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ISSUE 2

WINTER 2012-13

COHERE

FREE

cULTURE cRANBROOK magazine

GHADA ALATRASH | LA BELLE FAIRY CORSETS | WILL HUXTABLE FREE INDOOR SKATING | JOEL ROBISON


thechoiceshop.ca ONLINE SHOP now open 2

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SKATEBOARDS  •  SNOWBOARDS  •  MENS & WOMENS APPAREL

816 Baker Street, Cranbrook BC •

250.489.4568

www.thechoiceshop.ca

• www.facebook.com/thechoice1996


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COHERE is published by:

COHERE

“Without culture and the relative freedom it implies, society, even when perfect, is but a jungle. This is why any authentic creation is a gift to the future.”

CULTURE CRANBROOK MAGAZINE

- Albert Camus

COHEREABOUT

COHERE is about celebrating the creative spirit and passions that thrive in the Cranbrook region. Through lively, provocative, and visually stimulating pages, we seek to motivate readers to deepen their knowledge and appreciation of this quiet community, and to explore and share in the complex variety of cultural expression in the Kootenays and abroad.

Photo: Marty Uri

CREATEDBY CRANBROOK CRAFT COMPANY TRISH BARNES: EDITOR VINE MADDER: CREATIVE DIRECTOR SIOUX BROWNING: LEAD WRITER BRAD SMILEY: LEAD PHOTOGRAPHER JIM CAMERON: WRITER STEVEN LECHMANN: FOOD CONTRIBUTOR JOEL ROBISON: PHOTOGRAPHER MARTY URI: PHOTOGRAPHER

CONTACTUS GENERAL INQUIRIES & ADVERTISING: EMAIL: Desk@COHERECranbrook.com PHONE: 250 464 9613 SUBMISSIONS & STORY IDEAS: EMAIL: Editor@COHERECranbrook.com We welcome your questions and comments. Send contribution submissions by email. All submissions will be subject to Cranbrook Craft Company’s right to make editorial comments or edit for style, space, or content. All opinions expressed in submissions are the author’s and are not necessarily shared with

Our team is made up of talented people who share a passion for art and creativity in all aspects of life. The magazine is based in Cranbrook, British Columbia. We publish four times a year; March, June, September and December.

COHERECOPYRIGHT

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported Licence. For more information visit: CreativeCommons.org/Licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0 COHERE makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information it publishes; it is not responsible for any contingencies that may arise from errors or omissions in the information it publishes.

COVERART Ski Day, by Nataile Bright

staff or advertisers in COHERE.

Correction:

Last issue we mistakenly printed that Angus (Gus) MacDonald was from New Brunswick. He actually hails from Cape Breton, Nova Scotia.

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A GREAT PLACE FOR

. ENTERTAINMENT . SHOPPING .

WE’VE GOT SPIRIT

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DINING . FRIENDS It’s Everybody’s Neighbourhood!

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CONTENT THINK...............................6 A great downtown

LIVE..........................10

Corset maker Jenny Frank

MAKE........................14

Joel Robision

LOOK.......16

Nokie Creek Trail

EXPLORE.......................24

The world of Will

LISTEN...........................12

Foods for the season

Culture Cranbrook A heart with two homes

TASTE..................8

Features

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Kin you skate?

MOVE........23

STYLE......................18 Staycation FIND...................................10 CONNECT.......................18 MARKET...........................28 COHERE CRUNCH.......30 REMEMBER......................31

EVENTS..................26 Upcoming Cranbrook

Activities WINTER 2012-2013

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¤¤THINK

ONE DOWNTOWN: MANY QUESTIONS Sioux Browning talks local ideas Sioux Browning talks culture

A great downtown is an experience you don’t forget. I know I’m in one when I can’t decide which side of the street to walk down first. High-end stores are not required, just a great selection of one-ofa-kind items and services. If a city is a building with many levels, downtown is the ground floor. It welcomes people in with a brand that identifies its character. It boosts economic health and is a point of local pride. I recently took a train trip down the U.S. East Coast, travelling through small towns and cities in New York, Maryland, Virginia, the Carolinas and Florida. A lot of these communities are going through ruination, as old brick industrial buildings and shops are pulled apart by kudzu vines. Shattered glass shines in the window frames of boarded-up buildings and graffiti blazes on the fading walls. The towns of the Rust Belt and the industrial South have foundered under bad economies, underwater mortgages, suburb culture, and population shifts to urban centres. It was sad to think of all those hollowed-out towns with no reason to visit them.

For decades, small cities like Cranbrook have experienced what economists call ‘leakage’ from downtown to outlying areas. All across North America movements are afoot to revitalize downtowns. Cranbrook’s downtown is lucky to have a Downtown Business Association and Chamber of Commerce that are dedicated to improving the area.

PROS: Downtown Cranbrook • Several financial institutions create stability. • Lots of long-time businesses have histories of success. • New businesses are happy to be downtown. • There are good sidewalks and reams of parking. • It’s close to residential areas. • There are cultural facilities and government office. • Cranbrook’s Downtown Business Association works to improve the area.

CRANBROOK CONNECTED: PERFECTED It takes a village to shape a town

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Sustainability. Community. Priority. These concepts are a tougher sell than hockey, celebrity or corn chips. But Chris Ayling and the rest of the Cranbrook Connected team want to change that, at least locally. Cranbrook Connected is a City-funded, ongoing process to achieve the goals in Connecting to Our Future, the first Integrated Community Sustainability Plan (ICSP) for Cranbrook.

First, some background

The development of this sustainability plan was a requirement for the City to receive $750 thousand in annual federal gas-tax transfer payments up to 2015. So far, funds have been used for local green infrastructure investments, such as upgrades to Cranbrook’s wastewater treatment system. (The City won an award for ‘Excellence in Environmental Responsibility’ from The Federation of Canadian Municipalities in 2012 for this project.)


Does it have a vibrant ar ts sce ne, day an d night ?

it w to el se com ni or ing Do es s? gro it h cer ave ys tor a Doe e? s it hav e u rest niqu aur ant e s?

Is

-

Numbers and Dollars

• Baker Street is a stub, blocked at both ends.

According to a 2004 estimate by Place Economics (Washington, DC), a small building sitting empty in a small city’s commercial district for one year can cost the following: $250,000 in lost sales, $12,500 in lost sales tax revenue to state (provincial) and local governments, and $16,250 in lost employee payroll.

• Fire destroyed several buildings and put a hole in the streetscape. • The area is ‘10-to-5’ on weekdays, with tumbleweeds after hours. • The empty grocery store on Baker Street has deadened a block for two decades.

And now, some context

its of ey t ? th os m re own e th s? A wnt t e ak en do m lem om it e r es ge d f Do ita fin r he y to s ea people where place e? Is it a gregat lly con natura

CONS: Downtown Cranbrook

Does it emphasize the city’s personal ‘story?’ Does elem it have sidw ents: sig cohesive nage alk v and , sea isual I light t (C s it i ng ing om m af conc , in ford m ixed epts du e ? str able rcia use l, ? ial h , c ous res i re i at ng, dent ive lig ia .) ht l,

-

an cle e, ms? f a e s roo l her bath t al e e rs? Ar ublic v e r p se pp it sho s oe of D ps ou gr

GREAT N W O T N W DO

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Does it draw students?

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ha ce? it spa es ac es n p s o D ree y’s en g re e cit ts? g e Do k th ass lin ique un able? walk re there Is it A ble? Sit-a ks? rac bike

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All of these elements contribute to a great downtown. Which do you value most? What might you be willing to do to make them possible? Is it f frie amily ndl y? Doe out- s it att r of-t own act gues ts?

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ve

Cities all over B.C. are developing similar plans. What sets Cranbrook’s apart is how well things are going. Starting just two years ago with a volunteer board, a paid coordinator (Laurie Cordell) and a lot of public sessions, Cranbrook Connected developed an accessible, readerfriendly document that’s organized into eight Big Ideas. Like guiding principles, they include things like Water Forever, Hometown Opportunity and Restore the Core. Cranbrook Connected Chair, Chris Ayling, says the group is always looking

to bring people together to find ways for Cranbrook to meet the targets of the plan. “Our role is to encourage people and organizations to achieve goals in each of the big ideas,” Ayling says. “We’re facilitators to help our community become more sustainable over the long haul.” By Ayling’s reckoning, our community has achieved or is in the process of achieving 40 of the 50 goals in Connecting to Our Future. He emphasizes that because the plan was developed by citizens, it should be implemented by them, too.

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Imagine what a large building sitting empty for nearly 20 years has cost Cranbrook’s downtown.

“If you have a question or an idea, but you don’t know who to talk to about it or where to start, start with us,” he says. “We’ll connect you with the person or group who’s working in the same vein. Connecting our efforts is definitely the path to building a better and stronger community.” For more details, visit www.CranbrookConnected.ca. And stay in the loop at www.Facebook.com/CranbrookConnected or contact info@CranbrookConnected.ca

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s d o o & M d o n o o s a F e e h t r fo

¤¤TASTE

artists, artisans and musicians

Special orders welcome! Order online any time.

33 10th Avenue South across from City Hall 8 250 | 426 3415 www.lotusbooks.ca

Here are some of my personal recipies I use for small-to-medium sized gatherings that are sure to warm you up. The bodies are made from choux paste, a light pastry dough used to make éclairs, French crullers, beignets, and other well known delights. Like Yorkshire Pudding, instead of a raising agent it employs high moisture content to create steam during cooking to puff the pastry.

. maps . unique gifts . works by local

and hate how quickly they disapear!

. books . cards

When I think of the holiday season I think of warm, cozy comfort food with friends and family near my side. A hot, crackling fire inspires me to cook, reminding me of childhood. The smells, the sounds, all linked somehow to the kitchen and its magical ability to bring us together, draw us in, to sit together, eat together and share together.

You will love how easy these are to make,

We carry

S

Steven Lechmann talks food & drink

Cream Puff Swans

Your ity commun e! book stor

Choux Paste 3

METRIC

STANDARD 4

200 mL . MILK . 3/4 C + 2 TBSP 110 mL . WATER . 1/2 C + 2 TBSP 125g . BUTTER . 1/2 C + 1 TBSP 180g . BREAD FLOUR . 1 2/3 C .......

-

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in Br

to

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bo

ck e ba plac s , t a e , be inut Add t 2 m ea on h

a paddle r to mixer with 5 EGGS ........ Transfe one at a time. attachment. Add Cool briefly.

Spoon roughly 1/4 of the pastry batter into a piping bag with a small round tip. On a parchment paper-lined baking sheet, pipe out swan-shaped heads and necks. Tuck a pistachio nut into the head part of batter to form a beak. Next, spoon the remaining pastry batter into a piping bag with a large star tip. Pipe body shapes onto parchment paper-lined baking sheet. Bake 6-8 minutes at 425 degrees Farenheit. Cool completely. Make filling while baking. Cut off the top thirds of the puff bodies. Cut the tops in half lengthwise. These will form the wings. Pipe filling on top of bottom piece of body. Tuck necks carefully into one end. Gently place wings into front of swan near neck. Dust with confectioner’s sugar.


Drunken Wheel

...

3 METRIC

.

STANDARD 4

.

.

.

5 mL BUTTER 1 TSP 60 mL SLICED ALMONDS 1/4 CUP PINCH OF DRY VEGETABLE STOCK 5 mL CHILI PEPPER 1 TSP

.

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t Sau

to Add re. mixtu d n o on alm & set e z a l deg fire

SPLASH OF APRICOT BRANDY LARGE BRIE WHEEL TABLE GRAPES

Top brie wheel with almond mixture. Warm in oven until just soft, about 10 minutes.

/ Draw lines on the paper to make consistent sizes

Bait’s Whiskey Cream

Finish with table grapes. Serve with toasted baguette, crackers or vegetable canapes.

3 METRIC

. . . . . .

STANDARD 4

.

.

.

250 mL CREAM 1 CUP 60 mL CONDENSED MILK 14 OZ 450 mL WHISKEY 1 3/4 CUP 15 mL INSTANT COFFEE 1 TBSP 15 mL VANILLA 1 TBSP 15 mL ALMOND EXTRACT 1 TBSP 30 mL CHOCOLATE SYRUP 2 TBSP

. .

. . .

Place all ingredients in a large bowl and whisk. Bait’s Whisky Cream will keep in the refridgerator for up to 60 days. Good luck keeping yourself away from it that long!

Basic Whipped Cream Filling METRIC

3

10 mL / Use a star tip for piping the bodies

.

.

STANDARD 4

.

250 mL MILK 1 C CONFECTIONER’S SUGAR

.

2 TBSP

Whip in an electric mixer until stiff peaks form. Be careful not to over mix, or you’ll make sweet butter!

Steven Lechmann, also known as Bait, is a Red Seal Chef currently working with his family operate Pita Wrapbit restaurant at the College of the Rockies. Steven is also a culinary instructor within the college’s culinary department, guiding students through the Class Act Dinning Room’s weekly dinner service. “Live to eat, don’t eat to live” -Steve

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¤¤FIND

IN THE NEIGHBOURHOOD

¤¤LIVE EXCLUSIVE

Marty Uri talks local retail finds

Ecotronic Animal Flashlights Choose one of these cute little buddies to keep you or a little friend company in the dark. Complete with adjustable wrist straps.

~Find it at Bumble Tree

Red Fire Alarm Box These telegraph system boxes were installed in neighbourhoods and would transmit their location directly to the fire department when pulled, before telephones were common.

Ghad

Ala

~Find it at Dragon Antiques

Sioux Browning talks living the good life in Cranbrook

Moose Head Belt Buckle

W

Hold your pants up and flash your style all at once.

~Find it at Hillbilly Hardware

Printed Flasks Various prints in Canadiana outdoor motifs: wood grain, argyle, camo, psychedelic swirls, targets and more.

~Find it at MJ Floral Designs

Canon EOS M Mirrorless Interchangable Lens Camera Focus quickly and effortlessly with this new camera which is lighter and sturdier than DLSR and compact cameras of the same size.

~Find it at Cranbrook Photo

The Walking Dead Board Game Gather the family ’round to kill some zombies in this fun board game.

~Find it at Pages Book Emporium

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hen asked to describe her family, Cranbrook writer and translator Ghada Alatrash chooses the word “passionate.” And passionate describes Alatrash herself. When talking about her work, her three children, her homeland of Syria or her adopted home of Canada, Alatrash lights up. She projects a powerful positive energy that warms anyone nearby. As a columnist for the Cranbrook Daily Townsman, the Gulf News (Dubai, U.A.E.), and other publications, and as a blogger, Alatrash writes vividly about her passions. She writes about being an Arab woman living in the west, about struggles faced by Syria, and about bridging the gap between Western and Eastern cultures. Being an abassador for Syria and Arab culture is important to her. And that drive towards ambassadorship is one Alatrash comes by honestly. She was born in China, the daughter of


...

da

atrash

A heart with two homes Syria’s abassador there. Her father, Dr. Jabr Al-Atrash, served as Syrian ambassador to countries all over the world before moving with his family to Texas to teach at university. Alatrash’s mother, who was a 17-year old farm girl before marrying Dr. Al-Atrash, transformed herself once again from an ambassador’s wife to a Syrian mother of three children in deepest conservative America. Alatrash herself eventually attended university in Abilene, Texas. She married Dr. Ehsan Janbey, a pulmonologist and intensivist, and they moved to Oklahoma, where Alatrash earned a graduate degree in Post-Colonial literature. In 2004, she and her growing family relocated to Cranbrook. “I love it here,” she says. “I make a point of pinching myself every day when I wake up and see the Rockies.” It isn’t just the warm welcome she and her family have received here that she treasures but also everything that Canadian citizenship represents. “There’s a sense of security here,” she says. “We are so far away from national threats, political upheaval, most natural threats. I

love what this place has given me.” Her Canadian passport is a prized possession, as it allows her to pass with dignity through international borders, rather than as a suspected terrorist with Syrian identification. “I was always a threat to U.S. security,” Alatrash says. “I was always pulled aside and interrogated or physically searched. It is amazing now to walk into the lines that say, ‘U.S. and Canadian passports.’ It makes me want to remind Canadians how privileged they are in that respect.” While Alatrash’s mother and brothers still live in Texas (her father died in 2003), her extended family and inlaws are still in Syria, enduring the political upheaval there. They are in Sweida, a city in the south-west near Jordan. Sweida is crowded with a growing population of refugees from the violence elsewhere in Syria. The city is stable for now, but it seems only a matter of time before someone comes for the refugees, with violence in tow. “I can’t sleep at night,” Alatrash says. WINTER 2012-2013

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“Today, all the media and Internet access from Syria were cut off. I can’t contact anyone. It’s terrifying. What do you do? You are helpless and the world is so silent.” She is frustrated by the inaction of world governments regarding Syria. Another frustration is the media filters that shield western audiences from the truth of the situation there. “We are all almost desensitized, including me. I have to make a concerted effort to face the facts.” The facts from the current civil struggle in her home country would be hard for anyone to face. Alatrash has friends, young married men, who have been captured and are still beyond contact because they spoke out. She is reluctant to mention her next detail, but facing the truth is important to her. “I have seen the body of a little girl in a ruffled dress. But she had no head.” The grief this causes her as a mother, as a citizen of the world, is evident. Her grief, and the empathy behind it, is part of what drives Alatrash. “I would love to be an activist. I calculate my words, though, because I’d like

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[ Continued from Page 11 ]

¤¤LISTEN

to return to Syria. I have to think of my family there.” So she speaks out in thoughtful and measured essays and articles. Another key driver behind her work is her desire to celebrate the rich Arab culture which is so seldom noticed in the West. It’s a culture with rich histories of literature, dance and music. Her latest project is a book of poetry in translation. She has selected favourite poems from five volumes written by Lebanese/American poet Youssef Abdul Samad. Some of his poems are spiritual, passionate, political and world-aware. And some are poems of love. Samad’s poems appeal to Alatrash because of their content but also because they are the work of someone like herself, a citizen of two worlds. Their book, So That The Poem Remains, is an evocative, thoughtful read. In Arab culture, poetry is sung. Ancient poems are known by everyone because they are set to music. Poetry is part of the school curriculum. Poetry is a passion for Alatrash because it looks deeply into humanity and univeralizes experience. “A grieving mother in Israel feels the same pain as a grieving mother in Palestine,” she says. “A poet can show us that.” She loves to write herself, but is honoured to translate the work of Arab writers, making it accessible to the Western world. Alatrash has also founded a scholarship fund to bring qualified Syrian students to North America to finish their undergraduate studies. The universities in Syria are closed. “When you look at the violence in Aleppo and other cities, who is going to teach there, much less study?” she asks.

The

d L r o W

Jim Cameron talks lights and sound

H

e is of a special breed, this man who inhabits the World of Will. Will Huxtable is a Cranbrook boy, the son and grandson of CPR men, a profession he has declined to pursue. He has forged his own survival and prosperity in the Cranbrook world of music and theatre, where he may be found day (possibly) or night (definitely). A world he’s happy to live in. COHERE sat down for a chat with Huxtable.

C: You have recently been promoted to

In her warm and passionate way, Ghada Alatrash is both an ambassador and a teacher. “I feel it’s my role to amplify the unheard voices of people who happen to be my fellow Syrians, my fellow Arabs. Whatever we can do to bring each other together can only be a good thing.”

Technical Director at the Cranbrook Key City Theatre. How did you get started?

Find Ghada

So it was luck?

Alatrash’s book,

Partly. I have a pretty solid musical background and I had some experience working lights with the Cranbrook Community Theatre. That probably helped.

So That the Poem Remains at

Lotus Books.

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WH: I was playing guitar during a private recording session at the theatre and the technical director at the time needed some help for an upcoming Sarah Harmer show. He asked if I’d be interested, I was, and I came out of it with a job as an assistant.

of

Wi

Jim Cameron talks sound & light

You’ve worked with two different managers and three technical directors before becoming the T.D. yourself. What’s the secret of your longevity at Key City Theatre? I try to learn the right methods for the right people. Everyone has ways they like things done and once you get it down it’s a breeze. It’s a great environment to work in. I can be creative and at the same time catch some great acts. It helps that I’m easy-going. Give me a typical day at the theatre, say, for a professional ballet. The size of the production determines how early I arrive. For big productions, I usually hire a local crew to help me. I hang the lights a day or two ahead so when the company arrives to load in, usually around eight in the morning, the lights just need to be focused and gelled [aimed at the proper spots with the proper colours]. A ballet is usually a 14- to 16-hour day with a break or two when time allows. I help them with their gear, sets, costumes and additional lights while their people lay


...

d

Photo: Brad Smiley

ill

down the dance floor. I work hand-in-hand with their director. There’s always a runthrough to program lighting cues into the lighting system and make any changes. I run the lights during the show and afterwards we pack everything up and load it back onto the big truck. You’ve worked with some big names. Any favourites? Colin James, Sloan, Harry Manx, David Gogo, Craig Northey, Powder Blues Band, Fred Eaglesmith, Sarah Harmer, Matthew Good, the Tennessee Three, Josh Ritter, April Wine, Chilliwack. The Amazing Kreskin was pretty amazing. I could go on. It seems the longer a performer has been practicing their craft the easier and nicer they are to work with. You’re also a well-known guitarist. You’ve managed to build a very nice guitar collection; a Fender Telecaster, Stratocasters, a classic old Mustang. Any favourites?

I’ve really been enjoying one of my most recent acquisitions, a sweet acoustic par-

lour guitar made by local luthier Jamie Wiens. You’ve built a solid reputation not only as a guitarist that a crowd can really enjoy but as a great player that other musicians admire. If that’s true then I’m flattered. The feelings are mutual, for sure. Any secrets to your musical success? Enjoying the music. I love playing. It’s great spending time with other musicians. Practicing certainly never hurts.

Museum of Modern Art, Matt Umanov Guitars, walking all the way through Central Park. So much more to see. Good food? Great food. The Spotted Pig in the East Village, the Modern – a very classy restaurant. They cut my entrée for me just so I could relax my picking hand. Very thoughtful. Mesa Grill [Bobby Flay’s place] and some great food carts on Sixth Avenue: big tasty hot dogs, gyros and some of the best pizza I’ve ever tasted.

I’ve been there a couple of times, the first to crash on the couch of a good friend, a theatre student. The second time I stayed at the Hampton Inn in Manhattan. The room service was better at the Hampton.

I couldn’t help noticing the books you have lying handy in your reading room: On The Road by Kerouac, Hello Sunshine by songwriter/guitarist Ryan Adams, a bio by Foo Fighters leader David Grohl, The Five Love Languages—Secrets to Love That Lasts and twenty-one Entertainment magazines. Any comments?

Your favourite sights?

The Five Love Languages may not be mine.

Everything, to be honest. Walking across the Brooklyn Bridge, Bleecker Street, the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, the Museum of natural History, the Chelsea Hotel, the

But you are a lover?

You’ve managed to find time to travel. New York City seems to be a favourite.

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Smiles, “I can be.”

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¤¤MAKE

The

Pull of the

corset Corsets are here to stay

Photos: Brad Smiley

Trish Barnes talks craftsmanship

D

id you know Cranbrook, B.C. is the corset capital of Canada? It is. And we’re not talking about cheapo corsets made out of vinyl and string, either. We’re talking about corsets made with coutil, with steel busks and stays and special laces woven to withstand ‘The Pull.’ Jenny Frank of La Belle Fairy is the corsetmaker—or corsetière— putting Cranbrook on the map. From her straw-bale studio on the outskirts of town she sends custom-made corsets to women around the world.

Online, customers browse through her catalogue and choose which corset they want. They provide their own measurements and Frank custom-makes their corsets from scratch. Corsets must withstand a practice known as ‘tightlacing,’ which turns the waist into a waspish fulcrum of the female figure. Even corsets not designed to be tightlaced are built to reduce the natural waist by four inches.

“People who have never worn corsets before will buy them,” Frank says. “They love them. I’ve had women crying, telling me, ‘I haven’t had a waist in years!’”

Most corsets Frank makes have a busk—a metal fastener in two parts—in the front and grommets for lacing on the back. Through the grommets run two ribbons or laces, one from the top to the waist, and one from the bottom to the waist. Once the corset has been tightened from top and bottom to the middle, the final touch—really a yank—pulls the waist in à la Scarlet O’Hara. “‘The Pull’ gives the waist definition,” Frank says. “So it’s important for the waist to be in the right place.”

Corsets, Frank says, can enhance any woman’s figure, but they make the most difference to an already-voluptuous build. “They enhance a woman’s natural assets,” she says. “Dolly Parton has worn a corset her entire adult life.”

There are a handful of tried-and-true corset shapes and many ways to customize them. “Most people want the Victorian style, which gives the classic hourglass shape,” Frank says. “The Edwardian style creates a longer torso.”

Frank does most of her business through her online shop on the giant handmade-wares website Etsy.com.

Frank gets her supplies from around the world, shunning plastic stays (the boning that gives a corset its pulling-in powers) for

Her clients include a rock star, a Penthouse photographer, burlesque performers, brides-to-be and ‘Average Jills’ who find La Belle Fairy on the Internet.

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proper steel stays. She’ll use up to 48 stays in a corset, depending on how much shaping it’s required to do. The coutil she uses comes from one of the last coutil fabric mills on the planet (in Germany) and costs upwards of $40 per metre. She buys the corset laces from special suppliers, and gets the trims from vintage or specialty shops. Corsets were once de rigueur for ladies rich and poor, old and young. From the 1600s to the early 20th century, women and even girls wore them to fit the fashions of the times. A corset was a necessity, a functional garment, and to not wear one took—as one 19th century woman put it—“moral courage.” Today, corsets are worn by choice, not societal diktat. The rise of burlesque, a sizzling underground fetish culture, and designers like Jean Paul Gaultier are bringing corsets out in the open, although they’ve never gone away entirely. Frank’s interest in corsetmaking started in 2005, when she was visiting her hometown of Medicine Hat, Alberta. (She’s lived in Cranbrook for 17 years.) “I turned on the TV at my parent’s house and saw a show about extreme body modification,” she says. “This woman had the world’s smallest waist—the size of a bagel. “I didn’t think ‘Wow, what a small waist!’ I thought, ‘Wow, what an amazing garment she’s wearing!’”

Up close, you see the straight-as-a-ruler stitching, snug around the metal stays that hardwire strength into a corset. From a distance, you see a female hourglass form that’s hardwired, apparently, into the male brain. “Corsets are sexy for an evening,” Frank says. “They show you’ve taken the time to do something special, and they make women look good—really show-stopping.” Frank has made hundreds of corsets. She made several for the rock star Courtenay Love, and is developing a White Witch of Narnia corset (from the C.S. Lewis books) for a photographer who shoots for Penthouse Magazine. “I get good feedback from my customers,” she says. “The people who know corsets know mine are properly made.” While she’s won the hearts of corset aficionados, Frank wants to expand her couture offerings. She’s experimenting with skirts, chemises and dresses. In 2011, she visited a Gaultier retrospective at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. Gaultier is known for using corsets in high fashion, something Frank wants to do. “I was inspired to see his clothes,” Frank says. “They weren’t washable—but who cares? “I want to create art like that—sculptures to wear, with feathers and details, and not worry about whether they’re washable or not.”

After that, Frank, who was already designing and making clothes, began to focus on corsets, tracking down patterns, materials, and a special sewing machine. In her studio the machine sits in front of a picture window, past a red velvet couch and stacks of vintage dolls. It sews very fast in just two ways: forward and backward, which is all a corsetmaker needs.

Maker jenny Frank

explains how to best lace up.

. First . Pull the lacing out

a generous amount.

For now, with several orders each month, Frank is making corsets for women who want to wear them, and wash them. If she happens to release a droplet of blood onto a corset she relies on the traditional method of stain removal: “Saliva works,” she says. “It takes the stain right out.”

F P

Nothing, however, takes the saucy out of a well-made corset worn by a confident dame.

. second . Wrap the corset

around your body. Secure the front bracing closures beginning in the W I N T E R 2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 3middle. | COHERE CULTURE

Find them at: www.LaBelleFairy.com

. third . Tighten the laces,

beginning at the top. It can be handy to have a friend to help. Wait 15 minutes, and pull the laces in again to find your CRANBROOK | 15 tightest shape.


¤¤Look

EVERY PICTURE TELLS A STORY Trish Barnes talks visual art Meet Joel Robison, Cranbrook’s hottest conceptual photographer. He takes photos with his digital camera then alters them using Photoshop, an image-editing software. What he comes out with—thousands of images so far— are lessons in imagination, of making the impossible seem real. For example, Robison adores a good cup of coffee. In his photos, sometimes the cup is larger than he is. Sometimes the cup is smaller. But it’s never the same way twice and it’s always a visual surprise. “I play with scale,” Robison says. “Making something much bigger or smaller gives a sense of surrealism to real situations in a real environment.” Robison also enjoys a good book. In his images, magical beings might surge from the book he’s reading. Or the books themselves might fly through the air. In such cases, Robison flies, too. Or floats. Or just watches in wonder. “I allow myself to daydream,” he says, “I try to let inspiration come in whatever form it decides to come in. I’m not boxed in by what society says is real or not real—I don’t say to myself, ‘Well, that’s not a possibility.’” 16

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Conceptual photographers have created images to express ideas since photography was invented. But digital cameras, editing software, and the Internet are pushing the medium to greater heights and giving it more reach. Robison is one of a new breed of photographers who create and share their conceptual photographs online. Many of them are under 30 years old, and they form a global subculture of image makers whose work is seen by huge audiences and sought after by magazines, websites and brands. Even with thousands of conceptual photographers sharing their work, Robison is making a pretty big mark. Coca Cola found an image of his online with an iconic Coke bottle in it. Coke’s head office e-mailed him, not with a notification of copyright infringement, but with a presentation outlining how they would like to work with him.

“They asked me to create images for them based around positive terms,” Robison says. “It’s a different approach to marketing.” He sends the company a continual stream of images which Coca Cola uses in its social media outreach. He retains copyright, and the images are more ‘art’ than ‘advertisement.’ “Working with them, it’s been great,” Robison says. “They are open to letting me do pretty much what I want to do.” Robison is self-taught. He started transforming photos close to five years ago. Shortly after, he embarked on his first ‘365’—a project to create an image a day for a year. He’s done three 365 projects, and creates many images for his other clients. On the photo sharing website Flickr.com, Robison goes by the handle Boy_Wonder. His “photostream” is packed with over 1,500 images. He also sells prints from a shop at Etsy.com, and does family photography.


... ... ...

“It’s a trend in photography,” Robison says. “People want something a little different. And the kids really enjoy them—it’s neat to see their reactions, they are excited.” One of his favourite places to take pictures is a big field in the Cranbrook Community Forest. Once the city dump, the field is now a recreational spot, with vistas of the setting sun against hills over Cranbrook. Robison, who is on the board of the Cranbrook Community Forest Society, has shot hundreds of images in the field. Even when he throws a visual surprise into the final image, the field is instantly recognizable to those who have walked through it. “The natural areas around Cranbrook are a huge selling point,” he says. “People think they look amazing.” Robison is car-free, preferring to bike

and walk everywhere, including to his day job, as an educational assistant at Mount Baker Senior Secondary. “Living in a small town, you don’t have to worry about transport,” he says. “Home-to-work is five minutes. “I have the freedom to do what I like to do.”

Photography tips from Joel Robison

Robison spends a few hours a day on his images. Starting with an idea, he plans the shots he needs to take and goes out (or stays in) to shoot the photos. Then he edits them, adding in imaginary elements to give them their appeal.

“Learn about the manual settings on your camera. I know how my camera functions and I know the settings, but I still have to fiddle to get the right shot sometimes.”

“I’m not looking to make millions or to be anything other than happy to create,” he says. “It started as a hobby, and still is. I’d keep doing it even if I wasn’t getting business or attention from it.”

“Use your camera more and more. You will realize what works and what doesn’t.”

WINTER 2012-2013

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“Take pictures of everything. In every type of light, in every setting.”

“There are great tutorials online; you can find a YouTube video to explain almost anything you need to know.”

“The world is a big place and there is opportunity for so many people—keep creating C O H E R E C U Land T U posting.” RE CRANBROOK | 17


¤¤CONNECT

CRANBROOK’S

10 PER CENT SOL Watch those dollars go round and round, or watch them float right out of town We like to get stuff fast and cheap, so many of us shop online and outside our own communities. At the same time, though, we want to live in vibrant cities with good services. This creates an ouroboros, a snake eating its own tail. When we spend outside of town, fewer profits are available inside, for local businesses, taxes and donations. The city retains less money, the citizens feel pinched and look for more bargains—elsewhere. And so it goes around again. Two recent Cranbrook initiatives contend that an easy fix is a close as your wallet.

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE: 10 PER CENT INITIATIVE The Cranbrook and District Chamber of Commerce launched its 10 Per Cent Initiative in October. Connor Stewart is president of the chamber’s retail committee. “I was reading and one story just leapt off the page,” Stewart says. “It tied in with all the issues the chamber was trying to tackle.” The article told the remarkable story of high school students in Howard, South Dakota, who came up with a way to fix their town’s ailing economy. The students calculated that if everyone spent just 10 per cent more of their household budget in Howard it might be possible to generate $7 million locally in one year. Word got out and residents got on board. One year and $15.6 million local dollars later, the town knew it was onto something big. It should be noted that Howard is home to just 846 people. Stewart says the retail committee is working with local college students to accurately determine what a similar shift would mean for Cranbrook. In the meantime, the chamber is spreading the word. It hosted Kathy Callies from Howard in October for two presentations, one at the college and one at the chamber 18

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...

LUTION luncheon. And it spearheaded a successful Black Friday event in November, in which dozens of businesses offered special deals to buyers to entice them to stay in town instead of crossing the border on their annual Black Friday pilgrimage.

“And we all still give as much as we can. But the amount we donate is the same, while our business volume has decreased.” Downtown, the story is the same. “Taking locally earned money out of the community hurts everyone to a degree,” says Iain MacLeod, president of the Downtown Business Association. “The more money that stays in the community can only serve to make this a more vibrant and prosperous place to live, play and work. The benefits are too countless and widespread to list.”

“This is not a short term project,” Stewart says. “It’ll take a lot of work to get everyone on board, but the evidence from Howard shows it could be a massive success in Cranbrook.”

CUPE: 10 PER CENT SHIFT

LOCAL FIRST: CALCULATIONS

While the chamber was lighting up its 10 Per Cent Initiative in October, BC CUPE (Canadian Union of Public Employees) president Barry O’Neill was also in Cranbrook promoting CUPE’s 10 Per Cent Shift.

A Local First campaign adopted in several U.S. states calculates that for every 100 dollars spent at local businesses, 68 dollars stay local. A C-note spent in non-locally owned businesses keeps 43 dollars local at most.

The goal is similar: To encourage buyers to nudge just 10 per cent more of their dollars towards Cranbrook businesses and locally produced goods.

For instance, if you purchase 350 coffees a year—at three dollars a cup —you’ll spend $1,050. Using the Local First numbers, buying those drinks at a non-locally owned business will leave $451, or 42%, to circulate in the local economy. Buy local, and $714, or 68%, will stay in town.

COHERE estimates, using CUPE and Howard figures, that a 10 per cent increase in Cranbrook spending could result in hundreds of new jobs and close to $80 million in new economic activity per year.

The 10 per cent idea doesn’t rely on government or civic organizations to succeed. It depends on simple, personal decisions.

FEELING THE PINCH

There’s a loonie in your pocket. Spend it thoughtfully.

10 %

TIPS

What are the alternatives? Is spending more money locally worth it in order to boost local employment, tax base, services and charities?

What does a local product look like to you? Can you buy a sweater made in Cranbrook? Wine from Creston? Smoked salmon from Vancouver? If you can, wouldn’t you rather purchase those items instead of similar ones from China, Washington State or Ireland?

Do you know the full story? A big-box store may be locally owned. A little research will fill you in.

Can you wait a little?

If you want a specific item but it’s not immediately available in town, chances are a local supplier will order it for you.

Do you spread the word?

Martin Torgerson, owner of Cranbrook’s Home Hardware and member of the chamber’s retail committee, says out-of-town spending affects more than business bottom lines and employment.

If you find a great local deal, tell your friends. Not every business has a huge advertising budget.

“With the recession and with money leaving the community, it’s harder for us to offer community support,” Torgerson says. “Every year businesses are asked for hundreds of donations, from raffle prizes to big projects and fundraisers.

Sources

WINTER 2012-2013

www.CranbrookChamber.com (Local business community) www.TenPercentShift.ca (CUPE) www.10PercentShift.org (U.S.) |

COHERE CULTURE CRANBROOK

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造造STYLE

A weekend away can be just a sweet km down the road

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THIS PAGE Find what Lindsay is wearing: Dress, necklace & earrings: Velvet Moss Styling: Lori Pocha, Venue for Hair

WINTER 2012-2013

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COHERE CULTURE CRANBROOK

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THIS PAGE Find what Mike is wearing: Shirt, shoes: The Choice. Find what Lindsay is wearing: Dress: Velvet Moss

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¤¤MOVE

KIN YOU SKATE?

Free skating for the people

It’s a 21-year tradition, a perk for kids, families and anyone who likes to swirl around a rink. It’s free skating at Kinsmen Arena, brought to you by the Kin Club of Cranbrook, via the City of Cranbrook. The rink is booked solid every winter for hockey and lessons, but it’s also open for public free skating on Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays. Everyone is welcome, and usually 60 to 100 skaters take to the ice. Skaters of all ages come out, while non-skaters sit under the heaters in the ‘Parent Trap’ or chat with each other around the boards. Heated change rooms, Zamboni-groomed ice and skate monitors (students who know how to skate and are there to help) make for a comfy and safe experience. Mike Paugh is president of the Kin Club of Cranbrook. He says it’s vital for kids to have places to play in their own neighbourhoods. “Our motto is ‘Serving Our Community’s Greatest Needs,’” Paugh says. “Free skating is one way to do that.”

“So far we haven’t had to buy a new pair of skates,” she says. “But we do take care of sharpening and maintaining the skates, with help from Player’s Bench.” Kenyon invites anyone with outgrown, well cared-for skates to consider donating them to the free skate program. “Just contact me at 250.489.6100.”

More info about Kin Club The Kinsmen Arena is one of several recreational resources built by the Kin Club. Others include the Kinsmen Water Park, (a $200,000 item), the tennis courts on Victoria Drive, the adjacent Kinsmen Park and the Quad Ball Park down by the Alliance Church.

The club is always working to raise funds for its projects that help the community. Its biggest fundraising event is the annual Home Show, coming up on May 3 to 5, 2013. The Kin Club also rents out blackjack tables for parties—they have eight tables. “We’re also the dealers, when our schedules allow,” Paugh says. “It’s fun for Christmas parties, company events.” And Kin Club rents out a bouncy tent to groups. To inquire about any of these things, contact Mike at 250.489.6100. The Kin Club of Cranbrook welcomes new members. Visit the Kin Club website for more information: www.CranbrookKin.ca.

The City of Cranbrook operates the rink, but Kin Club raises money to buy the ice time for free public skating.

Skate rentals are available If you don’t have skates, you can rent a pair as you walk in. The Kin Club collects and maintains skates in many sizes to rent out by donation. Crystal Kenyon of Kin Club says the club is grateful to people for donating skates.

Free Skate Public Skate Hours Wednesdays 3:30 to 5 pm Fridays 7 to 9 pm Sundays 2 to 4 pm WINTER 2012-2013

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Kinsmen Arena 1432 - 2nd Street North Holiday Public Skate Hours December 24: 1 to 3 pm December 27 - 31: 1 to 3 pm January 2 - 4: 1 to 3 pm

COHERE CULTURE CRANBROOK

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¤¤EXPLORE

NOKIE CREEK Part way up Baldy Mountain

Nokie Creek is located in the Purcell

Mountain range, up the old Lumberton Road. To get there from Cranbrook, get onto Hwy 3/95 and point your vehicle west towards Moyie Lake. Drive about 15 kilometres to Lumberton Road; on the right-hand side. Once on Lumberton Road, you’ll need to drive another 15 kilometres. Park and either hike, ski, or snowmobile 6 kilometres up the Nokie Creek Road/Trail to find this spot and this incredible view. We recommend bringing along a small thermos of Bait’s Whisky Cream or hot chocolate to share at the top.

Photos: Brad Smiley

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coming soon

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January 5th 7:30 pm 2013 Tickets $25 Sponsored by Wildsight

Key City Theatre

The Banff Mountain Film Festival

January 24th, 25th, 26th, 31st February 1, 2nd Thurs-Sat 7:30 pm 2013

Enjoy an evening of some of the year’s best mountain adventure & culture films. Experience the adventure of climbing, mountain expeditions, remote cultures, and the world’s last wild places. Purchase tickets early; this event always sells out. Proceeds to local educational projects.

The Merchant of Venice

Ballet Jörgen Canada celebrates its 25th anniversary season with the world’s most renowned classical ballet, Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake.

Bengt Jörgen, one of Canada’s most distinguished classical ballet choreographers, is delighted to bring the production across Canada so that everyone has the opportunity to see, experience and be touched by this extraordinary ballet. This classical production is a story of true love, the union of two souls and the ultimate sacrifice to be set free. Swan Lake is rarely toured because of its sheer size and grandeur.

January 27th & 28th 7:30 pm 2013 Tickets $46.50

The title character, merchant Antonio, secures a bond for his friend, the love-struck Venetian noble, Bassanio. As a condition of the loan, if the repayment deadline is not met, Antonio must give up a pound of flesh.

Country Star Dean Brody Comes home

www.balletjorgen.ca

Jaffray’s own Dean Brody, winner of The Canadian Country Music Association ‘Male Artist of the Year Award,’ winner is bringing his band to Cranbook as part of a cross-Canada tour.

February 21 | 7:30 pm | Subscribers $45 | General $50 www.KeyCityTheatre.com | 250. 426. 7006

only at the

key city theatre Kootenay Flameworks

Custom Flames Indoor & Out Design . Installation . Service . Inspections

www.kootenayflameworks.com

250 426 9406

WINTER 2012-2013

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COHERE CULTURE CRANBROOK

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EVENTS ¤¤EVENTS

FESTIVALS & SPECIAL EVENTS CHILDREN’S CHRISTMAS SHOPPING PARTY Heritage Inn | 803 Cranbrook St N December 16 - 1-5pm

SENIORS DAY Cranbrook Legion | 803 Cranbrook St N December 19 - 1:30-2:30pm

HOLISTIC TIPS FOR THE CHILDBEARING YEARS Family Connections | 46 17th Ave S December 20 - 7-9pm

RSHD CHRISTMAS CHARITY RECITAL FOR THE SALVATION ARMY Heritage Inn | 803 Cranbrook St N Decmber 20 - 7-8pm

COMMUNITY CHRISTMAS EVE SERVICE Fort Steele | 9851 Hwy 93/95 | 250.417.6000 December 24 - 7pm - 8:30pm

NEW YEAR’S EVE GALA BUFFET St. Eugene Resort | 7777 Mission Rd December 31 - 5-9pm

FLY ME TO THE MOON NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY Casino of the Rockies | 7777 Mission Rd December 31 - 10-4am

ROBBIE BURNS NIGHT Prestige Rocky Mountain Resort 209 Van Horne St S | 250. 417. 0444 January 26 - 5:30-11:30pm

SLEIGH RIDES Fort Steele | 9851 Hwy 93/95 | 250.417.6000 December 8, 9, 15, 22 - 11am - 2pm

FATHER CHRISTMAS IN THE LAMBI Fort Steele | 9851 Hwy 93/95 | 250.417.6000 December 8, 15, 22 - 11am - 3pm

ANNUAL SLEIGH RIDE DAY Fort Steele | 9851 Hwy 93/95 | 250.417.6000 December 29 - 11am - 3pm

BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL Key City Theatre 20 14th Ave N | 250. 426. 7006 January 5 - 7:30pm

CANADIAN PARENTS FOR FRENCH TM Roberts School library 10 Wattsville Road | 250. 489. 4575 January 7 - 12-1pm

ONE PLANET FILM SERIES Surviving Progress COTR Lecture Theatre January 31 - 7:30pm

V-DAY: THE VAGINA MONOLOGUES Key City Theatre 20 14th Ave N | 250. 426. 7006 February 15, 2013 www.FriendsoftheWomensCentre.com

2013 GREEN BUILDING CONFERENCE Kimberley, BC • May 10 - 11, 2013 www.GreenBuildingConference.ca

MUSIC SCHOOL CONCERTS THROUGHOUT DECEMBER Key City Theatre 20 14th Ave N | 250. 426. 7006 Check theatre website for times

CONNECT CHRISTMAS CONCERT & PLAY

10th Ave South | Cranbrook, BC www.cranbrookfarmersmarket.com Look for it soon! Sat 10am-1pm

KIMBERLEY FARMER’S MARKET Lions Park | Marysville Arena Look for it soon! Sundays 10am-2pm

JAFFRAY BAYNES LAKE MARKET Baynes Lake Community Centre 250.429.3519 threebears@cyberlink.bc.ca Look for it soon! Saturday 9am-12.3pm

SPORTS & ATHLETICS

WEEKEND SHOWCASE FEATURING DANI STRONG

Western Financial Place Aquatic Centre | 1777 2nd St N December 18 - 7-8pm

Casino of the Rockies | 7777 Mission Road December 21 & 22- 9pm-1am

WEEKEND SHOWCASE FEATURING “JURASSIC” MIKE STENHOUSE Casino of the Rockies | 7777 Mission Road December 28 to 30 - 9pm-1am Key City Theatre 20 14th Ave N | 250. 426. 7006 January 27, 28 - 7:30pm

THEATRE CRANBROOK COMMUNITY THEATRE Studio & Stage Door 11-11 Ave South | 250. 426. 2490

MERCHANT OF VENICE Key City Theatre 20 14th Ave N | 250. 426. 7006 January 24, 25, 26, 31 - 7:30pm February 1, 2 - 7:30pm

SWAN LAKE Key City Theatre 20 14th Ave N | 250. 426. 7006 January 21 - 7:30pm

VISUAL ARTS 3 DIMENSIONAL ART

YOUTH KAYAK POOL SESSION

ADULT KAYAK POOL SESSIONS Western Financial Place Aquatic Centre | 1777 2nd St N December 20 - 8-9pm

YOUTH KAYAK POOL SESSION Western Financial Place Aquatic Centre | 1777 2nd St N December 25 - 7-8pm

ADULT KAYAK POOL SESSIONS Western Financial Place Aquatic Centre | 1777 2nd Street North December 27 - 8-9pm

BC WESTERN REGIONAL POND HOCKEY CHAMPIONSHIPS Kinsmen Beach, Invermere, BC Feb 1 - 6-7pm

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS ARTS & CULTURE AASLAND MUSEUM OF TAXIDERMY Odd Asland | 250. 426. 3566

CANADIAN MUSEUM OF RAIL TRAVEL Garry Anderson | 250. 489. 3918

Artrageous Art Gallery | CDAC 104 - 135, 10 Ave. S | 250. 426. 4223 December 6 – January 2

CRANBROOK ARCHIVES MUSEUM & LANDMARK FOUNDATION

NUDE ART

CRANBROOK HERITAGE AWARDS & MAPS

Artrageous Art Gallery | CDAC 104 - 135, 10 Ave. S | 250. 426. 4223 January 3 – February 6

ARTY GRAS - HANDS ON WORKSHOP Artrageous Art Gallery | CDAC 104 - 135, 10 Ave. S | 250. 426. 4223 February 7 - March 6

YOUTH ART - ADJUDICATED Artrageous Art Gallery | CDAC 104 - 135, 10 Ave. S | 250. 426. 4223 March 7 - April 3 |

CRANBROOK FARMER’S MARKET

Key City Theatre 20 14th Ave N | 250. 426. 7006 December 15, 16 - 6:30pm

DEAN BRODY

26

MARKETS

Garry Anderson | 250. 489. 3918

Garry Anderson | 250. 489. 3918

CRANBROOK COMMUNITY THEATRE Harriet Pollock | 250. 489. 4984

CRANBROOK & DISTRICT ARTS COUNCIL 135 10th Ave S | 250. 426. 4223

CRANBROOK PUBLIC LIBRARY 1212 2nd St N | 250. 426. 4063

CRANBROOK WRITER’S GROUP Artrageous Art Gallery | CDAC 104 - 135, 10 Ave. S | 250. 426. 4223


...

SEND YOUR EVENT, CLUB OR ORGANIZATION LISTING TO: DESK@COHERERANBROOK.COM 250 464 9613 EAST KOOTENAY HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION Irene Kaun | 250. 426. 3452

FESTIVAL OF THE PERFORMING ARTS Key City Theatre Lorraine Butler | 250. 489. 2609

KEY CITY AIR CADETS

SUNRISE ROTARY CLUB

EK HUNTERS ASSOCIATION

Shawn Ferguson | 250. 426. 3685

Daryl Richardson | 250. 426. 3284

ROYAL CANADIAN ARMY CADETS

TOASTMASTERS: CRANBROOK 1ST CLUB

Box 655 Cranbrook BC 250. 426. 5102

100-13th Ave S | 250. 426. 2126

Kathy Simon | 250.489. 4464

CRANBROOK BOYS & GIRLS CLUB

Jennifer De-Kieviet | 250. 489. 8114

JUDO CLUB

UNITED WAY OF CRANBROOK& KIMBERLEY

Cranbrook | 250. 489. 4987

930 Baker St | 250.426. 8833

310 1st Ave S | 250. 426. 2090

FRIENDS OF FORT STEELE

1404-2nd St N | 250. 426. 3830

8444 Hwy 93/95 | 250. 417. 6000

CRANBROOK WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTRE

KOOTENAY ANIME BUREAU Sean Schotts | 250. 919. 6791

32 - 13 Ave. S | 250. 426. 2976

MUSIC FOR YOUNG CHILDREN

4-H CLUB

Wendy Guimont | 250. 489. 1746

Mark Bostock | 250. 489. 8785

MUSIC TEACHERS ASSOCIATION, EK

GIRL GUIDES OF CANADA

Ellen Bailey | 250. 426. 1746

PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS, CANADIAN ASSOCIATION Karen Crawford | 250. 489. 5298

QUILTERS GUILD Seniors Citizen Centre 250. 426. 8817 2nd & 4th Tuesdays 7pm

WILDLIFE MUSEUM Bob Janzen | 250. 829. 0689

ORGANIZATIONS AMNISTY INTERNATIONAL Max Hyde | 250. 426. 3468

CANADIAN FEDERATION OF WOMEN

Tara Archambault | 778. 517. 4533

HOME RUN SOCIETY Gary Slonowsky | 250. 417. 3236

JCI (JUNIOR CHAMBER INTERNATIONAL) Mike Adams | 250. 426. 2801

KIN CLUB OF CRANBROOK Anita Llewellyn | 250. 489. 0628

KENNEL CLUB

KEY CITY OLD TIMERS HOCKEY

Cranbrook BC, Canada 250.489. 1833

SPORTS CRANBROOK BOXING CLUB 202 106th Ave | 250. 427. 5691

CRANBROOK DISTRICT ROD & GUN CLUB 109 Cranbrook St. N 250. 489. 2888

CRANBROOK FIGURE SKATING CLUB

907 Baker St | 250. 426. 6171

KOOTENAY FREE WHEELERS BICYCLE CLUB ‑613 17th Ave S | 250. 426. 8352 MAVERICK RIDING CLUB Carmen Gnucci | 250. 426. 8272

MOUNTAIN TOWN MAULERS ROLLER DERBY GIRLS www.facebook.com/pages/MountainTown-Maulers

ROCKY MOUNTAIN NATURALISTS 250. 426. 8349

NORDIC CLUB

CYCLE CLUB

32A - 11 Ave. S | 250. 426. 0854

EK OUTDOOR CLUB

KTUNAXA NATION COUNCIL

Lorne 250 426 8864

250. 426. 7155

220 Cranbrook St N 250. 489. 2464

LION’S CLUB CRANBROOK

2279 Cranbrook St N | 250. 426. 5914

PHOENIX CLUB

COMMUNITIES IN BLOOM

Roberta Rogers | 250. 489. 0174

Pat Adams | 250. 426. 2341

ROCKIN THE ROCKIES CAR CLUB

COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS SOCIETY OF CRANBROOK

Darlene Demaniuk | 250. 489. 5638

Fywn Noble | 250. 426. 2976

Laura Kennedy | 250. 426. 4161

CRANBROOK & DISTRICT COMMUNITY FOUNDATION

SCOUTS CANADA

CRANBROOK GARDEN ASSOCIATION

KEY CITY GYMNASTICS CLUB

Box 515 Cranbrook BC 250. 489. 3501

KOOTENAY REGION METIS ASSOCIATION

Jim Hong | 250. 426. 4618

CRANBROOK FARMER’S MARKET

WELCOME WAGON NEWCOMERS CLUB

1432 2nd St N | 250. 489. 0904

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Erna Jensen-Shill | 250. 427. 9360

Joe Marco | 250. 489. 5856

T.O.P.S.

Chris Burke | 250. 489. 4981

Judie Blakely | 250. 489. 2112

Melba Hanson | 250. 426. 1119

ROCKY MOUNTAIN FLY FISHERS

Say it like you mean it. Get your business across with easy-to-use brand building blocks.

SAM STEELE SOCIETY

Clarify and express your message so people understand it. Develop marketing collateral they will remember and share.

Susan Rad | 250. 426. 7234

SEARCH & RESCUE Judy Bertalanie | 250. 919. 5190

SENIOR CITIZENS ORGANIZATION Florence Tomicki | 250. 489. 2720

Anna Sandburg | 250. 489. 2443

SENIORS ASSOCIATION

CRANBROOK SOCIETY FOR COMMUNITY LIVING

Sharron Schonagael | 250. 426. 4081

1402 1st St S | 250. 426. 7588

3339 Hwy 3/95 | 250. 426. 6751

CALL

250-489-0474

SPCA

Baby and Children Essentials Tuesday - Saturday 10:00 am - 5:00 pm WINTER 2012-2013

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. R E C R A N BBC . 250 1117 C OBaker H E R E Street C U L T UCranbrook ROO K 489 | 4499 27


MARKET ROSE MARRIOTT, COMMISSIONED ARTIST Acrylics and water colour. Landscapes, floral and critters. Contact the COHERE office 250 464 9613

MARISA PHILLIPS, COMMISSIONED ARTIST Example artwork can be found in the Aboriginal People’s Space in the Cranbrook Regional Hospital. facebook.com/marisa.phillips

KIM BROWN, STYLIST Venue for Hair:: Specializing in intense & fabulous colour, wild & rock ready cuts. http://venueforhair.com. 520. 2277

RANDI NELSON, STYLIST C’est La Vie:: Hair & make-up, bridal, grad, parties & day-to-day style. facebook.com/pages/Cest-La-Vie-Hair-Studio 250. 417. 3287

LAURA POCHA, STYLIST Venue for Hair:: Comfortable and relaxed. Weddings, special events, every day, your way. http://venueforhair.com 778. 520. 2277

THE CAKE LADY Cakes, cupcakes, & cheesecakes for special events, holidays, or any day! Fully customized or choose from our collection. facebook.com/pages/The-Cake-Lady

CALLING ALL ARTISANS, CRAFTSPEOPLE, AND HOME BUSINESS PEOPLE! Advertise your work here for as little as $21/month.

SEND YOUR LISTING TO: DESK@COHERERANBROOK.COM 28

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Cranbrook & District Arts Council Suite 104 - 135 10th Ave South Across from Rotary Park www.theartscouncil.ca


...

¤¤MARKET

thechoiceshop.ca ONLINE SHOP now open SKATEBOARDS  •  SNOWBOARDS  •  MENS & WOMENS APPAREL

W I N T EW RI N 2T 0E 1R 2 -2 20 01 12 3- 2 0| 1 3C O|H E R CE OH CE UR LE TU CRUEL T CU RR AEN B CR RO AO NK B R O|O K 2 9|

816 Baker Street, Cranbrook BC •

250.489.4568

www.thechoiceshop.ca

www.facebook.com/thechoice1996

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¤¤COHERE CRUNCH

COHERE CRUNCH Rapid-fire questions for our featured guest. What is your favourite virtue in others? Generosity.

What is your own chief virtue? I love too much.

What is your ideal of happiness? Health for my children.

What about Cranbrook makes you most happy?

Who are your heroes in real life? My father.

Do you have specific quirk? I’m very impatient. I want things to happen immediately. Which is not so good when you are publishing a book.

The acceptance of the community.

If you could live anywhere, where would it be?

What is frustrating about Cranbrook?

Canada. One hundred per cent.

How isolated it is from the rest of the world. I think it’s the end of the world. It took me 37 hours to get here from Abu Dhabi

Do you have a secret talent?

this week.

Yes, I do. It’s a secret.

What is your favourite Cranbrook spot?

Which talent would you like to be gifted with?

My office, which looks out at the Rockies.

I’d love to sing and I can’t.

What is your idea of misery? Losing a child.

What is your greatest accomplishment? What I am most proud of is being Syrian and being Canadian, both at once. I am so very proud of representing both countries on whichever corner of the globe I happen to be.

Who/what do you most hate? I hate societal rules. Societal rules are manmade, and I simply might differ in opinion from those men and women who made those rules. I abide by my own convictions, regardless of what society might think of them. I try to stay away from being a “people’s pleaser.” And I teach my daughter to do the same.

Who/what do you most love? My children (Selma, 14, Aamer, 9, and Marcel, 6).

What is your favourite pastime? Reading, for sure.

: Issue ok next Cranbro more ome! awes

Who are your favorite creative artists (painters/composers/dancers etc.)? Poet Mahmoud Derwish. His work is so powerful. And the poet Nizar Qabbani. Every woman is in love with Nizar. He is an expert on the physical and internal geography of women. And composer Marcel Khalifeh; it’s crazy that so few people have heard of him. My son is named for him.

If you didn’t have this career, what would you be doing? I’d be a physician. An internist.

What is your motto? I have to translate from Arabic. “A human is a cause.”

How would you like to die? A heart attack at 65, before I need anyone’s help physically.


造 造 rEMEMBER

Manwoman never forgotten artist . visionary . friend Eternity - 1938 - 2012 - Eternity


Make Some Memories

WE’VE COME A LONG WAY

WELCOME

TO

THE

LITTLE

BIG

TOWN

IN

THE

EK

We’ r e b i g o n t a s t e , w e’ r e b i g o n t a l e n t . We’ v e g o t s t a r s s h o o t i n g i n e v e r y d i r e c t i o n a n d m o u n t a i n s o f o p p o r t u n i t y. We’ v e g o t i n n o v a t o r s , c o n s e r v a t o r s a n d g r o u n d - b r e a k e r s . We’ v e g o t e l e p h a n t s i n o u r h i s t o r y a n d s u n s h i n e i n o u r f u t u re . A t a c ro s s ro a d s i n t i m e a n d p l a c e , t h e re’s l o t s f o r u s t o e x p l o r e . S t a y . P l a y a n e x t r a d a y . W e ’ r e h e r e . Yo u ’ r e h e r e . C O H E R E .

w w w. CO H E R E C r a n b r o o k . c o m Brought to you by the:

St.Eugene Golf Resort and Casino www.steugene.ca | 1 866 292 2020 | Free shuttle bus from Cranbrook, BC

2012-13 WINTER COHERE  

COHERE Culture Cranbrook Magazine. Jenny Frank, Ghada Alatrash, Will Huxtable, Joel Robison and more.