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2015 2016

CRADLE COAST NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ANNUAL REPORT

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2015-16

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Cradle Coast NRM Annual Report 2015-2016 Copyright Š Cradle Coast Authority 2016 No part of this publication may be reproduced without the express prior permission of the publisher. Published by: Cradle Coast Authority PO Box 338 Burnie TAS 7320 Ph: 03 6433 8400 nrm@cradlecoast.com www.cradlecoastnrm.com www.facebook.com/cradlecoastnrm This report is produced to fulfil the statutory reporting obligations of the Cradle Coast NRM Committee under the Tasmanian Natural Resource Management Act 2002. The Committee is required to report on its activity to the Minister for Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment. This report covers the period from 1 July 2015 to 30 June 2016. The Cradle Coast NRM Committee acknowledges the financial support provided to it by the Australian and Tasmanian Governments.


CONTENTS 4

Foreword

7

Introduction

8-10

Cradle Coast NRM Staff and Committee

12

Executive Officer Report

14

Cradle Coast NRM Strategy Summary Cradle Coast NRM 2015/2016 Program Overview Sustainable Environment

16-17

Restoring and Maintaining Urban Waterways and Coastal Environments

18-19

Conserving and Protecting Species and Eco-Systems

20-21

Community Skills, Knowledge and Engagement Sustainable Agriculture

25

Regional Landcare Facilitator

26-27

Productive Landscapes

28

Building Indigenous People’s Capacity in NRM

29-33

Cradle Coast NRM Financial Statements

34

Thank You

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2015-16

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FOREWORD I present the Annual Report for 2015/16 on behalf of the Cradle Coast Natural Resource Management Committee. A key task this year was to review the Cradle Coast Regional NRM Strategy, which was completed in 2015 and formally accredited in early 2016. We developed the revised document in response to feedback from our community and stakeholders. This Strategy will provide valuable guidance for strategic decisions and investment in our region through the next five years, at a time when we are recovering from a range of natural disasters and challenges. The 2015/16 year has been one of our most challenging, particularly for our region’s primary producers and the environment. With record dry spells, devastating fires then floods, compounded by difficult economic conditions, notably in the dairy industry, and emerging biosecurity threats including Myrtle and Blueberry Rust, the need to work together across government, industry and community is clear. Cradle Coast NRM will continue to play its part and evolve to meet the regions’ needs, both current and future. Recent events have highlighted the importance of our regional capacity and networks. The capacity to communicate and disseminate critical information on biosecurity threats and our ability to respond swiftly to support State agencies and others in fire and flood events has also been notable. With fewer resources and more centralised services, it has become 4

clear that there is a crucial role for regional NRM in supporting the impact assessment and recovery actions.

on our committee and staff, whose experience, knowledge and passion contributed so much to this region.

While optimistic about our future, it is clear that the recovery from recent events will take time. We are committed to working with our regional community in the recovery process. It is also important that we work on creating a more resilient region to ensure that we are better prepared to deal with any future events. We reflect this in our commitment to supporting our farmers in sustainable agriculture, our schools education program and community participation in a diversity of environmental activities.

As we look to the future, I would like to acknowledge the significant contribution of Committee members Tina Alderson, Shane Broad, Sue Jennings and Bill Walker, who left us in this period. I would particularly like to thank Bill for his support as Deputy Chair and Sue for her incredible passion and dedication to NRM. I am pleased to welcome Gemma Lewis to our Committee in this period and extend a warm welcome to our new members who will be joining us later in 2016.

This Report is my last as Chair of the Cradle Coast NRM Committee, and I would like to acknowledge and reflect on the incredible journey NRM and the Region has undertaken over the last 15 years. At the beginning in 2001/02 a combination of interest and fear of the unknown packed initial public consultation meetings to capacity. Our Committee operated with 15 representative members, and our discussions and debate were robust and informative, setting the culture of an open and respectful environment which was also challenging and productive. It is gratifying to look back and realise how far we have come in this time, to our acceptance today as an integral part of the regional community which operates effectively in partnership with government, industry and community. It is a credit to the many exceptional people I have been privileged to work with

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2015-16

The task ahead for the NRM Committee will be challenging, but with the support of capable and dedicated staff, I am confident that we will deliver the best possible outcomes for the region. On behalf of the Committee I would like to express our gratitude to the community of this region, who in partnership with our Committee and staff continue to support and participate in NRM activities in our region, regardless of the adversities and challenges we face. Thank you. Rick Rockliff Committee Chairman

Opposite photo: Mark Wisniewski


CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2015-16

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CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2015-16


INTRODUCTION Cradle Coast NRM work with North West Tasmanian communities and industry to manage natural resources, such as land, water and coasts, to ensure a sustainable future for the region. Cradle Coast NRM supports community and industry projects, facilitates funding, and coordinates natural resource activities and information sharing. The Cradle Coast region’s natural resources and landscapes sustain primary industries; provide clean water, air and homes for a diverse range of animal and plant communities. The Cradle Coast region is bounded by 2640km of coastline and covers approximately one-third of Tasmania. The region stretches from Narawntapu National Park in the East to King Island and Cape Grim in the far North West and to Port Davey in the South. The region incorporates the nine local government municipalities of Burnie City, Central Coast, Circular Head, Devonport City, Kentish, King Island, Latrobe, Waratah-Wynyard and West Coast.

In 2000, these nine local government municipalities established a regional organisation known as the Cradle Coast Authority to provide a regional voice for North West Tasmania. The Cradle Coast NRM Committee is an independent committee hosted by the Cradle Coast Authority. The Cradle Coast NRM Annual Report for 2015/16 outlines the achievements of natural resource management activities within the Cradle Coast region. Additional copies of this report can be found at www.cradlecoastnrm.com For information on the objectives and strategic direction of natural resource management in the Cradle Coast, refer to the 2015-2020 Cradle Coast Regional Natural Resource Management Strategy also available from www.cradlecoastnrm.com

Currie Naracoopa Grassy

Stanley Smithton

rd nya e ni Bur

Wy

Marrawah

e ton nport ers Ulv Devo

Waratah Cradle Valley Zeehan Queenstown Strahan

Opposite photo: Geo Gleave

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STAFF Cradle Coast NRM staff have expertise in agriculture, water, coastal and biodiversity management, monitoring and mapping, and community engagement. They identify regional natural resource management priorities, prepare regional strategies, promotes NRM principles and support the implementation of NRM activities. Cradle Coast NRM is a business unit based within the Cradle Coast Authority. The Authority is responsible for providing services including economic development, tourism and natural resource management across the North West Region of Tasmania.

Brett Smith – Chief Executive Officer

Richard Ingram – Executive Officer

Grant Pearce – Operations Manager

Is responsible for leading the Cradle Coast Authority’s services and functions including Cradle Coast NRM.

Leads the team and is the link between the Cradle Coast NRM Committee, Cradle Coast Authority and industry stakeholders.

Networks with stakeholder groups, project management, and positions Cradle Coast NRM to support the direction of relevant sciences.

Ernst Kemmerer – Strategy and Implementation Manager

Tom O’Malley – Regional Landcare Facilitator

Anna Wind – Coordinator: Coastal

Develops strategies and programs that better align State and Commonwealth funding with community aspirations

Facilitates community access to skills and knowledge related to sustainable land management practices

This information reflects the team composition at 30 June 2016.

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CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2015-16

Heads the Coastal, Estuarine and Marine and Community Skills, Knowledge and Engagement programs


Will Hogg – Coordinator: Biodiversity Heads projects to protect healthy ecosystems by monitoring threatened flora and fauna species, protection of conservation areas and community education

Mark Wisniewski – Project Officer: GIS & NRM Provides regional NRM GIS services whilst supporting community groups to raise awareness of NRM issues and implement ‘hands-on’ programs.

Spencer Gibbs – Coordinator: Productive Landscapes

Sherrie Jaffray – Project Officer: Community Education

Dionna Newton – Project Officer: Coastal, Estuarine & Marine

Leads the Sustainable Agriculture program, facilitating latest best farm management and innovation practices

Works with school groups and youth organisations and supports community groups to facilitate environmental education

Facilitates Coastal, Estuarine and Marine projects, supports community groups and programs

Claire Smith – Finance and Corporate Services Manager Provides financial and budgetary support for the NRM team.

Jemma O’Neill – Business Support Officer Provides financial administrative support for the NRM team.

Lauren Clarke – Reception and Administrative Support Officer Provides general administrative support for the NRM team.

Kate Elphinstone – Communications Officer Provides media and communications support for the NRM team.

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CRADLE COAST NRM COMMITTEE The Cradle Coast NRM Committee is comprised of nine members with agricultural, cultural heritage, scientific, educational and forestry experience. The Committee guides NRM projects, defines priorities and, as required, oversees regional NRM strategic planning. Committee members are appointed by a selection panel established through a public process for a term of up to three years. Tasmania has 3 Natural Resource Management Committees established under the Tasmanian Natural Resource Management Act 2002 to represent the South, North and Cradle Coast (North West) regions of the state.

Rick Rockliff AM – Chair

Peter Tyson

Peter Voller

Bill Walker – Deputy Chair

Sue Jennings

Tony Moore

Additional Members Guy Grey Shane Broad Helen Strickland

Gemma Lewis

Opposite: Apple orchard. Photo: Ernst Kemmerer

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CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2015-16


CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2015-16

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EXECUTIVE OFFICER REPORT The 2015/16 year started with great promise and potential but proved to be one of the most challenging for our region in recent history. The completion of our Regional NRM Strategy review in late 2015, our third iteration, was a welcome milestone. It was pleasing and humbling that so many in our community expressed an interest and were willing to share their knowledge and views in support of our work. In addition to regional input, the Strategy also incorporated feedback from stakeholders across our State. It was rewarding to work together with NRM North and NRM South to develop this Strategy document.

of the fires. Before we had time to recover, the region was hit with catastrophic floods in June. The floods severely impacted many of our coastal catchments and inundated our communities. Cradle Coast NRM has been actively engaged in supporting impact assessment and recovery actions associated with these events and will continue to monitor and adapt our response in the recovery phase.

Counter to this positive experience, the dry spring and summer brought with it many challenges for our primary producers and our environment. Impacts included unprecedented demand on our region’s water resources and record amounts of supplementary feed being imported to support grazing enterprises, adding to the farmer’s input costs and increasing the risk of weed incursions. The dry conditions also put stress on many of our native vegetation communities and fauna species.

We face a long and potentially difficult recovery from this exceptional period, but we are confident that the Regional NRM Strategy can provide some of the necessary guidance. You, our community, had already identified our rivers as a priority in the region, and our climate change work had identified the increased risk from fire and flood. We have already been developing and delivering projects to address these threats, including innovative work in developing our “Fuel Gauge” App to assess and report bushfire fuel load hazards, pasture modelling under changing climate projections to assist graziers and our Clean Rivers partnership with Dairy Tas to protect and improve our waterways.

With such a dry landscape, there was a heightened level of fire risk. Sadly, we experienced one of the worst fire seasons in many years. The January fires devastated many parts of our region. The impact on our natural environment was particularly severe with many areas unlikely to recover for decades, if at all. Thankfully there was no loss of human life and minimum damage to infrastructure relative of the scale

There is no doubt that this has been one of the most difficult years we have faced as a region, but the resilience of our landscape and our community is remarkable. However, this resilience is not without limits, and it is critical that we continue to support each other as a community. We must work together to support and maintain the resilience of our landscape to ensure that we are best positioned to deal with future challenges.

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CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2015-16

Above:

Eroded river. Photo: Cradle Coast NRM Flood damage. Photo: Mark Wisniewski Opposite: Flood damage. Photo: Mark Wisniewski

With the new Regional NRM Strategy as a guide, we are well positioned to work in partnership with our community and our investors in 2016/17 to maintain and improve this wonderful part of our planet. Richard Ingram NRM Executive Officer


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CRADLE COAST NRM STRATEGY 2015-2020 The Review of the Cradle Coast NRM Strategy in 2015 helps to inform the next five years of natural resource management for our community and stakeholders.

PURPOSE OF THE STRATEGY The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Strategy for Cradle Coast 2015–2020 is to guide activity that will help manage and improve the natural resources in the North West of Tasmania. It is a whole-of-community Strategy that identifies the social, economic and environmental values of the region and outlines how the community can work together to manage and improve its condition. The Strategy does not have statutory power or replace any current mechanism or policy relating to natural resource management but encourages partnerships between community, industry and Government.

VISION The Vision for natural resource management in the Cradle Coast region is:

To have proactive, vibrant communities who protect and advocate environmental, social and economic progress for a sustainable and bright future for our region.

HOW THE STRATEGY SUPPORTS THIS VISION The Strategy supports this Vision by: • Providing a guide to anyone living or working in the region to engage in activities that promote and foster healthy natural resource management; • Outlining the current condition of the region’s natural resources, so we can build on previous achievements and recognise key areas for future activities, increasing the community’s awareness and capacity to manage natural resources; • Identifying the main threats and issues facing these resources, so we can plan preventative actions and implement restorative works where necessary;

The Strategy is available to download at cradlecoastnrm.com

• Setting out what is known about the resources, so we are working from a common understanding and can help to fill any knowledge gaps and share knowledge from past experience; • Having focus areas for action so we know what we are working towards; and • Providing a summary of community priorities for the region based on state and regional surveys and workshops.

Opposite: Sunrise. Photo: Kaare Wind

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CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2015-16


SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENT CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2015-16

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RESTORING AND MAINTAINING URBAN WATERWAYS AND COASTAL ENVIRONMENTS

ABOUT: This program is designed to protect or restore high priority coastal and urban waterways by ensuring a

sustainable balance between economic, environmental and social values. This is achieved through weed reduction which decreases key threats and by increasing community awareness. This program faces challenges of adverse weather conditions, including flooding and bushfires.

FOR THE 2015/2016 YEAR THE PROGRAM ACHIEVED:

161Ha 490 protected.

9 Land Manager Projects.

16

plantings for revegetation projects.

3 27

HECTARES PROTECTED OR RESTORED

workshops on Saltmarsh Mapping

with workshop participants.

Aim Achieved 161Ha 140Ha

FUNDING:

PROJECT PARTNERS:

This project is funded by the Australian Government National Landcare Programme.

King Island NRM, Burnie City Council, Devonport City Council, Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service, Tasmanian Government, University of Tasmania, Storm Pastoral and Circular Head Landcare.

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2015-16


KEY PROJECT | LAUNCH OF THE SALTMARSH ATLAS ABOUT: The Cradle Coast region is home to threatened saltmarsh wetlands, a largely unknown and unappreciated

part of our natural environment. Through a partnership with the University of Tasmania, Cradle Coast NRM co-published a Coastal Saltmarsh Atlas. This resource is available to all council and community groups.

1 Top photo: Black River. Photo: Ernst Kemmerer Inset photo: Tourism Tasmania and Jason Charles Hill

Saltmarsh wetlands are vulnerable

to habitat fragmentation, threats from human activities, invasive species and sea level rise.

Coastal Saltmarsh Atlas launched.

The University of Tasmania and Cradle Coast NRM,

mapped threatened wetlands using aerial imagery and surveys.

LISTED FOR PROTECTION IN 2013 under the Federal Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

FUNDING:

PROJECT PARTNERS:

This project is funded by the Australian Government National Landcare Programme and the University of Tasmania.

University of Tasmania, Circular Head Landcare, Launceston Field Naturalists and King Island NRM Group.

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2015-16

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CONSERVING AND PROTECTING SPECIES AND ECOSYSTEMS

ABOUT: This program strives to maintain and enhance natural values throughout North West Tasmania and

primarily focuses on plants, animals and waterway management. This is delivered through the Biodiversity program, which partners with a large range of stakeholders and the community to deliver a suite of environmental and conservation projects throughout the region.

FOR THE 2015/2016 YEAR THE PROGRAM ACHIEVED:

16

75

engaged to collate data, check cameras and analyse photographs from the devils and quoll IR camera monitoring at the Vale of Belvoir by Devils@Cradle.

attended a

community members Giant Freshwater Lobster

talk presented by Todd Walsh.

FUNDING: This project is funded by the Australian Government National Landcare Programme.

18

of rice

grass control

undertaken by Circular Head Landcare Group in Duck Bay. The protection and enhancement of nationally

threatened saltmarsh

habitat is evident after another successful season of weed control.

27Ha

ecological burn

undertaken by Tasmanian Land Conservancy in the Vale of Belvoir with

post-burn flora surveys complete.

PROJECT PARTNERS: Devils @ Cradle, University of Tasmania, Parks and Wildlife, Tasmanian Land Conservancy, Mt Roland Rivercare Group Inc, Circular Head Landcare Group, Friends of Fernglade, Todd Walsh (consultant), NRM South, NRM North, Threatened Plants Tasmania, Tasmanian Government, Friends of the Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens, Conservation Landholders Tasmania.

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2015-16

Giant Freshwater Lobster. Photo: Anna Wind

volunteers and students

125Ha


ATTENDEES AT EVENTS

VOLUNTEERS ENGAGED As part of the Devils @ Cradle Monitoring Program

Aim 10

Achieved 117

Aim 5

Achieved 16

HECTARES IMPROVED HECTARES PROTECTED

Aim 25

Achieved 25

Aim 125

Achieved 125

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COMMUNITY SKILLS, KNOWLEDGE AND ENGAGEMENT PROGRAM

ABOUT: This program is designed to increase community skills, knowledge and engagement across four

project areas: Community Group Support, Citizen Science, Youth Education and Community Education Projects. The Cradle to Coastlines print and e-newsletter features stories of these projects, spreading the education message even further into the community. Natural Connections Grants are also offered to eligible community groups.

FOR THE 2015/2016 YEAR THE PROGRAM ACHIEVED:

44 field days with 569 participants.

9 NRM Community capacity building

8 educational workshops totalling 970 participants.

2295

total participants.

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2015-16

Above: Burnie beach. Photo: Anna Wind Opposite photos: Kaare Wind

Achieved

10

9

7 Aim

20

20

COMMUNICATIONS

Achieved

44

COMMUNITY GROUPS participating in NRM

Aim

FIELD DAYS

Achieved

Aim 20

388 participants.

Aim

17

14

Achieved

WORKSHOPS

workshops totalling


KEY PROJECT | NATURAL CONNECTIONS GRANTS ABOUT: Natural Connections Grants were launched at a Coastcare Week Event themed “Connecting the Coast”

in December 2015. Community Groups that successfully applied for and received grants were: Ulverstone Coastcare, King Island NRM, Turners Beach Coastcare, Reef Life Survey, Central North Field Naturalists and Friends of the Leven.

8

Natural Connections Grants.

The grants totalled

$82,701.

8

activities and events.

246 project

volunteers.

KEY PROJECT | FUNGI TALKS AND WALKS ABOUT: The Natural Connections Community Group Grants funded specialist Fungi Field Trips in the Cradle

Coast Region. Citizen science is critical to discovering new Fungi species, due to the large diversity of fungi species. Fungi Researchers alone cannot discover them all, and arming our community members with Fungi knowledge enables citizens to contribute valuable information to research databases.

FUNGIMAP

is a national not-for-profit

CITIZEN-SCIENCE organisation dedicated to the study and appreciation of Australia’s incredible fungal diversity.

400

Over fungi species have been found in the Tarkine Wilderness Area.

FUNDING: This project is funded by the Natural Connections Grants made possible through the Australian Government National Landcare Programme.

60 people

Over attended fungi talks held by Cradle Coast NRM in Burnie.

40

Over community members attended fungi walks in the Tarkine Wilderness Area.

PROJECT PARTNERS: Fungimap and Central North Field Naturalists.

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KEY PROJECT | YOUTH EDUCATION ABOUT: Our Youth Education Program, recently branded ‘Inspiring Our Kids’, engages schools and the wider

community of young people in activities and information sessions that will promote environmental awareness and invoke passion to make a difference in their communities.

4

primary schools participated in Marine Matters Workshops, including Somerset, Cooee, Boat Harbour and Port Sorell Primary in July 2015.

$600

sponsorship for the UTAS Science Investigation Awards.

$100 prize for the best

170

students participated in the National Science Week Bright Ideas Festival in Queenstown in August 2015.

180

students participated in student-led workshops at the annual Kids Teaching Kids event held in September 2015 including

6

5

schools visited by The Lobster Man Todd Walsh in October 2015 and May 2016.

16

bags of sea spurge and rubbish removed from Doctor’s Rock’s Beach by year 7 and 8 students from Marist Regional College in partnership with Waratah Wynyard Council and Wynyard Landcare in December 2016.

This project is funded by the Australian Government National Landcare Programme.

22

500+

people reached in partnership with the Parks and Wildlife Service Discovery Ranger Program in the Ulverstone, Devonport and Circular Head, Arthur River and Montague River areas in January 2016.

122

Penguin High School students participated in learning how to assess the fire hazard of the bush adjacent to their school.

local primary schools: from Boat Harbour, Somerset, Cooee, Port Sorell, Sassafras, and Yolla District High School.

FUNDING:

environmental investigation in each grade level.

PROJECT PARTNERS: Local Primary Schools including Cooee, Somerset, Boat Harbour, Sassafras, Port Sorell, Havenview, Burnie, and Yolla and Penguin District High Schools. National Kids Teaching Kids, Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service, National Science Week, University of Tasmania, local community groups and councils, such as Burnie City Council, Waratah Wynyard Council, Friends of Fern Glade.

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2015-16


KEY PROJECT | SHOREBIRD MONITORING PROJECT ABOUT: The Shorebird Monitoring Project is a community driven project to increase awareness of resident beach-

nesting birds. The project was designed to address the decline of resident beach nesting birds in the Cradle Coast region. This is the only volunteer driven shorebird monitoring project of its kind in Australia.

7 10

th

year of a year study.

Counts are conducted

Above: Shorebird volunteers. Photo: Cradle Coast NRM Inset: Red-capped Plover. Photo: John Harrison

twice a year

in November and March. The timing is strategic – at the start and end of the breeding season.

FUNDING: This project is funded by the Australian Government National Landcare Programme.

45

project sites were identified using Google Earth and our Geographic Information System (GIS), scoped between Stanley and Narawntapu National Park (128kms).

18

Lead Volunteers are instrumental to the project’s success. Managing

85

volunteers.

PROJECT PARTNERS: Volunteers Birdlife Australia, Birdlife Tasmania, The Natural Values Atlas, Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service, Birdlife Australia: Shorebird 2020 Project and The Atlas Project, DPIPWE, Land Managers: Circular Head Council, Waratah Wynyard Council, Burnie City Council, Central Coast Council, Devonport City Council, Latrobe Council.

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SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE 24

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REGIONAL LANDCARE FACILITATOR

ABOUT: The Regional Landcare Facilitator role enables community access to skills and knowledge related to

sustainable land management practices. This is achieved via the Smallholder Property Management Planning Program, which delivers educational programs, support and advice to small landholders in the Cradle Coast Region. The program will continue until 2018.

FOR THE 2015/2016 YEAR THE SMALLHOLDER PROPERTY MANAGEMENT PLANNING PROGRAM ACHIEVED:

508

events and workshops including beekeeping, Introduction to Permaculture and LIST Map Training various events and workshops.

people involved across the program through

hectares of soil sampling on paddocks across

12

hectares of productive land in the Cradle Coast region.

EVENTS

50%

of Cradle Coast land managers are hobby farmers, individually managing

100

new members of the Cradle Coast Smallholder Network, a networking group for the region’s hobby farmers formed from participants of the workshop program.

hectares or less.

154 Aim

146

Achieved

INDIVIDUALS ENGAGED

Achieved

3

Aim

Opposite: Planting. Photo: Cradle Coast NRM

12

34

Approximately

COMMUNITY GROUPS

27 13

FUNDING:

PROJECT PARTNERS:

This project is funded by the Australian Government National Landcare Programme.

TasTAFE, various guest presenters, experts and consultants.

Achieved

154

Aim

81.5

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PRODUCTIVE LANDSCAPES PROGRAM

ABOUT: The Productive Landscapes Program focuses on improving land management. The aim is to encourage

improved practices through offering land and soil management support, property management planning, trials and demonstrations in innovative and best farming practices. All of this is delivered with on ground support. The program will continue until 2018.

FOR THE 2015/2016 YEAR THE PROGRAM ACHIEVED:

8249Ha 860Ha of improved management practices.

of implemented sustainable farm practice.

Engaging

Across

49

172

farms.

people.

26

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2015-16

EVENTS

Photo: David McCormack

9

Achieved

158 Aim

1

INDIVIDUALS ENGAGED

Achieved

4 Aim

15

Aim

49

Achieved

ADOPTED CHANGE


KEY PROJECT | COVER CROP TRIAL SITE ABOUT: This Program established a cover crop trial site to demonstrate groundcover management to prevent

soil loss. Longer term aims include: lowering reliance on synthetic herbicides and fertilisers, efficiency of irrigation water use, and to increase the productivity of properties whilst reducing the risks of soil and nutrient losses to our waterways.

Trial planted

in February 2016 and incorporated back into the soil in June 2016. The following crop will be monitored for

yield and quality

to determine immediate benefits.

Biofumigants, mixed cover crops and tillage radish will be compared against traditional rye grass for their abilities to condition the biological, physical and chemical qualities of the soil.

Cover crops,

5

hectare paddock trial site located at Van Diemen Quality Bulbs The Tulip Farm at Table Cape, Wynyard.

established between

Cash crops,

protect bare soil from rain or surface run off. These crops improve soil structure, soil fertility and control of weeds and disease.

FUNDING:

PROJECT PARTNERS:

This project is funded by the Australian Government National Landcare Programme.

Van Diemen Quality Bulbs, Serve Ag and RM Consulting Group

KEY PROJECT | FERT$MART DAIRY NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT PROJECT ABOUT: This Program established a cover crop trial site to demonstrate groundcover management to prevent soil

loss. Longer term aims include: lowering reliance on synthetic herbicides and fertilisers, efficiency of irrigation water use, and to increase the productivity of properties whilst reducing the risks of soil and nutrient losses to our waterways.

41

800Ha of soil sampling undertaken to assist in improving soil and nutrient management.

farmers have been engaged across

30 8202Ha dairy farms totalling

of dairying operations.

FUNDING: This project is funded by the Australian Government National Landcare Programme.

Savings made by improving efficiency can equate to as much as

$30,000 p.a. on average dairying operations in North West Tasmania.

2

Another years of support is needed for the program, to give as many farmers as possible the opportunity to become involved.

PROJECT PARTNERS: DairyTas, Dairy Australia and Fert$mart accredited consultants: Dr Bill Cotching, Seona Findlay (Tas Agronomy Plus) and Luke Taylor (Ag Assist)

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BUILDING INDIGENOUS PEOPLE’S CAPACITY IN NRM ABOUT: This program is an iterative consultation with the Aboriginal Community to develop relationships,

partnerships and ultimately build capacity in the community to participate in NRM activities. This work is strongly focused on maintaining and developing our relationships with Aboriginal organisations. The program will include: training and support for land management practices (including traditional fire management), development of capacity and skills necessary to monitor and evaluate the program, facilitate broader networks and partnership opportunities and building cultural knowledge and awareness.

THE FOLLOWING HAS BEEN ACHIEVED SO FAR:

90+

small scale burns have been implemented by the Tasmanian Aboriginal Fire Group across the landscape in Tasmania.

This project was built on

genuine long term relationships with the local Tasmanian Aboriginal community.

5

year commitment to support the Tasmanian Aboriginal community to send

6

community members to attend Indigenous Fire Management workshops in Northern Australia. The initial success and application of the Tasmanian Fire Group has attracted interest and support from the private sector,

NGO’s and private land managers.

This project was conceived after viewing a presentation at the 2013 NRM Knowledge Conference and facilitated by networks established at cross jurisdictional events.

The Tasmanian Aboriginal Community

have independently supported additional members of the community to attend Indigenous fire management workshops.

THANKS

28

FUNDING:

PROJECT PARTNERS:

This project is funded by the Australian Government National Landcare Programme.

Tasmanian Aboriginal Centre, Aboriginal Land Council Tasmania

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2015-16

Photo: Ernst Kemmerer

We would like to acknowledge and thank Victor Steffensen and Peta-Marie Standley for their passion and commitment and the traditional owners in Northern Australia for making this project possible.


FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


AUDIT REPORT

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CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2015-16


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FINANCIAL STATEMENTS CRADLE COAST AUTHORITY

STATE SUPPORT – NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

COMPREHENSIVE INCOME STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2016

Note

2016 $

2015 $

246,667

246,667

REVENUE Department of Primary Industry, Parks, Water & Environment Project Contributions Interest Income Total Income

14,185

-

8,884

8,480

269,736

255,147

151,755

116,150

2,918

27,233

102,007

69,095

256,680

212,478

13,056

42,669

EXPENSES Employee Costs Project Delivery and Consultancy Other Operating Expenses

3

Total Expenses Comprehensive Result

4

The financial statements presented have been compiled from the audited financial statements in relation to State Support for Regional Natural Resource Management 2014-17. This statement should be read in conjunction with accompanying notes.

32

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2015-16


CRADLE COAST AUTHORITY

STATE SUPPORT – NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2016

2016 $

Note 3

OTHER OPERATING EXPENSES Annual Reporting Costs Accounting, Administration & Audit Costs

6,605

4,291

23,194

21,756

Advertising

995

1,767

Bank Fees

40

40

25,530

23,687

6,690

-

Committee Expenses Communications & Marketing General Office Expenses IT Support & Consumables Postage, Printing & Stationery Sponsorship Telephone, Faxes & Internet Vehicle Expenses TOTAL 4

2015 $

66

-

2,484

2,304

428

2,090

1,258

3,202

1,416

962

33,300

8,996

102,007

69,095

COMPREHENSIVE RESULT Project Carry Over

368,048

315,379

Surplus

13,056

42,669

TOTAL

381,104

358,048

The financial statements presented have been compiled from the audited financial statements in relation to State Support for Regional Natural Resource Management 2014-17

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2015-16

33


THANK YOU Thank you to everyone involved with our work throughout the 2015/2016 year.

Friends of the Royal Botanical Gardens

Tasmanian Land Conservancy

34

CRADLE COAST NRM ANNUAL REPORT 2015-16


Cradle Coast NRM would like to acknowledge the following photographers for their contribution to this publication: Mark Wisniewski, Geo Gleave, Kaare Wind, Ernst Kemmerer, Jason Charles Hill, Anna Wind, John Harrison, David McCormack and Tourism Tasmania Cover photograph: Anna Wind Designed by Emma Duncan, Red Bird Design


Cradle Coast NRM 1 – 3 Spring Street, Burnie PO Box 338, Burnie TAS 7320 Ph: 03 6433 8400 Fax: 03 6431 7014 nrm@cradlecoast.com Cradle Coast NRM is an independent committee hosted by the Cradle Coast Authority

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NRM Annual Report 2015-2016  

NRM Annual Report 2015-2016

NRM Annual Report 2015-2016  

NRM Annual Report 2015-2016