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Turners Beach Vegetation & Fire

Management Plan July 2011

SMT Endorsed

PO Box 220 / DX 70506 19 King Edward Street Ulverstone Tasmania 7315 Tel 03 6429 8900 Fax 03 6425 1224 admin@centralcoast.tas.gov.au www.centralcoast.tas.gov.au


Contents 1

GENERAL ................................................................................................3

1.1

Introduction............................................................................................................ 3

1.3

Outcomes for the Management Plan ....................................................................... 3

1.2 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9

2

Statutory Requirements and Related Policies .......................................................... 4 Land Ownership...................................................................................................... 5 Land Zoning ........................................................................................................... 5 Adjacent Land Uses ................................................................................................ 5 Turners Beach Local Area Plan ................................................................................ 5

2.1

Geology .................................................................................................................. 7

2.3

Fauna...................................................................................................................... 9

2.4 2.5

Flora ....................................................................................................................... 7 Heritage................................................................................................................ 11 Values................................................................................................................... 12

VEGETATION AND FORESHORE MANAGEMENT .......................................13

3.1

Tree Assessments................................................................................................. 13

3.3

Vegetation ............................................................................................................ 16

3.2 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8

4

Management Plan Objectives .................................................................................. 4

PHYSICAL FEATURES ...............................................................................7

2.2

3

Location.................................................................................................................. 3

Weeds and Exotic Plants ....................................................................................... 13 Beach Accesses Maintained By The Council........................................................... 17 Unauthorised Beach Access Points ........................................................................ 18 Beach and River Erosion/ Climate Change/Sea Level Rise ..................................... 18 Animal Management ............................................................................................. 20 Passive Recreational Activities .............................................................................. 20

RESERVE CHARACTERISTICS AND MANAGEMENT....................................21

4.1

Coastal Reserve Management Structure ................................................................ 21

4.3

Coastal Reserve – Lethborg Avenue (Area 2) ......................................................... 22

4.2 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8 4.9

4.10

Clayton Wetland (Area 1) ...................................................................................... 22 Coastal Reserve Turners Beach Road - Albert Street (Area 3) ................................ 24 Coastal Reserve Albert Street - Forth River (Area 4).............................................. 27 Blackburn Drive Area (Area 5) ............................................................................... 32 Custom Reserve (Area 6)....................................................................................... 32 Gables Park (Area 7) ............................................................................................. 33 HW Braid Reserve (Area 8)..................................................................................... 35 Stubbs Road ......................................................................................................... 36

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5

FIRE MANAGEMENT...............................................................................36

5.1

General ................................................................................................................. 36

5.2

Turners Beach Fire Plan ........................................................................................ 39

5.3

Turners Beach Fire Risk Assessment ..................................................................... 40

5.1.1 Introduction......................................................................................................... 36 5.1.2 Risk Management Approach ................................................................................ 36 5.1.3 Fire Service Act 1979 ........................................................................................... 37 5.1.4 Fuel Types and Hazard Levels .............................................................................. 38 5.1.5 Fire Management Assets ...................................................................................... 39 5.2.1 Scope................................................................................................................... 39 5.2.2 Objectives............................................................................................................ 39

5.4

Fire Breaks/Fuel Modification and Trail................................................................. 41

6

ACTION/IMPLEMENTATION PLAN ..........................................................43

7

REFERENCES .........................................................................................49 Appendix A: Central Coast Municipal Area Locality Plan............................................ 50 Appendix B: Turners Beach Locality Plan ................................................................... 51 Appendix C: Turners Beach Parks and Reserves ........................................................ 52 Appendix D: Turners Beach Fire breaks & fuel modification zones............................ 53 Appendix E: Turners Beach Water Lines .................................................................... 54 Appendix F: Native plant species of Turners Beach ................................................... 55

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1 1.1

GENERAL Introduction

The initial request for a Turners Beach Foreshore and Vegetation Management Plan was made at the Turners Beach Community Workshop in 2006.

This Management Plan has been

developed to complement the Turners Beach Local Area Plan and address issues raised at community meetings in 2009.

This Management Plan studies the current conditions and characteristics of the environment around Turners Beach including the foreshore and the Forth River Reserve and identifies any factors that impact upon them.

It establishes clear directions and strategies for future

vegetation management and development of the Turners Beach area including fire management treatments.

The management of the Turners Beach foreshore area requires partnerships between the Central Coast Council, the community and key stakeholders to be further fostered and the coordination of on-ground works to be continually improved in accordance with this plan and the Council’s Guidelines for the Formation and Management of Environmental Groups within the Central Coast Municipal Area. 1.2

Location

The seaside township of Turners Beach is situated in the Central Coast municipal area on the

North West Coast of Tasmania. It is located approximately 7 kilometres east of Ulverstone

and has an estimated resident population of 1,477 people based on the 2006 census. (See Appendix A and B for location plans) 1.3

Outcomes for the Management Plan  

Improve Community Pride - a local community that is proud of Turners Beach;

Equitable access to opportunity - improved equity of access to the beach and river and possible recreational opportunities;

 

Sustainable environment - enhanced and protected built and natural environment;

Visual amenity - maintained and enhanced natural visual characteristics of Turners Beach;

Legacy for future generations - Turners Beach is preserved for the benefit of future generations;

Realistic,

achievable

and

sustainable

development

-

Management

Plan

recommendations are to be planned and delivered within the capabilities of the Council and the community; 

Education - improved awareness and understanding of any environmental and heritage values of Turners Beach;

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Outcome performance measures will include:     

Level of local community pride regarding the Turners Beach area;

Visitor level of recognition for Turners Beach;

Community satisfaction with the Turners Beach area;

Improvement in the quality of vegetation and enhancement of ecosystems;

Community and visitor perceptions of safety within Turners Beach including the management of fire risk;

   1.4

Better understanding of climate change and its impacts i.e. sea level rise; Visitation rates to the Turners Beach area; and

Efficiency and effectiveness in required service levels for Turners Beach. Management Plan Objectives

The objectives of this Management Plan are to:  

    1.5

Manage the natural resources identified in all vegetated areas of Turners Beach. Maintain and preserve all existing native flora and fauna in a natural state, by: o

Reducing or eliminating any influence that will impact on the natural resources

o

Preserving the natural resources and processes that help to maintain biodiversity

such as weed infestations and human pressures. in the area.

Restore degraded areas through revegetation/remediation.

Provide and maintain safe open space for passive recreation.

Provide and maintain suitable assets to support the community of Turners Beach. Manage the risk of fire.

Statutory Requirements and Related Policies

This Management Plan will comply with State and Federal Legislation. The various Acts and Guidelines to be aware of in conjunction with this plan are listed below: 

Threatened Species Protection Act 1995 - this Act provides for the protection and

management of threatened native flora and fauna, as listed in the Schedules. The Act also enables and promotes the conservation of native flora and fauna. 

Endangered Species Protection Act 1992 - this Act provides protection for threatened or vulnerable species of plants and animals, and their habitats.

Endangered Species Act 1973 - an act to provide for the conservation of endangered and threatened species of fish, wildlife, and plants.

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - an Act relating to the protection of the environment and the conservation of biodiversity.

Crown Lands Act 1976 - an Act to make fresh provisions with respect to the management, sale, and disposal of the lands of the Crown.

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 

Central Coat Council Climate Change Action Plan (2010) Weed Management Act 1999 - an Act which provides for the control and eradication of weeds that are classified as declared weeds.

Weeds of National Significance (WONS) - are those weeds determined by the Department of Environment and Heritage as being of national significance.

Plant Protection Act 1990 – an Act to consolidate and amend the law relating to diseases affecting plants and the control of noxious weeds and noxious invertebrates.

National Water Quality Management Strategy 1992 - a series of documents which address fresh and marine water quality, sewerage, urban stormwater.

           1.6

Fire Service Act 1979 State Coastal Policy 1996 Recreation and Open Space Strategy 2009 Central Coast Council Vegetation Management Strategy 2009 Central Coast Vegetation Management Policy 2009 Custom Reserve Management Plan 2008, Turners Beach Coastcare Inc. Turners Beach Community Plan 2006 Cradle Coast Natural Resource Management Strategy, August 2005 Environmental Management and Pollution Control Act 1994 Clayton Wetland Management Plan 2001, Turners Beach Coastcare Inc. Draft Turners Beach Local Area Plan (Urban Design Guidelines) 2010 Land Ownership

The Turners Beach area discussed in detail in this Management Plan includes parks, coastal, river and road reservations. The Council holds a recreational licence over the Turners Beach

coastal reserve and the Forth River reserve from Crown Land Services. The Council also holds a lease from Crown Land Services over the area of the OC Ling Caravan Park. 1.7

Land Zoning

The parks and reserves in Turners Beach are zoned either Environmental Management or Recreation under the Central Coast Planning Scheme 2005. 1.8

Adjacent Land Uses

Land use in Turners Beach is required to comply with the Central Coast Planning Scheme 2005.

The land use zoning in Turners Beach is predominately residential with limited

pockets of Local Business zoning to service local needs. 1.9

Turners Beach Local Area Plan (Urban Design Guidelines – Draft)

The Turners Beach Community Plan was adopted by the Central Coast Council in 2007

committed to guiding future development to preserve the character of Turners Beach by developing guidelines to facilitate sensitive urban design. According, a Local Area Plan is

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under development for Turners Beach to provide urban design guidelines to preserve this character and consider such issues as:    

The longer term future role and size of Turners Beach;

Identifying the extent of the urban boundaries and location of staged growth areas; Identifying asset and values of the area to be retained and enhanced;

A precinct plan for the community hall/recreation ground precinct (including the lawn bowling facility, Turners Beach hall, tennis courts etc.);

Mitigating or adapting to the hazards affecting the area, including flooding and climate change related impacts;

   

Natural Resource Management/Coastal Management issues;

Incorporation of the Council’s Open Space and Recreation Plan;

Identifying any traffic management, infrastructure or parking needs; and A service road between Turners Beach and Ulverstone.

A Draft Turners Beach Vegetation and Fire Management Plan was made available to the community for consultation between December 2010 and January in conjunction with and during development of the Turner Beach Local Area Plan.

This plan compliments the Tuners Beach Local Area Plan by providing direction in addressing the Natural Resource Management/Coast Management Issues raised by the community.

Figures 1, 2 and 3: Aerial Photographs of Turners Beach

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2 PHYSICAL FEATURES 2.1

Geology

A search has been conducted on the Department of Primary Industry, Parks, Water and Environment’s (DPIPWE) ‘Natural Values Atlas’ database which identifies sites that have geoconservation significance. There were no geoconservation sites identified within 1,000 metres of the Turners Beach Area. 2.2

Flora

The Custom Reserve Flora Survey and Management Plan (A. Povey and H. Morgan - 2005)

Clayton Wetland Management Plan 2001) and the Botanical Survey of eastern part of Turners

Beach Coastal Reserve (N. Fitzgerald - 2001) all identify and list native flora species known to occur in the Turners Beach area.

The Department of Primary Industries Parks Water and Environment’s (DPIPWE) ‘Natural

Values Atlas’ database is also a great resource which identifies TasVeg communities and threatened flora and flora with a conservation significance within the area.

The report

provides lists based on observations made and estimated geographic range.

The

observations are based on sightings of species and the estimated geographic range provides an indication that species could possibly inhabit the area.

Vegetation within the Turners Beach area is diverse and includes several vegetation communities. The main TasVeg communities that inhabit Turners Beach are:

Eucalyptus viminalis- Eucalyptus globules (TasVeg Code - DVC) coastal forest and woodland.

This community is dominated by either Manna/White Gum or Tasmanian Blue Gum trees that are usually small and of poor form. They are dry sclerophyll communities with understory’s varying from shrubby to heathy.

Acacia longifolia (TasVeg code – SAC) -coastal scrub. This vegetation community is part of the Scrub, Heathland and Coastal Complexes group. Occurring along the coastline on dunes and rocky headlands this community is suited to the harsh coastal conditions. Made up of a diverse variety of shrubs and usually has an uneven structure due to the varying locations

and site conditions. This community may have a dense closed canopy due to wind pruning,

and will generally reach a height of between 2-8m. Typical species include Silver Banksia,

Coast Wattle, Coast Beard Heath, Common Tea Tree, Prickly Moses, Flax Lilly, Sagg, Coastal Saltbush and Ice Plant.

Eucalyptus obliqua (TasVeg code – DOB) - dry forest and woodland. community is part of the Dry Eucalypt Forest and Woodland group.

This vegetation

This forest type is

dominated by Stringybark trees typically of medium height (20-30m) and with well-formed

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stems often half of the total tree height. diverse, and the ground layer sparse.

The shrubby understory is typically dense and

The Turners Beach area also features riparian scrub and wetland communities; however, the wetlands at Turners Beach are not threatened. A small section of riparian scrub has been

identified within the Forth River reserve approximately 800m south of the Bass Highway. This part of the river reserve should be protected as it is the most substantial example of riparian scrub in Turners Beach.

The vegetation of the Turners Beach area shows good biodiversity through forest structure

and is in relatively good condition. The Turners Beach area once hosted a vast abundance of

native wildflowers however through development many of the species have been lost. The Greenhood and Sun Orchid remain visible in certain areas. The Natural Values Report has

identified that the Black Tongued Finger-orchid is located within a 500m radius of Turners Beach; this species is listed under the Threatened Species Protection Act 1995.

There are two species endemic to Tasmania, located in Turners Beach, the Black Peppermint and the Round-leaf Rice-flower.

Flora known to occur and likely to occur in the Turners Beach area: Refer to Appendix F.

Figure 4: Sagg and sedges in Gables Park

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2.3

Fauna

The Custom Reserve Flora Survey and Management Plan (A. Povey and H. Morgan - 2005)

Clayton Wetland Management Plan (2001) and The Turners Beach Fauna Values and Management Recommendations (G. Blake – 2005) all identify and list fauna

The report provides lists based on observations made and estimated geographic range. The

observations are based on sightings of species and the estimated geographic range is a suggestion that species could possibly inhabit the area based on geography.

The DPIPWE’s ‘Natural Values Atlas’ database has identified threatened fauna which have been sighted within a 500m radius of Turners Beach, these include the Eastern Barred Bandicoot, Grey Goshawk and Giant Freshwater Crayfish. Based on geographic range other

possible species include the Wedge-tailed Eagle, White-bellied Sea-eagle, Green and Golden Frog, Northwest Velvet Worm and Australian grayling.

These species are either listed under the Threatened Species Protection Act 1995 or the

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

There have been numerous sightings of species within the 5,000m radius, listed as threatened under the Threatened Species Protection Act 1995 or the Environment Protection

and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 including the White-fronted Tern, Masked Owl, Swift Parrot, Spotted-tail Quoll and the Tasmanian Devil.

Other fauna including bird species known to and thought to inhabit the Turners Beach area: Table 1. REPTILES AND AMPHIBIANS

BIRDS

Metallic Skink

Fairy Wren

She-oak Skink

Small Wattlebird

Tiger Snake

Spotted Pardalote

Blue-tongue Lizard

Native Hen

White-lipped Whip Snake

Black Cockatoo

Copperhead Snake

Honeyeater

Delicate Skink

Dusky Robin

Mountain Dragon

Cormorants

Three-lined Skink

Pelicans

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Tasmanian Froglet

White Egret

Brown tree frog

Swamp Harrier

Smooth Froglet

Brown Falcon

Bull Frog

Green Rosella

Spotted marsh frog

Pallid cuckoo

Common froglet

Silvereye Welcome Swallow

MAMMALS

Beautiful Firetail

Southern Brown Bandicoot

Forest Raven

Water Rat

Grey Butcherbird

Long-nosed Potoroo

Golden Whistler

Bennets Wallaby

Pied Oystercatcher

Ring-tail Possum

Masked Lapwing

Brush-tail Possum

Silver Gull

Echidna

Olive Whistler

Tasmanian Pademelon

Grey Shrike-thrush

Velvet-furred Swamp Rat

Fork-tailed Swift

Greater Long-eared Bat

Laughing Kookaburra

Lesser Long-eared Bat

Superb Fairy-wren

Gould’s Wattled Bat

Tasmanian Thornbill

Chocolate Wattled Bat

Brown Thornbill

Tasmanian Pipistrell

White-browed Scrub-wren

King River Eptesicus

Striated Pardalote Yellow-throated Honeyeater New Holland Honeyeater Crescent Honeyeater Little Wattle Bird Dusky Robin

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The wildlife corridor of remnant vegetation along the Forth River and through the Turners

Beach dune system provides important habitat providing protection, food and shelter for

native birds, mammals, reptiles, and invertebrate fauna. This vegetation must be protected to ensure healthy populations of these species are maintained in Turners Beach.

These

species depend on the natural environment to survive, leaf litter and dead wood provide

homes and food for invertebrates while old eucalypt tree hollows provide important habitat particularly for birds, bats and possums. The main threats to wildlife are habitat loss and feral animals such as rabbits and cats. 2.4

Heritage

Turners Beach was originally settled by Europeans during the 1840’s by James Fenton, a Tasmanian pioneer. The Gables House which is located adjacent to Gables Park was built during the early part of 1850 by John Williams. The house was originally built as a single storey hotel.

It was known as The Sailor’s Return Inn when in 1850 a hotel licence was

granted to John Williams as the licensee.

During this time numerous boats such as

schooners and cutters used to drop anchorage along the Forth River.

A water-well was

located in the garden of The Gables for sailor’s to replenish freshwater supplies for the boats. As part of the shipping trade between Tasmania and Melbourne the boats would carry vegetables and timber supplies back.

Several Aboriginal tribes roamed the North West Coast from Port Sorell to Emu Bay. The most

coastal tribe was called the Punnilerpanner; they travelled the area along the coastline

including Turners Beach. This tribe lived on coastal food sources all year round. A number

of Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Surveys have been undertaken throughout Turners Beach, and one Aboriginal heritage site is recorded and known within the Clayton Rivulet area.

It is

however possible that a number of other Aboriginal sites remain undiscovered in the area.

This is because site identification is often only possible when the area in which the site is buried is altered through factors such as erosion, vegetation removal or excavation.

If, during any works being undertaken, dense shell/artefacts appear above the high tide

mark, works are to cease, and the Aboriginal Heritage Tasmania Division of the Department of Primary Industries Parks Water and Environment must be contacted. Note it is a

requirement under section 10(3) of the Aboriginal Relics Act 1975 that anything found which

is believed to be an Aboriginal site must be reported at the first practical opportunity. Aboriginal Heritage Tasmania can be contacted on (03) 6233 6281or via email on Aboriginal@heritage.tas.gov.au

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2.5

Values

The values associated with Turners Beach are important and need to be measured to provide support for preserving and enhancing the area.

Natural

Turners Beach has important pockets of remnant vegetation remaining and provides for essential vegetation/wildlife corridors through the area.

Turners Beach already sustains

habitats for a large variety of wildlife and it provides suitable habitats to attract further species and possibly those listed as threatened.

The vegetation and dune system also

provides important protection for the residential area from wind and storm surge/high tide events.

Social

The recreational pathway from Ulverstone to Turners Beach enhances the quality of living for residents in the area by improving the social value.

Economic

Turners Beach receives high numbers of visitors during the tourist seasons. The low key feel of the area combined with the recreational opportunities such as fishing attract visitors. The

pathway contributes to creating Turners Beach as a desired destination to visit. There will be no direct expenditure on the activities; however there will be indirect expenditure on accommodation, food and supplies.

Visual

Turners Beach is an attractive town which continues to maintain a natural bushland setting

creating a relaxed atmosphere. The setting is partly what attracts residents and visitors to the area.

Educational

The efforts of Turners Beach Coastcare through newsletters, on-ground works, articles in the local newspaper and NRM publications has provided an excellent opportunity to showcase

results and educate the community on the importance of preserving native vegetation and communicating an ownership for caring for the environment. Many schools use the area to study urban impacts on coastal zones and the effects of erosion/climate change.

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3

VEGETATION AND FORESHORE MANAGEMENT

3.1

Tree Assessments

The Council’s annual urban tree assessment is undertaken to determine the safety of trees.

This includes identifying any health issues such as disease and decay and determining the potential for limb or complete tree failure. All trees located within road reserves, foreshore

reserves and parks are assessed in Turners Beach by a qualified arborist. This assessment also includes the OC Ling Caravan Park. Required works are prioritised and undertaken early

in the following financial year as budgets allow. The work may then be followed by the tree replacement program.

This replacement program will involve replacing native and non-

native trees and vegetation that has been removed. Trees may not necessarily be replaced in the same location, but the program will ensure that the overall vegetation cover in the Turners Beach area is maintained.

Action: Undertake annual tree assessments by April of each year. 3.2

Weeds and Exotic Plants

Weeds and exotic plants are spread by dumping garden rubbish, garden escapes, and

dispersal by wind, water, animals, humans and vehicles. Weeds and exotic plants displace native species; reduce biodiversity and impact on the quality of habitats. Evidence is visible of residents dumping garden waste throughout the Forth River and foreshore reserve.

Figure 5: Dumped Garden Waste in the Coastal Reserve

An extensive number of weeds and garden escapee plant species have been identified in

Turners Beach during the Central Coast Council’s 2011 Reserve Weed Mapping Program, as well as identified through the Custom Reserve Flora Survey and Management Plan (A. Povey and H. Morgan – 2005) and the Clayton Rivulet Management Plan (2001).

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The weeds surveyed in 2011 including others known to the area are shown in Table 2: Table 2: Weeds Identified in the Turners Beach Area Aeonium

Honey Flower

African Boxthorn**

Iris

African Daisy

Montpellier Broom**

Agapanthus

Mirror Bush

Agaves

Nettle-leaved Goosefoot

Asparagus Fern**

Onion Weed**

Blackberry*

Oval-leaved Privet

Black Nightshade

Pampas Grass**

Blue Butterfly-bush

Proliferous Pink

Bluebell Creeper

Purple Ragwort

Boneseed*

Quaking Grass

Bridal Creeper*

Radiata Pine

Cape Ivy

Red Valerian

Cape Weed

Sea Radish

Cape Wattle

Sea Rocket

Clover

Sea Spurge

Cock’s Foot

Smooth Cat’s Ear

Common Vetch

Soursob

Cotoneaster

Slender Thistle**

English Broom**

Sticky Weed

Forget-me-not

Sweet Pittosporum

Fumitory

Tecoma Pink

Gazania

Tree Lucerne

Geranium

Violet

Gorse*

Wandering creeper

Hair Grass

Wild radish

Hawthorn

Wood-sorrel

Holly

Three Cornered Garlic

Hemlock

Marram Grass

Macrocarpa Pine

Great Brome

Caper Spurge

Spear Thistle

English ivy

Buttercups

Greater Trefoil

Briar Rose

Narrow Leaf Plantain

Dock

Wide Leaf Plantain

Willow*

Sow Thistle

Blue Periwinkle

Salsify

Cumbungii

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Arum Lily

Polygala

Sollya

Cape Daisy

African Box Thorn

*Weed of National Significance **Declared Weed

There are currently four Weeds of National Significance (WONS) identified in the Turners Beach area Blackberries, Boneseed, Gorse and Bridal Creeper.

Under the Weed Management Act 1999 African Boxthorn, Asparagus Fern, Blackberry, Boneseed, Bridal Creeper, English Broom, Gorse, Montpellier Broom, Onion Weed, Pampas

Grass and Slender Thistle are all declared weeds in Tasmania, largely due to their impacts on the environment and agricultural productivity.

As such, the importation, sale and

distribution of these plants is prohibited. The legal responsibilities of land holders and other stakeholders for these declared weeds are specified in the Statutory Weed Management Plans. Table 3: Management Measure from Statutory Weed Management Plan DECLARED WEED African boxthorn

MANAGEMENT MEASURE Zone B - Containment within municipal

boundaries, protection of specified areas

within municipal boundaries, prevention of spread to Zone A municipalities. Asparagus fern

Implement integrated control program for eradication and prevent future occurrences.

Blackberry

Zone B - Containment within municipal

boundaries, protection of specified areas

within municipal boundaries, prevention of spread to Zone A municipalities. Boneseed

Zone A – Eradication.

Bridal creeper

Integrated control program for eradication.

English broom

Zone B - Containment within municipal

boundaries, protection of specified areas

within municipal boundaries, prevention of spread to Zone A municipalities. Gorse

Zone B - Containment within municipal

boundaries, protection of specified areas

within municipal boundaries, prevention of

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spread to Zone A municipalities. Montpellier broom

Zone B - Containment within municipal

boundaries, protection of specified areas

within municipal boundaries, prevention of spread to Zone A municipalities. Onion weed

Prevention and early detection.

Pampas grass

Implement integrated control program for

Slender thistle

Zone B - Containment within municipal

eradication.

boundaries, protection of specified areas

within municipal boundaries, prevention of spread to Zone A municipalities.

*Zone A - None recorded or isolated occurrences, Zone B - Localised or wide spread infestation.

The Central Coast Council has initially selected priority weed species for eradication within the Forth River and Foreshore reserve area. Two weed mapping and control programs are undertaken yearly in conjunction with local environmental groups.

Priority weeds at this

stage are Asparagus Fern, Boneseed, Bridal Creeper, Gorse, Cape Daisy, Tree Lucerne, Montpellier Broom, Pampas Grass, African Boxthorn and Slender Thistle.

All other weed

species identified within the area will be targeted as resources and funds allow. All volunteer

environmental groups undertaking weed control must do so in accordance with the

Guidelines for the Formation and Management of Volunteer Environmental Groups within the Central Coast Municipal Area 2010.

The Turners Beach community will be provided with educational information on the importance of not dumping garden waste in the reserve and maintaining their private

gardens free of WONS and declared weeds to prevent them from escaping into the environment.

Action: Undertake weed control of priority weeds identified in the Council’s weed mapping program. 3.3

Vegetation

It is important to maintain and improve the remnant riparian and foreshore vegetation buffer

which currently exists. Turners Beach is one of the few coastal areas which have retained a considerable quality, quantity and diversity of vegetation. This vegetation is very important to wildlife, biodiversity and adds to the aesthetic appeal of the area. It plays an important role by stabilising the river bank and dune system.

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Native vegetation must be protected and natural regeneration encouraged. Areas degraded by weed infestations, impacted on by humans or subject to fire, should be considered for revegetation with species native to the Turners Beach area.

As the Central Coast Council holds a recreational licence over the Coastal reserve and the Forth River reserve from Crown Land Services, it must comply with the lease conditions. Clause 3 (j), (k) and (l) of the lease reads as follows: j)

“Not to make any alterations, or erect buildings or structures on the Land without obtaining the Ministers prior written consent. In seeking the approval of the Minister, the Lessee must provide detailed plans of the proposed alteration, building or structure to the Minister for his consideration;

k) Not to do, or permit to be done on the Land anything which, in the Ministers opinion may be or become a nuisance or annoyance to an occupier of an adjoining property;

l)

Not to permit any activity on the Land that is not authorised under this lease without obtaining the Ministers prior written consent�.

Activities such as the pruning/removal of native vegetation, planting of non-native vegetation and dumping of garden waste in the coastal reserve and Forth River reserve by

residents is not acceptable and will result in a non-compliance of the Council/Crown lease conditions.

The main concerns are that these activities will harm the native vegetation,

dune/bank stability and wildlife habitats.

Any issues surrounding vegetation will be managed as outlined in the Central Coast Council

Vegetation Management Strategy 2009.

Action: Engage the community regarding responsible use of the coastal reserve and the

impacts of such activities as dumping of garden waste, encroachments and planting nonnative species. 3.4

Beach Accesses Maintained By The Council

The Council is currently maintaining eight constructed beach accesses along the Turners

Beach foreshore. The accesses are located adjacent to Lethborg Avenue, old Beach Haven Caravan Park, East End Park, and Albert Street, two adjacent to the OC Ling Caravan Park,

West End Park and the Forth River. There are another two informal accesses maintained by the Council located off Groom Street and at the end of Fenton Street.

There are also

numerous unauthorised accesses. In summary a total of ten beach accesses are available

through 2.1km of coastal reserve. The Council’s policy is to provide one access every 400 plus metres through coastal areas where possible.

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The majority of the constructed beach accesses require a reasonable level of maintenance under the current coastal conditions. There will be no installation of any additional beach

accesses in Turners Beach and there will be a need for rationalisation of unauthorised accesses in the future.

A beach viewing platform has been installed at the East End Park access to allow for persons with limited mobility.

There is no current Australian Standard for beach accesses, however, the Council uses AS1428.1:2009 Design for access and mobility - General requirements for access - New building work when designing and constructing new beach accesses as a guide.

Action: Undertake beach access assessment and carry out any rationalisation and/or maintenance works identified. 3.5

Unauthorised Beach Access Points

Many unauthorised beach access points have been created by members of the public as

opposed to using those provided and maintained by the Council due to proximity and convenience.

Unauthorised beach access points are an issue for public safety, cause

dune/bank erosion, segmentation of native vegetation and prevent the Council from complying with its lease with the Crown. Residents and members of the public are expected to use the authorised access points.

Action: Pursue the reduction in unauthorised access, encroachments etc. in conjunction with Crown Land Services 3.6

Beach and River Erosion/ Climate Change/Sea Level Rise

Parts of the Turners Beach foreshore dune system and the Forth River bank are highly susceptible to erosion from storm surge events, king tides and flooding. The damage has

caused large amounts of the dune system to be washed away and beach access footings exposed.

Maintaining an adequate vegetation cover is the first defence to protecting vulnerable areas at this stage.

Investigations into erosion protection such as rock placement has been

undertaken by suitably qualified persons as part of the Turners Beach Local Area Plan.

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Figure 6: The white paint marks the sand level prior to November 2007

Figures 7 and 8: Erosion along the Turners Beach Foreshore

Turners Beach is being impacted on by high tide and storm surge events which has left heavily eroded areas along the dune system and the footings of constructed beach accesses exposed.

Winds associated with these storms are also impacting on the dune system,

particularly in exposed areas.

The Chris Sharples report Indicative Mapping of Tasmanian Coastal Vulnerability to Climate

Change and Sea Level Rise: Explanatory Report, 2nd edition identifies the vulnerability of the Tasmanian coastline to the impacts of climate change and sea-level rise.

By integrating

geomorphology and topography, the report maps coastal areas potentially vulnerable to climate change impacts such as sea-level rise. vulnerable and may be subject to inundation.

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Turners Beach has been identified as


Local environmental groups will be encouraged to participate in the Tasmanian Shoreline Monitoring and Archiving Project (Tasmarc).

This project involves taking monthly

measurements of the beach profile from a permanent survey mark located in the dune. Results are then collated and made available via the internet. The results from the data can give an indication as to the amount of erosion taking place and can influence management decisions and erosion control methods used.

Action: Monitor and respond to climate change in accordance with the Turners Beach Local Area Plan and the Central Coast Council Climate Change Action Plan 2010. 3.7

Animal Management

The main beach at Turners Beach from the Forth River to Claytons Rivulet is a designated dog

exercise area. Annual restrictions apply during December, January and February, when dogs

can only be exercised on the beach after 7:00pm and before 9:00am. Dogs can be off lead but must be under effective control at all times.

Domestic animals including cats and dogs need to be controlled effectively otherwise they can have a severe impact on the native wildlife. A number of measures can be undertaken to ensure this happens by: 

Promoting responsible ownership of animals through letters, pamphlets, signage,

media and educational days.  3.8

Council enforcing the Dog Control Act, 2000. Passive Recreational Activities

The passive recreation activities that are carried out in the Turners Beach area by residents and visitors include:        

Walking and running Picnics/socialising Fishing

Boating

Swimming and other water activities Non-motorised water sports Photography

Nature observing and bird watching

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4 RESERVE CHARACTERISTICS AND MANAGEMENT The Turners Beach open space park and passive recreation areas include Gables Park,

Custom Reserve, Forth River reserve, East End Park, the Coastal Reserve, Turners Beach Recreation Ground and Community Hall Precinct, West End Park, Clayton Wetlands, Blackburn Drive and the HW Braid Reserve. The Turners Beach Coastal Reserve covers approximately 3km from the Forth River to the Clayton Rivulet.

There is adequate park infrastructure provided at Turners Beach with two public toilets along

the foreshore, ten authorised beach access locations and three barbeque huts and one picnic shelter. These assets continually require maintenance and will be renewed when required and as funds allow.

Renewed infrastructure will be designed in accordance with any

applicable Australian Standards and in an environmentally sensitive manner with limited visual impact. 4.1

Coastal Reserve Management Structure

The chart below indicates the management structure for the coastal reserve areas and the relationship between Crown Land Services, Central Coast Council and the various environmental groups.

Crown Land Services – Owner

Central Coast Council – Land Manager

Sulphur Creek Coastcare

Penguin Coastcare

Ulverstone Coastcare

Turners Beach Coastcare

Riverside Avenue Community Group

Turners Beach Friends of the Dune

The Central Coast Council and the Turners Beach community are fortunate to have the

Turners Beach Coastcare Inc. (TBCC) who have undertaken various on-ground activities including weed management, monitoring, community education and revegetation works for the last 15 years or so.

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The Council also welcomes the formation of a new environmental group to be known as the Turners Beach Friends of the Dunes (TBFD) and look forward to this group undertaking environmental activities in this area. 4.2

Clayton Wetland (Area 1)

Please refer to the Clayton Wetland Management Plan 2001 prepared by TBCC. The main objectives are to continue preserving the wetland area by controlling weeds and human activity and improving the management of this area.

Turners Beach Coastcare Inc. currently maintain the area through weed control and revegetation and in accordance with the Clayton Wetland Management Plan 2001.

Maintenance issues have included dumping of garden waste and household rubbish. Action: Continue to support TBCC to maintain this area in accordance with the Clayton

Wetland Management Plan 2001. 4.3

Coastal Reserve – Lethborg Avenue (Area 2)

This section includes West End Park which is located at the western end of the Esplanade and

coastal reserve through to the end of Lethborg Avenue covering a distance of approximately 580m.

Infrastructure and services located through this area include:      

Open space grassed area Toilet facility

Barbeque shelter Picnic tables Swing set

Three constructed beach accesses and one informal beach access Sealed car park

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Figures 38 and 39: Toilet facilities and swing set at West End Park

The refurbished toilet facility and dune seating off the beach access at West End Park was a joint project by TBCC, Central Coast Council, University of Tasmania Architecture Department, and a number of community individuals.

The car park adjacent to West End Park is sealed and in a good condition providing parking for approximately eight vehicles.

The West End Park provides one of the main beach accesses because of the parking and barbecue facility; however, it is in need of some repair work.

Figures 40 and 41: West End Park dune seating and beach access

The constructed beach accesses at Lethborg Avenue and the old Beach Haven Caravan Park are in fair condition but also require repair work.

Issues consist of native vegetation overgrown with weeds, encroachment from adjoining

properties in the form of introduction of exotic plants, pruning for views, dumping of garden waste, and it is noted that some residents are undertaking weed control works in the area to prevent Blackberries encroaching on properties. These residents will be encouraged to join

an environmental group so that they will be covered by insurance when undertaking works and can be educated on weed control techniques.

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To assist with defining the boundary between private property and the coastal reserve

Council will further investigate the area and identify encroachments. Improved definition of the boundary line will provide the appropriate detail to residents on where their property ends to assist with encroachment issues.

The pedestrian access through the dune system along between Groom Street and the access from the old Beach Haven Caravan Park will be maintained in the current condition. Actions: a) Eradicate priority weeds and exotic plants and conduct regular weed maintenance in conjunction with TBCC.

b) Undertake revegetation as required with species native to the area. c) Review and maintain constructed beach accesses.

d) Address encroachment issues with residents adjoining the reserve, and encourage residents to work with/join an environmental group.

e) Continue to support and work with TBCC in preserving and maintaining this area. 4.4

Coastal Reserve Turners Beach Road - Albert Street (Area 3)

This section covers a distance of 420m of coastal reserve that is adjacent to northern

property boundaries. The coastal reserve is approximately 30m wide and consists of mostly native vegetation in good condition.

There is minimal dune erosion and no Council

infrastructure exists through this section of the reserve.

The objective for this area is to address the encroachment issues, unauthorised accesses and to encourage weed control and revegetation.

There are a number of management issues for this section of coastal reserve including encroachment of private property, unauthorised access tracks and fire management.

Encroachment activities include dumping of garden wastes and household rubbish, planting of exotic species such as fruit trees, storing outdoor items, constructing infrastructure such as sheds, play structures, outdoor showers and sprinkler systems, using the reserve for wood storage, composting and incineration and removing vegetation for views and larger scale clearing for extending lawns and gardens to the top of the dune system.

All of these

activities result in the Council not complying with the lease conditions set by Crown Land

Services. The Council has sought advice from Crown Land Services on the most appropriate manner to address these activities and the rationalisation of unauthorised accesses and structures.

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Figures 30 and 31: Encroachment issues

Figures 32 and 33: Encroachment issues

Dumping garden waste and planting exotic species in the coastal reserve leads to weed

infestation. This section of the coastal reserve has a number of infestations of exotic plants including African Daisy, Daffodil, Bamboo, Agaves, Cotoneaster, Agapanthas and a yellow

succulent. The accumulation of dead vegetation into piles and grass clippings in the reserve is also considered poor management and must not continue.

There is to be no further dumping of garden waste and household rubbish in the coastal reserve. The Council will work with adjacent landowners to address the encroachment issues through an action plan.

To assist with defining the boundary between private property and the coastal reserve the Council will further investigate having any encroachments identified. Improved definition of the boundary line will provide the appropriate detail to residents on where their property ends to assist with encroachment issues.

A major concern along this section is the number of unauthorised access tracks through the coastal reserve from private properties. There are nineteen properties adjoining the coastal

reserve and fifteen access points have been identified from recent aerial photography. These accesses tracks compromise the integrity of the dune system.

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Figures 34 and 35: Private Beach Access Tracks

Any constructed access poses legal responsibilities for the Council in that if a member of the public is injured on the access, the Council may be liable. Although there is no Australian

Standard for beach accesses the Council uses AS1428.1:2009 as a guide. A number of the unauthorised constructed beach accesses appear to be in poor condition and dangerous due to the absence of handrails, gradient and inadequate step width. There is no requirement

from Tasmania Fire Service to retain these accesses to assist with fire management. Advice

from Crown Land Services is that there are currently no authorised accesses through this section of reserve.

The Council will work with Crown Land Services and the residents to reduce the number of beach accesses through the implementation of an action plan.

In addition to the exotic plants, this section of reserve also has infestations of Ragwort, Mirror Bush, Sea Spurge, Butterfly Bush, Cape Ivy and Boneseed.

Figures 36 and 37: Cape ivy and a yellow succulent infestations

The Council will guide and educate TBFD on weed control and revegetation through this area in conjunction with on-ground works.

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Residents are not permitted to work in the coastal reserve without the Councils’ prior consent and are encouraged to work with an authorised environmental group not individually. Group working bees can be organised by the group on a regular basis and members of the public

are welcome to get involved in these working bees. Also if a resident is not a member of the

group they will be unable to undertake on-ground works as they will not be covered by insurance for personal accident and public liability.

Turners Beach Friends of the Dunes

members should be able to work in all areas of the reserve and not be confined to the patch in front of their property.

All works must be in conjunction with the Guidelines for the

Formation and Management of Volunteer Environmental Groups within the Central Coast Municipal Area 2010. Actions:

a) Prepare and implement an annual activity plan to address weed control, weed identification, revegetation etc.

b) Prepare and implement a long term action plan to address encroachment issues, beach accesses and revegetation.

4.5

Coastal Reserve Albert Street - Forth River (Area 4)

This is a strip of vegetation which extends from Albert Street to Gables Park including river and coastal reserve, a distance of approximately 1.4km. The width of this strip of vegetation varies from approximately 1m to 70m.

In places it has been susceptible to human

disturbance. A considerable amount of work is undertaken in this area by TBCC such as weed control, revegetation, spreading mulch and litter collection.

The objective for this area is to maintain and improve the native vegetation, park assets and the pathway.

Infrastructure and services located through this area include:       

A new toilet facility constructed in 2007

Three picnic shelters - two with barbecues Picnic tables

Open space grassed area Boat ramp and signage

Vegetation protection barriers

Five constructed beach accesses and one informal access point Sealed car park at East End Park

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Figures 15 and 16: Toilet Facility and the Barbeque Shelter along the Forth River

A pathway meanders from Gables Park northwards through the river reserve connecting up with the East End Park.

Parking exists along the eastern side of the Esplanade in bays that have been created by the installation of vegetation protection barriers. Parking is also provided at the toilet facility, barbeque shelter and boat ramp.

Figures 17 and 18: Turners Beach Boat Ramp and Parking

The constructed beach access situated adjacent to the barbeque shelter along the Forth River

is in good condition and currently requires minimal maintenance. A number of unauthorised river accesses have been cut through the vegetation. It is anticipated that the installation of vegetation protection barriers which demarcate the authorised accesses will assist with guiding users to them.

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Figures 19 and 20: Constructed and informal river access

‘No camping’ signage has been installed throughout the reserve. A number of rubbish bins

are located through the reserve and are situated in good positions close to facilities, boat ramp and the pathway. Dog tidy bags are also attached to a number of the bins.

Barriers have been installed between the road and coastal reserves to protect the vegetation

by defining parking areas. Issues have occurred in the past where vehicles have continually parked over vegetation causing degradation.

River bank erosion ranges from minimal to severe along the edge of the Forth River. Native climbing vegetation has been strategically planted through the section to assist in holding

the bank together. Blue stones have been placed in the past along the dune to assist with erosion.

The rocks have moved over time through tide and wave actions and require

replacement at the bottom of the dune.

Figure 21: Erosion control through revegetation

The East End Park covers an area of 660m from the mouth of the Forth River to the Albert Street access. It includes a picnic and playground area and a densely vegetated section of the dune system.

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Figures 22 and 23: Barbeque and picnic facilities

Figures 24, 25 and 26: Playground equipment

The constructed beach access located off the park provides a beach viewing platform catering for persons with limited mobility. This access is in good condition and does not appear to have been effected by recent high tide events.

Figures 27: Beach access and viewing platform from East End Park

The sealed car park providing for approximately ten vehicles requires resurfacing. Two bins are also located in the car park and one has dog tidy bags attached.

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Figure 28: East End Park car park

There are two constructed beach accesses located in the OC Ling Caravan Park which can be used by the public. Signage is required to identify available existing accesses. The eastern access is due for replacement in 2010/2011 with the western one being removed.

There has previously been encroachment issues associated with the Caravan Park with long

term residents cutting private access tracks through the reserve to the beach and increasing campsite areas. These activities will be monitored by the Central Coast Council and action taken as/when required.

The constructed beach access at the end of Albert Street is in good condition and has had the pathway adjacent sealed.

Figure 29: Albert Street beach access

Actions: a) Maintain recreational pathway adjacent to the Esplanade.

b) Review, rationalise and maintain constructed beach accesses as required. c) Monitor encroachment issues with the OC Ling Caravan Park.

d) Eradicate priority weeds and exotic plants and conduct regular weed maintenance.

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e) Undertake revegetation as required to further enhance the reserve and to thicken in f)

areas that have been degraded by vehicles and access tracks.

Assess and improve all reserve signage including dog notifications, boat ramp and reserve signage.

g) Continue to support and work with TBCC in preserving and maintaining this area. 4.6

Blackburn Drive Area (Area 5)

A narrow buffer of native vegetation stretches from Turners Beach Road to the Forth River.

This native green belt is framed by the railway line to the north and Blackburn drive to the south.

Although narrow this buffer occupies approx. 3600sq.m. and provides a corridor

allowing native fauna to move from Blackburn Drive through Gables Park and around the coastal reserve. Actions: a) Eradicate priority weeds and exotic plants and conduct regular weed maintenance.

b) Maintain buffer width and quality of habitat by undertaking revegetation works as required with species native to the area.

c) Monitor the illegal dumping of rubbish at Blackburn Drive and install appropriate signage where required.

d) Continue to support and work with TBCC in preserving and maintaining this area. 4.7

Custom Reserve (Area 6)

Turners Beach Coastcare Inc. has a long term lease with Crown Land Services for the management of Custom Reserve.

Refer to the Custom Reserve Management Plan 2007

prepared by TBCC (copies are available from the group).

The main objective of this management plan is to provide a well-managed, natural area that accommodates a diverse range of environmental and community needs.

Figure 14: Custom Reserve managed by TBCC

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4.8

Gables Park (Area 7)

Gables Park, comprising of 3.75ha, forms part of the Turners Beach Coastal Reserve. Gables

Park is a relatively flat area consisting of remnant native bushland and provides habitats for wildlife. Eucalyptus species including White Gum form a canopy over the park and native vegetation forms the understorey.

It is bordered by the Forth River estuary to the east,

residential housing to the north and wetlands to the west and south. Gables Park is easily accessible through the southern ends of either Lukin Street or the Esplanade.

Figure 9: Gables Park on the edge of the Forth River

The main objectives for the future management of Gables Park is to eradicate weeds and enhance the native vegetation to encourage native fauna and birds to inhabit the area and to provide a safe open space area for passive recreation such as walking or fishing. Gables Park will be maintained by the Central Coast Council with weed management support by TBCC. Infrastructure and services located at Gables Park include: 

Two picnic tables, one in excellent condition located next to the car park and the other in poor condition located towards the southern perimeter.

    

A potable water tap is located along the southern boundary. A place name sign.

James Fenton Memorial.

Car park located at the northern end of Gables Park off the Esplanade.

Authorised access for maintenance vehicles into Gables Park off the Esplanade.

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Figures 10 and 11: Picnic table and Car Park at Gables Park

Figures 12 and 13: Bluebell Creeper and Agapanthus infestations at Gables Park

The main weeds in the park are Agapanthus, Boneseed, Asparagus Fern, Three Cornered Garlic and Gorse.

The pathways through the park require rationalisation and upgrades.

The Gables Park

pathway network is connected to the Turners Beach foreshore through the Esplanade. The

park pathway also connects to the southern end of Lukin Street and to the track that traverses the wetland to link with the track that runs parallel with the Bass Highway.

Service vehicles access into the park will be maintained for a short distance, allowing sufficient room for a vehicle to undertake tree maintenance and fire management. River access for fishing should be monitored for erosion and safety. Gables Park is worthy of conservation as a natural bush area as there are very few patches of coastal White Gum forests left on the North West Coast. It has good biodiversity and with effective management and maintenance will continue to provide for passive recreation.

The maintenance of Gables Park includes pruning or removal of potentially dangerous trees overhanging any park furniture or pathways, weed control, grass slashing, revegetation and

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removal of bush litter as appropriate. The improvements will consist of upgrading pathways, signage and park furnishings. Actions: a) Clearly defined the pathway through Gables Park.

b) Enhance existing vegetation through revegetation where necessary. c) Continue weed control in conjunction with TBCC. d) Undertake grass slashing.

e) Improve signage and park furnishings. f)

Maintain river access for fishing.

g) Protect, restore and enhance the adjacent wetland area. 4.9

HW Braid Reserve (Area 8)

This reserve is the only open space/passive recreation area on the southern side of the Bass Highway.

The subdivision around the reserve is growing at a considerable rate and now

services over 150 residential properties with three accesses provided into the reserve. Various recreational activities are undertaken in the reserve.

The reserve covers an area of approximately 0.6ha that consists of two pieces of play equipment; a swing and a slide, a basketball half court and flat open space area for recreational purposes. A picnic table is also located in the reserve in close proximity to the

play equipment. There are two car parks providing spaces for approximately twelve cars adjacent to the reserve, one at Rose Court and Cordell Place. There is no bin provided.

Figure 42: H W Braid Reserve

There is also minimal vegetation surrounding and in the reserve, making it an area that would benefit from the Central Coast Council Tree Replacement Program. Actions: a) Undertake gorse control annually until adequately controlled.

b) Undertake further planting with native species around the perimeter of the park.

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4.10

Stubbs Road

A significant parcel of bush land featuring remnant native species of the Eucalyptus obliqua dry forest and woodland community remains on the southern side of Turners Beach. The bushland is significant from a skyline perspective and enhances the visual amenity of the area.

A buffer zone has recently been established between the Residential and Rural Resource zoned land at the base of Stubbs Hill.

This area is privately owned therefore fire management is the land owner’s responsibility. Land owners are encouraged to develop a fire management plan for their property in conjunction with the Tasmanian Fire service.

5 FIRE MANAGEMENT 5.1

General

5.1.1 Introduction

Residential properties in Turners Beach are set amongst the vegetation, therefore it is important to assess the surrounding vegetation and implement any fire management

strategies if required. The protection of life and property is always the number one priority. Whilst most native plant and animal communities have developed mechanisms to survive fires at intervals every 100 to 500 years. undergrowth can be susceptible to fire.

Vegetation communities with dry scrubby

5.1.2 Risk Management Approach

The fire management for the Turners Beach area broadly follows the 5Rs risk management framework recommended in the April 2004 Council of Australian Governments (COAG) national inquiry into bushfire mitigation and management (Ellis et al, 2004).

The COAG

report adapted this from the more common PPRR framework (Prevention, Preparedness, Response and Recovery) used for emergency management in Australia to fit the requirements of bushfire management. The 5Rs framework as stated in the COAG report is: 1. Research, information and analysis; 2. Risk modification; 3. Readiness;

4. Response; and 5. Recovery.

The COAG report also states that “Application of the 5Rs framework should be informed by a thorough understanding of the full range of assets that are threatened by bushfire; life and property, infrastructure and production systems, and environmental values.�

It should be

noted that this fire management plan is not an operations plan and does not deal directly

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with “response” to bushfires. Operational procedures are dealt with in various documents prepared by the Tasmanian Fire Service and other emergency services.

The fire threat to infrastructure and built assets such as dwellings can be reduced by creating

a buffer zone around the asset where fine fuel loads are maintained at low levels. Generally

these buffers consist of an inner zone around the asset with minimal fine fuel loads and an outer zone with reduced fine fuel loads within property boundaries.

The purpose of the

outer zone is to reduce the intensity of any bushfire approaching an asset. The purpose of the inner zone is to protect the asset from flame contact and intense radiant heat. The inner

zone is called the “building protection zone” and the outer zone the “fuel modified buffer zone”. The whole buffer can be termed a “defendable space”. Slashing, mowing or hand cutting of vegetation are generally the most effective methods for establishing and maintaining small defendable spaces around isolated assets or long narrow defendable spaces along urban/bushland perimeters.

Protection of other assets and values such as water catchments, views and threatened species is generally more difficult and requires strategies that minimise the risk of bushfires starting and spreading. The main strategies are to: 

Minimise the risk of bushfires igniting by removing or limiting as many potential causes of fire as possible.

Maximising the ability of fire suppression agencies to detect and control any bushfires that do start.

Maintaining fuel loads at a low level will limit the intensity and rate of spread of bushfires

and make it easier for fire brigades to control and suppress them. Prescribed burning is

generally the most effective way to reduce fuel loads over large areas or where other

methods of fuel management such as slashing are not feasible. However, there is always a risk of prescribed burns escaping control lines and becoming destructive bushfires.

In

addition some vegetation types accumulate fuel very rapidly and therefore require frequent

burning to maintain fuel reduced conditions. Frequent burning can have adverse side effect such as loss of plant communities and fauna habitat, increased erosion and loss of visual amenity.

5.1.3 Fire Service Act 1979

The main responsibilities of landowners/occupiers under the Fire Service Act, 1979 are: 

To take all reasonable precautions to prevent any fire lit on their property from spreading onto neighbouring land (s.63).

To take diligent steps to extinguish or control any unauthorised fire on their property

during a fire permit period and to report that fire to the Tasmania Fire Service or the Police (s.64).

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As well as the obligations that apply to all landowners/occupiers, the Central Coast Council has a number of specific powers and obligations under this Act. These are:  

To nominate a representative to sit on the local Fire Area Committee (s.55).

to “cause the formation in its municipal area of such fire breaks as it considers

necessary or desirable to arrest the spread or to facilitate the suppression of fires” (s.56). 

To contribute towards the operating costs of fire brigades (s.79 to 95).

It should also be noted that s.49 of the Act authorises officers of the Tasmanian Fire Service to enter and inspect land for any fire hazard. Where a fire hazard is detected the Act further empowers the State Fire Commission, or an authorised officer to:

“…by notice in writing given to the council of the municipal area in which that land is situated, require that local council to deal with the fire danger, within such reasonable

period of not less than 30 days as is specified in the notice, as if that fire danger were a nuisance under the Local Government Act, 1993…”

5.1.4 Fuel Types and Hazard Levels

The higher the intensity of a bushfire the greater its destructiveness and the more difficult it is to control. Fire intensity is a function of the heat content of the fuel, the quantity of fuel

(fuel load) and the rate of spread of the fire. The heat content of vegetation fuels is roughly constant so fire intensity is largely determined by slope and weather conditions (wind speed and relative humidity) and fuel quantity and distribution.

Fine fuels are the main factor influencing fire behaviour (larger fuels burn during a fire but do

not contribute significantly to the spread of the main fire front, though they may be a source

of embers that start spot fires ahead of the main fire front). Fine fuels consist of live and dead plant matter (including grasses, bracken, leaves, bark, twigs and branches).

This

measure normally includes any fine fuel in the understorey as well as litter on the ground. Fine fuel load (measured in tonnes per hectare) is therefore used as a convenient measure of the underlying fire hazard in a particular area.

The fine fuel load at any given time is a balance between the rate of fuel build up and factors

that remove fuel such as litter decomposition and fire. In the absence of fire, fuel loads build

up to a maximum level where the rate of fuel production equals the rate of decomposition.

This theoretical maximum varies for different vegetation types; however it is rare for dry eucalypt forests and woodlands to reach their maximum fuel loadings due to relatively frequent fires. Fine fuels over most of Turners Beach are predominately leaf litter, shrubs, trees, bracken and grasses in cleared areas.

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5.1.5 Fire Management Assets

Fire management assets are natural and man-made features that can assist with the control of bushfires. They include fire breaks, vehicle and foot access and water sources. Water lines and hydrant/valve locations are shown on Appendix E. It is important to note the difference between a “fuel break” or “firebreak” and a “defendable space”. A fuel break or firebreak is a strip of cleared or partly cleared vegetation constructed

and maintained to slow or stop the progress of a bushfire or to provide a control line for backburning or prescribed burning. Fuel breaks in grassland can be effective in stopping

fires if cleared down to mineral earth but where trees and shrubs are present windblown

burning embers will usually carry a bush fire across a fuel break if the wind is blowing the fire towards the break. Therefore in bushland with shrubs and trees the only benefit of a fuel break is to provide access for fire fighters and a boundary for backburning operations. Currently there are no standards or guidelines available for fuel breaks in Tasmania.

A defendable space is an area of managed vegetation around an asset likely to be at risk

from fire which protects it from direct flame contact and intense radiant heat as well as providing an area where fire fighters can defend the asset.

The Tasmania Fire Service

document Guidelines for Development in Bushfire Prone Areas of Tasmania recommends that a defendable space be established and maintained on the hazard side of dwellings in bushfire prone areas. The defendable space consists of an inner building protection zone

with minimal fine fuel, and an outer fuel modified buffer zone where fine fuel loads are kept in a reduced state.

The building protection zone provides a space around buildings with minimal fine fuel that

allows them to be defended from bushfires. It also reduces the risk of wind-blown burning debris from bushfires starting spot fires close to buildings. The building protection zone extends outwards from the walls of the building being protected.

The fuel modified buffer zone forms a concentric ring around the building protection zone

and has fine fuel loads reduced sufficiently to isolate the building protection zone from direct flame attack, radiant heat and the majority of wind borne burning embers. 5.2

Turners Beach Fire Plan

5.2.1 Scope

This Fire Plan applies to all public land in the Turners Beach area including the Turners Beach foreshore, Gables Park, Blackburn Drive. (See Appendix C).

5.2.2 Objectives

The objectives of the plan are to:

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 

Protect life, property and fauna from fire within the planned area;

Protect cultural and natural values within the plan areas from any adverse effects of fire;

Prevent the spread of fire from within the plan area on to adjoining land and from adjoining land onto the planned area.

The objectives of the plan are to be achieved by:    

Assessing and treating the risks posed by other fire hazards; To the values within the Turners Beach area;

External to the area that pose a risk to values within the area;

Ensuring there is adequate access and control lines to control fires that may start

around Turners Beach;  

Minimising the risk to built, natural and heritage assets within Turners Beach;

Updating plans as required, monitoring the assessment and treatment processes at

least every six months, reviewing the process at least every two years; 

Communicating and consulting with stakeholders at all stages of the Risk

Management Process;

Given the diverse nature of the hazards, risk and stakeholders within the area, several individual risk assessments may be required.

Where risks are shared between stakeholder groups, they will work collaboratively to manage the risks. 5.3

Turners Beach Fire Risk Assessment

The vegetation risk to the community and natural environment around Turners Beach has been appreciated for many years. Recent increases in subdivisions, construction of private dwellings and infrastructure lead land managers to commission this risk assessment in order to identify additional options for fire management and protection of local residents.

There have been a number of small coastal fires through the foreshore reserve over the

years, usually ignited by vandals. Fires have also occurred and been controlled around the Stubbs Road Area.

The Turners Beach water front reserve areas were assessed for risk through the Mersey

District Wildfire Treatment Strategy. This assessment determined that there would be a low impact level on the community should a fire start.

Risks (shown in Table 5) posed by fire were identified in the Turners Beach Area Risk Assessment 2009 as part of the Tasmanian Emergency Risk Management Project.

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Table 5: Risks identified in the Turners Beach Area Risk Assessment 2009 RISK ID

RISK STATEMENT

TB 02.01

There is a risk to residents’ lives and visitors’ lives within the Turners

TB 02.02

There is a risk of damage to the residents’ housing, businesses, and

TB 02.03

There is a risk to livestock and crops within the Turners Beach areas, as a

TB 02.04

There is a risk to recreational users within the Turners Beach areas as a

TB 02.05

There is a risk to sand dunes within the Turners Beach area as a result of

Beach area as a result of wildfires.

tourist accommodation within the area as a result of wildfires. result of wildfires. result of wildfires. fire also erosion.

Where a risk is owned by parties external to the organisation the treatment strategy requires the risk owner to be notified, and advised of the assessments outcomes and presented with

possible treatment options, however as owners of the risk they will be advised of their need to manage the risk themselves.

The Tasmanian Fire Service commenced in 2010 a 3-year bushfire planning project, called Community Protection Planning project.

The aim of the project is to enhance community resilience to bushfire. The method chosen to do this is to develop community protection plans for use by members of the community, TFS brigades and other stakeholders, particularly to protect vulnerable people and key

community assets when bushfires are burning out of control. Further information can be

obtained from Alexander Bigham on (03) 6336 5686 or Alexander.Bigham@fire.tas.gov.au 5.4

Fire Breaks/Fuel Modification and Trail

Following consultation with the Tasmanian Fire Service the following has been determined.

Existing fire breaks to be retained:  

Gables Park between Lukin Street and the Esplanade

Blackburn Drive in the form of the road reservation and the rail reservation

Proposed fuel modification buffer zones: 

western and eastern end of OC Ling Caravan Park

41


(Remove undergrowth and dead wood only and retain/re-establish trees within this area, 5m from either side of Caravan Park infrastructure)

Old fire trail (End of Lethborg Avenue, northern side of Groom Street): 

Retain the western end of trail for fire vehicle access. The remainder will be retained as a walking trail only.

The Tasmania Fire Service has recommended that the Council establish fuel reduction zones

either side of the OC Ling Caravan Park, in the case of a fire these zones are expected to slow down the speed and reduce the heat from the blaze. For the locations refer to Appendix D. Actions: a) Manage the volume of fine fuels (grasses, bracken, leaves, bark, twigs and branches)

with a clean-up of reserve/park areas annually. To be carried out prior to summer each calendar year in the months of September/October.

b) Control weeds in reserve/park areas.

c) Before and during every summer slash grasses in open areas, taking care of any revegetation or new native growth.

d) Establish and maintain fuel modification buffer zones

e) Properties on the northern side of the Esplanade shall have a defendable space within f)

the property boundary in accordance with the Tasmanian Fire Service.

Maintain fire breaks/fuel modification buffer zones in Turners Beach as required.

g) Retain the western end of the old fire trail for fire/service vehicle access. remainder will be retained as a walking trail only.

42

The


6 ACTION/IMPLEMENTATION PLAN Action

Action

By When

By Who

Completion Date

tree

Ongoing

CCC

April of each year

Undertake weed control of priority weeds

Ongoing

CCC

Undertaken twice

Ongoing

CCC/TBCC/TBFD

2012

CCC

Ongoing

CCC/CLS

Ongoing

CCC

Number

Comments

GENERAL 3.1 3.2

Undertake

assessments.

annual

urban

identified in Councils Weed Mapping Program. Engage

the

community

regarding

responsible use of the coastal reserve 3.3

and impacts of such activities as the dumping

of

garden

waste,

encroachments and the planting of nonnative species. 3.4

3.5 3.6

Undertake beach access assessment and carry

out

any

rationalisation

maintenance works identified.

and/or

Pursue the reduction in unauthorised access,

encroachments

etc.

conjunction with Crown Land Services.

in

Monitoring and responding to climate change.

yearly

As when

required


Clayton Wetland (Area 1) Continue 4.2

Ongoing

TBCC

Ongoing

TBCC/CCC

Undertake revegetation as required with

Ongoing

TBCC/CCC

Review and maintain constructed beach

Ongoing

CCC

Address

Ongoing

CCC

Ongoing

CCC

Coastcare

to

to

support

maintain

Turners this

Beach

area

in

accordance with the Clayton Wetland

Management Plan 2001. 4.3

COASTAL RESERVE LETHBORGE AVENUE (Area 2)

Eradicate 4.3a

plants

priority

and

weeds

conduct

and

regular

exotic weed

maintenance in conjunction with Turners Beach Coastcare.

4.3b 4.3c

4.3d

species native to the area. accesses.

residents

encroachment adjoining

the

issues

reserve

with

and

encourage residents to work with/join an environmental group.

4.3e

Continue to support and work with Turners Beach Coastcare in preserving and maintaining this area.

44


4.4

4.4a

4.4b 4.5 4.5a 4.5b 4.5c 4.5d

COASTAL RESERVE

TURNERS BEACH ROAD - ALBERT STREET (Area 3)

Prepare and implement an annual activity

July/August

TBFD/CCC

July/August

TBFD/CCC

Maintain recreational pathway adjacent

Ongoing

CCC

Review,

maintain

Ongoing

CCC

Monitor encroachment issues with the

Ongoing

CCC

Eradicate

Ongoing

TBCC/CCC

Ongoing

TBCC/CCC

2014

CCC

plan to address weed control, weed identification, revegetation etc.

Prepare and implement a long term action plan to address encroachment issues, beach accesses and revegetation. COASTAL RESERVE

FORTH RIVER (Area 4)

rationalise

OC Ling Caravan Park. priority

maintenance. Undertake

4.5e

and

constructed beach accesses as required.

and

2011

ALBERT STREET –

to the Esplanade.

plants

2011

weeds

conduct

revegetation

and

regular

exotic

works

weed as

required to further enhance the reserve and to restore areas that have been degraded by vehicles and access tracks.

4.5f

Assess and improve all reserve signage including dog notifications, boat ramp and park signage.

45


4.5g 4.6 4.6a

4.6b 4.6c 4.6d

Continue to support and work with

Ongoing

CCC

exotic

Ongoing

CCC

Maintain buffer width and quality of

Ongoing

CCC

Monitor the illegal dumping and install

Ongoing

CCC

Continue to support and work with

Ongoing

CCC

Turners Beach Coastcare in preserving and maintaining this area.

BLACKBURN DRIVE AREA – (Area 5) Eradicate plants

priority

and

maintenance. habitat

by

weeds

conduct

and

regular

undertaking

works as required.

weed

revegetation

appropriate signage where required.

Turners Beach Coastcare in preserving and maintaining this area.

CUSTOM RESERVE – (Area 6) 4.7 4.8 4.8a 4.8b 4.8c 4.8d

Tuners Beach Coastcare have a long term

TBCC

lease with Crown Land Services.

Custom Reserve Management Plan 2007 GABLES PARK – (Area 7)

Clearly defined the pathway through

2013

CCC

through

Ongoing

CCC

Continue weed control. In conjunction

Ongoing

TBCC/CCC

Gables Park. Enhance

existing

vegetation

revegetation where necessary. with TBCC.

Undertake grass slashing.

As required

46


4.8e 4.8f 4.8g 4.9 4.9a 4.9b 5

Install new place name sign and consider

As required

CCC

Ongoing

CCC

Undertake gorse control annually until

Ongoing

CCC

Undertake further planting with native

2013

CCC

Ongoing

CCC

Control weeds in reserve/park areas.

Ongoing

CCC

Before and during every summer slash

Ongoing

CCCC

installing interpretive signage including items of significance.

Maintain river access for fishing. Protect, restore and enhance the adjacent wetland area

H W BRAID RESERVE – (Area 8) adequately controlled.

species around the perimeter of the park within budget constraints. FIRE MANAGEMENT Manage the volume of fine fuels (grasses, bracken,

branches) a

Esplanade annually.

leaves, with and

a

bark,

twigs

clean-up

reserve/

park

of

and

the

areas

To be carried out prior to summer each calendar

year

in

September/October. b c

the

months

of

long grass along the reserve and in open

areas, taking care not to trim native vegetation.

47


Establish fuel modification buffer zones d

identified by the Tasmania Fire Service

2011

CCC

Ongoing

Residents in

(at the east and west end of the OC Ling Caravan Park).

Properties on the northern side of the e

Esplanade shall have a defendable space within

the

property

boundary

in

liaison with TFS

accordance with Tasmanian Fire Service requirements.

f

Maintain firebreaks/buffer zones/access track in Turners Beach as required.

As required

48

CCC


7 REFERENCES Australian Plant Society Tasmania Inc. (2004) Are you Growing Invaders Booklet, Australian Plants Society Tasmania Inc.

Brownlea, Stuart. (1999) Pre-European Vegetation in the Ulverstone Region, University of Tasmania, Hobart

Ellis, B. (1988) Ulverstone and Outline of its History, Geneva Press, Latrobe Lyndall, R. (1981) The Aboriginal Tasmanians, St Lucia: University of Queensland Press Lincolne, T. (2004) Leven River Precinct Study, Sinclair Knight Merz

Threatened Species Protection Act 1995 Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 Weed Management Act 1999 Ellis S., Kanowski P. and Whelan R. (2004) National Inquiry on Bushfire Mitigation and

Management, Commonwealth of Australia, Canberra.

(2009) Dodges Ferry Recreation Reserve Fire Management Plan, AVK Environmental Management, Tasmania.

Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment- Natural Values Atlas Mersey District Wildfire Treatment Strategy Povey A. and Morgan H. (2005) Custom Reserve Flora Survey and Management Plan Blake G. (2005) Turners Beach Fauna Values and Management Recommendations Fitzgerald N. (2001) Botanical Survey of eastern part of Turners Beach Coastal Reserve


Appendix A: Central Coast Municipal Area Locality Plan


Appendix B: Turners Beach Locality Plan

51


Appendix C: Turners Beach Parks and Reserves

52


Appendix D: Turners Beach Fire breaks and fuel modification zones

53


Appendix E: Turners Beach Water Lines

54


Appendix F: Native plant species of Turners Beach GRASSES, SEDGES AND RUSHES Common name

Scientific name

Carex appressa var virgata

Tall Sedge

Carex pumila

Dune Sedge

Cyperus lucidus

Leaf-rush

Gahnia filum

Chaffy Saw-sedge

Gahnia grandis

Cutting Grass

Isolepis nodosa

Club Rush

Lepidosperma

Hill Sword-sedge

Lepidosperma ensiforme

Sword-sedge

Lepidosperma gladiatum

Coast Sword-sedge

Spinifex sericeus

Beach Spinifex

Austrostipa stipoides

Coastal Spear Grass

Distichlis distichophylla

Australian Salt Grass

Lagurus ovatus

Hare’s-tail Grass

Phragmites australis

Common Reed

Poa labillardierei

Tussock Grass

Poa poiformis

Blue Tussock Grass

Juncus australis

Austral Rush

Juncus kraussii

Sea Rush

Juncus pallidus

Rush

Luzula flaccida

Flaccid Luzula

Pterostylis sp.

Greenhood

Thelymitra sp.

Sun Orchid

Lomandra longifolia

Sagg

55


Pteridium esculentum

Austral Bracken

Dianella tasmanica

Flax Lily

Dianella revoluta

Flax Lily

Geranium potentilloides

Native Geranium

Selliera radicans

Swamp-weed

Apium prostratum

Sea Parsley

Samolus repens

Creeping Brookweed

Drosera peltate subsp. auriculata

Tall Sundew

Potamogeton sp.

Pondweed

Hibbertia sericea

Silky Guinea Flower Herbs and Creepers

Stylidium graminifolium

Grass Trigger Plant

Geranium potentilloides

Native Geranium

Limonium australe

Yellow sealavender

Epilobium pallidiflorum

Showy Willowherb

Gonocarpus teucrioides

Raspwort

Carpobrotus rossii

Native Pigface

Tetragonia implexicoma

Ice Plant

Tetragonia tetragonoides

New Zealand Spinach

Apium prostratum

Filiforme Sea Celery

Hymenanthera dentata

Tree Violet

Glycine clandestina

Twining Glycine

Acaena novae-zelandiae

Buzzy

Rubus parvifolius

Native Raspberry

Clematis aristata

Australian Clematis

Kennedia prostrata

Running Postman

56


Shrubs

Lotus australis

Australian Trefoil

Atriplex cinerea

Grey Saltbush

Einadia nutans ssp.

Climbing Saltbush

Rhagodia candolleana

Seaberry Saltbush

Pimelea linifolia

Slender Rice Flower

Pimelea glauca

Smooth Rice Flower

Billardiera mutabilis

Apple-berry

Pimelea humilis

Dwarf Rice Flower

Pimelea nivea

Round-leaf Rice Flower

Leucopogon australis

Spike Beard-Heath

Epacris impressa

Common Heath

Leucopogon ericoides

Pink Beard-heath

Leucopogon parviflorus

Coast Beard-heath

Coprosma quadrifida

Native Currant

Correa alba

White Correa

Stellaria pugens

Prickly Starwort

Aotus ericoides

Golden Pea

Dichondra repens

Kidney Weed

Ipomoea brasiliensis

Beach Morning Glory

Indigofera australis

Native Indigo

Pultenaea daphnoides

Native Daphne

Pomaderris apetala

Dogwood

Cassinia aculeata

Dolly Bush

Olearia phlogopappa

Daisy Bush

57


Trees

Acacia melanoxylon

Blackwood

Acacia retinoides

Wirilda

Acacia sophorae

Coastal Wattle

Acacia verticillata

Prickly Mimosa

Acacia dealbata

Silver Wattle

Allocasuarina littoralis

Black Sheoak

Allocasuarina verticillate

Sheoak

Eucalyptus amygdalina

Black Peppermint

Eucalyptus obliqua

Stringy Bark

Eucalyptus ovata

Swamp/Black Gum

Eucalyptus viminalis

Manna/White Gum

Leptospermum laevigatum

Coastal Tea-Tree

Melaleuca ericifolia

Swamp Paperbark

Myoporum insulare

Boobyalla

Banksia marginata

Silver Banksia

Exocarpos cupressiformis

Native Cherry

Billardiera scandens

Apple-berry

Bursaria spinosa

Prickly Box

Ozothamnus ferrugineus

Tree Everlasting

Senecio minimus

Shrubby Fireweed

58

Profile for Cradle Coast Authority

Turners Beach Vegetation & Fire Management Plan  

Turners Beach Vegetation & Fire Management Plan

Turners Beach Vegetation & Fire Management Plan  

Turners Beach Vegetation & Fire Management Plan