Page 1


Cover: 1. Low White Sun, 1962


THEODOROS

(1922-1997)

24th may – 16th july 2005

CRANE KALMAN GALLERY LTD 178 brompton road, london sw3 1hq tel: 020 7584 7566 fax: 020 7584 3843 www.cranekalman.com / ckg.ltd@virgin.net


THEODOROS STAMOS (1922-1997) I think Stamos liked to look fierce. He felt the power of his blacks: eyes, bushy circumflex eyebrows, and a great black shelf of a moustache. His frown was formidable. But, as his life’s work attests, he was basically a tender, lyrical man, attuned in his very own way to the universe. His devoted friend, Mark Rothko, used to say he was especially fond of Stamos because he had openly wept when a close friend died. Those of us who knew Stamos found that behind the intense and often forbidding gaze he cultivated, was a spirit capable of bursts of humour (some would say a wicked humour) and that was not averse to pure fun. Sometimes Stamos’ humour was even at his own expense. I think of the time in the late 1950’s when I interviewed him and mentioned that critics often characterised his work as inflected by oriental aesthetics. “I guess because I’m Greek, you could call me Oriental, but I’m not Oriental like the Japanese,” he said “not ascetic, that is. I’m Oriental like a Greek or Turkish rug”. He laughed when he said that – a full laugh terminating in a giggle – but the truth was that he himself had called attention to his interest in the Orient two years before, in an essay, “Why Nature in Art?”. There he proclaimed his belief in “the inner vision” – a belief he never renounced – and went on to say: What matters is the concentration of thought and the prompt and vigorous action of the hand to the directing will. Such a response seems like a kind of automatic writing, but the Oriental in possession of an infallible technique places himself at the mercy of inspiration. There is no doubt that Stamos followed the principles he formulated in 1954 throughout his life. He was “at the mercy of inspiration” at all times, and his inspiration was usually derived from singular experiences in nature. As far as I know, Stamos never lingered with the human form or the still life, or any of the conventional painter’s motifs. From his first one-man exhibition, which took place shortly before his twenty-first birthday, his interests were apparent. He himself clearly defined them in his 1957 answer to a Whitney Museum questionnaire:


I entered the world of echinoids, sea anemones, fossils and the inside of a stone. Many of them were arranged in a flat space, as if one were looking down a strip of beach. Textures and brittle, feathery surfaces became an obsession. To free the mystery of the stone’s inner life was my object. Stamos was not alone in the early 1940s, in being concerned with what he called an “ancestral world.” The child of Greek immigrants, he was predisposed to think mythically, as were the painters in New York to whom he gravitated. Perhaps because it was a desperate moment in Western history, painters working during the Second World War such as Mark Rothko, Adolph Gottlieb and Barnett Newman had resolutely turned away from all current artistic modes toward the horizons farthest from modern life. They were concerned with ancientness as a possible salvation. They were drawn to pictographs, ideograms, and in some cases, calligraphy. Stamos, the youngest among them, sought, as he said, the stone’s inner life – implying the millennial deposits of world history. Rocks, after all, had had a long symbolic life, as poets of that period repeatedly reminded us. I think of T. S. Eliot and Wallace Stevens, both of whom were greatly admired in New York’s artistic colony. At the time, it was the evident preoccupation with natural forms that led critics to talk about “biomorphic” art. Stamos’s older friends among the painters, who would soon be dubbed Abstract Expressionists, had cast a glance at the Surrealists, among them Masson and Tanguy, both of whom had taken refuge in the United States during the war and had adapted organic, as opposed to the geometric abstraction in their work. The New York version, however, quickly metamorphosed into a general concern with primordial sources. While Stamos easily moved in the same psychologically tempered idioms, his course soon diverged. By the mid-1950s, it became apparent that what moved him was not so much the petroglyphs of the American southwest, or the carvings of the Haida Indians, but rather, intimations of vital life drawn from landscapes he actively sought to experience. He travelled widely. He also built a house in Eastern Long Island from which he could note nuances of weather; the rhythm of the sea; the geology of the cliff overhanging the water, and the great diversity of sea-sculptured stones and pebbles. The responses to his chosen vista were joined with his impressions of the Red Sea and ultimately, the Ionian Sea from which his parents had emigrated (but


“The Irascibles” 1950 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

Willem de Kooning Adolph Gottlieb Ad Reinhardt Hedda Sterne Richard Pousette-Dart William Baziotes Jackson Pollock Clyfford Still Robert Motherwell Bradley Walker Tomlin Theodoros Stamos Jimmy Ernst Barnett Newman James Brooks Mark Rothko

A letter of protest by 18 American artists was addressed to the President of the Metropolitan Museum of Art (Mr. Roland L. Redmond). They were boycotting the Museum’s hostility towards advanced art. The letter was also printed on the first page of the New York Times on 22nd May 1950. The group was labelled “The Irascibles”.


never forgot, according to Stamos, who grew up hearing tales of the homeland, myths and descriptions of beloved landscapes in Greece). Stamos often said that what interested him above all was “the idea of a thing”. The Lucretian approach to landscape was always with him, and is, in my view, the very essence of his art. He would alight on some distant shore, such as the terraced surround of the Red Sea, and would diligently seek to mine the “idea” until he felt he had seized and expressed it. During the 1950s, then, he began to think of his work in series, as he did ever after. He sought atmospheric effects by thinning his paints, simplifying his palette, feathering his strokes to soften boundaries, and opening out into ambiguous spaces, suggesting infinites that would, towards the end of his life, wholly preoccupy his imagination. By the 1960’s, Stamos had developed a palette that was his alone. If I think back and try to characterise my own impressions, I remember the filmy whites, fogged or evanescent juxtaposed with brilliant reds that rose like fiery columns; or midnight blues and variations on mauve and saturated purple, in nocturnal meditations. He had also enlarged his vocabulary of techniques, ranging from thinning his paints to veil-like consistency to cross-hatching and weaving together rich impasto strokes. There were fluttering passages and dense passages that spoke of his extensive experience with brush and canvas, and his willingness to explore the possibilities of his media to the fullest. After Rothko’s death in 1970, and the lurid trial that followed (in which I see Stamos as a cruelly persecuted victim) Stamos fled to his parents’ homeland on the island of Lefkada in the Ionian Sea. There he established a studio and undertook to express his deepest feelings; his most abstract approach to life in a universe he always saw as infinite. The works in the “Infinity Series” still reflect his personal exploration of various sites including those in Greece, such as Delphi and Sunion, and those to which he travelled, such as Jerusalem. He had long maintained that things are created by the mind, and that the mind is “concerned with interpreting values rather than giving a description of facts”. His works from the mid-1970s to his death deal with his search for a summary interpretation of his long experience with wind, sea, flowers, horizons, skies, stars – in short, the universe and its


endless source of wonder for an artist. In these late works he retrieves his early interest in ideographic or calligraphic hints of the hand of man, but he indicates that they will not reveal their secrets. There are hieroglyphs that are impressed on landscape vistas, or float up from beneath an atmospheric surface. Stamos works with alternate opacities and transparencies; he scumbles and dapples in artful suggestions of how things are. When I look back at his oeuvre, I remember conversations I had with Stamos, often about artists of the past that interest him. When I first knew him, he told me about his struggles as a working-class boy doing odd jobs to survive, and how he was eventually able to establish a framing business in which he had the great fortune to mount and frame a number of works by Paul Klee. In the late paintings of Stamos, I see a certain affinity with Klee, not only in the undecipherable, sign-like lines, but also in his preoccupation with the variety of form in nature. I’m quite sure Stamos understood instinctively what Klee advocated when he said the painter’s task is not to reproduce the visible but to make visible. Other painters he mentioned were Monet (for his painterliness, as I recall) and, oddly enough, Caspar David Friedrich (probably for his gaze into infinity). The struggle to make visible his own emotions in the face of the cosmos led Stamos to abstraction, but he never abandoned specific sensuous responses. In this, he was an authentic heir to the great Romantic tradition in which the search for correspondences between what is felt and what is seen, takes on an almost mystical cast.

Dore Ashton

Dore Ashton, one of America’s foremost art critics, is the author of many books on modern art, including The New York School: A Cultural Reckoning, A Reading of Modern Art, Modern American Sculpture and A Fable of Modern Art and the editor of Picasso on Art (published by Penguin Books). She is a professor and head of the Division of Art at the Cooper Union in New York City, and her articles have appeared in some seventy journals throughout the world.


2. The Green Sky, 1944


3. Little Bird on a Rock, 1945


4. Abstract Composition, 1946/56


5. Granite Shore, 1946


6. Ascent for Ritual, 1947


7. Compoistion, 1949


8. Composition, c.1950


9. Untitled (Columns of Fire), 1959


10. Untitled, 1961


11. Untitled, 1963


12. Divide, 1960


13. Chosica Sun Box II, 1968


14. Infinity Field, Lefkada Series, 1977


15. Infinity Field, Lefkada Series IX, 1978


16. Infinity Field, Lefkada Series VI, 1978


17. Infinity Field, Lefkada Series 15c, 1979


18. Infinity Field, Lefkada Series, 1980


19. Infinity Field, Lefkada Series, 1980


20. Infinity Field, Jerusalem Series, 1985


21. Infinity Field, Jerusalem Series No. 2, 1992


Chronological Biography, Bibliography and Exhibitions 1922 Born on December 31 on East 18th Street, New York City. The fourth of six children of Greek immigrant parents. Stamos’s mother, Stamatata came from Sparta. His father, Theodoros came from the mountains north of the Island of Lefkada in the Ionian Sea. His father had been a fisherman in Greece before Stamos was born, and for many years thereafter he ran a small hat cleaning and shoe shine shop off St Mark’s Place in Lower Manhattan. 1930 Stamos ruptures spleen as a result of a fall, and it is removed. While recuperating he begins to draw.

1944 One-man Exhibition Mortimer Brandt Gallery, New York City, February. 1945 Group Exhibitions Mortimer Brandt Gallery, “Paintings by John Graham, David Hill, Theodoros Stamos, Hedda Sterne”, May 5-29. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York City, “1945 Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting”.

1936 Attends Peter Stuyvesant High School in Manhattan; awarded a scholarship to The American Artists’ School as the result of some drawings.

Collector, Edward Root, purchases Stamos’s “Movement of Plants” (1945), exhibited in The Whitney Museum Annual Exhibition, the first of thirty-two paintings by Stamos purchased by Root, which are now at The Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute in Utica, New York.

1937 Stamos meets Joseph Solman, member of the artists’ group called “The Ten” Solman encourages Stamos to begin painting at home and also directs him to visit Alfred Steiglitz’s gallery, where Stamos sees paintings by Milton Avery and Arthur Dove.

1946 Group Exhibitions Mortimer Brandt Gallery, “Paintings by Stamos”, April 1-20.

1939 Three months before graduation, Stamos leaves Stuyvesant High School. He drops sculpture, partly because of financial difficulties and space, and he paints in shared studios around 10th Street. For the next two years he supports himself by working as a florist, hat blocker, printer, prism maker, caster, enamel polisher and book salesman. 1941 Begins running small frame shop on East 18th Street, which he continues to do until 1948. Meets Arshile Gorky, Fernand Leger and other artists in shop. Frames a large number of Paul Klee’s works for the Karl Nierendorf Gallery. 1943 Stamos’s first one-man exhibition, Wakefield Gallery/ Bookshop run by Betty Parsons, November 29-December 11. Meets Adolph Gottlieb and Barnett Newman.

Whitney Museum of American Art “1946 Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting”. The Betty Parsons Gallery opens in September, including the works of Stamos, Newman, Pollock, Rothko and Still. First museum purchase, “Sounds in the Rock” (1946), by The Museum of Modern Art, N.Y. 1947 One-man Exhibition Betty Parsons Gallery, February 10-March 1, introductory essay by B. B. Newman. Group Exhibitions Betty Parsons Gallery “The Ideographic Picture”, paintings by Hans Hofmann, Pietro Lazzari, Boris Margo, Barnett Newman, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko, Theodoros Stamos, Clyfford Still. Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, “Paintings in the United States, 1947”, October 9-December 7.


The Art Institute of Chicago, “58th Annual Exhibition of American Painting and Sculpture, Abstract and Surrealist American Art”, November 6, 1947January 11, 1948

Publications James Thrall Soby, “Contemporary Painters”, The Museum of Modern Art, N.Y., 1948, reprinted by The Arno Press, N.Y., 1966.

Whitney Museum of American Art “1947 Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting”, December 6 1947January 26, 1948.

Alfred H. Barr, Jr., “Painting and Sculpture in The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1948”.

Publications Thomas B. Hess, “Abstracting the Ocean”, Art News, February 1947. Benjamin Baldwin “Theodoros Stamos”, Arts and Architecture, July 1947. James Thrall Soby “The Younger American Artists”, Harper’s Bazaar, September 1947. The Tiger’s Eye, issue titled “The Sea”, December 1947, includes statement by Stamos and reproductions of paintings Ancestral Shore, (colln. B. B. Newman) and Ancestral Construction (Edward Root colln.). Stamos meets Mark Rothko, Kurt Seligman and Peggy Guggenheim. Travels by train throughout the United States and meets Mark Tooey with whom he exchanges pictures. Completes mural commission for Moore-McCormack Line’s “S. S. Argentina”. Becomes friendly with John Graham. 1948 One-man Exhibitions Betty Parsons Gallery, January 26-February 14. Margaret Brown Gallery, Boston, October 25-November 13. Group Exhibitions Whitney Museum of American Art, “1948 Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Sculpture, Watercolors and Drawings”, January 31-March 21.

Anne B. Louchheim “ABC (or XYZ) of Abstract Art” The New York Times Magazine, July 11, 1948. James Thrall Soby “The Fine Arts”, Saturday Review of Literature, January 24, 1948. Stamos travels by freighter to France, Italy and Greece with poet Robert Price. Through Christian Zervos, he meets in Paris Brancusi, Victor Brauner, Giacometti, Henri Laurens and Picasso. Meets Morris Graves at Chatres. 1949 One-man Exhibition Betty Parsons Gallery, December 13-31. Group Exhibitions Contemporary Painting in the United States, Great Britain and France, The Art Gallery of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Whitney Museum of American Art, “Juliana Force and American Art: A Memorial Exhibition” September 24-October 30. Whitney Museum of American Art, “1949 Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting”, December 15, 1949February 5, 1960. Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh “Paintings in the United States”. “Young American Artists”, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y. Publication James Thrall Soby “Does Our Art Impress Europe?” Saturday Review of Literature, August 6, 1949.

“XXIV Bennale di Venezia", Venice, June 4-September 8. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, “New York Private Collections”, July 20-September 12. Whitney Museum of American Art, “1948 Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting”, November 13, 1948January 2, 1949.

1950 One-man Exhibitions The Duncan Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C., January 15-31. Betty Parsons Gallery, February 24-March 17.


Margaret Brown Gallery, Boston, Mass., October 23-November 11. Group Exhibitions Whitney Museum of American Art, “1950 Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting”, November 10-December 31. California Palace of the Legion of Honor, San Francisco, “4th Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting”, November 25-January 1, 1951. Publication “19 Young American Artists,” Life Magazine, March 20, 1950. An historically significant art publication. Tony Smith recommends Stamos for teaching position at the Hartley Settlement House which he holds for the next four years.

Illustrates book “The Sorrows of Cold Stone: Poems 1940-1950”, by John Malcom Brinin, Dodd, Mead, New York, 1951. Publications “The Metropolitan and Modernism”, Life Magazine, January 15, 1951. “Betty Parsons: Her Gallery and Her Influence”, Vogue, October 1, 1951. John I. H. Baur, “Revolution and Tradition in Modern American Art”, Harvard University Press, Cambridge 1951. 1952 One-man Exhibitions Betty Parsons Gallery, February 16-March 8. Baldwin Kingrey Inc., Chicago, April 15-May 24.

Also teaches at the famous Black Mountain College, North Carolina, where painter Kenneth Noland is among his students. Clement Greenberg was also in residence at the time.

Group Exhibitions Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, “The 1952 Pittsburgh International Exhibition of Contemporary Painting”, October 16-December 14.

1951 One-man Exhibition Betty Parsons Gallery, January 8-27

The Barnett Aden Gallery, Washington, D.C., “Paintings Purchased by Patrons 1943-1952”.

Group Exhibitions Frank Perls Gallery, Beverly Hills, Ca., “Seventeen Modern American Painters”, January. The Museum of Modern Art, N.Y. “Abstract Painting and Sculpture in America”, January. Whitney Museum of American Art, “1951 Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Sculpture, Watercolors and Drawings”, March 17-May 5. Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Ca., “Contemporary Painting in the United States, 1951 Annual Exhibition”, June 2-July 22. The Brooklyn Museum, N.Y., “Revolution and Tradition”, November 15, 1951-January 6, 1952.

Stamos takes part in “Artists Sessions at Studio 35”, edited version published in Modern Artists in America, ed. Robert Motherwell and Ad Reinhardt, No. 1, Wittenborn, Schulz Inc., N.Y., 1952 1953 One-man Exhibition Betty Parsons Gallery, January 5-24. Group Exhibitions The Metropolitan Museum of Art N.Y. “The Edward Root Collection”, February 12-April 12. The Brooklyn Museum, N.Y. “International Watercolor Exhibition”, 17th Biennial, May 13-June 21.

Stamos awarded Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Fellowship.

Cranbrook Academy of Art, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, “First Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting and Sculpture”, October 2-November 1.

Builds house on Long Island, designed for him by sculptor Tony Smith.

Whitney Museum of American Art, “1953 Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting”, October 15-December 6.


1954 One-man Exhibition The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C., December 1-January 3. Group Exhibitions Whitney Museum of American Art, “1954 Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Sculpture, Watercolors and Drawings”, March 17-April 18. Stamos writes and delivers important lecture titled “Why Nature in Art?” at The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. where it is well received by Clive Bell, among others. During the next few years, delivers lecture at The Art Institute of Chicago, “The Munson Williams-Proctor Institute in Utica, N.Y., Tulane University, Tuscaloosa Festival of the Arts at The University of Alabama (February 1965). Untimely death of close friend, poet Robert Price. Publication John I. H. Baur, “Trends and the Museum”, Art In America, December, 1954.

1956; Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, February 9-March 20, 1956; City Art Museum of St Louis, April 15-May 15, 1956. Museo de Arte Moderno, Barcelona, III Biennal Hispanoamericano de Arte “El Arte Moderno en los Estados Unidos”, September 24-October 24, travelled to: The Tate Gallery, London as “Modern Art in the United States”, January 5-February 12, 1956. Publication Preston Stuart “The Artist in Europe – And in America”. The New York Times Magazine, May 8, 1955. Stamos begins teaching at The Art Students’ League in New York City. 1956 One-man Exhibition Betty Parsons Gallery, January 16-February 4. Group Exhibitions The Toledo Museum of Art, Ohio “Watercolours Today”, February-March.

1955 One-man Exhibition The DeCordova and Dana Museum, Lincoln, Massachusetts, January 16-February 17.

Whitney Museum of American Art, “Annual Exhibition: Sculpture, Paintings, Watercolors, Drawings”, November 14, 1956-January 6, 1957.

Group Exhibitions University of Illinois, Urbana, “Contemporary American Painting and Sculpture”, February 27-April 3.

Publications Parker Tyler, Review of Stamos Exhibition at Betty Parsons Gallery, Art News, January 1956.

Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, Utica, N.Y., “Italy Rediscovered: An Exhibition of American Painters in Italy Since World War II”, March 5-27.

Dore Ashton, “About Art and Artists”, The New York Times, January 20, 1956.

Congress for Cultural Freedom, “U.S. Representation: International Exhibition of Painters under 35”, travelled to: Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna, Rome as “Giovani Pitori”, April 15-May 20; Palais des Beaux-Arts, Brussels as “Jeunes Peintres”, June 3-July 3; Musée National d’Art Moderne, Paris as “Jeunes Peintres”, October 14-November 13. The Brooklyn Museum, “International Watercolor Exhibition”, 18th Biennial, May 4-June 5. Whitney Museum of American Art, “The New Decade: 35 American Painters and Sculptors”, May 11-August 7, travelled to: San Francisco Museum of Art, October 6-November 6; University of California at Los Angeles, November 20-January 7,

Dore Ashton, “The Age of Lyricism”, Arts and Architecture, March, 1956. “Art: What the Museums Are Buying”, Time Magazine June 25, 1956. Stamos illustrates “The Hidden Airdrome and Uncollected Poems” by Robert Price, Cummington Press, Rowe, Mass., 1956. Stamos receives National Institute of Arts and Letters Awards. 1957 One-man Exhibitions Philadelphia Arts Alliance, January 14-March 5. Gump’s Gallery, San Francisco, March 4-30.


Department of Art, Michigan State University, East Lansing, March 20-April 9.

Whitney Museum of American Art, “The Museum and Its Friends: Twentieth Century American Art from Collections of the Friends of the Whitney Museum”, April 30-June 15.

Group Exhibitions The Brooklyn Museum, “Trends in Watercolors Today: Italy, United States”, April 9-May 26.

The Minneapolis Institute of Arts, “American Paintings 1945-1957”, June 18-September 1.

Schleier Gallery, The Denver Art Museum, “63rd Annual", June 7-July 21.

The Cincinnati Art Museum “Two Centuries of American Painting”, October 4-November 4.

The Minneapolis Institute of Arts, “American Paintings: 1945-1957”, June 18-September 1. Whitney Museum of American Art, “1957 Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Sculpture, Paintings, Watercolors and Drawings”, November 20, 1957-January 12, 1958. Publication Alexander Elliot, Three Hundred Years of American Art, Time, Inc., New York, 1957. 1958 One-man Exhibitions André Emmerich Gallery, New York, April 1-30. The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. “A Selection of Twelve Years”, introductory essay by Kenneth Sawyer, December 31, 1958-March 1959. Group Exhibitions Whitney Museum of American Art, “Nature in Abstraction”, January 14-March 16, travelled to: The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C., April 2-May 4; Fort Worth Art Center, Texas, June 2-29; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, July 16-Aug. 24; San Francisco Museum of Art, September 10-October 12; The Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, October 29-December 14; City Art Museum of St. Louis, January 7-February 8, 1959. International Program of The Museum of Modern Art, New York, “The New American Painting As Shown in Eight European Countries 1958-1959”, travelled to: Kunsthalle Basel, April 19-26; Galleria Civica d’Arte Moderna, Milan, June 1-29; Museo Nacional de Arte Contemporaneo, Madrid, July 16August 11; Hochschule für Bildende Kunst, Berlin, September 1October 1; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, October 17November 24; Palais des Beaux-Arts, Brussels, December 6 1958January 4, 1959; Musée National d’Art Moderne, Paris, January 16-February 15, 1959; The Tate Gallery, London, February 24March 23, 1959.

Whitney Museum of American Art, “1958 Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Sculpture, Paintings, Watercolors and Drawings”, November 18, 1958-January 4, 1959. Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, Texas “A Decade of Contemporary Drawings, 1948-1958”. November 20, 1958January 4, 1959. Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, “The 1958 Pittsburgh Bicentennial International Exhibition of Contemporary Painting and Sculpture", December 5, 1958-February 8, 1959. Albright Art Gallery, Buffalo, N.Y., “Contemporary Art Acquisitions 1957-1958”, December 8, 1958-January 18, 1969. Publications John I. H. Baur, “Nature In Abstraction: The Relation of Abstract Painting and Sculpture To Nature in 20th Century American Art”, Catalogue of the Exhibition, Whitney Museum of American Art, N.Y., 1958. Dorothy Miller and Alfred H. Barr, Jr., “The New American Painting As Shown In Eight European Countries, 1958-1959”, Catalogue of the Exhibition, The Museum of Modern Art, N.Y., 1958. Eduard Trier, “Neue Tendenzen der amerikanischen Kunst”, Das Kunstwerk, February, 1958. Dore Ashton, “La Signature Americaine”, XXe Siecle, March 1958. “Art: American Abstraction Abroad”, Time Magazine, August 4, 1958. Robert Brustein, “The Cult of Unthink”, Horizon, September 1958.


1959 One-man Exhibition André Emmerich Gallery, New York, February 3-28.

1960 One-man Exhibitions André Emmerich Gallery, February 1-27 Gimpel Fils, London, February 2-28.

Group Exhibitions The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas "New York and Paris Painting in the Fifties", January 16-February 8. American Art Expositions Inc. New York, “Art: USA 59 – a force a language, a frontier”, April 3-19.

Marion Koogler MacNay Art Institute San Antonio, Texas, February 21-March 15. Group Exhibitions Whitney Museum of American Art,“Business Buys American Art”, March 17-April 24.

Galleria dell’Ariete Milan, “20 Quadri 1959”; April 8-May 31.

The Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, “60 American Painters 1960”, April 3-May 8.

Museum Fridericianum, Kassel, Germany, “II. Documenta ’59", July 11-October 11.

Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, “New Accessions USA”, July 7-September 7.

Mary Washington College, University of Virginia, Fredericksburg, Va., “4th Exhibition of Modern Art”. October 25-November 22. North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, N.C., “1959 North Carolina Artists’ Exhibition with Fifteen Invited Works”, December 3-January 3, 1960. Whitney Museum of American Art, “1959 Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting”, December 9, 1959January 31, 1960. Twentieth Century American Painting from the Edward W. Root Collection, Smithsonian Institute, Washington. Publications Virgil Barker, “From Realism to Reality In Recent American Painting”, University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln, Nebraska 1959. “Artists’ Statements”, It Is Magazine, Winter/Spring, 1959.. Kenneth Rexroth, “Americans Seen Abroad”, Art News, Summer, 1959.

Publications Kenneth B. Sawyer, Stamos, The Pocket Museum, Editions Georges Fall, Paris, 1960. Lawrence Alloway, "Stamos As Pastoral", Art News and Review, February 13, 1960. “Corporate Splurge in Abstract Art”, Fortune Magazine, April 1960. Lawrence Alloway. “Classicism or Hard Edge”, Art International, April/May, 1960. Hans Theodor Flemming “International Look At the USA: The Challenge of Contemporary Art”, Art in America, Summer, 1960. 1961 One-man Exhibitions André Emmerich Gallery, January 24-February 11. Galleria Naviglio, Milan, January 28-February 10. Group Exhibitions “The VI Tokyo Biennale”, Tokyo, Summer 1961. The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, “American Abstract Expressionists And Imagists”, October.

“Eight New York Painters”, Vogue, October 15, 1959.

Carnegie Institute Pittsburgh, “The 1961 Pittsburgh International Exhibition of Contemporary Painting and Sculpture", October 27-January 7, 1962.

A. Jouffroy and K. A. Jeienski "Une Grande Enquête: Tendances de la Jeune Peinture", Preuves 68, October, 1959.

Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, Utica, N.Y., "Edward Wales Root Bequest", November 5-February 4, 1962.


Whitney Museum of American Art, “1961 Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting”, December 13, 1961February 4, 1962.

1963 One-man Exhibition André Emmerich Gallery, December 3, 1963-January 2, 1964.

Publication Michel Seuphor, “Abstract Painting”, transl. Haakon Chevalier, Abrams, New York, 1961.

Group Exhibitions Krannett Art Museum University of Illinois Urbana, “Contemporary American Painting and Sculpture”, March 3-April 7.

Stamos wins the Mainichi Newspaper Prize at the 6th Tokyo International. Moves into house on West 83rd Street in Manhattan.

Whitney Museum of American Art "1963 Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting", December 11, 1963February 2, 1964.

1962 One-man Exhibition André Emmerich Gallery, January 9-27.

Publication Cleve Gray, “The Artist in America, 1963: Anniversary Album”, Art In America, February, 1963.

Group Exhibitions The Art Institute of Chicago, “65th Annual American Exhibition”, January 5-February 18. Seattle World’s Fair 1962, “Art Since 1950”, April 21-October 21.

1964 Group Exhibitions Whitney Museum of American Art, “The Friends Collect”, May 8-June 16.

Whitney Museum of American Art, “The First Five Years”, May 16-June 17.

Whitney Museum of American Art, “Between the Fairs: 25 Years of American Art, 1939-1964”, June 24-September 23.

The Art Institute of Chicago, “Society for Contemporary Arts”, Summer.

Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, “The 1964 Pittsburgh International Exhibition of Contemporary Painting and Sculpture”, October 30, 1964-January 10, 1965.

Whitney Museum of American Art “Forty Artists Under Forty”, July 23-September 16, travelled to: Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, Utica, N.Y. October 14-November 18; Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse, N.Y., April 14-May 12, 1963; Andrew Dickson White Museum of Art, Cornell University, Ithaca N.Y., May 26-June 23, 1963; Albright-Know Art Gallery, Buffalo, N.Y., July 7-August 4, 1963; Corcoran Gallery of Art Washington, D.C., Art USA: The Johnson Collection. Publications Lee Nordness, ed., “Art USA Now”, text Arlen S. Weller, Bucher, Lucerne, 1962. Harriet Janis and Rudi Blesh, “Collage: Personalities Concepts Techniques”, Chilton, New York, 1962.

“Art: USA: The Johnson Collection”. travelled to: The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., December 29-January 17, 1965; Philadelphia Museum of Art, February 1-March 7, 1965; Whitney Museum of American Art: March 23-April 19; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, June 4-27; The Detroit Institute of Arts, July 9-August 1; Minneapolis Institute of Arts, August 10-September 5; City Art Museum of St Louis, October 22-November 14; Seattle Art Museum, April 8-May 1, 1966; California Palace of the Legion of Honor, San Francisco, May 13-June 5, 1966; Art Gallery of Toronto, December 1966; Andrew Dickson White Museum of Art, Cornell University, January-February, 1967. Publication Robert Koch, Louis C. Tiffany: Rebel In Glass, Crown Publ., N.Y. 1964.


1965 Group Exhibitions The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, "Three Centuries of American Painting" April 9-October 17. Whitney Museum of American Art, “1965 Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting”. December 8, 1965-January 30,1966 Publications Henry Geldzahler, “American Painting in the Twentieth Century”, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1965. Lawrence Alloway "The Biomorphic Forties”, Artforum, September 1965; reprinted in Lawrence Alloway, “Topics in American Art Since 1945”, W. W. Norton & Co. Inc. New York, 1975. Francine de Plessis “Painters and Poets” Art In America, October-November, 1965. 1966 One-Man Exhibition André Emmerich Gallery, January 11-29. Group Exhibitions The Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, Connecticut. Washington Gallery of Modern Art, Washington, D.C., “The Permanent Collection”. Whitney Museum of American Art, “Art of the United States 1670-1966,” September 28-November 27. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Mass., “Sculpture and Painting Today: Selections from the Collection of Susan Morse Hilles”, October 7-November 6. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, N.Y., “Two Hundred Years of Watercolour Painting in America: An Exhibition Commemorating The Centennial of the American Watercolor Society”, December 8, 1966-January 29, 1967. Publications Paul Cummings, “A Dictionary of Contemporary American Artists”, St. Martin’s Press, New York, 1966.

William S. Rubin, “Toward A Critical Framework: A Post-Cubist Morphology”, Artforum. Special issue. September 1966. Stamos is guest lecturer at Columbia University, School of Fine Arts, New York. 1967 One-Man Exhibition Springold Theater Arts Center Gallery, Brandeis University, Waltham, Mass., January 23-February 26. Group Exhibitions The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., “30th Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting”, February 25-April 9. Whitney Museum of American Art, “1967 Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting”, December 13-February 4, 1968. Publications Barbara Rose, “American Art Since 1900: A Critical History”, Praeger, New York, 1967; Revised and Expanded Edition, 1975. T. H. G. “Introductory Essay, ‘Theodorous Stamos’ ”, Springold Theater Arts Center Gallery, Brandeis University, January-February, 1967. Stamos becomes the third Maurice and Shirley Saltzman Artist-In-Residence at Brandeis University, succeeding Jacob Lawrence and Philip Guston. Receives National Arts Foundation Award. Begins frequent visits to Mark Rothko. 1968 One-man Exhibitions André Emmerich Gallery, March 16-April 4. Waddington Fine Arts Ltd., Montreal, June 5-July 6. Group Exhibitions Finch College Museum of Art, New York City, “Betty Parsons’ Private Collection”, March 13-April 24. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, “Dada, Surrealism and Their Heritage”, March 27-June 9, travelled to: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, July 16-September 8; The Art Institute of Chicago, October 19-December 8.


The American Federation of Arts, New York City, “A University Collects: The University of California, Berkeley”.

Carter Ratcliff, Review, Art International, April 1970.

Museum of Natural History Building, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., “The Art of Organic Form”, June.

February 25, Mark Rothko commits suicide. Stamos offers Rothko family part of his family burial plot in East Marion, Long Island.

The Honolulu Academy of Arts, Hawaii, “Signals in the Sixties”, October 5-November 10. Publications William S. Rubin, “Dada, Surrealism and their Heritage”, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1968. Cover by Stamos (Cornish Sun-Box, acrylic on board, 1967) Art International, March, 1968. Ralph Pomeroy, “Stamos’s Sun Boxes”, Art News, March, 1968. “Hoving of the Metropolitan”, Newsweek, April 1, 1968 1969 Group Exhibitions Geigy Chemical Corporation, Ardsley, N.Y., “Geigy Art Collection”, March-April. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, “The New American Painting and Sculpture: The First Generation”, June 18-October 5. Publications Harold Rosenberg, “The Art World”, The New Yorker, September 27, 1969. Stamos completes first large-scale tapestry commission for lobby of office building at 150 East 58th Street in Manhattan. 1970 One-man Exhibition André Emmerich Gallery, January 31-February 19. Group Exhibitions University of California, Santa Barbara, Ca. “Trends In Twentieth Century Art”, January 6-February 1. Publications Peter Schjeldahl, “After Nothing Less Than Emotional Profundity”, The New York Times, February 8, 1970. Robert Pincus-Witten, Review, Artforum, April, 1970.

Review of Stamos at Emmerich, Arts, February, 1970.

Stamos is asked to help supervise the installation of the Rothko Ecumenical Chapel in Houston, Texas, commissioned by Mr and Mrs John de Menil, aided by painter Roy Edwards, who worked on the murals with Rothko. Stamos makes second visit to Greece and begins to return regularly, spending summers on the island of Lefkada. 1971 Group Exhibition Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, “The Structure of Colour”. Publications Irving Sandler, “The Triumph of American Painting”, Praeger, New York, 1971. November, Kate Rothko’s guardian files petition against the three executors of Mark Rothko’s Estate (Kate is Rothko’s daughter). 1973 One-man Exhibition Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, Nebraska. 1974 One-man Exhibition Athens Gallery, Athens, Greece. Group Exhibitions The Packard Gallery, Ohio. The Herbert F. Johnson Museum, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York. Louis K. Meisel Gallery, New York City. Publications Ralph Pomeroy, “Stamos”, Harry Abrams, New York, 1974. The Rothko Trial opens on February 14 – a harrowing time for Stamos as he was one of the three executors of the Rothko Estate. Because of his deep friendship with Rothko, the personal horror and the mis-understandings that accompanied this situation were hard to bare – a complicated situation.


1975 Group Exhibition “Subjects of the Artist”, The Whitney Museum of American Art, Downtown Branch, 55 Water Street, New York, April-May, 1975. Catalogue of the Exhibition includes Statement by Stamos in 1947. On December 18, New York Surrogate Court Judge Millard L. Midonick handed down his decision in “The Matter of Mark Rothko, Deceased” in an 87 page long statement.

Group Exhibitions “Abstract Expressionism: The Formative Years”, The Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, March 30-May 14, travelled to: Whitney Museum of American Art, October 5-December 3; The Seibu Museum of Art, Tokyo, June 1-July 12. The Arts and Crafts Center of Pittsburgh, Pa. “Washington International Arts Fair”, Washington, D.C.

1976 Group Exhibition Athens Museum, Athens, Greece Publications Laurie Adams, “Art On Trial: From Whistler to Rothko”, Walker & Co. New York, 1976. Edith Evans Asbury, “The Rothko Decision”, Art News, February, 1976. 1977 One-man Exhibitions Louis K. Meisel Gallery, New York. Galerie Le Portail, Heidelberg, Germany. Morgan Gallery, Shawnee Mission, Kansas. Group Exhibitions The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. The Brooklyn Museum, New York, “Noemata: Contemporary Greek American Artists”. Publications Barbara Cavaliere, “Theodoros Stamos in Perspective”, Arts, December 1977. Verena Auffermann, “Meditatives, Manuelles, Asthetisches”, Rhein Neckar Zeitung, December 19, 1977. Sigrid Feeser, “Falsche Rede und ein Gerücht, Mannheimer Morgen, December 7, 1977. B. D. H., “Theodoros Stamos”, Art/World, New York, December 10-January 13, 1978. Barbara Cavaliere & Robert Hobbs, “Against A Newer Laocoon”, Arts, April 1977. 1978 One-man Exhibitions Tomasulo Gallery, Union College, New Jersey. Hokin Gallery, Palm Beach, Florida.

National Pinacotek, Athens, Greece. Panakajsheka Picture Gallery, Athens, Greece. Publications Madeleine Burnside, “Theodoros Stamos”, Art News, February, 1978. Ralph Pomeroy, “Theodoros Stamos”, Art in America, March, 1978. Hilton Kramer, “Making Vivid the Spirit of the New York Scene”, The New York Times, April 16, 1978. “Rothko Case: Lee Seldes replies to John Myers” and “John Myers . . . Riposte to Lee Seldes”, Art/World, New York, May 18-June 16, 1978. Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art Spring Bulletin, 1978. R. H. Friedman, “The Irascibles, a Split Second in Art History”, Arts, September, 1978. Robert Hughes, “The Tribal Style: Ab Ex at the Whitney Museum”, Time Magazine, October 16, 1978. “Abstract Expressionism: The Formative Years”, Catalogue of the Exhibition, Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University and Whitney Museum of American Art, 1978: introductory essays by Robert Carlton Hobbs and Gail Levin, essay on Stamos by Barbara Cavaliere. 1979 One-man Exhibitions Edwin Ulrich Museum, Wichita State University, Kansas. Louis K. Meisel Gallery, New York. “Stamos”, Stamford Museum, Connecticut, November 5-December 31, 1979.


Group Exhibitions Gallery 700, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The Solomon R Guggenheim Museum, New York. Publication Barbara Cavaliere, “Early Abstract Expressionism: The 1940’s”, Flash Art, January/February 1979. 1980 One-man Exhibitions “Theodoros Stamos: Selected Paintings 1945-1979”, State University College, New Paltz, New York. Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, Utica, New York. “Paintings, Works on Paper”, Turske Fine Art, Cologne, Germany, May 9-August 2. Group Exhibitions Hokin Gallery, Palm Beach, Florida and Chicago, Illinois. DuBose Gallery, Inc., Houston, Texas. Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, Utica, N.Y., February 5-23 Publication Academic American Encyclopedia, 21 Volumes, Arete Publishing Co. Inc., Princeton, New Jersey, includes “Abstract Expressionism” by Barabara Cavaliere and “Stamos”, individual artist entry. 1981 One-man Exhibitions “Paintings 1958-1960”, Louis K. Meisel Gallery, April. Turske Fine Art, Zürich, April. Publications Barbara Cavaliere, Catalogue Essay “Paintings 1958-1960”, Louis K. Meisel Gallery, New York, 1981.

One-man Exhibition Karen and Jean Bernier Gallery, Athens, December 81/January 82. 1984 One-man Exhibition Knoedler, Zürich. Group Exhibition Museum of Modern Art, New York, “Primitivism in 20th century American Art”. 1986 Group Exhibition Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN., “The Interpretative Link: Abstract Surreralism into Abstract Expressionism, Work on Paper, 1938-48”. 1991 Group Exhibition The Museum of Modern Art, New York, “Art of the Forties”. 1992 Group Exhibition National Gallery and Alexandros Soutzes Museum, Athens, Greece, “Metamorphoses of the Modern: The Greek Experience”. 1993 Group Exhibition The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, “Abstract Expressionism: Works on Paper”. 1995 Group Exhibition The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo, “Abstract Expressionism: Masterpieces from Japanese colllections”.

Theodore F. Wolff, Stamos in series titled “The Many Masks of Modern Art”, The Christian Science Monitor, February 3, 1981.

1996 Group Exhibition Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, New York, “Exploring the Unknown: Surrealism in American Art”.

1982 Group Exhibition “A Curator’s Choice 1942-1963: A tribute to Dorothy Miller”, Rosa Esman Gallery, New York, February 6-March 6.

1999 Group Exhibition Heckscher Museum, Huntington, New York, “Shaping a Generation: The Art and Artists of Betty Parsons”.


Public Collections of Stamos’s Paintings Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass. Albright Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, N.Y. The Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, Conn. Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, Canada. Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Ill. The Art Students League New York, N.Y. Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, Md. Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlung, Munich, Germany. The Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, N.Y.

National Pinacotek, Athens, Greece. New Jersey State Museum, Trenton, N.J. The New Milwaukee Art Center, Milwaukee, Wisc. Notre Dame University Art Gallery, South Bend, Ind. Palace of Legion of Honor, San Francisco, Cal. Palm Springs Desert Museum, Palm Springs, Cal. The Phillips Collection, Washington D.C. The Phoenix Art Museum, Phoenix, Ariz. Rose Art Museum Brandeis University, Waltham, Mass. Rutgers University Art Gallery, New Brunswick, N.J.

Department of Art, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.

San Francisco Museum of Art, San Francisco, Cal.

The Chrysler Art Museum, Provincetown, Mass.

Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb.

The Columbus Gallery of Fine Arts, Columbus, Ohio. The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. The Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, Mich. Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Joseph H. Hirshhorn Collection, Washington D.C. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y. Marion Koogler Art Institute, San Antonio, Texas. Kresge Art Center, Michigan State University, Lansing, Mich. La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art, La Jolla, Cal. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y. Montclair Art Museum, Montclair, N.J. Munson-Williams Proctor Institute, Utica, N.Y. Museo d’Arte Moderno, Rio de Janerio, Brazil. Museum of Modern Art, New York, N.Y. National Picture Gallery, Athens, Greece.

Smith College Museum of Art, Northampton, Mass. Smithsonian Institute of Art, Washington, D.C. Tel Aviv Museum, Tel Aviv, Israel. University of California Art Museum, Berkeley, Cal. University of Iowa Museum of Art, Iowa City, Iowa. Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, N.Y. Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Norfolk, Va. Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, Conn. Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minn. Wellesley College Art Museum, Wellesley, Mass. The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, N.Y. Wilhelm-Hack Museum, Ludwigshafen, Germany. Museum Moderner Kunst, Wien. Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen, Staatsgalerie Moderner Kunst, München.


List of Paintings 1.

Low White Sun, 1962 (Cover) acrylic on cotton 56 x 52 ins (142 x 132 cm) Exhibited: “Theodoros Stamos: Works from 1945 to 1984”, June-August 1984, Galerie Knoedler, Zürich Provenance: Private Collection, Surrey

6.

Ascent for Ritual, 1947 oil on masonite 39 x 23¾ ins (99 x 60.5 cm) Exhibited: The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. “A Selection of Twelve Years”, Essay by Kenneth Sawyer, December 31, 1958; Provenance: Betty Parsons Gallery, New York

2.

The Green Sky, 1944 oil on masonite 23¼ x 29½ ins (59 x 75 cm) Signed and dated ‘T. Stamos 44’, lower left Exhibited: “Land of the Free, Home of the Brave”, June-August 2000, Crane Kalman Gallery, London

7.

Composition, 1949 oil on canvas 38 x 30 ins (96.5 x 76 cm) Provenance: Turske & Turske, Zürich

8.

Composition, c. 1950 oil on canvas 53 x 31½ ins (135 x 80 cm) Provenance: Turske & Turske, Zürich

9.

Untitled (Columns of Fire), 1959 oil on canvas 48 x 32 ins (122 x 81 cm)

3.

4.

5.

Little Bird on a Rock, 1945 oil on masonite 24 x 30 ins (61 x 76 cm) Exhibited: “Paintings in the United States”, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, October-December, 1945 Provenance: Private Collection, New England Private Collection, Surrey Abstract Composition, 1946/56 oil on masonite 16 x 19¾ ins (40.5 x 50 cm) Provenance: Private Collection, Los Angeles Granite Shore, 1946 oil on masonite 38 x 18 ins (96.5 x 46 cm)

10. Untitled, 1961 oil on canvas 44 x 18 ins (112 x 46 cm) Provenance: Louis K. Meisel Gallery, New York 11. Untitled, 1963 oil on canvas 30 x 30 ins (76 x 76 cm) Provenance: Galerie Knoedler, Zürich Private Collection, Switzerland


12. Divide, 1960

17. Infinity Field, Lefkada Series 15c, 1979

oil on canvas

acrylic on linen

52 x 56 ins (132 x 142 cm)

50¼ x 66 ins (127 x 168 cm) Exhibited: “Theodoros Stamos: Works from 1945 to 1984”, June-August 1984, Galerie Knoedler, Zürich

13. Chosica Sun Box II, 1968 oil on canvas

Galerie Veith Turske, Cologne, 1979

60 x 68 ins (152.5 x 173 cm)

Turske Fine Art, Zürich

Provenance: André Emmerich Gallery, New York Private Collection, Kentucky

18. Infinity Field, Lefkada Series, 1980 oil on canvas 14. Infinity Field, Lefkada Series, 1977 oil on canvas 30 x 24 ins (76 x 61 cm)

15. Infinity Field, Lefkada Series IX, 1978 acrylic on canvas 76½ x 67¾ ins (194.5 x 172 cm) Provenance: Bess Cutler Gallery, New York Louis K. Meisel Gallery, New York

38¾ x 30 ins (98.5 x 76 cm) Provenance: Matthew Scott Fine Art, Los Angeles

19. Infinity Field, Lefkada Series, 1980 acrylic on canvas 54 x 32 ins (137.5 x 81 cm)

20. Infinity Field, Jerusalem Series, 1985 oil on canvas 66 x 40¼ ins (168 x 102 cm)

16. Infinity Field, Lefkada Series VI, 1978 oil on canvas 49½ x 72 ins (125 x 183 cm) Provenance: Louis K. Meisel Gallery, New York

21. Infinity Field, Jerusalem Series No. 2, 1992 acrylic on canvas 60 x 50 ins (152.5 x 127 cm)


Museums and Public Galleries that have Acquired Paintings from Crane Kalman Gallery Aberdeen Art Gallery, Aberdeen, Scotland Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide Baltimore Museum of Art, USA Ulster Museum, Belfast, Northern Ireland University Art Museum, Berkeley, California Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, USA The National Museum of Wales, Cardiff Yale Center for British Art, Connecticut, USA Dundee Art Gallery, Dundee, Scotland National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin, Ireland Kunstmuseum, Dusseldorf, Germany Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh Glasgow Museums and Art Galleries, Glasgow, Scotland Hiroshima Prefectural Art Museum, Japan The City Art Gallery, Leicester, England MusĂŠe des Beaux Arts, Le Havre, France MusĂŠe Malraux, Le Havre, France Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool, England The Tate Gallery, London, England Arts Council of Great Britain, London, England Imperial War Museum, London, England The Victoria and Albert Museum, London, England The Museum of London, England Whitworth Art Gallery, University of Manchester, Manchester, England City Art Gallery, Manchester, England The Felton Bequest, Melbourne, England Milwaukee Art Museum, Wisconsin, USA Stadtische Galerie im Lenbachhaus, Munich, Germany Museum of Modern Art, New York, USA The Andrew Dickson White Museum of Art, Cornell University, New York, USA Toledo Museum of Art, Ohio, USA The Louvre, Paris, France Western Australia Art Gallery, Perth, Australia Rochdale Art Gallery, Rochdale, England Museum of Sao Paulo, Brazil Art Gallery of New South Wales, Australia National Gallery of New Zealand, Wellington


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THEODOROS STAMOS (1922-1997)

MAY 2005

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