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Darlene C. Deever Editor-in-Chief & Publisher Roy Bheer Executive Editor

Emilie Flory Creative Director Tony Newton Editor-at-large Christopher Zisi Editor-at-large Christopher Bourez Lorenza Florida Editor/Translator Kelly B Editor-at-large Eric Alfonsi Business Development Director Charlotte Trends Community Manager AStyanaX Graphic Designer Dub Meter Biscuit C Translator

Chantal Handley Levinsky Kent Steine Jim Towns Nikki Brett Correspondent Patricia Lelievre Correspondent Illeana Ganz Lydia Buckley Proofreader Eleanor Fawcett Transidioethnograph Special Thanks to: Anthony Dubois Photographer Margaux Chalmel Photographer Marine Creuzet Majorelle PR & Events

For General & Advertising Inquiries CONTACT US


EDITOR’S LETTER Dear Reader(s),

D-NG-TR-N-QU-C-345523-UNSPLASH

At last, here it is: our special Art issue that you have been waiting for! It is available online in the expanded version of our uncensored downloadable edition for 5$. The media economy has radically changed and continues to evolve. This is just the beginning. The internet is no longer so democratic. The system the giants of the net offer us to have easy access to everything has a price… Freedom, choice, quality and of course privacy are involved… The current system, through its failings, promotes hatred and spreads suspicion rather than empathy. Mitchell Baker, recently urged the giants of the Internet to rethink their "Ad System Economy" and to question themselves. There is what we see, what’s imposed on us and what’s left. The opportunity to strive for quality, beauty, human enrichment is possible. Our battle at CREATORS UNITE is to allow superior artists and creative work to emerge, be seen, supported as well as funded. There are outstanding artists that the world ignores. Art may come from outside the margins, but it is not marginal! It speaks to all of us. It struggles to be heard, nonetheless, it makes our lives more bearable and beautiful. CREATORS UNITE was born out of this need to introduce strong, undefinable and original work by authentic artists of all categories. It is an alternative to the cultural and artistic media currently available. We are totally independent and work tirelessly at our own expense to bring you atypical and in-depth content which makes us unique. For this reason, our free edition will from now on be an abridged version of our downloadable edition for 5$ (printable in the same way as our book series). To keep you entertained, we recently launched AHCA (a contest that supports creators you can vote for) and at the same time we sponsor the SXF makeup contest of Promote Horror which strongly supports creators. A special treat for you; our favorite muse, the superb Kelly B has just launched an Instagram page dedicated to the magazine associated with our new spotlight feature ‘Focus’, which was her idea. Go check it out!

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

P. 002 MASTHEAD P. 003 EDITOR’S LETTER P. 008 THE STUDIO: Filmmaking Schlock Horror & Gore! By Tony Newton

P. 028 EXCLUSIVE: An Introduction to Christopher Zisi’s first novel The Himalayan Devil Woman P. 034 HIGHLIGHT: JR at Le Louvre P. 046 LE BOUDOIR: Dark Electro artist Levinsky talks his first full length album Electra Complex P. 062 IDENTIKIT: WEBTALK | PARLOUR 106 TIN-TIN / Le Mondial du Tatouage 2019 ▪ WEBTALK: Interview with Tin-tin

▪ PARLOUR: Photo Exhibition of Le Mondial du Tatouage feat. Co. DCA / Philippe Decouflé P. 126 INCEPTION: TECH SECRETS / Cinema & Story Ideas ▪ TECH SECRETS: Gojira vs. Godzilla- the Birth of the King of Monsters by Jim Towns P. 142 VAULT OF CREATION [GALERIE 106]: Chantal Handley’s Surf Art Exhibition Summer of Beauty P. 158 TRIBUTE: Special Tribute to Author and Pinup Artist Kent Steine P. 178 FOCUS by Kelly B: Dark Fiction Author Nick Younker | Martin Daniels’ House of Lexi P. 184 SUPERTREAT by Kelly B, Emilie Flory, Christopher Bourez and Roy Bheer: SOUNDS & VISIONS: Tommy Jacob - Decision, Thylacine - War Dance, Greg Kozo - Terry, Stereoclip - Feel The Game | Mimi Choi MAKEUP ARTISTRY | Pierre Châtel-Innocenti ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY | Christian Hogarth SUBCONCIOUS MIND PAINTING P. 227 SHOCKER: Viktoria Modesta Bionic Showgirl! Creators Unite 07 Art Issue

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By Tony Newton Visual Conception: Dub Meter & Emilie Flory | Images Courtesy of Vestra Pictures, Trash Arts, The Enchanted Architect, Troma Entertainment, SRS Cinema, Sector 5 Films, World Wide Multimedia, Body Bag & Schlock Films. I started out writing horror film scripts and, being a ghost-writer and script doctor on a few projects over the last ten years, it was my love of horror films that spurred me on to get into indie film making. Since then, I have made horror films, horror anthology films and VHS documentaries. I also write horror books. I'm obsessed with horror films to the point where basically everything in my life revolves around horror: I watch Horror films every chance I get, I listen to horror soundtracks and have an obsession with the band Goblin (theSuspiria soundtrack is the most played album in my house!), I collect skulls (I think at this point in time I have more skulls than a graveyard!), and my latest venture is creating a cabinet of curiosities (so, basically anything creepy ranging from dolls heads to mummified fairies to Cthulhu statues, old rocks, vampire killing kits and old medical equipment)‌ Apart from that, I collect horror VHS tapes and vintage horror toys and play horror movies on VHS and super 8! I'm obsessed with schlock horror and B movies so much that one of my film companies is now called SCHLOCK FILMS!... I also own VESTRA PICTURES and BODY BAG FILMS. I love the medium of film for telling stories. I don't think anything else comes close. I watched the Evil Dead when I was 5 years old; my parents won a VCR player in the early to mid-eighties so, every night they would rent the latest video nasty to cult classics like Friday the 13th film series, all the Nightmare on Elm Street films etc.

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Watching horror films at a young age literally makes you get scared. You experience real terror and fear. You wouldn't need to explain to a rationally thinking 19-year-old that Freddy Krueger wasn't going to kill you in your sleep… but to a 10-year boy, it's a different story! I think I had more sleepless nights thanks to that git Freddy than anything else. A Nightmare on Elm Street changed the rules: this was a film you watched that made even the act of sleeping unsafe territory… and damn did those girls singing “1, 2 Freddy's coming for you” send chills down your spine! Horror really can send the viewer into another realm… Watching horror films, the viewer will experience a faster heart rate and sweaty palms. The unconscious mind can't tell the difference and thinks what you are watching, you are really experiencing, as you are getting scared from whatever the source is! I have been on a quest ever since to try to evoke the same feelings that I felt as a child to get that kind of safe scared feeling from watching a movie…

I was blown away by the film Hereditary it shocked and really scared me… What a truly amazing horror film and a surprise that was in 2018 to watch a horror movie and actually be scared! Commercially successful horror films of recent years are increasingly predictable and don't make the viewer scared or get them out there comfort zone, but there are a few films that were made both in and out of the studio system that are breaking new ground and making the headlines like It Follows, Hereditary, The Babadook, A Serbian film, Baise Moi, Martyrs… That are modern horror greats with directors creating pure art.

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Over the last decade there has been some really crazy and bizarre horror films; it seems like they have to break the rules then take a shit on them as well. One thing is for sure, by doing this, not only will the film get exposure (although not always for the right reasons), but the viewer will be left thinking, and in most cases left in a state of shock. It’s getting increasingly hard in the modern internet cantered world not to see spoilers of films popping up online, even before you have had a chance to view the film itself. I look out for unique films which offer unforeseen twists. I enjoy the use of unique camera angles and effects to create ambience, suspense and fear, as well as the various ways in which each director endeavours to build suspense. The writers and directors of the horror genre have the opportunity to unleash their full potential, creativity and imagination to impress, shock and terrify the viewer whilst providing unforeseen twists and turns. Ninety nine percent of horror films are made with the sole intention of scaring the audience. The reason for our global love of horror films is they bring audiences pleasure, pain, fear, suspense, terror and inspire the viewer to unleash their own creativity in the genre. Horror films can even help the viewer deal with issues like grief and even overcoming fears and phobias. It sounds old fashioned just the old git "They don't make them like they did in the good old Day's" but I'm a lover of the classic video nasties; they were fresh, they were new, they were breaking the rules and making new ones along the way. I crave for an era in film like it again.

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A lot of today's horror films like Hostel, Paranormal activity and even The Blair Witch Project started out as great ideas and were very entertaining horror films but copycat filmmakers re-hash the same ideas and have since been milked to death, though they still pull in large numbers at theatres and then DVD sales. The strange thing is that there’s far less to the story, plot and characters in these modern studio produced horror films, than there was in the classic independent video nasty films in the eighties. In the latest wave of torture porn flicks, gore is featured just for gore’s sake ninety percent of the time… Not that I mind this, I'm a lover of gore, but I love seeing new stories, not the same old. I think in order for horror to evolve, we need new ideas. I think we are finally going to realize in cinema that the scariest thing isn't the monster in the closet or the ghoul under your bed, but us. Humans ourselves are really the true monsters to be scared of. Just turn on the news. Horror films are evolving, the times we are living in are changing. My prediction is films like Unfriended and internet-based films will become the staple of horror films of the future; young people can relate to them… Hell, it's like they are still looking at their Smartphone! There is nothing I would like more than being given a huge budget to make a really great horror movie, though I think my dream movie to remake would be Zombie Flesh Eaters or something like Driller Killer. The Indie film scene literally is blood sweat and tears. When I'm not doing my day job, I'm editing, writing, filming something, networking, non-stop. I think my family must think I'm crazy; there isn't much return for indie films filmmaking and most of the time you are self-funding projects.

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THE STUDIO You literally have to love what you are doing… that reward you can't put a price on… I have made so many great friends who are indie film makers and writers. We are all in the same boat and we all spur each other on always supporting each other. Indie filmmaking isn't easy, it's not pretty. You have to be a die-hard fan, have a passion for the craft, enjoy what you are doing, be it writing, directing, producing, editing (among other jobs) and, 99% of the time in the indie horror world all of the above working with a very small or no budget… but it's fun as hell. We are living in such great times now! When I was younger, you would shoot a film in your back garden on VHS or a digital 8 camera. You had nowhere to showcase it, so it went in the loft or got taped over! Today, people can create and produce a short film and have it up on sites like YOUTUBE for everyone to see instantly. If you are getting into indie filmmaking, you are going to face many challenges… My advice is you have to love what you are doing. If you love filmmaking, do it! Don't wait, get out there and do it! Pick up a camera and just shoot something! Everyone has a Smartphone in their back pocket. We have the technology to record a HD high quality video with us all the time so, even if you haven't got access to a RED or BLACK MAGIC 4K camera, get out there and start shooting something! Think about the locations within your story, if you have to film the short in your bedroom and lounge, do it (be realistic within your budget)! What camera to shoot on? Once again use the equipment within your budget. If you are making a zero-budget short or feature for your first film, why not film on your cell phone? You can get rigs, tripods, lighting and even put in an external mic for a very little cost.

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Try to use an external mic as the sound capture device on cell phones isn't made for the type of thing you are after. A short film with good sound will be all the better. You can find copyright free music on many websites online so you will have use to music tracks and music to score your short film. Story is everything. Making the story and the script good is the most important thing. Even if you are writing a schlock B movie, make something that fans like yourself will want to watch. When writing your screenplay, if it's your first one, write a short film. And read, re-read scripts in the same genre to the script you are working on, but most importantly, write within your budget. You can't have cars exploding or jumping from rooftops on a $500-dollar budget, be realistic! Get social, get on social media and promote with posters, trailers and hopefully links to your short film! Always get into a routine of writing daily. Use the same pen or Smartphone, have a lucky mascot, keep writing and reading other genre film screenplays, and within no time you will have your first screenplay! Never take no for an answer! Just keep doing what you love! In the film industry, at every level, you are going to get knock backs but keep at it, keep creating! If you get rejection letters for film scripts and ideas, if you can't get a budget or investors for your film project, go out there and do it yourself using any means you have possible. But most important of all, just create, keep creating! And remember #creatorsunite!

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EXCLUSIVE

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I write daily mainly horror film scripts and VHS, trash cinema and B movie reviews. I also write horror books: I'm working on a Creepypasta collection now! I wrote The Zombie Rule Book and I'm Zombie. Both zombie books are out now via COSMIC EGG BOOKS. I produce horror films through VESTRA PICTURES, BODY BAG FILMS and SCHLOCK FILMS including documentaries and horror anthologies as well as feature films. My VHS Documentary VHS Lives: A Schlockumentary is out now with part 2 VHS Lives: Undead format! I have a love of horror and trying new things. First and foremost, I love creating and get excited about new projects. I also work with TRASH ARTS and producer Sam Mason Bell. We co-wrote and directed Toxic Schlock and we have jointly produced a lot of horror anthologies including the Home Videos series of films, Gore Theatre and A Taste of Phobia with Domiziano Cristopharo. I always love collaborating on new projects, be it writing, producing, directing, or joining new projects. Feel free to reach out to my email! Horror is like Marmite, you either love it or you hate it. Horror has dedicated fans unlike fans of any other film genre; they’re great, passionate people. When you are a horror fan, you're a horror fan for life! Keep it Horror! #SupportIndieFilm

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-Tony Newton

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HIGHLIGHT

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EXCLUSIVE

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ADVERT PROMOTE HORROR CONTEST

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SFX HORROR MAKEUP CONTEST CALL FOR ENTRIES

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SFX HORROR MAKEUP CONTEST CALL FOR ENTRIES

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LE BOUDOIR

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LE BOUDOIR We are keen to hear about any new work in progress by you, when can we expect a follow-up to Method To The Madness? Thanks for asking that! The fact is I’m releasing my debut full-length album entitled Electra Complex this summer. Musically, this will be my most emotional yet ravaging work up to date, and marks the introduction of some entirely new influences pushing the genre envelope so to say. The single off the album Pet Hate is already out there so do check it out! The themes explored on the album range from psychoanalysis, psychosexuality, eroticism, animal rights and societal hate to name a few. I want to get people thinking and finding out about things for themselves, not only to provoke them simply for provocation’s sake. Expect a lot of influences from 80’s synthpop, soundtracks and a few more experimental and “arty” takes on music too! Production-wise, I’m putting really a lot of effort into this one as I want it to be absolutely perfect, from the cover artwork by the Finnish graphic artist Ninni Kairisalo -check out her amazing work at kaligraphics.fi (click on the poster to enjoy Ninni Kairisalo’s work, Ed)- to everything else. Expect also a cassette and vinyl editions on top of digital release and of course some new merchandise to boot! Your artist name really stands out, how did you come up with that? My dear brother (who’s a musician too, he plays guitar and writes songs in two bands actually) came up with the moniker. It’s a play on our family name, and it just stuck naturally as I could identify with it well. On top of that and as such, it’s a real family name too. Under such a moniker I also find it easy to push the musical envelope as I wish, as the name is not specifically bound or limiting to any particular style or approach, I think. When you started making music as Levinsky, how did that take its course? Do you find it natural to create music by yourself? Well, I already got into making music back in the mid-80’s as a kid when I got my first guitar.

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LE BOUDOIR Ever since I’ve been more or less actively involved in music, composing, playing and singing for some bands representing various genres, from hard rock and heavy metal to alternative rock, more jazzy/bluesy stuff and also synthpop. When you’re in a band, the common problem can often be that, over time, you are more or less bound to have differing opinions within the group, which can lead to undecidedness and arguments over musical direction and artistic choices. But when you write your music yourself from start to the end, no such issues exist -you’re the Master of your Margarita if you like! After all, it is you who makes your music best. That approach seems to suit me pretty perfectly, though I’m open to collaborate with other artists of course and have done that. Are you a self-taught musician or did you study music formally too? I’m a self-taught guy, but I always try to learn more along the way. For example, I started taking more piano lessons to expand my approach to composing music. I think especially making electronic music is an excellent opportunity to truly learn and find out about musical rules and also how to bend and break them in innovative and new ways. Your music is very intense, charged with suspense, tension and cinematic qualities. Where do you draw your inspiration from? I’m inspired by many things and, of course, it’s no surprise that I just love movies… Anything from Blade Runner and other sci-fi to thriller/horror classics. I love John Carpenter and HAMMER Horror films, for instance; and numerous Italian gialli -Argento being my absolute favourite- to more modern underground and art-house flicks… but often, I pick up inspiration also from other visual arts and literature. I guess I’m a good example of an artist whose mind never really sleeps! Everything can be a source of inspiration, if you let it speaks to you in the right way. My music has always been described as “cinematic” and I definitely have no issues with that, on the contrary.

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LE BOUDOIR Can you tell us a bit about the themes behind your songs Psychosexuality and Love Kills? Psychosexuality is totally inspired by classic giallo films such as The Strange Vice of Mrs. Wardh (check out Sergio Martino’s film by clicking on the Youtube icon, Ed ). The guest vocalist Megan McDuffee wrote the lyrics after I presented her with the thematic framework and she did a splendid job, I must say! She also came up with a more arty vocal arrangement and sweet harmonics that suit the song perfectly, making it a “title track” type of a piece fit for a film. Love Kills tells us a story of seduction, the dangers related to falling in love and puts a strong sensual tension on the foreground. Here, I wrote the lyrics, which are also influenced by the movie Neon Demon to an extent, whilst Sandra Bullet did such a great job with the vocal arrangements and performance. Her take on the vocals is very 80’s, very sensual and colourful, yet charmingly effortless. Your thoughts on the creative process itself? What are the principles you swear by? Most of the time things flow pretty naturally, and nowadays I can surely spend a reasonable amount of time honing the tiniest details as I tend to be somewhat perfectionist by nature anyway -of course, having a good song is the main thing, so songwriting comes first, then everything else. Some songs are of course finished earlier than others, and I love the challenge of making things click, so I don’t really care how much time I put into a song as long as I’m happy with the final result. You cannot rush things and, in my opinion, you should not just churn out “bulk” just to give an impression of being hugely productive. As with all things art and music, a fair amount of hard work and lots of creativity, discretion and inspiration must all be involved if you want quality or originality.

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What is your point of view on record labels as such nowadays? Up to now, I’ve mostly concentrated on writing quality material and releasing it so far pretty much entirely by myself, without any compromises. I also actively engage and interact with my followers and other artists on social media platforms as I think it’s very important to give a genuine, personal impression and it seems to promote true and organic following. I was backed up for a while by a U.S. independent record label but they unfortunately called it quits due to lack of time and resources. Every now and then I’m approached by a fresh record label, but up to date I’m pretty happy to run my gamut by myself unless I can look forward to a solid and sustainable label support. What do you think about criticism? Does it mean something to you? Let’s say I am not a big fan of having anyone telling me what to do -I take criticism or advice best from my brother, who now and then acts as my musical “coach” so to say, which I do appreciate and always learn from. Also, I have a few trusted friends with whom I can exchange views and opinions. But, for example, if I’d get criticized for my sound choices or song structures, I just could not give a fuck. In the end of the day, it’s you who makes your own music best!

Can you describe your studio setup a bit? Do you use software synthesizers alone or do you also use hardware synths? My home studio setup is a kind of an ever-evolving thing, things come and go whilst certain key pieces will always be there.

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LE BOUDOIR I work on a MACBOOK PRO accompanied by a variety of software synthesizers, LOGIC PRO X as my digital audio workstation, midi keyboards by ARTURIA and NATIVE INSTRUMENTS, NATIVE INSTRUMENTS’ MASCHINE MK3, an audio interface, an ARTURIA MICROBRUTE analog synthesizer and DSI PROPHET-6 analog synthesizer. I also have a mixed collection of other musical instruments including even a melodica. Do you work somewhere or music is your only job? Currently I have a day job, it’s all good but I can also tell you by experience that there are better things in life than being pissed off having to head to the office every morning! Of course, it would be pleasant to be able to focus on making art. A day job can also draw quite a bit of your mental energy required for being creative so, it’s important to maintain a balance and take care of yourself. What does making music mean to you? I’ve been making music for such a long time, so I’d say it’s more like a way of life. It’s an essential thing to me as it also acts as a channel to vent out a lot of negative feelings and frustration, often turning into tangible energy in the process of writing music. Some artists are in for it for just being famous or for money. What is your take on that? More than being famous, I’d be way happier if my art can bring energy, excitement, and joy to people. “It’s nice to be important, but more important to be nice” as the saying goes. I believe in doing good and making good things to go around. The world has enough selfish people already. Regarding money, I’d just like to say that I’ve contributed a major amount of any small earnings I’ve made so far to charity -e.g. children with illnesses and animal rights- I also love to run my own shop so to say. I find great pleasure in, for example, mailing out all my merch by myself, including a handwritten note to each person. Such little things mean the world to me.

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LE BOUDOIR

Which artists do you look up to? What genres of music do you listen to? I’m a huge music fan, and I listen to a lot of different music every day. When I’m writing my own music, I tend to cut it down a bit to maintain focus on my work. Some great artists to mention from the synthwave/electro scene are for example Carpenter Brut, Perturbator and of course, the legendary pioneers of electronic music Jean-Michel Jarre, Vangelis and Tangerine Dream to name a few. I also love synthpop, new wave and the hits from the 1980’s as well as a bit of experimental electro and some gothic rock, post-punk, jazz, classical and metal too. And I absolutely worship Kate Bush, the most talented female musician to ever walk on earth. I have drawn quite a bit of influence from her work recently and that can be heard on the forthcoming album too. What are your plans for the future? What would be your ultimate dream considering your musical career? I keep on making things my way and if that leads to something bigger, then all the happier. My ultimate dream would be to get my music featured for a film, so any film makers, feel free to get in touch! We think that’s all for now, many thanks for this opportunity. What would you like to say to our readers as parting words? Many thanks to you for the interview, it has been a true pleasure! My sincere thanks to anyone who having supported me so far, such a thing means the world to me. Take care out there and play it loud! I hope to see you on the road someday!

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IDENTIKIT

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IDENTIKIT

A PRIVATE TALK WITH TATTOO ART’ SUPERSTAR TIN-TIN Editors: Lorenza Florida & Roy Bheer | Translators: Lorenza Florida & Biscuit C | Correspondent: Patricia Lelièvre | PR: Marine Creuzet, Majorelle PR & Events | Photographers: Anthony Dubois & Margaux Chalmel | Photos Courtesy: Le Mondial du Tatouage, Co. DCA/Philippe Decouflé, Lucifer, Greg Conraux, Filip Leu, Bill Salmon, Luke Atkinson, Kari Barba, Mark Mahoney, Ultra Vomit, Anthony Dubois & Margaux Chalmel

A self-taught artist, Tin-Tin starts his career as a tattooist in 1984 in Berlin during his national service. By finding inspiration in art books, rather than in the common iconography of tattoo artists at that time, Tin-Tin makes his personal learning his strength; this even makes him stand out and quickly acknowledge in many countries until getting a worldwide reputation. In France, Tin-Tin pleads for an artist status (the 10th Art, Ed) that many tattoo artists despair to have officially recognized. It has become a life-long battle. We met Tin-Tin on the occasion of Le Mondial Du Tatouage 2019 (Paris Worldwide Tattoo Convention, Ed) where he invited us. Number one of the conventions dedicated to tattoo art in the world, Le Mondial Du Tatouage, founded and organized by Tin-Tin himself is a key event for professionals: Paris convention indeed allows them to show off their creations to the public but also to present some of their finest pieces to a jury composed of legendary tattoo artists such as Filip Leu, Bill Salmon, Luke Atkinson, Kari Barba and Mark Mahoney... And sometimes to be awarded a prize!

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IDENTIKIT

INTERVIEW WITH TIN-TIN Creators Unite: Hi, thank you for giving us this interview Tin - Tin. How would you define yourself? Tin-Tin: Well… That’s quite complicated... How would I define myself?... Well I am considered as… … Creators Unite: An artist! Yes, but you know, even “being an artist”, that’s not something easy to say… I am an advocate for the profession, I militate in favor of some of us to get an artist status… If I’m recognized as an artist then good for me but I tell you, I cannot really judge if I’m an artist... And then the people who say things like: “Me, as an artist...” … Well, I never spoke of myself as an artist; I am campaigning for the recognition of my art, and for some practitioners to have them considered as artists but... Me, you know… Well… I do not define myself actually... It’s difficult to define people...

A waitress comes

Tin-tin: Why should we look up there? Is there only one thing or… Several things? There we go… Meat... The Waitress: or veggie... Tin-Tin: No: Meat! Yes!... rather meat! Creators Unite: What has been the trigger for you, what is it that made you choose tattoo art? Did you really choose tattoo art? Tin-Tin: Yes, absolutely, but the trigger...Well… I don't know… I was sixteen... But precisely, that’s a trigger: you don't really know what’s going on!... It just happens, it chooses you... And you constantly think about it, you don't know why... Indeed, it's completely trivial: one day, I saw a tattoo made with colors… I found it nice and suddenly I was...

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IDENTIKIT

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IDENTIKIT Well, I had seen plenty of tattoos in the subway, not appalling stuff: cross, calvaries… I thought it was not very cool!... Getting older we think it has a certain charm, but when I was a kid, it surely didn’t attract me... And one day I saw a tattoo, inked with a machine and it just fascinated me. Why it fascinated me… That’s the question... Afterward, people told me “you’re gifted”, “you’re THIS”, “you're THAT” ... But no, when you're fascinated by something, you're so fascinated that you work all the time and it is actually your... This is not work! … It's your passion! Because it’s what fascinates you, you don't need to “work”, if you see what I mean, it’s not painful. You can work 15 to 16 hours a day because you’re going flat-out! That’s it, actually. That's passion... It happens and you don’t know why… For some it’s Fashion, for others it’s Dance or playing guitar... For me, it's Tattoo Art... And we don't know why.

He laughs and adds wryly

Maybe that’s fate! Creators Unite: Do you remember the first tattoo you saw? Tin-Tin: I remember, Yes… It was a Holy Virgin with some blue color... Something done by a tattoo artist, who's not great yet... Creators Unite: Often those who inspire us, are those who create kitsch stuff not always completed. Tin-Tin: The old Bruno, at Pigalle, was the only tattoo artist of the time! (Pigalle is the “hottest” quarter of Paris. During years, it was considered as the place to be for creators, Ed). At the time only he was tattooing! So, the first tattoo I did, I did it at his parlour and it wasn't great either, so I ended up covering it! Creators Unite: What was it? Tin-Tin: It was a bloody little devil... It was really not... Yeah, really not…

We laugh

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And then looking at the drawing and thinking about it, I don’t know why I did it because it was without any reason... “How about that! A little devil, that’s cute!” Creators Unite: You come from Nantes...What influence did the city have on you? Tin-Tin: I Come from Nantes? Creators Unite: You were born in Nantes? No, not even? Not at all? That’s the information the biographies we find about you give!... You’re Parisian… Tin-Tin: I told loads of silly stories, you know, but this one... Creators Unite: It's a good one! Artistically Nantes is a very active city, especially regarding graphic design! Tin-Tin: I said I was born in the Republic of Chile in Concarneau while Concarneau is not in Chile... Creators Unite: no in France, in Brittany… Tin-Tin: That was just a way to have fun with Chile-Concarneau/Chili Con Carne... but nobody got the joke!...

We laugh

And everyone believed that... Even American travel guides!... I published this information on the internet, on an old site where I had a bio… I’m disruptive by spirit… I posted a bio where I said bullshit but actually, American guide books said I was Chilean and others said I was born in Concarneau… So, now Concarneau becomes Nantes. Strange because I never talked about Nantes. Creators Unite: We have an anecdote in this regard, during our interview with Rude (Creators Unite 05: The Cult Issue, Ed), we discovered his last name was not Waterzoi and this invention came from you! Tin-Tin: Yes! It was me who called him Waterzoi.

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Creators Unite: Related to your artistic evolution what do you notice? Are there specific areas you would like to explore? Tin-Tin: There must be. I don't have any in mind but what I'm doing with Decouflé now is a good example of it (Philippe Decouflé, one of the world's best contemporary dance choreographer, Ed)… We are right there in the thick of it! Creators Unite: Absolutely and that’s great. Precisely what made you realize that dance and tattoo art could match so well? Tin-Tin: Because dance is body art... It really is body art like hell! And so is tattoo art. They fit fantastically. I don’t know if you saw the show yesterday but… Look! Here are some videos on the screens!

Excerpts from the sole Octopus by Ashley Chen [Cie DCA / Philippe Decouflé] are broadcast on a big screen above the stage. It was magnificent yesterday... With cello... and today we still have cello plus Nosfell on guitar!... We have incredible musicians... I was in the dressing room earlier to apply fake tattoos, they were singing, playing… It was amazing... We truly have remarkable artists! Creators Unite: Decouflé is a master, his choreographies are extraordinary. Tin-Tin: This is high class: Indeed I created Decouflé’s costumes! All the dancers are in underwear with tattoos I drew... Voilà!... Lots of tattoos that will come back repeatedly and symmetrically on them... You'll see... It’s going to be great this afternoon! We had a lovely foretaste yesterday but today it is going to be... Creators Unite: Which artist (or art) continues to make you dream?

He pauses a moment to reflect…

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Tin-Tin: Talking about someone who makes you dream and also brings an incredibly dramatic dimension in his work, Decouflé is definitely a great example... What he does is so beautiful! Yesterday I had tears in my eyes during the show... Creators Unite: His work is truly powerful. How did the decision to collaborate start? Tin-Tin: I went to see Decouflé’s Short Pieces at Le Palais de Chaillot and I suddenly thought “Damn it! That’s it!” Creators Unite: It’s true that there is a merger when we see Philippe Decouflé’s work, he covers a wide range of areas artistically. Your work and his are body arts but also spiritual arts. Tin-Tin: Here, you see, here is Philippe, he is right behind... When I asked him, he was so excited; he was wild about the idea... Here we go! Showtime! We take our leave of Tin-Tin who invites us to visit his parlour to continue our discussion. We thank him and, like him, get in front of the stage to enjoy the duo My Girl, an excerpt of the Ballet Octopus interpreted by the dancers Alice Roland and Sean Patrick Mombruno of Philippe Decouflé’s company DCA (According to him, “D” stands for diversity, “C” for camaraderie, and “A” for agility, Ed)…

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Philippe Decouflé Choreographer Philippe Decouflé was born on October 22, 1961, in Paris. He grew up on comic books and musical comedies. Inspired by the Bauhaus choreographer Oskar Schlemmer, he took to dance through mime and the Annie Fratellini circus school. He worked with Merce Cunningham, Régine Chopinot and Alwin Nikolais before founding the company DCA in 1983.

In addition to the many dance shows that he created, Philippe Decouflé explored new territories such as commercials, music videos (for New Order or Fine Young Cannibals) and short films. On July 14, 1989, he collaborated with Jean-Paul Goude during the parade of the bicentenary of the French Revolution. But what brought him international fame was the opening and closing ceremonies of the Olympics in Albertville In 1992. Découflé’s audience was conquered by this unprecedented meeting between the worlds of circus and dance, by the offbeat, humorous and poetic aspect of his choreographies enriched by the use of video. Philippe Decouflé’s success has not wavered since. He alternates performances with his company DCA (a resident of Saint-Denis’ boiler room since 1993), and multiple experiences such as musicals direction, opening ceremonies (the 50th anniversary of Cannes Film Festival, the opening of the Rugby World Cup in 2007…), commercials for famous TV channels, or even direction of adult shows (CRAZY HORSE Cabaret’s Show Desire). Associated with the national theater of Britain where he created Panorama (a show in which he revisits his choreographic career), Decouflé is the writer and director of the CIRQUE DU SOLEIL’ show Iris. and the director of the CIRQUE DU SOLEIL show’s Paramour which started in 2016 in New York City.

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TECH SECRETS GOJIRA VS. GODZILLA The Birth of the King of Monsters

By Jim Towns Visual Conception: Emilie Flory & Astyanax | Photos Courtesy: TOHO STUDIOS, GODZILLA TM, WARNER BROS PICTURES & LEGENDARY © Godzilla ® Gojira and the character design are trademarks of Toho Co. Ltd. © 1954 Toho Co. Ltd. All Rights Reserved

31 May, 2019 This week marks the release of Godzilla: King of the Monsters, and it made me want to revisit the original film, as a way of remembering where this watershed character came from: Ishiro Honda’s 1954 masterpiece, Gojira. Before we get started, we should make sure everyone’s caught up on how this film contrasts with its better-known American counterpart film Godzilla. This might be a bit remedial for fans of Japanese cinema, but bear with me: In 1954, TOHO STUDIOS was in production on two big-budget films: Akira Kurosawa’s Shichinin no Samurai or Seven Samurai, and this film: Gojira. Spiraling budgets on both projects very nearly sank the company into bankruptcy, but luckily these films turned out to be two of the biggest hits ever produced in Japan. Gojira was partially inspired by the 1933 American film King Kong, and also by a film called The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms which had come out the year before-but MOSTLY Gojira was inspired by the destruction of Japanese cities Hiroshima and Nagasaki by atomic bombs at the end of World War 2. More on that below.

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Gojira’s story begins as two Japanese freighters- the Eiko Maru and the Bingo Maru, are mysteriously

sunk, and an island fishing village is devastated. Professor Kyohei Yamane (Takashi Shimura- who that year also played the master samurai Kambei Shimada in Seven Samurai) is tasked by the Japanese government to discover the cause of the destruction. The fishermen on the island have a legend about a creature named ‘Gojira’, to whom they apparently used to sacrifice girls in the old days. The professor and his party very quickly discover that the legend is real, and Gojira exists in the form of a titanic dinosaur-like creature left over from the Cretaceous period, now re-awoken and mutated by modern atomic testing in the Pacific. As the scientists and military try to form a plan for what to do about this, Gojira shows up in Tokyo Harbor. Professor Yamane’s daughter Emiko seeks out her childhood friend Dr. Serizawa, a brilliant scientist who was disfigured during the war. There’s a love triangle between Emiko, Serizawa and Emiko’s sweetheart Hideto, who works in some capacity for the Japanese government and/or military. Serizawa has created a process that can destroy any organic matter underwater, which (while terrifying) obviously has some real-world applications for Japan’s present predicament. Gojira proceeds to turn downtown Tokyo into a flaming heap of rubble. The creature seems possessed with a primal urge to destroy everything humans have built, and he does so with the greatest of ease. Rockets, bombs and bullets have absolutely no affect on Gojira- so in the end; it’s up to science to save Tokyo. Serizawa and Hideto must dive underwater in the harbor to where Gojira lies resting after his rampage, and set off Serizawa’s device. In doing so, the war-haunted Serizawa sacrifices himself, saving Tokyo.

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In an effort to make the film more palatable for a postwar American audience, the US distributors decided to re-edit it, keeping all the monster footage and some of the character subplot, but inserting a new Western character in a leading role. Raymond Burr shot all his scenes as American Journalist Steve Martin (yes, Steve Martin) in just a few days. That footage was sporadically spliced into the original Gojira film, and the title was altered to one that (someone obviously believed) would be easier for English speakers to pronounce: GODZILLA.

The American version of the film follows roughly the same plot, but places Burr’s American correspondent character at the forefront of the story, inexplicably narrating what’s happening in the film to an audience who can SEE what’s happening for themselves. The film’s Japanese characters are relegated to second-class status, and their dialogue is replaced with poorly-dubbed English- and THAT above all other changes is what turned a wonderfully executed and thoughtful science fiction fable into something that felt more like late night b-movie dreck. So just in case my feelings on the matter are unclear: Gojira is not only a vastly superior version of what Western audiences commonly know as Godzilla... it’s really an entirely different film. The Japanese version does an incredible job knitting this giant imaginary creature into Japan’s history, folklore & culture- both ancient and contemporary. When we think of old Godzilla movies, we generally think of guys in big rubber suits. We think miniature cities and stock footage of military tanks and cannons. And this film has all those things. Some of the effects date pretty badly, but one thing this film has going for it is the almost documentary feel of its black and white cinematography, which does an impressive job of blending what’s real and what’s a special effect.

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The film has some very successful and evocative shots as Gojira wends a path of destruction through Tokyo that feel almost like archival war footage. Director Ishiro Honda had been drafted during the War and had seen the remains of Nagasaki firsthand, and he brought that feeling of loss and devastation to this film. Gojira is a terrifying, unstoppable force that brings radiation poisoning wherever he goes. He’s the very incarnation of postwar nuclear nightmare. Regarding Gojira’s destruction of Tokyo, it’s important to remember that while the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings reflect heavily in this film, Tokyo itself was heavily firebombed at the end of the war with conventional bombs, and those attacks left a large part of the city in ruins, as well as almost 100,000 civilians dead. Let me state that again: 100,000 Tokyo residents were killed in bombing raids in 1945, not even ten years before this film was made. One can only imagine how chillingly familiar Gojira’s imagery must have been for Japanese audiences, but according to many film scholars that’s Gojira’s power- it serves as a cinematic catharsis.

In a way, Gojira represented a kind of exorcism for a country still scarred from a conflict that it started, and then lost in the most bitter of ways. It’s a great monster movie, but it’s also an unwinking condemnation of human tampering with the very fabric of creation, as well as a plea for understanding of the natural wonders that predate us. The influence of this single film on modern culture and entertainment is almost immeasurable. It’s a seminal work that had a ripple effect on hundreds of horror and science fiction films which came after, and which also started a multibilliondollar franchise, giving birth to dozens of sequels films, cartoons, toys, clothing and more. It’s also largely responsible for the genesis of KAIJU culture (KAIJU translates to strange beast, Ed) which permeates both Japanese and American culture today.

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Finally, Gojira (as well as its American counterpart) is also a critical cultural touchstone. It created a conduit into Japanese and Asian cinema for many western film and sci-fi fans like myself, smashing the social and ideological barriers created between two peoples by politicians, xenophobes and warmongers, and showcasing the similarities we all share- the love of family, friends and country- and the hope that as human civilization continues to grow, it will also grow wiser. Jim Towns Jim Towns is an LA-based writer, director, producer and artist. His feature films include Prometheus Triumphant, STIFF, House of Bad, and State of Desolation, as well as the upcoming documentaries A Guitar Story and Ninjapocalypse. His short films have been included in the anthologies Grindsploitation and Shane Ryan’s Faces of Snuff, and his producing work includes Survival Knife, Enter the Samurai and The Bill Murray Experience.

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[Uncensored Downloadable] Creators Unite Magazine Issue 07 THE ART ISSUE