Academic Heritage Scholar Auburn University Founders Gold Award Northern Arizona University Johnson Scholars Award Santa Clara University NICOLE K. BENKELMAN Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona Dean’s Scholarship Indiana University Presidential Scholarship Chapman University Merit Scholarship Santa Clara University Mark Twain Scholarship & Journalism Study Abroad Swcholarship University of Missouri Old Gold Scholarship University of Iowa Merit Scholarship University of Miami President Joseph A. Sewall Award University of Colorado Boulder CMCI Journalism Scholarship University of Colorado Boulder Green & Gold Scholarship

Colorado State University Merit Scholarship University of Missouri EMILEE E. BENTLER Bluegrass Spirit Scholarship University of Kentucky Premier Scholarship Kenan and Trustee Awards Transylvania University President’s Gold Scholarship Baylor University TANVI BERI Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona COURTNEY E. BINKLEY Collegiate Scholar The University of Alabama CAITLIN A. BLAKELEY Founders Gold Scholarship Northern Arizona University UA Scholar The University of Alabama Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona KAYLA R. BOXER Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona EVAN A. BREITKREUZ President’s Scholarship Colorado School of Mines ALYEA C. CALDWELL The Theatre School Scholarship DePaul University COLE W. CANTOR President Horace M. Hale Award University of Colorado Boulder Music Scholarship University of Colorado Boulder School of Music Lamont School of Music Scholarship University of Denver Merit Scholarship University of North Carolina School of the Arts Merit Scholarship Indiana University JESSICA B. CANTOR Ohio Next Generation Award OU Strategic Enrollment Presidential Study Abroad Michigan State University

National Spartan Award Michigan State University Spartan Scholarship University of Tampa Ohio Trustee Award Ohio University Ohio Success Scholarship Ohio University Scholarship of Distinction West Virginiaw University WVU Scholarship West Virginia University Residential Experience Award University of Missouri ROBERT C. CHAMBERS National Merit Scholarship Texas Tech University President Select Scholarship Texas Tech University TERRY B.CHEN Scholarship of Distinction University of Texas Dallas Distinguished Scholar Award Southern Methodist University Presidential Scholarship Loyola University Chicago Presidential Scholarship Seattle University Merit Scholarship Northeastern University Merit Scholarship Loyola Marymount University Merit Scholarship Baylor University President Joseph A. Sewall Award University of Colorado Boulder EMMA K. CHICHESTER Dussault Scholarship Gonzaga University President James H. Baker Award University of Colorado Boulder Colorado Merit Scholarship Colorado State University Honors College KU Distinction Scholarship The University of Kansas Creighton University Founders Award Creighton University Summit Scholarship University of Oregon

May 2018


CREEK SCHOLARSHIPS Merit Scholarship St.Thomas University Dean’s Scholarship Indiana University University Scholarship University of Oklahoma BRADY M. CHLOE Summit/Apex Scholarship University of Oregon SAMUEL H. COLE Provost Scholar Award & Distinguished BBA Scholar Southern Methodist University JACK H. CONGEL Summit/Apex Scholarship University of Oregon Puget Sound Faculty Scholarship University of Puget Sound GEORGE H. CONWAY Chick Evans Caddie Scholarship Western Golf Association and Evans Scholars Foundation NICOLA K. COOPER USD Presidential Scholarship University of San Diego LMU Achievement Award Loyola Marymount University LMU Early Action Award Loyola Marymount University Regents Scholarship Gonzaga University Colorado Merit Scholarship Colorado State University KU Distinction Scholarship The University of Kansas RedHawk Excellence Scholarship Miami University of Ohio ZACHARY AV. CORWIN Dean’s Scholarship College of Wooster Music Scholarship College of Wooster Trustee Scholarship Eckerd College PS Faculty Scholarship University of Puget Sound St.Olaf Academic Scholarship St.Olaf College Hla/Fisher Scholarship Denison University KAILEY S. D’AMBROSIA Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona RICARDO A. DE BASTOS National NROTC Navy Option

May 2018

Scholarship United States Navy Type 2 Air Force ROTC United States Air Force National Buckeye Scholarship The Ohio State University Maximus Scholarship The Ohio State University President Joseph A. Sewall Award University of Colorado Boulder Engineering Scholars University of Colorado Boulder College of Engineering Merit Scholarship Pennsylvania State University College of Engineering KYLE A. DI GIORGIO Lillian Disneg Scholarship California Institute of the Arts Provost Scholarship California Institute of the Arts MARGARET C. DOUGHERTY PSCU Community Scholarship Public Service Credit Union BENNETT A. EDELSCHEIN National Merit Semifinalist Award University of Arizona NICHOLAS C. EDWARDS Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona JOSEPH L. EIGNER Presidential Scholar The University of Alabama LINDSEY A. EVANS Merit Scholarship Texas Christian University SYDNEY R. FELSEN Founders Blue Scholarship Northern Arizona University SAM M. FLORA Regent Scholarship Gonzaga University Summit/Apex Scholarship University of Oregon President Horace M. Hale Award University of Colorado Boulder TRENT A. FOWLER President’s Excellence Award St. Edward’s University Edwardian Scholarship St. Edward’s University UCCS Chancellor’s Award University of Colorado Colorado

Springs SAMUEL J. FREED President Joseph A. Sewall Award University of Colorado Boulder Engineering Scholars University of Colorado Boulder College of Engineering President’s Leadership Class University of Colorado Boulder HENRY A. FRIEDMAN Berklee World Tour Scholarship Berklee College of Music JOSHUA S. FULLMER Founders Blue Scholarship Northern Arizona University LARISSA M. GAMBLE Founders Blue Scholarship Northern Arizona University BO M. GARFINKEL Second Century Scholar Award Southern Methodist University HANNAH S. GHARRITY Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona DUNCAN L. GOTTSCHALL President Horace M. Hale Award University of Colorado Boulder COLIN L. GREENE Bishop Scholar Ohio Wesleyan University Puget Sound Alumni Scholarship University of Puget Sound CHARLES M. GRUBER Faculty Scholarship Texas Christian University ASHLEY J. HAND Athletic Scholarship Women’s Volleyball Tennessee Tech University Athletic Scholarship Women’s Volleyball Rutgers University Athletic Scholarship Women’s Volleyball High Point University Athletic Scholarship Women’s Volleyball University of Texas Arlington Athletic Scholarship Women’s Volleyball University of Nevada Las Vegas CAMILLE A. HARMON Faculty Scholarship Texas Christian University

ALEXANDER S. HARRINGTON Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona MAXWELL R. HENDEN Dean’s Scholarship Indiana University JACQUELINE N. HENRY President Horace M. Hale Award University of Colorado Boulder Esteemed Scholars Program University of Colorado Boulder Faculty Scholarship Texas Christian University PARKER N. HILVITZ Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona JACK E. HOELLEN Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona ADAM F. HOERGER National Merit Scholarship National Merit Scholarship Corporation HAILEY E. HOGUE Dean’s Scholar University of Denver CAMILLA C. HOLMSEN Distinguished Scholar Award & Distinguished BBA Scholar Southern Methodist University ALEXANDRA E. HONG National Merit Allergan Foundation Scholarship The Allergan Foundation CLARE N. HUDSON Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona Tiger Nation and Transformation Merit Non-Resident Award Louisiana State University Academic Excellence Scholarship University of Mississippi KYRA F. HUGHES Arts & Humanities Gold Scholarship University of Colorado Boulder Academic Scholarship Butler University Pioneer Scholar University of Denver

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CREEK SCHOLARSHIPS RASA I. HUMEYUMPTEWA Founders Blue Scholarship Northern Arizona University KYLIE T. HUNTER Banneker Key Scholarship University of Maryland Honors Program Boettcher Foundation Scholarship Boettcher Foundation LEAH M. HUZJAK Chancellor’s Scholarship University of Colorado Denver Dorothy Keith Memorial Scholarship Colorado Junior Classical League CC Scholarship Colorado College Merit Scholarship Colorado School of Mines Green & Gold Scholarship Colorado State University President Joseph A. Sewall Award University of Colorado Boulder ALEJANDRO JR. JAUREGUI Reginald D. Polk Scholarship Cherry Creek High School EVELYN R. JENKINS Amigo Scholarship University of New Mexico LIESL T. JENSEN Founders Gold Scholarship Northern Arizona University DAI AN JIANG National Merit Scholarship National Merit Scholarship Corporation MATTHEW D. JOHNSTON KU Achievement Scholarship The University of Kansas EVERETT C. KANE Merit Scholarship Texas Christian University University Scholar Award Southern Methodist University BRETT R. KAPLAN Founders Blue Scholarship Northern Arizona University Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona SWATHI KOMPELLA Merit Scholarship Texas Christian University LARA G. KREMER Presidential Scholar and Engineering Scholarship The

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University of Alabama Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona Merit Scholarship Embry Riddle Aeronautical University CLARA M. LAVANDIER Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona JACOB M. LAWRENCE Trustee’s Scholarship Trinity University TOBY J. LEE National Merit Scholarship National Merit Scholarship Corporation MINJU LEE Richard Cohen Scholarship Boston University MOLLY Y. LEIBBRANDT FCCLA Scholarship Johnson & Wales University Johnson & Wales Scholar Johnson & Wales University JARRON T. LEWIS 2018 Daniels Scholar Scholarship The Daniels Fund Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona STRYKER C. LEWIS President’s Gold Scholarship Baylor University Distinguished Scholars Scholarship Baylor University Arrupe Scholars Scholarship Loyola Marymount University Meinig Scholars Scholarship Cornell University YU-XI LIU Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona SIDDHARTH M. MANE National Merit Scholarship National Merit Scholarship Corporation MARKUS S. MANLY President Joseph A. Sewall Award University of Colorado Boulder Dave Kinsey Memorial Scholarship DECA Cherry Creek High School TAYLOR J. MARCINI Green & Gold Scholarship Colorado State University HANNA S. MAY Descendants of Veterans Schol-

arship Littleton’s George C. Evans Post 103 of the American Legion ANA MAYORDOMO Boettcher Foundation Scholarship Boettcher Foundation VICTORIA N. MCCANN New American University Scholar Arizona State University JORDAN R. MCCURDY Athletic Scholarship Track & Field United States Naval Academy RACHEL M. MOES National Merit Scholarship National Merit Scholarship Corporation STEPHEN M. MALONEY Founders Blue Scholarship Northern Arizona University ASHLEY E. MILLER Future Teacher Scholarship Cherry Creek High School TREVOR K. MONTREAL Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona REID Z. MOONEY Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona RYAN A. MOORE Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona CHADWICK B. MULLIGAN Dean’s Scholarship Indiana University Chancellor Scholar University of Denver President James H. Baker Award University of Colorado Boulder USD Presidential Scholar University of San Diego Faculty Scholarship Texas Christian University Second Century Scholar & SMU Discovery Scholarship Southern Methodist University TANNER J. O’TREMBA Presidential Scholarship Texas Tech University Athletic Scholarship Men’s Baseball Texas Tech University MEGAN A. PATRICK Athletic Scholarship Womens Lacrosse George Washington

University CAROLINA A. PEREZ Colorado Merit Scholarship Colorado State University PASCAL A. PEREZ Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona GRACE C. PETROFF Creighton University Academic Scholarship Creighton University Father Joseph Labaj Award Creighton University The Juli Anne Perry Scholarship WILLIAM M. PINKELMAN Chancellor Scholar University of Denver President’s Scholarship Colorado School of Mines Achievement Award Montana State University SAMANTHA R. POOLE Merit Scholarship Texas Christian University EMILY S. POWIS Presidential Scholarship University of Southern California Wallace Scholarship Macalester College Purple and Gold Scholarship University of Washington Academic Scholarship University of Colorado Boulder ABILASH PRABHAKARAN Regeneron Science Talent Search Top 40 Finalist Regeneron and Society for Science & the Public SARAH B. RAGAN Madeleva Award Saint Mary’s College President’s Scholarship Holy Cross College Board of Trustees Scholarship Regis University Bear Scholarship University of Northern Colorado MANASIBA Y. RAOL Trustee’s Scholarship Trinity University Creighton Academic Scholarship Creighton University Shaffel Award Creighton University Chancellor’s Scholarship Uni-

May 2018


CREEK SCHOLARSHIPS versity of Colorado Denver President Joseph A. Sewall Award University of Colorado Boulder Engineering Scholars University of Colorado Boulder College of Engineering BOLD Community Engineering Scholarship University of Colorado Boulder Chancellor Scholarship University of Denver Pacific Merit Scholarship University of the Pacific MAKAYLA A. RAPP President’s Scholar Award Seattle Pacific University Green & Gold Scholarship Colorado State University National Buckeye Non-Resident Scholarship Ohio State University Mark Twain Non-Resident Scholarship University of Missouri GEORGIA K. ROBERTS Trinity Tower Scholarship Trinity University SCU Dean’s Scholarship Santa Clara University ADJOA P. SAKWA The National Scholarship The Dream.US Green Apple Book Award Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Provost’s Scholarship University of Colorado Denver SEBASTIANA R. SAYA Athletic Scholarship Swim-

ming University of Northern Colorado Academic Scholarship University of Northern Colorado JARED E. SCOTT National Merit Scholarship National Merit Scholarship Corporation CHRISTOPHER P. SEIFERT Chancellor’s Scholarship University of Denver Dean’s Scholarship Gustavus Adolphus College Academic Scholarship Butler University Founders Scholarship Emory & Henry College Achievement Award Montana State University President’s Scholarship University of Puget Sound Rhodes Award Rhodes College Achievement Scholarship Whitman College HALI D. SIBILIA Athletic Scholarship Lacrosse American University Dean’s Scholarship American University STEPHEN P. SIGMAN President Joseph A. Sewall Award University of Colorado Boulder Leeds Scholars Program University of Colorado Boulder School of Business ISANI SINGH National Merit Scholarship National Merit Scholarship

Corporation Coca Cola-Scholars Program Winner Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation Regeneron Science Talent Search 3rd Place Regeneron and Society for Science & the Public DAILEY J. SOLOMON Founders Blue Scholarship Northern Arizona University Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona HARI O. SOWRIRAJAN National Merit Scholarship National Merit Scholarship Corporation OLIVIA C. STACKS Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona AMANDA J. STEWART Second Century Scholar Southern Methodist University UA Scholar The University of Alabama CARTER A. STILL Achievement Award Montana State University Presidential Scholarship University of Northern Colorado President James H. Baker Award University of Colorado Boulder Trustee Scholarship Colorado Mesa University UCCS Chancellor’s Award University of Colorado Colorado Springs Merit Scholarship Miami Uni-

versity Ohio Founders Gold Scholarship Northern Arizona University JACOB B. STOKEN Presidential Scholarship Award Eckerd College CHARLES N. SYNNOTT Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona ANNA BELLE F. SZYMANSKI Founders Blue Scholarship Northern Arizona University DAISY K. VAN Dean’s Scholarship Univesity of Denver Puksta Scholars Puksta Foundation MADELINE E. WEBB Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona ALLEN C. WEST Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona CALAHAN L. WILSON Air Force ROTC United States Air Force LOWELL E. WILSON Arizona Excellence Award University of Arizona JOSHUA J. WOJAHN Esteemed Scholars Program University of Colorado Boulder JULIA M. WOOLLEY Merit Scholarship University of Utah Business Scholars University of Utah School of Business

Class of 2018 Grand Total:

$15.2 Million May 2018

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Battle of the

VICTORY ROYALE: One giant map and one battle bus. Fortnite involves building skills and destructible environments combined with intense PvP combat. The last one standing wins.

By: MIKE RAGNOW Staff Writer You’re sitting on a bus, rocketing through the sky over a remote island. One by one you and 99 other people leap from the sky and hurtle towards the ground. When you reach land, you all scavenge for weapons and begin eliminating each other one by one until there is one left standing. All of this within a seven minute passing period. Fortnite, developed by Epic Games, exploded onto the scene earlier this year, scratching a certain itch for many passionate gamers, 45

million of them in fact. Even though it’s a free download, Epic made over $126 million in the month of February and another $18 million the first month the game was on the Apple App Store. The in app purchases in Fortnite are strictly cosmetic, and have no actual real impact on the gameplay. The Battle Royale genre is not new with Fortnite. The earliest iterations of the concept came out of online first person shooters like Counter Strike and Unreal Tournament that offered a “Last Man Standing” multiplayer mode, that would put about a dozen players on a map in a free for all deathmatch. This evolved and transformed into other games. The hit game Minecraft

boasted a series of “Hunger Games” modes, inspired by the book and film series of the same name, which pitted the competitors against one another in a massive dome. It is fitting then that the Hunger Games modes would evolve into the genre known as Battle Royale, which gets its name from a 1999 novel that originally inspired The Hunger Games. Battle Royale games still had a long way to go before they reached the status of today’s. DayZ, a mod to the hit game Arma II, was the first major adopter to the genre. DayZ: Battle Royale was developed by Brendan Greene, AKA PlayerUnknown, who’s game PlayerUnknown’s: Battlegrounds (PUBG) is currently

For Fortnite “It’s fun to play with friends and it’s a good waste of time.” Owen Covell, Freshman 10

May 2018


Battle Royales

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER: Players are dropped into a wide, open area, and they must fight to the death - all while the battlefield shrinks, adding pressure to all in its grip.

Greene was soon hired by Daybreak Studios, and licensed the rights to an Arma III mod, PlayerUnknown’s: Battle Royale which was released as a game mode in Daybreak’s H1Z1, which sold a million copies in two months. In March of last year, Greene released PUBG, which has sold over 25 million copies on PC, making it the second highest selling PC game, second only to Minecraft. PUBG has also sold 5 million copies on Xbox, where it holds the crown for most copies sold. It is strange then, given how integral PlayerUnknown has been in the growth of the Battle Royale genre, that PUBG has been shadowed by a game that essentially cop-

ied its formula. Fortnite. Epic Games have created a titan in the gaming industry, that is not content at slowing down. Fortnite set a world record in March of 2018, clocking in a massive 3.4 million people playing all at the same time on Steam, a record previously set by PUBG at 3.2 million. “I think that the satisfaction of winning is just such a good feeling, that you have to continue to win,” Junior and Fortnite fan Kennan Weekly said when asked why so many people love the game, “If I get a win in a night, I am happy, and feel good. If I go to bed without winning, I just stay angry, cause of how competitive I am. I think the competitiveness of Fortnite is what makes people want

to play.” Fortnite is indeed competitive, having officially made its entrance into the Esports scene with a massive tournament at the Luxor Resort in Las Vegas, headlined by Fortnite mega star Ninja, who makes over $500,000 a month playing Fortnite on the streaming service Twitch. Ashland University in Ohio is now offering the first competitive Fortnite scholarships. Applicants can earn up to $4,000 towards their tuition to join their growing Esports program which also includes League of Legends and Overwatch.

For PUBG “It’s a really fun game and it brings people together. It’s a really nice community.” William Carroll, Freshman May 2018

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SPORTS

Creek athletes: where are they now? BY: BRISON OWENS Sports Editor

We asked former Creek athletes how different college/the pro level is compared to their sport in high school.

“The offense is way complex and the game speed is a lot faster,” Congel said.

COURTESY OF ROBERT CONGEL

ROBERT CONGEL: Current center at Texas A&M

“The competition is much more intense, and the overall pace of the game and practices are infinitely faster than high school,” Nemecek said COURTESY OF ALLEE NEMECEK

ALLEE NEMECEK: Current Setter for Point Loma Nazarene University

“It is 100,000 times better than Colorado high school baseball. Creek is so good at baseball that it didn’t matter,” Sweeney said.

COURTESY OF NATE SWEENEY

NATE SWEENEY: Pitcher for the Short Season Low-A Minor League team for the Chicago Cubs

Girls Tennis: continuing their success BY: GIOVANNI MACHADO Staff Writer

This year’s girls tennis season is the on Creek’s courts,” Jacob said. “ best season under Coach Chris Jacob. Even with a lot of girls on the team, They went 48-1 in the regular seaCreek players don’t get to play against son and went undefeated in regionals. Creek players competitivity. “I’ve been coaching this team for “They play challenge matches against 13 years, and everything has been each other throughout the season, but terrific,” she said. “We’ve never had a how our tournaments are set up, our season as good as this one.” players do not play against each other,” The Girls tennis team has about 135 Jacob said. players in its roster, so Jacob had to Jacob coaches all the four teams, howdivide the varsity teams in two teams ever that is not a problem to her. of 11-12 players. “It is terrific. It may sound crazy with “To divide the teams it takes a really 135 girls, but we are really organized long time, because every girl need to with our schedules, and practices, and play against every girl. We have two the girls and their parents are really Varsity teams of 24 players in the total, involved,so that helps us to keep everyPHOTO BY GIOVANNI MACHADO and we have two JV teams as well,” thing organized.” Jacob said. “So this have been a really SERVING UP SUCCESS: Freshman Nicole Hill This season has been a dominant one competed against Boulder High School at different year from that perspective for the Bruins. For Coach Jacob, this is too.” not unusual. Regionals at Creek. What also makes this season dif“Last season we won State, and we’ve The practices are really intense, and, ferent is the number of freshmen on the won State a lot of times before, and this because of the number of girls, sometimes Varsity team. season we’ve been giving our best to reach there are no courts left on Creek’s campus. “Out of the 11 players of the first varsity it again,” Jacob said. “We practice every single day, someteam, seven are freshmen, and that is really times we have practices at West and the The state tournament will start on unusual and great at the same time,” Jacob Thursday, May 10 through Saturday, May village club as well, besides the practices said. 12.

May 2018

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OPINIONS

Why you should make your bed. BY: GRACIE LORDI Editor-in-Chief

Much to the chagrin of lazy slobs everywhere mom’s nagging truly is a life-changing phenomenon. A simple shift in perspective reveals the importance of showing your bed a little TLC in the morning. Showing your bed care and maintenance isn’t just a reciprocal for all the things that does for you, but fuels it so it can do those things to the best of its ability. It can’t comfort you if your comforter is on the floor. It can’t catch your tears if your pillows are at your feet.

Completing this one simple task supplies the strength and motivation to continue achieving throughout the day. It’s no secret school is not my favorite thing on this planet. All of freshman year, I struggled with the motivation to take classes that weren’t moving towards my aspirations. I was frustrated that I was dedicating such a massive amount of time to studying and developing skills that I knew I would never need. I’m not saying that making my bed suddenly changed all of that. But it helped me realize that in the grander scheme of things I need to live more in the moment. Not every single task that I complete will contain an immediate gratification, but it will help me build discipline and stick-toit-iveness.

The act itself of tidying my bed isn’t the magic of the situation. It’s everything that making my bed represents. The go-getter dedication and the, “I have aspirations and goals in mind and I’m willing to put in the tedious work to make them happen.” As Admiral McRaven said in his 2014 Commencement speech, “If you can’t do the little things right, you’ll never be able to do the big things right. Just like building anything else, creating my day requires the construction of a solid, well made foundation that, at the end of the day, no matter how destroyed the rest of my day was there’s still a well made base to come back to, a safe home to rest.

ART BY SUSAN ZENG

SEIZE THE DAY; MAKE YOUR BED: Making your bed could be the difference between a productive, healthy day and a day that could leave you drained. 14

May 2018


OPINIONS

The war on free speech: Count Dankula BY: OLIVER MOLBERG Staff Writer Freedom isn’t free… it’s $1117. Thirty year old Scotsman, Markus Meechan, has been found guilty of a hate crime. He posted a video on his YouTube channel, Count Dankula, showing his girlfriend’s dog performing Nazi salutes. The dog, Buddha, would perform the salute and react excitedly about verbal commands regarding murdering Jews. Meechan wanted to annoy his girlfriend, so he “turned the dog into the least cute thing imaginable, which is, a Nazi.” The video has since garnered 3 million views. YouTube responded by putting the video into restricted mode; demonetizing the video, removing the comments and

ratings, and removing the video from search queries. The police then arrested Meechan under charges of a hate crime. Meechan has since dealt with a grueling two year court process, putting his life on hold and making him effectively unhirable. This heinous move against the fundamental human right to free speech has not gone unnoticed. Many people have expressed their support for Count Dankula, and he has become a martyr figure for supporters of free speech. Walking out of the courthouse, he and his girlfriend Suzanne Kelly were greeted by a large crowd of supporters. On the day of the sentencing, there was a protest in downtown London. Demonstrators marched under a banner that read, “You wouldn’t tell a joke,” in reference to the anti-piracy campaign.

Rather than throwing him in the slammer, which everyone was fully expecting, the judge kept the fine of £800 ($1100). Meechan is going to appeal the ruling, and he set up a GoFundMe to cover the legal fees. He raised £100,000 ($139,000) in less than 24 hours. He said that the ruling has set a standard that courts can “willfully ignore the context and intent of a person’s words and actions in order to punish them and brand them as criminals,” he stated on his GoFundMe. This blatant disregard of human rights is something that should be a household topic. To support this man and his quest to defend human rights, you can donate to his GoFundMe or his Patreon. Remember, freedom isn’t free.

I want to thank everyone—from Hughes to Thorsen and Fine—from Samaria Sandoval to Renee and Caitlin—and especially this year’s staff. Without these people, I wouldn’t be here. To the people who just picked up this paper from a blue box or a USJ staff member: don’t hesitate to try journalism. Go take the class, go write, and go get to know your world better. You never know where journalism could take you or what it could teach you. I never go a day where I don’t use something journalism taught me, whether it’s how I listen to someone, or how I ask questions, or even how I research topics I have questions about. Journalism teaches you to be worldly, to be perceptive of the complex and intertwined world we live in. Journalism is both the easiest and hardest profession there is. You can write

about your passions and show everyone how much you know, or you can take a deep dive on some complex topic you have never encountered—no matter what, you have the goal of educating everyone. You get out of it what you put in. While I am excited to go study journalism, I hate having to leave this. I hate having to leave these people. But now more than ever, I feel comfortable handing it off. My hope is that I can come back in two years and see a paper that has continued to grow and achieve. Leaving Gracie Lordi with my position, I have no doubt that will be possible. From me to my family, my staff, and my community, thank you for everything. I now turn my attention from the Union Street Journal to my future endeavors, but I will miss this. Goodbye.

Letter from the editor: Goodbye

BY: CAMERON BARNARD Editor Emeritus

I’ve been on this paper for four years. I’ve seen the change of three different advisors. I’ve watched the Union Street Journal go from a monthly newspaper to a quarterly magazine and website. In those four years, I haven’t felt this good about the paper. Now more than ever, I have people asking me about our articles or when the next issue is. I still can’t explain the joy that fills me when I see kids reading the paper in the hallways. In fact, I can’t explain any of the emotions this paper has made me feel. I love to write and tell stories. I love politics and the world. I love talking to and meeting new people. The USJ has been all of that and more.

May 2018

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Who is retiring at creek? Jack August

Retirement Plan: “Some relatives of mine are getting married in Pennsylvania...Other than that, I have no plans right now.”

PHOTO BY BEN SAMPSON

Teaching Record: Years at Creek: 26 Years total: 28 Department: Science

Clyde Oakley

Time at Creek: “A great experience. I mean, I got very lucky to have the pleasure of working here. It’s a great school, the people I work with are great, the kids are great”

Retirement Plan: “Number one, I thought, I will not be bored... I have done a lot of kinds of mission work... I went to Africa three times, to Kenya, and worked with the schools there, and tried to help them get better services for students.”

PHOTO BY BEN SAMPSON Time at Creek:

Teaching Record: Years at Creek: 8 Years total: 8 Department: Science

“I had a really good experience at Creek. I have really enjoyed my time with students, I have really enjoyed developing challenging projects.”

Brian Daly

PHOTO BY ASHLY MILLER

Teaching Record: Years at Creek: 34 Years total: 34 Department: Science

Gussie Wyndham

PHOTO BY CAMDEN LASHLEE

Retirement Plan: “I’m probably going to have to get another job somewhere just to make a small amount of money... I could work at Home Depot.. I’m going to volunteer with Wounded Warriors Project type of thing called Healing Waters Fishing.”

Retirement Plan: “I am selling my house. And I am going to be moving to South Carolina and building a new house closer to the beach... I’m going to continue teaching summer institutes for AP World History teachers.”

Teaching Record: Years at Creek: 22 Time at Creek: Years total: 38 “I loved it all. I’ve had a really Department: Social Studies good time.”

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Taylor Dufford

Teaching Record: Years at Creek: 18 Years total: 28 Department: Science

Retirement Plan: “I’m already working at a lab at Anschutz Medical Center, and I’m doing cancer research... Hopefully I’ll do some fun stuff too, travel a little.”

Time at Creek: “I love the students, I love the people I teach with... Other than waking up in the morning, that’s the only thing I don’t like”

Chelo Curi

PHOTO BY BEN SAMPSON

Teaching Record: Years at Creek: 17.5 Years total: 28.5 Department: World Lang

Retirement Plan: “I have my own business running soccer camps, so I plan to dedicate more time to doing that, growing that business.” Time at Creek: “I love this place. I really enjoyed working with kids, both on the soccer field and in the classrooms… I have really enjoyed my time here at Creek”

Michael Barrett

PHOTO BY BEN SAMPSON

Teaching Record: Years at Creek: 12 Years total: 27 Department: Science

Kathy McKittrick

PHOTO BY CAMDEN LASHLEE

Teaching Record: Years at Creek: 15 Years total: 20 Department: Social Studies

Retirement Plan: “I am going to go the mountains on the weekdays instead of on the weekends and not be out there with the crowds. And I might, might, MIGHT, go teach overseas.” Time at Creek: “It’s been great, phenomenal... I got to see my daughter come through here and graduate.” Time at Creek: “I want to thank the whole faculty and staff and student body for making this an amazing 15 years. I’ve worked many places, I’ve had other careers, and I can honestly say I have never looked forward to everyday more than I have at Creek.”

UNIONSTREETJOURNAL.COM

May usj  

The May 2018 issue of The Union Street Journal, Cherry Creek High School's student newsmagazine

May usj  

The May 2018 issue of The Union Street Journal, Cherry Creek High School's student newsmagazine

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