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CRADLE COAST NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE ANNUAL REPORT 2013 – 2014


Cradle Coast NRM Annual Report 2013 -2014 Copyright Š Cradle Coast Authority 2014 No part of this publication may be reproduced without the express prior permission of the publisher. Published by: Cradle Coast Authority PO Box 338 Burnie TAS 7320 Ph: 03 6431 6285 nrm@cradlecoast.com

This report is produced to fulfil the statutory reporting obligations of the Cradle Coast NRM Committee under the Tasmanian Natural Resource Management Act 2002. The Committee is required to report on its activity to the Minister for Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment. This report covers the period from 1 July 2013 to 30 June 2014. The Cradle Coast NRM Committee acknowledges the financial support provided to it by the Australian and Tasmanian Governments.


CO N TE N TS 5

Foreword

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Introduction

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Executive Officer Report

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Cradle Coast NRM Staff and Committee

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Cradle Coast NRM 2013/14 Projects

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In Focus: Discovery Ranger – Experience, Play and Learn

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Sustainable Agriculture

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In Focus: GIS Gallery

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Sustainable Environment

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In Focus: Natural Connections Protect Biodiversity

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Cradle Coast NRM 2013/14 Project Snapshot

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In Focus: Weed Awareness Postcards

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Cradle Coast NRM Financial Statements

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2013–2014

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I would like to express my respect and gratitude to the community of this region, who in partnership with our Committee and staff continue to support and drive NRM activities in our region, regardless of the adversities and challenges.

Photograph by Geoff Gleave

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2013–2014


F OREWOR D by the Chair of the Cradle Coast NRM Committee On behalf of the Cradle Coast Natural Resource Management Committee I present the annual report for 2013/14. A solid performance in 2013/14 saw the conclusion of the Australian Government Caring for our Country program, with all programs completed as scheduled and on budget. The subsequent transition to the new funding program was not as smooth, with a number of external factors conspiring to create a very difficult operating period for our Committee and staff. Despite the challenges it was gratifying to see the response and commitment of our team, which was ultimately rewarded with a five year funding contract from the Australian Government. While this funding provides some welcome certainty and stability to our operations it was disappointing that many past lessons about funding transitions were ignored. It was the resolve and experience of the regional staff, stakeholders and community that maintained our NRM activities in this period, despite the adversities. This experience has given me confidence that we have established a strong and growing relationship with our regional community and as we await the details of the new National Landcare Program, I am confident that we will be able to make the most of the opportunities presented. This is particularly important when considering the shift in the economic base of our State. The increased focus and expectation on Aquaculture, Horticulture, Dairy, Mining and Tourism to lift our economy is significant, particularly considering the strong operational presence of each in our region. It is critical that NRM is in a position to provide relevant and adequate support to our community and industry to guide sustainable prosperity. While optimistic about our future, it has been built on the work and commitment of many people in our region. I would like to acknowledge the dedication, passion and many years of invaluable service to our Committee and region by Geoff King, who passed away unexpectedly in this last year. In concluding I would like to express my respect and gratitude to the community of this region, who in partnership with our Committee and staff continue to support and drive NRM activities in our region, regardless of the adversities and challenges. Thank you. Rick Rockliff AM Committee Chairman

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I NTRO D U C TIO N The Cradle Coast region is remarkably diverse, bounded by 2,640km of coastline and covering 22,520 square kilometres; approximately one-third of Tasmania. The region’s natural resources and landscapes are valuable for their ability to sustain primary industries, their ability to provide ecosystem services such as clean water and air and their intrinsic value as homes for animal and plant communities which also act as tourism drawcards. The region stretches from Narawntapu National Park in the East to King Island and Cape Grim in the far North West and to Port Davey in the South. Its Eastern border runs diagonally through Cradle Valley. The region incorporates the nine local government municipalities of Burnie City, Central Coast, Circular Head, Devonport City, Kentish, King Island, Latrobe, Waratah-Wynyard and West Coast. In 2000, these nine local government municipalities established a regional organisation known as the Cradle Coast Authority to facilitate the sustainable development of the Cradle Coast by hosting and coordinating regional-level initiatives. The Cradle Coast NRM Committee is an independent committee hosted by the Cradle Coast Authority. The Cradle Coast NRM team work with North West Tasmanian communities to improve natural resources such as our land, water and coasts to ensure a healthy future for the region. Cradle Coast NRM supports community and industry projects, facilitates funding, and coordinates natural resource activities and information sharing. The Cradle Coast NRM annual report for 2013/14 outlines the achievements and project deliverables of natural resource management activities within the Cradle Coast region. Additional copies of this report can be obtained from www.cradlecoastnrm.com For information on the objectives and strategic direction of natural resource management in the Cradle Coast, refer to the 2010-15 Regional Natural Resource Management Strategy also available from www.cradlecoastnrm.com

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2013–2014


EX ECU TIVE O F F IC E R R E P O R T The 2013/14 year marked the beginning of a new funding era, with both the State and Australian Government funding contracts with Cradle Coast NRM coming to an end in June 2013. I am pleased to report that Cradle Coast NRM delivered against all of our contracted outcomes and in many cases exceeded these contracted targets. This was achieved on time and on budget and is testament to the performance and commitment of the Cradle Coast NRM Committee and staff and the hard work of our community and partners in delivering all our projects. Coming off the back of this strong performance it was disappointing that there were delays to the roll out of the new federal funding program. Protracted negotiations through 2013 disrupted the continuity of some programs and also affected momentum among community stakeholders and NRM staff. The transition to new funding programs has historically been difficult, and the 2013 election and subsequent change of government in this period undoubtedly added to the complexity. However I must commend the professionalism and patience of our partners, community and staff in navigating this period of change and their positive response in maintaining NRM projects and services in uncertain times. Despite the many challenges this year we did manage to maintain a level of continuity, particularly in support of community groups and it was reflected in the strong support for our community Link and Learn workshop. Also apparent was the value of our strong and established relationships with industry and other regional stakeholders. In particular I would highlight the work in developing practical tools for agriculture under climate change scenarios. The pasture management tool gained significant value through the support and assistance of the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture (TIA) and the Van Diemen’s Land Company, who provided considerable technical input and access to field sites to help deliver a more practical outcome. Within the Cradle Coast Authority there has also been collaboration with the Regional Tourism Organisation to cross promote our activities and tourism products to interstate visitors. This highlights the value of our long term relationships and the benefit of working together on local and regional issues. Like many industries we are becoming accustomed to perpetual change and while it presents many challenges, it also brings opportunities. As we await the final details of the new Australian Government National Landcare Program and confirmation of the 2014/15 State Government budget, I am confident that the work done in 2013/14 has left us well positioned to deliver fresh ideas, better projects and leverage the most from the funding we receive. Part of the solution will be to work smarter not harder, and as an organisation we have worked in the last year to develop our skills and use new technology, the benefits of which will start to be realised in 2014/15. The new direction has also brought changes to our team and I would like to welcome Ernst Kemmerer, Tom O’Malley and Grant Pearce to Cradle Coast NRM and acknowledge Rod Graham in his new role on King Island. Each brings their own wealth of skills, knowledge and experience that will benefit the region in future years. I look forward to working with our community in writing the next chapter of the NRM story in 2014/15 and would like to thank you all for your ongoing commitment and support for our work this year. Richard Ingram Executive Officer

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C RA D LE C O A S T N R M S T A FF A N D C O M M I T T EE Tasmania has three Natural Resource Management Committees established under the Tasmanian Natural Resource Management Act 2002 to represent the South, North and Cradle Coast (North West) regions of the state. Cradle Coast NRM comprises of a Committee plus dedicated staff with expertise in agriculture, water, coastal and biodiversity management, monitoring and mapping, and community engagement. Collectively Cradle Coast NRM helps identify regional natural resource management priorities, prepare regional strategies, promotes NRM principles and supports the implementation of NRM activities. The Cradle Coast NRM team is based within the Cradle Coast Authority office in Burnie and is supported by the Authority’s corporate services staff. In addition to the core team, in 2013/14 Cradle Coast NRM also supported the West Coast Council to employ a Project Officer in the West Coast Weed and Fire Management Group. The information below reflects the team composition at 30 June 2014. RICHARD INGRAM – EXECUTIVE OFFICER Leads the team and is the link between the Cradle Coast NRM Committee, Cradle Coast Authority and industry stakeholders. GRANT PEARCE – OPERATIONS MANAGER Networks with stakeholder groups, manages and finds efficiencies in project management, and positions Cradle Coast NRM to support the direction of relevant sciences. ERNST KEMMERER – STRATEGY & IMPLEMENTATION MANAGER Develops strategies and programs that better align State and Commonwealth funding with community aspirations for natural resource management in the region. APRIL LANGERAK – INFORMATION MANAGER Collects and maintains NRM data from regional projects and coordinates program monitoring, evaluation, reporting and improvement. ANNA WIND – COORDINATOR: COASTAL Heads the Coastal, Community Education, Marine and Estuarine programs, and works with Coastcare, community and Friends of Penguin groups to raise awareness of regional NRM issues and implement ‘hands-on’ programs and training. ALISON DUGAND – COORDINATOR: BIODIVERSITY Heads projects to ensure healthy ecosystems restoration, such as riparian zones, the Giant Freshwater Lobster habitat, birds of prey monitoring and regional weeds management advice.

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SPENCER GIBBS – COORDINATOR: PRODUCTIVE LANDSCAPES Leads the Sustainable Agriculture program, facilitating latest best farm management and innovation practices for a range of Agricultural sectors. DIONNA NEWTON – PROJECT OFFICER: COASTAL, ESTUARINE & MARINE Facilitates Estuarine and Marine projects and supports community groups to raise awareness of regional NRM issues and implement ‘hands-on’ programs such as Shorebird monitoring. SHERRIE JAFFRAY – PROJECT OFFICER: EDUCATION Works with school groups and youth organisations and supports community groups to raise awareness of regional NRM issues and implement ‘hands-on’ programs. MARK WISNIEWSKI – PROJECT OFFICER: GIS & NRM Provides regional NRM GIS services whilst supporting community groups to raise awareness of NRM issues and implement ‘hands-on’ programs. TOM O’MALLEY – REGIONAL LANDCARE FACILITATOR Facilitate community access to skills and knowledge related to sustainable land management practices. BRAD GRIFFITHS – PROJECT OFFICER: SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE Supports the Sustainable Agriculture program, working with small landholders sharing best practice innovations. During 2013/14 the Cradle Coast NRM team was also assisted by Karina Rose, Facilitator; Sue Botting, Operations Manager; Rosie Britton, Business Support Manager; and Stacey Groves, Administration & Communications Officer.

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2013–2014


CRADLE COAST NRM COMMITTEE The Cradle Coast NRM Committee is comprised of nine members with extensive and diverse agricultural, cultural heritage, scientific, educational and forestry experience. The Committee meets monthly to guide NRM projects, define priorities and, as required, oversee regional NRM strategic planning. Committee members are appointed by a selection panel established through a public process for a term of up to three years. During the 2013/14 year, Geoff King also served on the Committee.

RICK ROCKLIFF AM – CHAIR

EVA FINZEL – DEPUTY CHAIR

TINA ALDERSON – COMMITTEE MEMBER

GUY GREY – COMMITTEE MEMBER

JAMES REYNOLDS – COMMITTEE MEMBER

PETER TYSON – COMMITTEE MEMBER

PETER VOLLER – COMMITTEE MEMBER

BILL WALKER – COMMITTEE MEMBER

SUE JENNINGS – COMMITTEE MEMBER

TRIBUTE TO GEOFF KING The Cradle Coast NRM team would like to highlight the immense contribution of Geoff King, our serving Committee member who suddenly and unexpectedly passed away this year. Geoff was one of the original members of the NRM Committee and had dedicated more than 10 years of continuous service to regional NRM, bringing an invaluable depth of knowledge and experience to our organisation. Geoff was a larger than life character who wore his passion on his sleeve and he is sadly missed. In Geoff’s honour Tasmania Parks and Wildlife created a moving video tribute which can be viewed by visiting You Tube and searching Geoff King - King of Conservation in the North-West.

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CRADLE COAST NRM 2013/14 PROJECTS Commenced in 13/14

Completed in 13/14

Ongoing projects commenced prior to 13/14

STATUS IN 2013/14

FUNDING SOURCE

SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENT Restoring and maintaining urban waterways and coastal environments Interpretive signage

Australian Government

Access management project

Australian Government

Coastal revegetation and rehabilitation

Australian Government

Conserving and protecting species and ecosystems Protect and connect natural values program (Natural Connections)

Australian Government

Threat mitigation of riparian zones project

Australian Government

Conservation land management training and partnerships program

Australian Government

Volunteer field research project

Australian Government

Riparian workshops project

Australian Government

Community skills knowledge and engagement Healthy coasts and estuaries project

Australian Government

Shorebird monitoring

Australian Government

Beachwatch project

Australian Government

School education project

Australian Government

Discovery Ranger project

Australian Government

Environmental awareness project

Australian Government

Community Group and Local/State Government support project

Australian Government

King Island NRM strategy implementation

Australian Government

Innovation in engagement

Australian Government

Building Indigenous people’s capacity for NRM Aboriginal engagement strategy

Australian Government

Junior Ranger Program

Australian Government

NRM partnership project

Australian Government

On-ground works for Aboriginal lands project

Australian Government

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2013–2014


STATUS IN 2013/14

FUNDING SOURCE

SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE – PRODUCTIVE LANDSCAPES Protecting the resource base Trial and demonstration sites

Australian Government

Adoption of sustainable land practices

Australian Government

Farmer soil condition studies

Caring for our Country

Biodiversity on farms – shelterbelt incentives

Caring for our Country

Improving planning and capacity for resource and environmental management Engagement and participation in NRM activities

Australian Government

Implementing property management planning incentives

Caring for our Country

REGIONAL LANDCARE FACILITATOR Regional Landcare Facilitator events Small landholder project Community Group support King Island Regional Landcare Facilitator

CLEAN ENERGY FUTURES Regional NRM Strategy update

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I N FO C U S DI SCOV E R Y R A N G E R – EX P E RIE N C E , PL A Y A N D L EA R N LOCATION: East Ulverstone, East Devonport, Latrobe and Port Sorell TOTAL FINANCIAL INVESTMENT: $1611 PARTNERS: Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service

April school holidays were the trigger for Cradle Coast NRM to team up with the Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service and offer a special Discovery Ranger Program. The program was designed for families camping and holidaying outside National Parks and Reserves and used interactive learning activities to engage visitors and holidaying residents in the local natural environment. A total of 421 people took part in the Discovery Ranger Program over the Easter break which included nature walks, rock pool explorations, and building life-sized whales on the beach. Of particular interest was the activity that created Tasmanian devil dens and shared knowledge about this iconic Tasmanian animal. Such a successful engagement will see the program return in 2014/15. To continue the learning beyond the camp-ground sessions, a competition was held after the events. The drawing and writing competition encouraged children to apply their knowledge in creating an NRM-themed poster titled Share your Discoveries. The competition doubled as an evaluation tool to gauge the success of the project in raising the level of the children’s understanding of the NRM themes presented. Seventeen entries were received and the winners were rewarded with a Family Travel pack containing NRM-branded travel mug, torch, pens, notepads, sunhats, drink bottle, Tasmanian animal book and a Parks and Wildlife Service DVD. The free sessions were held in camp-grounds at East Ulverstone, East Devonport, Latrobe and Port Sorell between 19 and 27 April and led by Discovery Ranger, John Bowden. Each session was between one and two-hours duration.

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2013–2014


A total of 421 people took part in the Discovery Ranger Program over the Easter break which included nature walks, rock pool explorations, and building life-sized whales on the beach.

Photograph by Jen Archer

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S U STA IN AB L E A G R IC U L T UR E STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES: To promote sustainable production of food; To promote innovation in Australian agricultural and fisheries practices; To reduce impact of weeds and pests on agriculture; To improve management of agriculture and fisheries and the natural resource base; and to foster a skilled and capable Landcare community.

Here are some of the key Sustainable Agriculture projects for 2013/14: PASTURE PESTS PROJECT Investment theme: Protecting the resource base trial and demonstration sites. This year saw the introduction of a project to help the region’s livestock producers reduce their reliance on agricultural chemicals in order to manage pasture pests, reduce soil erosion and improve pasture productivity. The Pasture Pests Program leveraged knowledge gained from previous Integrated Pest Management (IPM) trials to create a series of workshops and a demonstration site that could apply theory in practice. Commercial farmers and agricultural advisors from across the region signed up for three workshops being implemented in different seasons over a 12 month period. The project is operating in two streams, Burnie and Smithton, with each workshop running for a half day. The series commenced in May with 19 participants. This year, Cradle Coast NRM implemented a nominal workshop fee which proved successful in securing the long term commitment of those enrolled and a 100% turn out for the first workshops. Jason Lynch, a senior consultant at Macquarie Franklin with over 15 years experience as an agronomist, was engaged as workshop leader. Participants received a Pasture Pests Manual to guide their learning and development of an action plan for their property. The main pasture pests of grazing systems in the Cradle Coast region are the black and red headed cockchafers and corbie grubs. When present in sufficient numbers these pests can create large areas of bare ground and eliminate susceptible perennial ryegrass pastures. These areas are highly vulnerable to erosion and broadleaf weed infestations. Integrated Pest Management (IPM) incorporates preventative measures and involves actively monitoring

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pests and using a range of control techniques including bio-control, natural enemies, tolerant pasture species, management practices and chemical control. The Pasture Pests project is helping to increase ground cover quality and pasture productivity in the Cradle Coast region whilst lowering risks of soil erosion. DAIRY INDUSTRY CLIMATE CHANGE SIMULATIONS Investment theme: Improving planning and capacity for resource and environmental management engagement and participation in NRM activities. Dr Ernst Kemmerer from the Cradle Coast NRM team led a joint project with the University of Tasmania (UTAS) this year to simulate pasture production using climate information from Climate Futures Tasmania. Simulations were run across various drainage classes and soil types from 2014 until the year 2100. The results showed that pastures are predicted to have an increase in spring growth of around 30% due to warmer temperatures. This will be offset by more variable rainfall combined with overall lower pasture production in summer and autumn by around 20%. Project partners at the UTAS Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture (TIA) believe this may mean farmers will need to consider options to best utilise surplus feed. The project recommended considering varying calving dates, strategic use of nitrogen fertiliser in winter and early spring, conservation of surplus feed, and feed budgeting. The study found that summer feed deficits are likely to become more pronounced. This change will be due to high temperatures, greater evaporation and increasing variability in summer rainfall, leading to an increasing reliance on irrigation, use of summer forage crops and feed planning. Managing variability in pasture production under future climate change will be a challenge to producers in the region, with the larger producers such as VDL Company taking a keen interest in the spatial models developed to assist in improved farm planning. Dr Kemmerer worked on the joint project with David Phelan, Dr David Parsons and Dr Richard Rawnsley from the University of Tasmania. The project, Planning for climate change: spatial interpolation of pasture yields was funded by the Australian Government to evaluate the variation in pasture productivity under climate change. An interactive display of the predictions developed in this work is available from the cradlecoastnrm.com website. The display shows baseline spring, autumn and summer changes through until 2100. With AK Consultants and experts in the region, Cradle Coast NRM extended and translated the climate change project into fact sheets for each agricultural ►

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2013–2014


The Pasture Pests project is helping to increase ground cover quality and pasture productivity in the Cradle Coast region whilst lowering risks of soil erosion.

Photograph by Geoff Gleave

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Cradle Coast NRM has long-appreciated the benefits of healthy soils to the region’s productivity. Cost savings derived from minimising repair work are propagated through the entire food chain.

Photograph by David McCormack

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2013–2014


S U STA IN AB L E A G R IC U L T UR E sector in the North West, from cattle and sheep grazing through to viticulture and olive growing. The sheets outline practical things farmers can do to adjust to climate variability and are also available from the Cradle Coast NRM website. SOIL CONDITION REGIONAL REPORT CARD Investment theme: Improving planning and capacity for resource and environmental management engagement and participation in NRM activities. Cradle Coast NRM has long-appreciated the benefits of healthy soils to the region’s productivity. Cost savings derived from minimising repair work are propagated through the entire food chain. Healthy soils also have added benefits for a variety of ecosystem services such as water quality, vegetation health and biodiversity.

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ENGAGING WITH RURAL COMMUNITIES Investment theme: Regional Landcare Facilitator - events The Regional Landcare Facilitator (RLF) made the most of Tasmania’s largest agricultural trade show, Agfest, to raise the profile of Cradle Coast NRM and its sustainable agriculture principles by engaging with the region’s agricultural and Landcare stakeholders. NRM staff printed customised property maps for landholders and shared information on soil types, land capability and vegetation communities. Patrons received advice on land management issues specific to their property, which proved to be a popular service and resulted in new subscribers for the Cradle Coast NRM agriculture-sector e-newsletter Across the Paddocks.

The Soil Condition, Evaluation and Monitoring (SCEAM) project has been systematically measuring Tasmania’s soils for ten years and in 2013/14 delivered interesting and useful trend information for the Cradle Coast region.

The event was also used as a research exercise, with the NRM team collecting a register of interest for natural resource management topics. Performing strongly in this survey were shelterbelt design and maintenance, and weed identification and management. These are strong-hold areas of regional NRM and future project will continue to address this demand.

Tasmania’s Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment established SCEAM in conjunction with the three Tasmanian NRM regions and with financial support from the Australian Government.

Cradle Coast NRM participated in the event in partnership with the other two Tasmanian NRM regions, NRM North and NRM South, via a joint display in the high-profile Tasmanian Farmers and Gaziers marquee.

The Cradle Coast report card showed intense production in the robust red soils of the North West. Land use changes and irrigation scheme developments are pushing production into more marginal areas, and the SCEAM data has helped identify risks to long-term soil health. SCEAM monitors the soil condition in a large number of sites in the Cradle Coast region and details the status of the soils based on site observations. This year’s report showed that more than half of the sites in any particular land use are declining in condition, according to one or more soil health indicators. Such findings reinforce Cradle Coast NRM’s Sustainable Agriculture and Regional Landcare Facilitator programs that support farming communities in soil management. The Cradle Coast SCEAM report card recommended: • Monitoring and managing soil phosphorous in pasture sites to reduce the proportion of sites falling outside the phosphorous target range • Improving organic carbon levels in intensively cropped paddocks • Improving soil bulk density particularly under dry-land grazing • Monitoring of soil pH under dry-land grazing to ensure pH stays within the target range and to minimise over-application of lime.

SMALLHOLDER PROPERTY MANAGEMENT PLAN PROJECT Investment theme: Regional Landcare Facilitator small landholder project. Launch preparations for a new Smallholder Property Management Plan (PMP) Project were the focus of Cradle Coast NRM’s Sustainable Agriculture staff in the second half of 2013/14. The project was designed to increase small-hold land owners’ skills, knowledge and engagement in natural resource management and apply this information via the creation and implementation of customised PMPs. A series of workshops were developed targeting specific environmental topics and scheduled for implementation over a five-year period. The first workshop was successfully run involving 14 landholders on 29 June with follow-up sessions planned for July and August 2014. Workshop topics included soil and land capability, weed management and biodiversity. These priority topics were reinforced by the agricultural community survey conducted by the Cradle Coast NRM team whilst at Agfest and were also consistent with the learnings from the inaugural PMP Project run in the region in 2012/13. Future workshops will address pasture utilisation, threatened species, pest species and carrying capacities. Results from participant self-assessments have also been used to shape future workshops.

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I N FO C U S G I S GA LLE R Y LOCATION: Region-wide TOTAL FINANCIAL INVESTMENT: $9,500 PARTNERS: University of Tasmania, Cradle Coast community groups and Councils, ESRI Australia, Australian Government, and Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems, Cooperative Research Centre to link the Tasmanian Shoreline and Monitoring Project (TASMARC) directly to Cradle Coast Beachwatch sites.

Cradle Coast NRM continued to improve its innovative and accessible approach to natural resource management in 2013/14 with the launch of a new GIS Gallery and upgrade to its Top 10 Weed Pocket Guide App. The development of the online GIS (Geographic Information System) Mapping Gallery enabled the presentation of natural resource management information in a simple, visual and interactive format. The integration of GIS Web Maps with text and pictures connects users directly with the landscape and presents a realistic understanding of the on-ground situation. GIS has helped Cradle Coast NRM to create visually appealing maps whilst also telling a story. This new communication tool increases the accessibility of Cradle Coast NRM to local, state-wide, national and international audiences. Users can revisit past NRM projects and investments, learn about what Cradle Coast NRM does in the region, discover the works of local Coastcare, Landcare and ‘Friends of’ groups, or simply have the acronym NRM explained. Potential developments of this technology could also allow Cradle Coast NRM staff to map on-ground works via an online/mobile integrated mapping tool. It’s a feature that is being considered for 2014/15 and beyond. The GIS Gallery can be viewed at www.cradlecoastnrm. com/GISGallery. A selection of the web maps and web mapping applications were ‘mobile optimised’ this year and are also available through the free Cradle Coast NRM Android application (refer to the Sustainable Environment Program project on page 20 for details).

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2013–2014


The integration of GIS Web Maps with text and pictures connects users directly with the landscape and presents a realistic understanding of the on-ground situation.

Image: GIS Gallery, Summer Simulation 2071 to 2100

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S U STA IN AB L E E N V IR O N MEN T CRADLE COAST NRM MOBILE APP STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES: To maintain ecosystem services, including ecological and cultural values, now and into the future; To protect our conservation estate; and To enhance the capacity of Indigenous communities to conserve and protect natural resources.

Here are some of the key Sustainable Environment projects for 2013/14: SHARING LEVEN RIVER RESTORATIONS Investment theme: Conserving and protecting species and ecosystems. A field day to share river restoration advice was held in March targeting land managers along the Leven River in Gunns Plains. Farming neighbours met at Wings Wildlife Park to hear from specialists and locals with first-hand experiences in restoring the banks of this valuable water source. The event was organised by Cradle Coast NRM’s Biodiversity Coordinator in partnership with Greening Australia Tasmania. This partnership has been delivering positive outcomes for the Leven catchment over the last 10 years thanks in large part to the interest and commitment of local landholders. Demonstration of Willow removal and revegetation works were supported with information sharing and knowledge-building so participants better understand the impacts of woody weeds within a flood plain and how different management practices influence water quality and riverbank health downstream. This collaborative and incremental approach was demonstrated at the Leven River Recovery field day with guest presenters Todd Walsh, Alex Spink, Greg Jordan, Jim McLeod and host Colin Wing sharing their experiences. Topics addressed included the impacts of Willow invasion and options for Willow removal; water quality measurements; the importance of bank stability and soil retention; flood mitigation techniques and tips for long-term riparian maintenance among others. A video of the field day was produced as part of the project and was published on the Cradle Coast NRM website (via the Cradle Coast NRM YouTube channel). The Leven River field day was the first in a series of similar sessions to be implemented in other locations across the region in 2014/15.

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Investment theme: Community skills, knowledge and engagement. The successful Top 10 Weed Pocket Guide mobile app developed by Cradle Coast NRM in 2012 evolved this year to encompass natural resource management information and tools across a range of topics. The expanded and re-named app was re-launched for Android phone users in July 2013. Feature updates included the ability to hear rural radio broadcasts; connect to NRM on Facebook and YouTube; access Cradle Coast NRM’s Threatened Plant and Shorebird identification guides; and discover the region’s weather conditions. A significant change was the integration of Geographic Information System (GIS) technology directly from the Cradle Coast NRM GIS Gallery web page. The first mobile optimised mapping application included in the app answered the question ‘What is NRM?’ The content outlines the story of NRM in the Cradle Coast region through interactive maps, pictures and text. Content and app updates were made throughout the year without users having to re-install the app. Changes made by Cradle Coast NRM were automatically updated the next time the app was accessed by users. SCHOOLS FOCUS ON NATURAL RESOURCES Investment theme: Community skills, knowledge and engagement. Cradle Coast NRM took a different approach to the school’s project this year with the aim of creating a closer working relationship with the region’s education providers and providing quality delivery of environmental conservation messages and resources. By working closely with a small number of schools throughout the second half of 2013/14, Cradle Coast NRM’s Community Education Project Officer was able to provide students with a deeper understanding of the environment in which they live and the issues involved in the sustainability of environmental resources. Cradle Coast NRM began this important work with a focus on Somerset Primary, Cooee Primary and Stella Maris. Stella Maris prepared an environmental education plan first closely followed by the Somerset and Cooee teachers. Somerset Primary has threatened vegetation, Melaleuca Ericifolia (Swamp Paperbark) within the school grounds and teachers used this area for outdoor learning experiences tied to the Australian Curriculum. ►

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2013–2014


Cradle Coast NRM’s Community Education Project Officer was able to provide students with a deeper understanding of the environment in which they live and the issues involved in the sustainability of environmental resources.

Photograph by Sherrie Jaffray

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S U STA IN AB L E E N V IR O N MEN T In conjunction with Cradle Coast NRM the school began extending the area via revegetation with 320 trees, shrubs and grasses and offered the chance for every child at the school to participate in the planting. By the end of the financial year, the school was busy preparing celebrations with Cradle Coast NRM’s support for biodiversity month in September and plans to hold an Environmental Expo to educate on a variety of environmental themes. Cooee Primary is located on the beach and this year used that natural resource to educate and inspire their students. With assistance from Cradle Coast NRM, the school participated in the Woodbridge School Marine Travel Program which provided an opportunity for children to learn about the marine environment via a stimulating, interactive two-day school visit. PARTNERSHIPS AT WORK IN THE VALE OF BELVOIR Investment theme: Conserving and protecting species and ecosystems. The ability to take a big-picture view and manage natural resources on a catchment or landscape scale has been well demonstrated this year at the Vale of Belvoir in the Cradle Valley. A partnership project between the Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service Cradle Mountain, Devils@Cradle and the Tasmanian Land Conservancy has been operating in the Vale with project development and funding support from Cradle Coast NRM.

(co n ti n u ed)

SHARING A PASSION FOR LITTLE PENGUINS Investment theme: Community skills, knowledge and engagement. Little penguin colony sites at Burnie and Lillico have been developed to allow nightly viewing in a way that is both safe for people and respectful of the Little penguins’ natural habitat and behaviours. The viewing experience is enhanced by the presence of volunteer penguin guides from the Friends of Burnie Penguins and Friends of Lillico Penguins who share their passion and answer questions on anything from food preferences and nesting habits to penguin swimming and diving capabilities. Penguin viewing is a popular drawcard in the Cradle Coast region, attracting 10,000 visitors and residents to the designated penguin viewing areas each year. To ensure that the guides are well-supported in both numbers and knowledge, Cradle Coast NRM organised training at the start of the Little penguin season in late 2013 for existing guides and to attract new volunteers. The training featured talks from Research Scientist, Andre Chiaradia, of the Philip Island Nature Park and Ingrid Albion, Interpretation and Education Officer from the Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service. The 42 participants learnt about current penguin research, the penguin life-cycle, using interpretation for penguin guide talks and best practice penguin viewing techniques. BOXTHORN CONTROL AT LILLICO BEACH

The Vale of Belvoir land is owned by Tasmanian Land Conservancy and is adjoined by the Parks-managed Lake Lea and Vale of Belvoir Conservation Area. This distinction in ownership is not apparent with boundaries and this same seamless principle is being applied to how the land is protected and managed.

Investment theme: Restoring and maintaining urban waterways and coastal environments.

Low impact recreation activities occur throughout the Vale of Belvoir. Activities with a small environmental footprint were encouraged with the addition of interpretive information and signage helping visitors to identify the natural, cultural and historical values of the area.

African Boxthorn is a Weed of National Significance introduced from South Africa. A thorny, dense shrub growing to five metres, this weed has invaded many coastal areas and was well established along Lillico Beach.

School students, private businesses such as Devils@Cradle, and the general community were also consulted to ensure that management plans consider the preferences and requirements of different interest groups including threatened species research and long-term Tasmanian Devil monitoring. Partnership works with Devils@Cradle began in 2010 with support of Cradle Coast NRM’s Natural Connections project and are scheduled to continue as a minimum for the next five years.

22

An African Boxthorn weed control project was successfully concluded this year in a way that respected the inter-dependent ecosystems and multiple uses of the Lillico Beach Conservation Area.

The thorny weed created a safe haven for Little Penguins who built nests amongst the inaccessible foliage where they remained relatively protected from feral cats and dogs. The crowded habitat of the Boxthorn plants meant that it could also be fatal to Short-tailed Shearwaters and encroach on their nesting habitat. The Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service found a balanced solution to the growing problem with thanks to funding from Cradle Coast NRM’s Sustainable Environment stream and the Australian Government’s National Landcare Program.

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2013–2014


Small, recently established African Boxthorn plants were removed in priority Shearwater nesting areas, and larger plants closer to the Lillico Beach viewing platform were drilled and poisoned leaving them in situ as Little Penguin shelters. A coastal vegetation area of 18 hectares was included in the project’s scope which encompassed the Little Penguin viewing platform attended to by the Friends of Lillico Penguin volunteers. All of the African Boxthorn control work was undertaken after the shearwaters had migrated and outside of the penguin breeding season. Site monitoring is scheduled to continue in Spring and checked annually to ensure that follow up works will be identified early and undertaken in a timely manner. YEAR FOUR: SHOREBIRD MONITORING Investment theme: Community skills, knowledge and engagement. The community volunteer Shorebird Monitoring project continued to produce valuable data this year with another two counts completed in late Spring (November 2013) and Summer (February/March 2014). Around 100 volunteers teamed up to conduct counts of five shorebird species along the North West beaches from Narawntapu National Park to Stanley. Data was collated by project coordinator and ornithologist, Hazel Britton, with support from Cradle Coast NRM and shared with Birds Tasmania, Birds Australia and the Tasmanian Natural Values Atlas to inform conservation program development. The project is four years into what’s planned to be at least a ten-year initiative to create a solid baseline understanding of shorebird populations. The 2013/14 Summer count period revealed that Hooded Plover numbers were down on the previous year dropping from 71 adult sightings to 50. Juvenile sightings were up slightly from seven to eleven. The busy Summer holiday period on the region’s northern beaches contributed to low Red-capped Plover breeding numbers with 16 birds recorded. Local education and conservation efforts were also undertaken by Cradle Coast NRM this year including hosting a workshop in Burnie in February where Birdlife Tasmania’s Dr Eric Woehler presented findings from a decade of Tasmanian beach-nesting bird research. Full results of the monitoring in the past year, and since the project began, can be found on the Cradle Coast NRM website.

OPEN CALL FOR NATURAL CONNECTIONS Investment theme: Conserving and protecting species and ecosystems and restoring and maintaining urban waterways and coastal environments. A new community group support project was launched in the last quarter of this year when Cradle Coast NRM called on community groups to submit project proposals in its Sustainable Environment Natural Connections program. Project funding between $500 and $2,000 was made available to eligible applicants and projects within the region. The program commenced with promotion to Landcare, Coastcare, Aboriginal, and Friends of groups and was extended to the community via the Cradle Coast NRM website and Cradle to Coastlines Newsletter. Project ideas could be worked up with a Sustainable Environment team member at any time, and a process was established to assess projects on a quarterly basis. The program was designed to support activities that enhance ecosystem services, natural landscapes, coasts and waterways. Initiatives eligible for Natural Connections support included revegetation of reserves and conservation areas in coastal environments and urban waterways; activities promoting natural regeneration such as defining beach access points; and interpretative signage that highlights conservation and natural values and rare and threatened species among others. In addition to the Natural Connections project, Cradle Coast NRM also established annual $500 sponsorships this year to support community group projects in the region. Sponsorships support groups to undertake small scale on-ground projects, communications and capacity building of volunteers. Cradle Coast NRM provided support to seven community groups this year including: 1. Circular Head Landcare 2. Friends of Reid Street Reserve 3. Mt Roland Rivercare 4. Riverside Avenue Community Group 5. Friends of Burnie Penguins 6. Ulverstone Coastcare 7. Turners Beach Coastcare. The program continues in 2014/15 as an initiative in the Community skills, knowledge and engagement investment theme.

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2013–2014

23


I N FO C U S NA TU RA L C O N N E C TION S P R O T EC T B I O D I VER S I T Y LOCATION: Region-wide. TOTAL FINANCIAL INVESTMENT: $5,573 PARTNERS: Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service

This year there was an evolution within the Cradle Coast NRM Natural Connections project when threatened species monitoring equipment was leveraged to better understand how our region’s reserves were being utilised. Natural Connections was initiated in 2012/13 to support biodiversity conservation projects. One project undertaken with the Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service delivered remote monitoring cameras to assist Giant Freshwater Lobster field work. This year, the monitoring equipment was redeployed to improve our understanding of the type and frequency of reserve use. The remote sensing equipment saved travel time and improved the productivity of field trips by allowing staff to record popular reserve uses without having to be continuously on site. Understanding the community’s preferences when using reserves helps in the development of public education campaigns and in the content and placement of signage infrastructure. Another unanticipated benefit of the Natural Connections support was the ability of Parks and Wildlife Compliance Officers to perform their duties in remote areas without placing themselves in unnecessary, high risk situations. The adaptation of the Natural Connections monitoring project is an excellent example of the region’s ability to make the most of available resources and to deliver results efficiently and effectively.

24

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2013–2014


Understanding the community’s preferences when using reserves helps in the development of public education campaigns and in the content and placement of signage infrastructure.

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2013–2014

25


CRADLE COAST NRM 2013/14 PROJECT SNAPSHOT

Cradle to C oast l i n e s newsletter of the cradle coast natural resource management committee

in this issue: community activities

2

events and news

3

biodiversity

6

project updates

7

Feature Story A passion for Shorebirds Pages 4-5

JULY

AUG

SEPT

NEW FUNDING ERA

CRADLE TO COASTLINES

HOOKED RECOGNITION

2013/14 heralded a transition of Australian Government NRM funding programs, with the conclusion of Caring for our Country and introduction of Sustainable Agriculture and Sustainable Environment programs.

Each quarter throughout 2013/14, Cradle Coast NRM produced and distributed a free newsletter to keep community groups, residents and project partners informed of natural resource news.

Hooked! From the Mountain Dragon to the Handfish environmental arts program received a ‘Good Practice Recognition’ in the 2013 Creative Partnerships Australia Awards.

Cradle Coast NRM secured a Regional Landcare Facilitator position under the new agreement and implemented this position as two part-time roles; one based in the Burnie office and one on King Island in recognition of that municipality’s important agricultural sector. The Cradle Coast NRM team commenced the new financial year by developing plans and projects to align the region’s priorities with the two new Australian Government programs. A review and re-organisation of staff roles was also undertaken to ensure that skills and capabilities were best applied to the Agricultural and Environmental programs. Supported by funding from the Australian Government.

26

Available in both printed and electronic formats, the Cradle to Coastlines Newsletter was used to notify the 800 recipients of NRM events, to share project outcomes and recognise the achievements of individuals and groups across the region. Feature stories over the last 12 months have included milestone reporting in the Weeds of National Significance project, Shorebird monitoring results, the benefits of vegetation shelters and corridors, and Cradle Coast NRM’s GIS and mobile app services. Four editions were produced of 8 – 12 pages, coinciding with the change of seasons. Supported by funding from the Australian Government.

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2013–2014

Hooked! raised community awareness of Tasmania’s diverse flora, fauna and marine life by teaching participants about our natural resources and encouraging them to make replica species and their habitats in fibre, wool and other craft materials. The results were displayed in a public exhibition in Burnie in the last financial year and can be recapped on YouTube by searching for ‘Hooked Mountain Dragon’. The Awards celebrated good practice in partnerships between the arts, donors and business and were held in Hobart on 12 September, attended by Cradle Coast NRM’s project facilitator. An initiative of Creative Partnerships Australia.


OCT

NOV

DEC

CONFERENCE SUPPORT

FACILITATOR TEAM AWARD

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION

Sponsorships were offered to community group members from the Cradle Coast region to attend the Tasmanian Landcare Conference and Awards held in St Helens on 6-7 October.

Cradle Coast NRM staff working in the area of community skills, knowledge and engagement were announced as Semi-Finalists in the 2013 Community Achievement Awards.

Early December saw the NRM Education and Coastal Project Officers combine to deliver a community service activity with students from Marist Regional College.

Eight sponsorships of $250 each were awarded with representatives from Turners Beach Coastcare, Friends of Lillico Penguins, Wynyard Landcare, Circular Head Landcare, the Shorebird Monitoring Program and King Island NRM attending the event. The theme of the conference was ‘Linking Landscapes and People’ and delegates from the region benefited from meeting other volunteers, landowners and NRM professionals to exchange ideas, showcase projects and foster new and existing networks. Sponsorship recipients were able to attend the conference and workshops, participate in field trips and attend the Awards dinner.

The Award recognised the efforts of Anna Wind, Dionna Newton, Karina Rose and Mark Wisniewski in supporting 45 of the region’s environmental community groups, and working with schools and volunteers to plant trees, control weeds, conduct beach clean-ups, protect native flora and fauna, and much more. A key part of the Cradle Coast NRM team’s recognition was for their work in raising community awareness and involvement in environmental management across the region. Between 2011 and 2013, more than 5,714 people participated in the NRM team’s biodiversity and coastal activities. The Community Achievement Awards are an initiative of Awards Australia.

Staff and students visited South Burnie Beach and donned protective gear to remove 12 bags of the invasive dune weed, Sea Spurge. Participants learnt about the negative effects of Sea Spurge on the beach ecosystem and heard a presentation from the Cradle Coast NRM Coastal, Estuarine & Marine Project Officer on resident shorebirds and the dangers of marine debris. Despite rainy conditions, the students were enthusiastic environmental warriors and worked well with the extended team of staff and teachers to improve their local beach environment. Collaboration with Marist Regional College.

Collaboration with Landcare Tasmania. Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2013–2014

27


CRADLE COAST NRM 2013/14 PROJECT SNAPSHOT

JAN

FEB

MARCH

ACROSS THE PADDOCKS

BEACHWATCH

LANDCARE FACILITATORS

Cradle Coast NRM’s e-newsletter for farmers and commercial land managers continued to grow from strength to strength this year under the guidance of the Land Coordinator and Regional Landcare Facilitator.

Initiated in the Summer of 2012, Beachwatch entered its second year and recorded an impressive removal of 213 bags (10.65m3) of marine debris from the region’s coastlines.

This year the region welcomed two new Regional Landcare Facilitators on the North West Coast and on King Island.

Distributed approximately quarterly and coordinated with sustainable agriculture project milestones, the Across the Paddocks newsletter covered important topics such as Carbon Farming Initiatives, planned burning, nutrient budgeting, pasture improvements and promoted many event notices. The subscriber database for the newsletter increased to 295 recipients throughout the year and a new web content management system improved the ‘back-ofhouse’ processes and tools used to make the stories public. The Across the Paddocks name and design continued to be a trusted source of sustainable agriculture information in North West Tasmania.

28

Beaches continue to be cleaned-up by social clubs, school groups and youth organisations with 23 groups registered for beach adoptions at the program’s peak. Although some groups left the program this year, there continues to be a strong commitment from those involved to conducting clean-ups and to sending results to Tangaroa Blue Foundation, the CSIRO and Clean Up Australia. Some Beachwatch volunteer groups also undertake TasMARC sea level monitoring and their data is proving useful to understanding trends and local changes. Collaboration with the region’s community groups, and Tangaroa Blue Foundation, CSIRO, Clean Up Australia and TasMARC.

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2013–2014

Commencing in March, Tom O’Malley joined the Cradle Coast NRM team as the North West Tasmanian Facilitator and was followed soon after by Rod Graham supporting community groups and land managers on King Island. Both Facilitators are well networked within their communities and had an immediate impact on the promotion of sustainable farm and land management practices. Attending Landcare group events and meetings, and supporting new and existing groups with information, resources and contacts was a key part of the Facilitators’ induction into the role and will continue to make their mark in the new financial year. Supported by funding from the Australian Government.


APRIL

MAY

JUNE

LINK AND LEARN

VOLUNTEERS WEEK

STRATEGY REFRESH

Members of 15 Landcare, Coastcare, and ‘Friends of’ volunteer community groups from across the Cradle Coast came together in Burnie for the second annual Link and Learn community Forum.

In the past year more than 1000 volunteers from community groups and schools teamed up with Cradle Coast NRM to participate in environmental and sustainable agriculture initiatives.

This year marked the beginning of the fifth and final year of the Cradle Coast regional NRM Strategy. Prepared on behalf of the region, the NRM Strategy is a guiding document for anyone working with and around our region’s land, waterways and coasts.

Groups networked, shared knowledge and discussed NRM challenges which resonate across the region. Guest speakers included Andrew Potter of North West Coastare Association, Julie Hargreaves of Mt Roland Rivercare and Mark Ritchie of Landcare Tasmania. Damian Heran of Fishcare Tasmania also provided a wealth of information to participants related to fishing in the region. Workshops were then held on themes of Coast, Land and Biodiversity and associated environmental management issues including volunteer training and skill development, insurance and weed control techniques.

The NRM team had a chance to express a public ‘thank you’ to these people during National Volunteers Week in May. In addition to direct contact with the region’s Coastcare, Landcare and ‘Friends of’ group members, Cradle Coast NRM also took out an advertisement in the regional newspaper, The Advocate, declaring their gratitude and congratulations to volunteers active in natural resource management. Events like Link and Learn and the Shorebird Monitoring Workshop are examples of other networking and celebratory activities run by Cradle Coast NRM that show appreciation for volunteers throughout the year. Collaboration with National Volunteers Week and the region’s environmental volunteers.

In June a plan was created outlining the steps to collect stakeholder input and update the Strategy contents. One of the key amendments to the new Strategy is incorporating climate change impacts on the region’s natural resources. The Planning for Climate Change project (see page 14) was an important source for these updates. The target date for release of the 2015 – 2020 Strategy is end June 2015. Collaboration with the region’s natural resource stakeholders.

Collaboration with the region’s community groups. Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2013–2014

29


I N FO C U S W EE D A W A R E N E S S POS T C A R D S LOCATION: Region-wide. TOTAL FINANCIAL INVESTMENT: $5,676 PARTNERS: The nine Councils of the Cradle Coast region.

The battle against weeds is a long-term commitment, and Cradle Coast NRM knows from experience that one-off initiatives in weed control can have little impact if not followed through. Cradle Coast NRM’s Weed Advisory Group recognised this challenge and responded in 2013/14 with a weed awareness campaign that combined good humour with good information. Weeds: Wish you weren’t here postcards were produced for each of the nine municipal areas in the Cradle Coast region. Taking their inspiration from postcards used by holiday makers, the colourful cards highlighted four common weeds that may be found in each Council area and asks: Are weeds holidaying at your place? The postcards proved to be an effective way to encourage weed control as they were left in the letterboxes of properties seen to have weed problems, and were also distributed widely throughout communities by Council staff. The cards include a list of resources to assist with weed management and act as a positive way of advising people of their legal obligations in weed control. Each card is customised to highlight problem declared weeds in each of the nine municipal areas. A declared weed is a non-local plant that has been targeted for control under the Tasmanian Weed Management Act 1999 because they have the potential to take over areas of natural coast, bushland or farmland, restrict access to places and hinder the growth of native plants.

30

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2013–2014


Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2013–2014

31


The financial statements presented have been compiled from the audited financial statements of the reporting entity, the Cradle Coast Authority, for the year ended 30 June 2014.

C RA D LE C O A S T N A TU R A L R ES O UR C E MA N A GEMENT C O MP RE HE N S IV E IN COM E S T A T EMEN T For year ended 30 June 2014 NOTE REVENUE

2014

2013

$

$

Grant Income

1

2,424,992

2,386,542

Other Income

2

3,805

6,381

Interest Income

30,404

51,373

Total Revenue

2,459,201

2,444,296

1,041,256

1,038,265

473,242

1,367,570

490,882

403,649

2,005,380

2,809,484

453,821

-365,188

EXPENSES Employee Costs Project Delivery and Consultancy Other Operating Expenses

3

Total Expenses

Comprehensive Result

32

4

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2013–2014


The financial statements presented have been compiled from the audited financial statements of the reporting entity, the Cradle Coast Authority, for the year ended 30 June 2014.

C RA D LE C O A S T N A TU R A L R ES O UR C E MA N A GEMENT BAL A N CE S HE E T As at 30 June 2014

ASSETS

2014

2013

$

$

Current assets Cash at Bank

1,357,555

842,528

-

120

4,874

2,971

Total current assets

1,362,429

845,619

TOTAL ASSETS

1,362,429

845,619

70,160

34,671

-

18,847

Provision for annual and long service leave

64,006

42,705

Provision for parental leave

10,000

10,000

PAYG payable

18,023

17,581

1,826

2,609

164,015

126,413

Provision for annual and long service leave

56,358

30,971

Total non-current liabilities

56,358

30,971

220,373

157,384

1,142,056

688,235

Accumulated Funds

688,235

1,053,423

Comprehensive Result

453,821

-365,188

1,142,056

688,235

Trade Receivables Interest Accrued

LIABILITIES Current liabilities Trade Payables Superannuation Payable

Payroll tax payable Total current liabilities Non-current liabilities

TOTAL LIABILITIES NET ASSETS EQUITY

TOTAL EQUITY

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2013–2014

33


The financial statements presented have been compiled from the audited financial statements of the reporting entity, the Cradle Coast Authority, for the year ended 30 June 2014.

C RA D LE C O A S T N A TU R A L R ES O UR C E MA N A GEMENT NOTES TO F IN A N CIA L S T A T EM EN T S For year ended 30 June 2014 NOTE 1

2014 GRANT INCOME Dept of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population & Community

$

$

1,842,900

Natural Heritage Trust

151,000

Dept of Primary Industry, Parks,Water & Environment

246,667

Dept of the Environment

335,425

Dept of Premier & Cabinet

NRM North

1,187

External contributions to projects

2,618

6,381

3,805

6,381

12,643

23,055

OTHER OPERATING EXPENSES Fringe Benefits Tax IT Support

332 13,585

14,440

Meeting, Planning & Forum Expenses

9,416

11,180

Phone Faxes & Internet

1,970

4,537

Postage Printing & Stationery

11,889

25,507

Recruitment & Relocation Costs

11,774

5,732

Rent - Rates & Taxes

28,515

30,919

Sundries

10,908

14,924

Travelling Expenses

24,807

17,684

7,902

6,607

Audit Fees Communication Office Costs Seminars, Conferences & Subs Bank Fees

34,165

38,356

169,863

132,182

9,852

3,319

433

537

Vehicle expenses

27,765

30,980

Committee Expenses

34,645

31,954

Sponsorship

6,520

2,432

73,898

2,806

490,882

403,649

Project Carry Over 12/13

688,235

1,053,423

13/14 Surplus

453,821

(365,188)

1,142,056

688,235

Capital Expenditure

COMPREHENSIVE RESULT

Total Project unexpended Funds

34

2,386,542

OTHER INCOME

Advertising

4

246,667 4,545

2,424,992

3

1,843,000 141,330

Dept of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry

2

2013

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2013–2014


Cradle Coast NRM would like to acknowledge the following photographers for their contribution to this publication: Geoff Gleave, Geoff King, Ernst Kemmerer, Alison Dugand, Jen Archer, Don May, Sherrie Jaffray, David McCormack, Kaare Wind, Karina Rose, Alaister Bett, Amanda Wilson, Anna Wind, Spencer Gibbs, iStockphoto and Thinkstock Cover photograph by Geoff Gleave This report is printed on recycled paper Designed by Emma Duncan, Red Bird Design


Cradle Coast NRM 1 – 3 Spring Street, Burnie PO Box 338 Burnie TAS 7320 Ph: 03 6431 6285 Fax: 03 6431 7014 nrm@cradlecoast.com Cradle Coast NRM is an independent committee hosted by the Cradle Coast Authority

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NRM Annual Report 2013-2014  

NRM Annual Report 2013-2014

NRM Annual Report 2013-2014  

NRM Annual Report 2013-2014