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2016 2017

CRADLE COAST NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

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Cradle Coast Authority NRM Annual Report 2016-2017 Copyright © Cradle Coast Authority 2017 No part of the publication may be reproduced without the express prior permission of the publisher. Published by: Cradle Coast Authority PO Box 338, Burnie TAS 7320 Ph: 03 6433 8400 nrm@cradlecoast.com www.cradlecoastnrm.com www.facebook.com/cradlecoastnrm This report is produced to fulfil the statutory reporting obligation of the Cradle Coast Authority’s NRM Committee under the Tasmanian Natural Resource Management Act 2002. The Committee is required to report on it activity to the Minister for Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment. The report covers the period from July 1, 2016 to June 30, 2017. The Cradle Coast Authority’s NRM Committee acknowledges the financial support provided to it by the Australian and Tasmanian Governments and the nine local governments of north-west Tasmania.


CONTENTS 4-5

Foreword

7

Introduction

8-10

Cradle Coast NRM Staff and Committee

12

Cradle Coast NRM Manager Report

14

Cradle Coast NRM Strategy Summary Cradle Coast NRM 2016/2017 Program Overview

15

Sustainable Environment

16-19

Restoring and Maintaining Urban Waterways and Coastal Environments

20-23

Conserving and Protecting Eco-Systems

24-28

Community Skills, Knowledge and Engagement Program

29

Building Indigenous People’s Capacity in NRM

30-31

Sustainable Agriculture

32

Regional Landcare Facilitator

33

Productive Landscapes Program

34-41

Cradle Coast NRM Financial Statements

42

Thank You

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

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FOREWORD Chair’s Report 2016-17 Cradle Coast Regional Natural Resource Management Committee

Identifying regional priorities for Natural Resource Management The 2015-2020 Strategy document identifies regional priorities for natural resource management and will be used to guide planning and investment in our region over coming years. The Australian Government’s National Landcare Program 2 (NLP2) is due to commence in July 2018 and will be a key source of NRM investment in our region. Indications are that total program funding will be less than previous years and it is expected the new program will also be more competitive, as the Australian Government seeks greater efficiencies. Facilitating the implementation of the Regional Strategy and monitoring and evaluating the implementation of the Regional Strategy Our staff have been developing a range of plans based on the priorities identified in the 2015-2020 Strategy document. This work will be developed into a Regional Investment Plan (RIP) to support future investment opportunities including the Australian Government’s NLP2 funding round 2018-2023.

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Promoting Natural Resource Management principles and developing and implementing processes to ensure appropriate education and training in Natural Resource Management Education and capacity building continued to be well supported during the year with a particularly successful “Kids Teaching Kids” event which was attended by 250 primary school children, from seven Primary Schools from the north-west region. Community forums on NRM topics including: fungi, giant freshwater lobsters, Tasmanian devils and shorebirds were also very popular. Facilitate the integration of Natural Resource Management and planning activities for the north-west region This year staff have increased their engagement with Cradle Coast Councils to create more opportunities for cooperation and collaboration to achieve successful NRM outcomes across the region. This work was best highlighted by the collaborative efforts to support the flood recovery process which has continued throughout the year. Seeking, managing and allocating funds according to the Regional Strategy The 2016-17 year was the fourth year of the current five-year NLP funding round. The roll out of contracted programs has continued

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

with many of the highlights in this period described in detail in this annual report. The longer-term funding has also allowed us to continue to develop and build our relationship with the Australian Government and as we enter the final year of delivery we look forward to sharing the outcomes and learnings of the program. Coordinating the region’s participation in national and state programs relating to Natural Resource Management The announcement that the National Landcare Program will continue beyond June 2018 has come as welcome news and it is also encouraging that the State Government has committed to support Regional NRM for another two years. This level of support is very important but we are also aware of the need to continually evolve to meet our investor and community needs. We undertook our second iteration of an independent Organisational Performance Excellence review in this period and will use the review to continue to improve some areas of our performance and further develop our strengths. Changes in Committee membership Terms of four Committee members expired during the year and long-term members, Rick Rockliff, Sue Jennings and Bill Walker were not reappointed. We will miss their experience and wise counsel in our deliberations.


New members appointed were Rachel Brown, Linda Overend and Kurt De Jonge. They have brought with them a new range of qualifications, experience and views to Committee discussions. Helen Strickland, a long-term member from King Island, resigned during the year and we will also miss her contribution, particularly her knowledge of regional NRM and the Tasmanian dairy industry. I thank all Committee members for their participation and support.

the support for the flood recovery processes in our region and the ongoing work that lies ahead.

Meeting attendance CCNRM Committee Members 2016/17 Eligible to Attended attend

Member

On behalf of the Committee I thank our north-west regional community members, industry members and government agencies who continue to provide us and our staff with so much support and active participation in our shared vision for our regional NRM activities and outcomes.

Mr Rick Rockliff 1 Mr Tony Moore Ms Helen Strickland

1

6

6

4

4

Mr Peter Tyson

6

6

Mr Peter Voller

6

6

6

5

Mr Guy Grey

Tony Moore Committee Chair

1

Ms Sue Jennings

2

1

1

Dr Gemma Lewis

6

6

Outlook

Mr Bill Walker

1

0

As we enter the next phase of funding programs we are very aware that we must continue to evolve our delivery to meet the expectations and needs of our community and investors. Every iteration of funding brings new challenges and with diminishing budgets we need to continue to seek efficiencies and improve effectiveness across our delivery. The level of collaboration, innovation and cooperation with our partners, particularly the three Tasmanian NRM organisations, is likely to increase to ensure that the regions receive the necessary funding to achieve our strategic, long-term, and landscapescale NRM outcomes.

Mr Kurt De Jonge

5

5

Ms Clarissa Forster

5

4

Ms Rachel Brown

5

5

4

Ms Linda Overend

5

5

3

4

Ceased October 2016 Ceased April 2017 3 Ceased October 2016 4 Ceased October 2016 5 Ceased September 2017 1 2

I would like to acknowledge and thank Minister Matthew Groom for his support in this period and welcome Minister Jeremy Rockliff, as the new Minister responsible for NRM. In particular, we have appreciated

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

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CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17


INTRODUCTION The Cradle Coast Authority’s NRM team works with the communities and industry of Tasmania’s north-west and west coasts and King Island to manage natural resources, such as land, water and coasts, to ensure a sustainable future for the region. Cradle Coast NRM supports community and industry projects, facilitates funding, and coordinates natural resource activities and information sharing. The Cradle Coast region’s natural resources and landscapes sustain primary industries; provide clean water, air and homes for a diverse range of animal and plant communities. The Cradle Coast region is bounded by 2640km of coastline and covers approximately one-third of Tasmania. The region stretches from Narawntapu National Park in the east, to King Island and Cape Grim in the far north west and to Port Davey in the south. The region incorporates the nine local government municipalities of Burnie City, Central Coast, Circular Head, Devonport City, Kentish, King Island, Latrobe, Waratah-Wynyard and West Coast.

Opposite: Frogs, Pine Road Riana Photo by: Geoff Gleave

In 2000, these nine local government municipalities established a regional organisation known as the Cradle Coast Authority to provide a regional voice for north-west Tasmania. The Cradle Coast Authority’s NRM Committee is an independent committee hosted by the Cradle Coast Authority. The Cradle Coast NRM Annual Report for 2016/2017 outlines the achievements of natural resource management activities within the Cradle Coast region. Additional copies of this report can be found at www.cradlecoastnrm.com For information on the objectives and strategic direction of natural resource management in the Cradle Coast, refer to the 2015-2020 Cradle Coast Regional Natural Resource Management Strategy also available from www.cradlecoastnrm.com

Currie Naracoopa Grassy

Stanley Smithton

rd nya e ni Bur

Wy

Marrawah

e ton nport ers Ulv Devo

Waratah Cradle Valley Zeehan Queenstown Strahan

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

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STAFF Cradle Coast NRM staff have expertise in agriculture, water, coastal and biodiversity management, monitoring and mapping, and community engagement. They identify regional natural resource management priorities, prepare regional strategies, promote NRM principles and support the implementation of NRM activities. Cradle Coast NRM is a business unit based within the Cradle Coast Authority. The Authority is responsible for providing services including economic development, tourism and natural resource management across the north-west region of Tasmania.

Grant Pearce – Manager: strategy and implementation

Brett Smith – Chief Executive Officer

Richard Ingram – NRM Manager

Is responsible for leading the Cradle Coast Authority’s services and functions including Cradle Coast NRM.

Leads the team and is the link between the Cradle Coast NRM Committee, Cradle Coast Authority and industry stakeholders.

Tom O’Malley – Regional Landcare Facilitator

Anna Wind – Coordinator: Coastal

Mark Wisniewski – Manager: Information

Heads the Coastal, Estuarine and Marine and Community Skills, Knowledge and Engagement programs.

Manages spatial and information systems to support NRM project delivery, reporting and strategic objectives.

Develops strategies and programs that align science, community and stakeholder aspirations with State and Commonwealth funding.

This information reflects the team composition at 30 June 2017.

Facilitates community access to skills and knowledge related to sustainable land management practices.

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CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17


Spencer Gibbs – Operations Manager Manages the NRM team to deliver a regional NRM works program.

Hannah Sadler – Project Officer Supports a range of projects including small grants programs, sustainable agriculture projects and the youth education.

Will Hogg – Coordinator: Biodiversity Heads projects to protect healthy ecosystems by monitoring threatened flora and fauna species, protection of conservation areas and community education.

Iona Flett – Project Officer Manages projects funded under the National Landcare Program – Farm Conservation Grants, Coastal Land Manager Grants, and Natural Connections Grants.

Claire Smith – Corporate Services Manager

Jemma O’Neill – Business Support Officer

Leads and manages corporate service function including financial control and management, risk and human resource management.

Provides Financial, payroll and human resources support for the NRM team.

Dionna Newton – Project Officer: Coastal, Estuarine and Marine

Sherrie Jaffray – Project Officer: Community Education

Facilitates coastal, estuarine and marine projects, supports community groups and programs.

Works with school groups and youth organisations and supports community groups to facilitate environmental education.

Lauren Clarke – Reception and Administrative Support Officer

Catherine Gale-Stanton – Communications and Media Officer

Provides general administrative support for the NRM team.

Provides media and communications support for the NRM team.

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

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CRADLE COAST NRM COMMITTEE The Cradle Coast Regional NRM Committee is a sub-committee of the CCA Board, declared to be a regional committee for the region by the Tasmania Minister responsible for NRM. The Committee guides NRM projects, defines priorities and, as required, oversees regional NRM strategic planning in accordance with the Tasmanian Natural Resource Management act.

Mr Tony Moore – Chairman

Ms Clarissa Forster – Committee Member

Ms Linda Overend – Committee Member

Ms Helen Strickland – Committee Member

Dr Gemma Lewis – Committee Member

Mr Peter Tyson – Committee Member

Committee members are appointed by a selection panel established through a public process for a term of up to three years. Tasmania has 3 Natural Resource Management Committees established under the Tasmanian Natural Resource Management Act 2002 to represent the South, North and Cradle Coast (North West) regions of the state.

Additional Committee Member: Guy Grey

Mr Kurt de Jonge – Committee Member

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CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

Peter Voller – Committee Member Opposite: Irrigators Pine Road Riana Photo by: Geoff Gleave


CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

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NRM MANAGER REPORT The 2016/17 year started with the challenge of supporting our community and partner agencies in responding to the unprecedented June floods. Unfortunately, as flood recovery efforts began, we endured subsequent flood events in our region, further compounding the impact on our community, primary producers and environment. While devastating in so many ways, it was pleasing to see the remarkable response from across our community in support of those affected, and strong support from both State and Australian Governments for post-flood recovery activities. As we continue with the recovery process, it is clear there will be no quick fix and it will take many years of concerted and collaborative efforts to restore our landscapes and increase the resilience of our river systems that are valued for their economic, social and environmental benefits. The scale of the recovery period only serves to reinforce the need for long-term planning and working together as a community on common goals. Despite the challenges there have also been some great outcomes in this period, and the partnerships

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with community and industry have driven this success. Highlights include the collaboration with Dairy Tas and the farming community on the Fert$mart program which delivered economic and environmental gains through reductions and efficiencies in fertiliser use. Working with community, industry and volunteers on the Macquarie Harbour clean-up also proved successful in a social and environmental context, and it’s a program we hope to support expansion of in future. We even explored the depths of our marine environment through the work of the Reef Life Survey volunteers who are monitoring marine species on our rocky reefs, and discovered several new species arriving and establishing in Tasmanian waters. Our community orientated programs continued to be well supported and in many cases oversubscribed. Our education and awareness programs including our public information evenings on Threatened Species and Kids Teaching Kids school program enjoyed record attendances. The Rural Living Roundup was again well attended and has proven to be a great conduit for small landholders to enlist for our property management planning activities.

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

With waiting lists required across these activities we will be looking at options for future programs. As we enter the final year of our major funding program we have already begun developing plans based on the current Regional NRM Strategy to guide future investment in the region. We will also be looking to review the projects we have undertaken in recent years against our intended outcomes, to inform improvements and continue to work with our partners and community to build on our successes. In concluding my report, I would like to acknowledge and thank those staff who contributed so much to the region in this period, including valued colleagues Will Hogg, Sherrie Jaffray and Ernst Kemmerer who have now left . I would also like to again acknowledge the amazing community within which we work, who responded so positively to the adversity of the floods and continue to support and participate in natural resource management in our region. Richard Ingram Manager, NRM

Opposite: Pearshape lagoon


CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

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CRADLE COAST NRM STRATEGY 2015-2020 The Review of the Cradle Coast NRM Strategy in 2015 helps to inform the next five years of natural resource management for our community and stakeholders.

PURPOSE OF THE STRATEGY The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Strategy for Cradle Coast 2015–2020 is to guide activity that will help manage and improve the natural resources in the North West of Tasmania. It is a whole-of-community Strategy that identifies the social, economic and environmental values of the region and outlines how the community can work together to manage and improve its condition. The Strategy does not have statutory power or replace any current mechanism or policy relating to natural resource management but encourages partnerships between community, industry and Government.

VISION The Vision for natural resource management in the Cradle Coast region is:

To have proactive, vibrant communities who protect and advocate environmental, social and economic progress for a sustainable and bright future for our region.

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HOW THE STRATEGY SUPPORTS THIS VISION The Strategy supports this Vision by: • Providing a guide to anyone living or working in the region to engage in activities that promote and foster healthy natural resource management; • Outlining the current condition of the region’s natural resources, so we can build on previous achievements and recognise key areas for future activities, increasing the community’s awareness and capacity to manage natural resources; • Identifying the main threats and issues facing these resources, so we can plan preventative actions and implement restorative works where necessary; • Setting out what is known about the resources, so we are working from a common understanding and can help to fill any knowledge gaps and share knowledge from past experience; • Having focus areas for action so we know what we are working towards; and • Providing a summary of community priorities for the region based on state and regional surveys and workshops.

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

The Strategy is available to download at cradlecoastnrm.com


SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENT CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

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RESTORING AND MAINTAINING URBAN WATERWAYS AND COASTAL ENVIRONMENTS

ABOUT: In partnership with regional public land managers and key stakeholder organisations, Cradle Coast NRM delivers a targeted grant program to decrease key threats to coastal and waterway environments. Projects deliver improved access management, weed control, interpretation signage and protect threatened species and geo-heritage sites in reserves, National Parks and areas of high conservation value.

223

6

hectares

volunteers

land manager

Marine debris

4

182

of waterways fenced to protect riparian vegetation

treated for weeds

of high priority coastal and urban waterway environments protected and restored

removed from

267 Ha to protect threatened species

3

flora

surveys undertaken

16

56

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

participated in project activities

kilometres

grants funded

hectares


KEY PROJECT | MACQUARIE HARBOUR CLEAN-UP ABOUT: A shoreline clean-up of unparalleled proportions was completed at Macquarie Harbour and Ocean Beach. Covering 80kms of shoreline, more than 80 people removed more than 55 cubic metres of marine debris over 5 days.

The clean-up event was a collaborative eort supported by the aquaculture industry and major stakeholders and has protected marine life from entanglement and ingestion of plastics and cleaned up Strahan’s waterways. Project partners that participated in the Macquarie Harbour Shoreline Clean-up were Cradle Coast NRM, Conservation Volunteers Australia, Wildcare, Parks and Wildlife Service, Tassal, Petuna, Huon Aquaculture, West Coast Yacht Charters, Active Strahan, Strahan Village, the community and West Coast Council.

5

day event

55

80

80

helped to remove rubbish

shoreline covered

people

Marine debris collected from

kilometres

cubic metres

15

5000+ pieces

1700+ plastic

700

540

of rubbish removed

bottles

shoreline locations

cans

of rope were collected

glass bottles

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

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KEY PROJECT | FLOOD RECOVERY ABOUT: In June 2016, record-breaking rainfall delivered some of the worst floods Tasmania has seen. NRM South, NRM North and Cradle Coast NRM worked with the Tasmanian Government to provide some of the affected landowners across the State with advice on rehabilitation work required along riverbanks or on adjacent to their properties. Cradle Coast NRM in particular provided invaluable support, stepping outside their normal scope of business to undertake impact assessments on many rural and remote properties in the north-west. The Taskforce was able to use this spatial data to help form an accurate picture of flood damage, and where support was needed. Cradle Coast NRM also worked closely with Conservation Volunteers Australia to identify suitable small reparation projects that could be undertaken or supported by volunteers. In addition, the NRMs were able to use their established local networks to share information from the Taskforce on available assistance and support.

More than

1000 properties

across 9 north-west catchments were affected

4

information workshops

organised by NRM staff across the three worst flood-affected catchments

2

NRM staff

dedicated to assisting north-west landholders

A GIS spatial tool

was developed to identify flood

damage impacts and prioritise resources. Information was incorporated into the final report of the Tasmanian Flood Recovery Taskforce: From Floods Into Recovery

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CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

Base image from Esri, DigitalGlobe, Base data from theLIST © State of Tasmania


CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

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CONSERVING AND PROTECTING ECOSYSTEMS

ABOUT: This program strives to maintain and enhance natural values throughout north-west Tasmania, and

primarily focuses on plants, animals and waterway management. This is delivered through the Biodiversity program, which partners with a large range of stakeholders and the community to deliver a suite of environmental and conservation projects throughout the region.

314

203

1000

7

5

716

native vegetation fencing

surveys undertaken

species records

hectares

treated for weeds

kilometres

volunteers

fauna

1804

2

animals recorded

surveys undertaken

individual

flora

plants planted

fauna

1208 1207

flora

species records

individual plants recorded 20

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17


The Vale of Belvoir is home to one of the densest populations of carnivorous marsupials in the world. Securing of this valley would be the Tasmanian conservation triumph of the 21st century. Professor Jamie Kirkpatrick, UTAS

KEY PROJECT | Devils @ Cradle VALE of BELVOIR ABOUT: With a little help from infra-red cameras and a team of volunteers, Devils@Cradle has successfully captured a third season of Tasmanian Devil data within the tussock grasslands of the Vale of Belvoir.

The grassland habitat is home to one of the world’s most concentrated populations of marsupial carnivores, including the endangered Tasmanian Devil and vulnerable Spotted-tailed Quoll. The project monitors impacts of devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) and provides indication of other feral/invasive species.

20

infrared cameras

spread across survey area at 10 different sites

2089 observations

of all animal species (a large number of these were Wombats, Pademelons and Bennett’s Wallabies due to the grassland environment)

Has involved volunteers from

around the world

63

13

Tasmanian Devil

Eastern Quoll

2

4

observations

observations and 40 individuals

Spotted-Tailed Quolls

feral cats recorded

(both in different areas)

2 20

The conservation of EPBC listed species demonstrably improved

Funded collaboratively by Cradle Coast NRM, UTAS and Save The Tasmanian Devil Program

by engaging volunteers to undertake actions to reduce threats

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

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KEY PROJECT | GIANT FRESHWATER LOBSTER AND WATER QUALITY MONITORING ABOUT: To raise awareness of threatened species and the role of ecosystems that support the survival of the iconic and vulnerable Giant Freshwater Lobster.

Capacity building activities have been provided for community members to support their participation in river management and Giant Freshwater Lobster conservation.

GFL expert Todd Walsh

trained volunteers to undertake habitat assessments

11

days of surveys at four sites

22

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

60

lobsters

captured and released

27

new volunteers trained

Development of

citizen science

data collection methods

Giant Freshwater Lobster (Astacopsis gouldi) Photo by: Ali Dugand


CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

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COMMUNITY SKILLS, KNOWLEDGE AND ENGAGEMENT PROGRAM ABOUT: This program is designed to increase community skills, knowledge and engagement across four project areas: Community Group Support, Citizen Science, Youth Education and Community Education Projects. The Cradle to Coastlines print and e-newsletter features stories of these projects, spreading the education message even further into the community. Natural Connections Grants provided project funding to King Island NRM Group, Bookend Trust, Friends of Narawntapu, Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre, Six Rivers Aboriginal Corporation, Oldina Landcare, Ulverstone Coastcare, Circular Head Landcare Somerset Primary School, Mt Roland Rivercare, Friends of Lobster Ponds and Andrews Creek Primary School.

63

2627

participation events

engaged in project activities

community

60

volunteers

participated in shorebird monitoring activities

24

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

participants

6

community

groups provided with Community Group sponsorship

1163

students

engaged in youth education sessions

$64,086 funded

for community group projects


KEY PROJECT | BIOBLITZ ABOUT: More than 200 people joined in the BioBlitz Extinction Matters at Bells Parade, Latrobe in September

coordinated by the Bookend Trust. The aim of BioBlitz was to raise awareness of threatened species within the community and see how many species could be found over a 30-hour period in the vicinity of Dooleys Hill and Pig Island.

228

participants

235

5

45

68

120

invertebrates

dierent species were counted, including 213 species not previously found at the site

vertebrates

threatened species

plants and fungi were identified by 29 scientists and naturalists

167

This major event could not have been delivered without support from

participated from 8 schools

and funding from Cradle Coast NRM’s Natural Connections Community grant

students

19 organisations

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

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KEY PROJECT | KIDS TEACHING KIDS ABOUT: Our Youth Education Program, engages schools and the wider community of young people in activities and information sessions that will promote environmental awareness and invoke passion to make a dierence in their communities. Cradle Coast NRM has facilitated the Kids Teaching Kids event on the North-West Coast since 2014. In 2016, primary school students across the NW Coast gathered at Camp Clayton to engage in environmental education and improved environmental stewardship. Kids learn from other kids about environmental issues. The project supports Cradle Coast NRM objectives and brings communities together.

230

7

students

Students and teachers unite to learn from each other while

having fun

schools

(Yolla District High School, Sassafras, Somerset, Burnie, Havenview, Cooee and Boat Harbour Primary Schools)

Workshop topics:

Tassie

animals in danger

26

Human

impact on plants

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

Animals

and

water warriors


This partnership is beneficial as it facilitates valuable and potentially opinion-changing conversations with the communities of NorthWestern Tasmania, Discovery Ranger Emily.

KEY PROJECT | DISCOVERY RANGER ABOUT: The 2016-2017 Parks and Wildlife Service Discovery Ranger Program reached out to the Tasmanian

community and visitors to the state through public events and interactions both on and o Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) managed lands. Our highly skilled Discovery Rangers add value to the experience of visitors through their personal interpretive interactions, enhanced by their extensive knowledge of Tasmania’s natural and cultural values.

925

22

participants

sessions delivered

Discovery Rangers focused on: Tasmanian

Devils

and reducing road-kill

Twilight adventures Spotlighting and protection of Shearwaters and feral cat awareness

Nesting shorebirds particularly the Hooded Plover and the Red-Capped Plover

Marine debris plastic pollution

Leave No Trace

camping Rockpool Rambles, Global Warming and Plastics and Introduced species

Mini-beast safari

(insects and eco-systems)

and ingestion, Whale of a Time

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

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KEY PROJECT | REEF LIFE SURVEY ABOUT: Reef Life - Citizen Science Monitoring Marine Biodiversity dive surveys were completed at Rocky Cape.

The coastal habitat between Boat Harbour and Rocky Cape in Tasmania’s north-west has been recommended as a Marine Protected Area. It has very high fish diversity, geomorphological diversity and is the only extensive reef system in the region that has not been severely degraded by pollution and fishing. It is also oshore from a National Park.

10

volunteer divers

engaged in a 4-day training course to survey reef fauna near Rocky Cape

28

surveys

at 8 sites recorded 51 species of fish and 41 species of mobile invertebrates

The survey

methodology included 52 transects along 50m dividing lines covering 26,000m2 of reef. 45,314 counts were made of 101 species of fish, invertebrates and mammals, making it the most comprehensive documentation of reef fauna undertaken in this area. Fish were recorded within 5m of the line (including size estimates) and invertebrates within 1m

28

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

The Rocky Cape marine environment has been recommended for annual monitoring. Accumulated knowledge will assist management of nearshore marine ecosystems

Photos

of the sea bed

were taken every 2.5m to record the cover of seaweed and invertebrates


BUILDING INDIGENOUS PEOPLE’S CAPACITY IN NRM ABOUT: This program is an iterative consultation with the Aboriginal Community to develop relationships,

partnerships and ultimately build capacity in the community to participate in NRM activities. This work is strongly focused on maintaining and developing our relationships with Aboriginal organisations. The program will include: training and support for land management practices (including traditional fire management), development of capacity and skills necessary to monitor and evaluate the program, facilitate broader networks and partnership opportunities and building cultural knowledge and awareness.

volunteers

29

18

12

47

participating in project activities

new participants

44

Indigenous participants at project activities

2

community

on-country

groups

2

2

4

involving the sharing of Indigenous knowledge

treated for weeds

participation and engagement events

activities

run or organised by Indigenous people

2

visits involving both older and younger people together

activities

supported financially

hectares

activities

involved Indigenous knowledge being documented CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

29


SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE

30

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17


KEY PROJECT | DAIRY PROGRAM ABOUT: The Dairy Program includes both Clean Rivers (small grants program) and the Fert$mart Program.

Fert$mart is designed to promote best practice nutrient management to improve use efficiency and profitability, to improve soil health and reduce the risk of nutrient losses to the environment. Clean Rivers has seen 107 dairy businesses undertake effluent upgrades or off-stream watering projects to protect and improve water quality in Tasmanian catchments.

44

farming

28

entities engaged

nutrient

517

management plans created

of improved practice on farm

12

8

2

with improved on-farm nutrient management practices

excluded stock from waterways, 6kms of fencing constructed, water troughs reinstated

of erosion area treated

farms

Opposite: Storm paddock, Riana Photo by: Geoff Gleave

farms

hectares

hectares

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

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REGIONAL LANDCARE FACILITATOR ABOUT: The Regional Landcare Facilitator role enables community access to skills and knowledge related to

sustainable land management practices. This is achieved via the Smallholder Property Management Planning Program, which delivers educational programs, support and advice to small landholders in the Cradle Coast Region. The program will continue until 2018. Cradle Coast NRM’s Landholder Property Management Planning Workshop Program was delivered again, supporting up to 15 landholder families from across the region to create an action plan for sustainable management of their properties. The program, specifically designed for landholders who may not have a farming background, consists of workshops that build both theoretical knowledge and a practical understanding of a range of land management topics. This year’s participants included Rachel and Matthew of Guide Falls Farm in West Ridgley who hosted the workshops at their property so participants could experience real-life applications of the subjects being taught.

853 individuals

participated in events and workshops

19 school

groups engaged in sustainable agriculture

523

new participants

(attending project events or activities for the first time)

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

community participation and engagement events

19

13

groups supported

Management Plans and maps for landholders

community

The soil test and mapping information provided for our farm was brilliant. It helped confirm ideas we’d had for developing the production farm and provided a realistic guide to the best order to do things and the time it is likely to take, said Rachel - Guide Falls Farm.

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14

Property


PRODUCTIVE LANDSCAPES PROGRAM

ABOUT: The Productive Landscapes Program focuses on improving land management. The aim is to encourage

improved practices through oering land and soil management support, property management planning, trials and demonstrations in innovative and best farming practices. All of this is delivered with on ground support. The program will continue until 2018.

687 individuals

49

engaged 159 are new participants

entities engaged 44 of those farming entities have improved their practices

9

6

events

553

farming

hectares

of improved practice on farm

demonstration trials

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

33


FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 34

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17


FINANCIAL REPORT

The 2016/17 Audit Report and Financial Statements for Cradle Coast NRM, a business unit of the Cradle Coast Authority (‘The Authority’) are presented in the following pages. The statements represent the consolidated performance for the delivery of Regional Natural Resource Management activities. This year’s deficit ($239,372) represents a decrease in project reserves at 30 June, 2017 (2016 surplus; $279,238), comprising predominantly of grant funding being drawn down. After accounting for outstanding creditors and leave provisions, the Authority held reserves of $985,211 (2016: $1,224,583) representing unexpended Natural Resource Management grant funds held, these funds are restricted in accordance with grant funding conditions. The accompanying Financial Statements agree with the relevant accounts and records and have been prepared in compliance with; • Australian Accounting Standards • The Local Government Act 1993 Claire Smith Corporate Services Manager Date: 25 August 2017

Opposite: Burls Speeler Track, Cradle Mountain Photo by: Geoff Gleave

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

35


FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017

Note

2017 $

2016 $

1

1,720,986

1,720,987

23,851

28,582

57,561

48,764

1,802,398

1,798,333

Employee benefits

693,679

787,291

Project management expenses

781,440

243,960

566,651

487,844

2,041,770

1,519,095

(239,372)

279,238

INCOME Government grants Interest received Other Income

2

Total Income EXPENSES

Other operating expenses

3

Total Expenses Comprehensive Result

4

The financial statements presented have been compiled from the audited financial statements in relation to Natural Resource Management funding received. This Statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

36

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017

2017 $

2016 $

246,666

246,667

Environment

1,474,320

1,474,320

TOTAL GOVERNMENT GRANTS

1,720,986

1,720,987

35,940

48,764

4,545

-

Note 1

GOVERNMENT GRANTS Primary Industry, Parks, Water & Environment

2

OTHER INCOME Project Contributions Sponsorship

3

Other Contributions

17,076

-

TOTAL OTHER INCOME

57,561

48,764

2,867

6,605

446,784

356,928

1,600

1,790

Advertising

221

995

Bank charges

396

440

Committee expenses

16,058

25,530

Consultancy fees

17,283

2,918

Communications and branding

6,515

8,834

General office expenses

3,626

8,293

IT expenses

2,070

5,599

OTHER OPERATING EXPENSES Annual reporting costs Accounting, administration and office costs Audit fees

Meeting, seminars and conferences

16,304

9,798

Motor vehicle expenses

27,251

33,822

Printing and stationery

7,102

5,529

Recruitment expenses

1,231

-

-

1,258

Sponsorship Telephone and internet

4,817

5,977

12,526

13,528

566,651

487,844

Carryover balance

1,224,583

945,345

Surplus/Deficit

(239,372)

279,238

985,211

1,224,583

Travel and accommodation TOTAL OTHER OPERATING EXPENSES 4

COMPREHENSIVE RESULT

TOTAL RESERVES

Grant funding received by the Authority is provided for the purpose of achieving specific outcomes. The Authority manages these outcomes through internal project management functions and the appointment of service providers through competitive tender processes. Service providers are contracted by the Authority to deliver agreed services, and funds paid under those contracts are conditional upon successful completion of milestones and reporting targets. While funding received by the Authority is recognised as revenue when control of funds is obtained, the unspent portion is set-aside as reserves for future and ongoing project commitments. The Authority anticipates that the conditions attached to all amounts of funding received but not yet spent will be satisfied in accordance with funding requirements. CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

37


AUDIT REPORT

38

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17


CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

39


AUDIT REPORT

40

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17


CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

41


THANK YOU Thank you to everyone involved with our work throughout the 2016/2017 year.

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CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17


Cradle Coast Authority NRM would like to acknowledge the following photographers for their contribution to this publication: Rick Stuart-Smith, Geo Gleave, Anna Wind, Rick Eaves, Jay Rowley, Grant Wells and Tourism Tasmania Cover photograph: Disappointment Bay, King Island by Jay Rowley Designed by Emma Duncan, Red Bird Design


Cradle Coast NRM 1 – 3 Spring Street, Burnie PO Box 338, Burnie TAS 7320 Ph: 03 6433 8400 Fax: 03 6431 7014 nrm@cradlecoast.com Cradle Coast NRM is an independent committee hosted by the Cradle Coast Authority

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Profile for Cradle Coast Authority

NRM Annual Report 2016 2017  

NRM Annual Report 2016 2017

NRM Annual Report 2016 2017  

NRM Annual Report 2016 2017