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CRADLE COAST NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE ANNUAL REPORT 2012 – 2013


Cradle Coast NRM Annual Report 2012 – 2013 Copyright Š Cradle Coast Authority 2013 No part of this publication may be reproduced without the express prior permission of the publisher. Published by: Cradle Coast Authority PO Box 338 Burnie TAS 7320 Ph: 03 6431 6285 nrm@cradlecoast.com

This report is produced to fulfil the statutory reporting obligations of the Cradle Coast NRM Committee under the Tasmanian Natural Resource Management Act 2002. The Committee is required to report on its activity to the Minister for Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment. This report covers the period from 1 July 2012 to 30 June 2013. The Cradle Coast NRM Committee acknowledges the financial support provided to it by the Australian and Tasmanian Governments.


CO N TE N TS 5

Foreword

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Introduction

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Executive Officer Report

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Cradle Coast NRM Staff and Committee

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In Focus: A big backyard for Natural Resource Management

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Land

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Coasts

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Water

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In Focus: Plants At-risk in the Cradle Coast Area (PACCA)

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Cradle Coast NRM 2012/13 Projects

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Cradle Coast NRM 2012/13 Project Snapshot

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In Focus: Sustainable Agriculture Program

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Cradle Coast NRM Financial Statements

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013

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It is the never ending support and participation from the community of this region that continues to drive our NRM program and I would like to thank you all on behalf of our Committee and staff.

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013


F OREWOR D by the Chair of the Cradle Coast NRM Committee On behalf of the Cradle Coast Natural Resource Management Committee I present the annual report for 2012/13. This has been a significant year in many respects, but also one of contradictions. On the one hand we have been bringing a large number of funding programs to a successful conclusion and starting to reflect and review on this work, yet at the same time we have been engaged in planning for the future, building strong governance and operational processes that will support and deliver future programs. This eye on the future is particularly important in the current environment, with the prospect of significant changes to land tenure and management in the region and to the key economic drivers identified in our state (dairy, horticulture, aquaculture, mining and tourism) predominantly located in our region. These drivers have the potential to deliver economic and social benefits but they also rely heavily on our natural resources, creating a need and demand for Cradle Coast NRM and the services we provide. It is important that Cradle Coast NRM is well placed to meet these demands. It is rewarding to see that the proactive approach we have taken over recent years in reviewing and assessing our operations has identified a number of positive aspects but also others where we can make improvements. Both Committee and staff are committed to the process of ongoing improvement to further strengthen our delivery of NRM activities in the region. The true benefits of these improvements will only be realised if the relationships we have with our community are maintained and developed. It is therefore disappointing that despite the lessons of the past we are once again in a position of funding uncertainty. The continued sustainability of our Nation’s natural resources is so fundamental for future generations it should be funded on an ongoing basis. It should not be at the whim of changing political parties. That way we can attract and retain good people for this most important function of government. Despite this challenge we are optimistic that we can maintain continuity of our services in the short term and continue to support our diverse community in a range of NRM activities. It would be appropriate at this point to acknowledge the contribution of Committee member Brett Noble, who left us in the 2012/13 period, and provided many years of invaluable service to our Committee and NRM in the region. I would like to conclude by thanking the Committee and staff for their commitment and focus in these challenging times, particularly in view of the ongoing uncertainty around funding. However it is the never ending support and participation from the community of this region that continues to drive our NRM program and I would like to thank you all on behalf of our Committee and staff. Rick Rockliff AM Committee Chairman

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I NTRO D U C TIO N The Cradle Coast region is remarkably diverse, bounded by 2,640 km of coastline and covering 22,520 square kilometres; approximately one-third of Tasmania. The region’s natural resources and landscapes are valuable for their ability to sustain primary industries, their ability to provide ecosystem services such as clean water and air and their intrinsic value as homes for animal and plant communities which also act as tourism drawcards. The region stretches from Narawntapu National Park in the east to King Island and Cape Grim in the far north west and to Port Davey in the south. Its eastern border runs diagonally through Cradle Valley. The region incorporates the nine local government municipalities of Burnie City, Central Coast, Circular Head, Devonport City, Kentish, King Island, Latrobe, Waratah-Wynyard and West Coast. In 2000, these nine local government municipalities established a regional organisation known as the Cradle Coast Authority to facilitate sustainable development, host regional functions and coordinate regional-level issues and projects. The Cradle Coast NRM Committee is an independent committee hosted by the Cradle Coast Authority. The Cradle Coast NRM team work with north west Tasmanian communities to improve natural resources such as our land, water and coasts to ensure a healthy future for the region. Cradle Coast NRM supports community and industry projects, facilitates funding, and coordinates natural resource activities and information sharing. The Cradle Coast NRM annual report for 2012/13 outlines the achievements and project deliverables of natural resource management activities within the Cradle Coast region. Additional copies of this report can be obtained from www.cradlecoastnrm.com. For information on the objectives and strategic direction of natural resource management in the Cradle Coast, refer to the 2010–15 Regional Natural Resource Management Strategy also available from www.cradlecoastnrm.com.

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013


EX ECU TIVE O F F IC E R R E P O R T The 2012/13 year proved to be another productive year, building on the solid foundations of 2011/12 and delivering a number of important initiatives that will support future activities. The conclusion of the 2012/13 financial year also marked the end of current funding arrangements at both State and Australian Government level, creating an opportunity to reflect on achievements in the region and to initiate planning for future work. At an operational level, the recent focus has been on developing an improved method for implementation planning that links the regional NRM strategy to actions on the ground. This work has provided a basis for funding applications and delivery of future NRM activities, with benefits including the improved prioritisation of limited funding, better communications with stakeholders and improved linkages across key documents and programs. These benefits have been, and will continue to be, supported by the proactive approach of Cradle Coast NRM’s Committee, management and staff to continually improve our governance and business processes. In the 2012/13 period, Cradle Coast NRM completed an independent audit of performance and has begun implementation of recommendations. The NRM Committee and staff have also continued to improve skills in key areas through professional development and training. These activities strengthen our position and role in the future delivery of regional and statewide projects. All of these results and improvements are dependent on continued investment in the region. Unfortunately as we concluded programs at the end of 2012/13, Cradle Coast NRM is still awaiting confirmation of grant applications across a range of new funding programs, not least the Australian Government’s Caring for our Country. These programs provide the majority of our project funding, and support almost all of our regional NRM activities and project staff. While confident about the quality of our recent funding submissions, the ongoing delays, uncertainty and operational difficulties this has presented may impact short term NRM projects and community support activities. This disruption to operations also presents significant challenges for retaining key skills and resources in our region over the longer term, both internal and external to our organisation. Despite these challenges there are a large number of funding opportunities currently in process and we will be seeking to replicate the success of our many programs and activities in the region. These successes strongly reflect our ongoing partnership with our regional community, the army of volunteers that regularly support our activities and the increasing support from project partners within business, local government and the NRM community. As we evolve into the new funding programs we will continue to build these relationships for the benefit of our region and its communities. In concluding I would like to acknowledge the commitment and hard work of our NRM Committee and staff this year, in particular Sue Botting and Belinda Colson who left us in this period, with a combined and invaluable 10 years’ service to the delivery of NRM activities. I look forward to the opportunities the new year will bring and thank you all for your ongoing support and participation in 2012/13. Richard Ingram Executive Officer

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C RA D LE C O A S T N R M S T A FF A N D C O M M I T T EE Tasmania has three Natural Resource Management Committees established under the Tasmanian Natural Resource Management Act 2002 to represent the south, north and Cradle Coast (north west) regions of the state. Cradle Coast NRM comprises of a Committee plus dedicated staff with expertise in agriculture, water, coastal and biodiversity management, monitoring and mapping, and community engagement. Collectively Cradle Coast NRM helps identify regional natural resource management priorities, prepare regional strategies, promotes NRM principles and supports the implementation of NRM activities. The Cradle Coast NRM team is based within the Cradle Coast Authority office in Burnie and is supported by the Authority’s finance, administration and communications staff. In addition to the core team, Cradle Coast NRM also supports the West Coast Council to employ a Project Officer in the West Coast Weed and Fire Management Group. The information below reflects the team composition at 30 June 2013. RICHARD INGRAM – EXECUTIVE OFFICER Leads the team and is the link between the Cradle Coast NRM Committee, Cradle Coast Authority and industry stakeholders. SUE BOTTING – OPERATIONS MANAGER/SPECIAL PROJECTS Manages delivery of NRM programs. Seconded to delivery of special projects. ROSIE BRITTON – BUSINESS SUPPORT MANAGER Manages the business functions including contracting and reporting. ALISON DUGAND – BIODIVERSITY COORDINATOR Implements projects to ensure healthy ecosystems and threatened species protection and assists with regional weeds management. SPENCER GIBBS – REGIONAL LANDCARE FACILITATOR Works with landholders and community to promote Landcare and sustainable natural resource management practices. BRAD GRIFFITHS – PROJECT OFFICER Provides technical expertise for stand alone projects. STACEY GROVES – ADMINISTRATION AND COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER Provides administrative and communications services to support business functions and the implementation of projects.

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SHERRIE JAFFRAY – PROJECT OFFICER Works with producers, industry and extension professionals to develop and promote sustainable farm practices. APRIL LANGERAK – INFORMATION MANAGER Collects and maintains NRM data from regional projects and coordinates program monitoring, evaluation, reporting and improvement. DIONNA NEWTON – FACILITATOR Works with the community and supports community groups to raise awareness of regional NRM issues and implement ‘hands-on’ programs such as shorebird monitoring and Beachwatch. KARINA ROSE – FACILITATOR Works with school groups and youth organisations and supports community groups to raise awareness of regional NRM issues and implement ‘hands-on’ programs. ANNA WIND – FACILITATOR TEAM COORDINATOR Heads the facilitator team and works with the community and supports community groups to raise awareness of regional NRM issues and implement ‘hands-on’ projects including the Land Manager Grants Program. MARK WISNIEWSKI – FACILITATOR Supports community groups to raise awareness of regional NRM issues and implement ‘hands-on’ programs. Implements the Weeds of National Significance project. During 2012/13 the Cradle Coast NRM team was also assisted by Belinda Colson, Coastal Coordinator; Matt Rose, Implementation Manager; and Melissa Syme, Land Coordinator.

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013


CRADLE COAST NRM COMMITTEE The Cradle Coast NRM Committee is comprised of nine members with extensive and diverse agricultural, cultural heritage, scientific, educational and forestry experience. The Committee meets monthly to guide NRM projects, define priorities and, as required, oversee regional NRM strategic planning. Committee members are appointed by a selection panel established through a public process for a term of up to three years. During the 2012/13 year, members Brett Noble and Robert Onfray retired from the Committee.

RICK ROCKLIFF AM – CHAIR

EVA FINZEL – DEPUTY CHAIR

TINA ALDERSON – COMMITTEE MEMBER

GUY GREY – COMMITTEE MEMBER

SUE JENNINGS – COMMITTEE MEMBER

GEOFF KING – COMMITTEE MEMBER

JAMES REYNOLDS – COMMITTEE MEMBER

PETER TYSON – COMMITTEE MEMBER

PETER VOLLER – COMMITTEE MEMBER

BILL WALKER – COMMITTEE MEMBER

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I N FO C U S A BIG B A C KYA R D F O R NA TU RA L R E S O U R C E M A N A G EM EN T LOCATION: Australia-wide. TOTAL FINANCIAL INVESTMENT: $1,020 (from Cradle Coast region) PARTNERS: NRM North, NRM South and the 53 remaining NRM bodies across Australia.

Tasmania’s three regional natural resource management groups joined their interstate counterparts this year to celebrate a massive achievement: some 14 million hectares of land under improved management. Australia has 56 regional groups working together to care for our natural resources – the soil, water and coastal systems that ensure our food security and economic strength. These groups worked together to initiate a national awareness campaign celebrating their collective achievements in natural resource management. NRM South CEO, Dr. Kathleen Broderick, NRM North CEO, James McKee and Cradle Coast NRM Executive Officer, Richard Ingram said the achievements of NRM bodies throughout Australia could only ever be possible with communities working together to take better care of their land. “Regional bodies across Australia put a lot of emphasis on how they work with people who can actually make a difference on the ground,” Kathleen said. James McKee said the statistics for Tasmania alone were also quite impressive. “Across the three NRM regions, more than 7,000 people were engaged in practice change and more than 3,000 school children joined hands on programs where they learnt how to manage our natural resources for future generations.” The statistics also show more than 57,000 hectares of land in Tasmania is under improved management for healthier food and fibre production. Richard Ingram said that the national network of NRM regions provided a strong foundation for community and landholder support customised to each area’s particular needs. “We’ve been able to achieve these results with the support of the Australian Government and the many other partners who contribute. Regional natural resource management in Tasmania and across the big backyard Australia-wide, will continue to be a partnership approach to taking care of our land, waterways and coasts,” Richard said.

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013


Across the three NRM regions, more than 7,000 people were engaged in practice change and more than 3,000 school children joined hands on programs where they learnt how to manage our natural resources for future generations.

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LAN D GOAL: To protect and maintain or improve our natural, productive and urban landscapes by ensuring a sustainable balance between economic, environmental and social values.

Here are some of the key land projects for 2012/13: Surveys build understanding of orchid populations In January this year, Threatened Plants Tasmania and Cradle Coast NRM teamed up with Gunns Ltd to conduct a survey of the rare orchid Prasophyllum crebriflorum found on the Gunns’ Hatfield Plain property. The aim of the survey conducted by staff and volunteers was to gain a better understanding of the extent and size of the site’s orchid population amongst the grasslands. Phil Collier of Threatened Plants Tasmania (TPT) used the data to estimate that there are likely to be at least 2,500 Prasophyllum crebriflorum in the area. A systematic ‘police line’ style of search was undertaken in a permanent monitoring quadrat measuring 100 metres by 50 metres. A survey in this fixed quadrat allows TPT to track changes in orchid population dynamics over time. An additional 60 quadrats measuring 5 metres by 5 metres were surveyed in random locations across the grasslands and used to calculate the total population estimate for the species. The valuable knowledge gained from this survey helped the land managers to tailor burn and property management regimes to better suit such rare species. Sustainable plans for small acreage properties Following from the success of last year’s Rural Living Round-up hobby farmer field day and the interest in sustainable land management expressed by small acreage landholders, Cradle Coast NRM launched a Property Management Planning program in 2012/13 specifically for this segment of the community. Eighteen landholders from the region registered for the program including bush block owners, hobby and smallscale commercial farmers. The Property Management Planning initiative aimed to help participants understand and manage their land to meet their personalised goals.

Each participant received customised information including aerial photographs and topographical maps of their property as a starting point in planning infrastructure, natural asset and production area changes. By the end of the workshop series, each had developed a property management plan and had received information and tools to help in its implementation. A small grants program was then opened to the workshop participants to assist them in actioning an aspect of their property management plans. Twenty small-acreage land managers took up the opportunity and incentives were distributed on successful implementation of a range of fencing, shelterbelt planting, weed control and soil improvement projects. The property management planning and grant programs were additional resources within the growing stable of small acreage assistance provided by Cradle Coast NRM and the Regional Landcare Facilitator. Other resources included the free Rural Living in the Cradle Coast booklet, the annual Rural Living Round-up field day event and a range of property management fact sheets. Land Manager Community Partnership Grants Cradle Coast NRM continued to deliver programs that enhance regional biodiversity by helping to achieve the region’s strategic goal of having native flora, fauna and ecosystem functions that are valued, maintained and protected. A series of Land Manager Community Partnership Grants assisted in this goal in 2012/13 by supporting the development of skilled, knowledgeable and active community members who work together to reduce environmental threats and improve the conditions of our natural assets. The third round of Grants were announced in October with six public land management organisations being awarded a total of $21,004 to implement community engagement projects ranging from weed control to threatened species education across the region. Example projects within the biodiversity enhancement theme included Pampas Grass Education and Control by King Island Council; Burrowing Crayfish Community Education by Devonport City Council (see below); and community education at Sykes Reserve by Kentish Council. A full listing of the Land Manager Grant projects awarded over the past two years can be found at www.cradlecoastnrm.com. ►

The first of a series of free workshops was held in mid-July where participants received templates, planning tools and information on soil, native vegetation and weeds to guide them in the creation of their own property plans.

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013


The Property Management Planning initiative aimed to help participants understand and manage their land to meet their personalised goals.

Photograph by David McCormack

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LAN D

( c o n t inued )

Industry assists the Burrowing Crayfish Surrounding the site of dairy manufacturing plant, Fonterra Spreyton, is a population of the threatened species commonly known as the Burrowing Crayfish. An extensive vegetation buffer of 125 hectares is preserved around the Fonterra Spreyton factory including 45 hectares of covenanted land, an estuarine habitat, and areas of native bush and productive farmland. The estuarine grasslands provide a sanctuary for wildlife and the riparian zone along Cocker’s Creek is a key habitat for the threatened Burrowing Crayfish. The landscape was cleared of rubbish from Clean Up Australia Day efforts in 2012 and a Cradle Coast NRM Land Manager Community Grant was used this year to engage 125 school students via five excursions to the site. The students planted 500 indigenous understorey species including native pepper, native daphne, correas, grasses and sedges and enhanced the area’s native biodiversity. The plantings were accompanied by educational sessions on local plant species, the Burrowing Crayfish and other wildlife in the area. Students also toured the Fonterra Spreyton factory and had the opportunity to learn about local milk production. Students from Spreyton, Devonport, Hillcrest and East Devonport primary schools took part in the excursions and plantings to coincide with National Tree Day celebrations and educational activities. The Cradle Coast NRM Land Manager grant was implemented with the Devonport City Council and the assistance of the Devonport City Council’s Sustainability Officer, Phil Murray. Natural rejuvenation of a heritage asset The Pioneer Cemetery at Zeehan has been rejuvenated thanks to community volunteers and the West Coast Council. Owing to its remote location, the cemetery had become overgrown with weeds, including some impenetrable gorse bushes, and had fallen into neglect. Cradle Coast NRM provided a $4,000 grant to the West Coast Council for community education on weeds, replanting and gorse control under its Land Manager Grants Program. The West Coast Weed and Fire Management project officer coordinated the project’s on-ground delivery. When a scrub fire swept through the cemetery area, it damaged Huon pine headstones but also provided welcome relief in reducing the woody weed infestations. To take advantage of this otherwise damaging natural disaster, a working bee was arranged to plant 500 native species and enhance an area of Burrowing Crayfish habitat. The West Coast Weed and Fire Management Group has committed to a three year weed maintenance plan, ensuring follow up treatment for gorse will continue.

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Wrapping up the latest Weeds of National Significance program This year saw the conclusion of the latest Weeds of National Significance (WoNS) program in the Cradle Coast region and marked the delivery of 382 hectares of blackberry, boneseed, bridal creeper, gorse, seeding willow and serrated tussock control. Weed location knowledge underpinned the project’s sound planning and ability to achieve sustainable results. A ‘Field Data Capture System’ was used to map the location of weeds and monitor the before and after effects of any control works. This system integrated with the Field Manual for Surveying and was a useful tool provided to the nine local councils of the region, the West Coast Weed and Fire Management Group and to the King Island NRM Group. Weed mapping is now available via LISTmap on Tasmania’s theLIST website for public viewing of weed threats and control points. The far-reaching project called on the collaborative efforts of all levels of government plus private enterprise and partner NRM groups. Grange Resources played a major role in Cradle Coast NRM’s blackberry control between the areas of Peggs Beach and Crayfish Creek. Similarly, the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment worked with the King Island NRM Group and Cradle Coast NRM to implement a Serrated Tussock Control Plan on the island in line with current best practices. Across the region, seeding willow infestation reduced from 29 hectares to around 18 hectares. The work was implemented under the guidance of the Cradle Coast Weed Advisory Group who directed the region’s weed management plans and activities throughout 2012/13. Incentives create positive outcomes for our region’s biodiversity Another significant project to be concluded at the end of 2012/13 was Cradle Coast NRM’s Biodiversity Incentives Program. This program has encouraged positive change throughout the region since its commencement in July 2011 by avoiding a one-size-fitsall approach. Instead it has offered a range of incentive programs and activities that targeted diverse landowner groups and localities – all linked by a common thread: the enhancement of biodiversity. Commencing in the Forth-Wilmot catchment area with private land-holders, in the past year the program has evolved to engage Parks and Wildlife staff, covenanted properties as well as lifestyle block owners around the region. Example initiatives include stock control in riparian areas, weed management and native vegetation planting to protect threatened species and encourage a natural diversity of habitat communities.

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013


Funding of up to $10,000 per applicant was available to landholders in the Biodiversity on Farms component of the program. More than 800 hectares had been enhanced with improved connectivity of native vegetation and catchments on public and private lands by the end of 2012/13. Australian Government Caring for our Country funding has supported this extensive regional program, and enabled Cradle Coast NRM to provide long term planning options, technical advice and information to participants. The program’s completion in June 2013 left a legacy in productive and natural settings, and delivered positive outcomes for the flora and fauna species inhabiting these enhanced landscapes and the landholders who are their proud custodians.

Growing success of the Rural Living Round-up The third Rural Living Round-up field day for hobby farmers and small-acreage land holders was held in Burnie in May and attracted more than 300 interested participants. As per previous years, the event combined practical demonstrations; trade, livestock and machinery displays and informative presentations on a range of relevant topics from weed control to soil health and biodynamics to fencing construction.

Developing burn regimes in the Vale of Belvoir

The presentation agenda included tips on achieving water efficiency from Think Water; composting techniques from Dulverton Waste Management and the Tasmanian Polytechnic; and soil management best practices from Palm-AG Services. Presentation topics were selected based on feedback arising from last year’s event and from suggestions and key interest-areas raised by participants in Cradle Coast NRM’s Smallholder Property Management Planning program.

The three-year Natural Connections incentive program wound up in June 2013 with the completion of many significant knowledge-building projects to preserve and enhance the region’s threatened flora and fauna.

A survey of attendees at this year’s event revealed a high number or return visitors from previous events, and a high incidence of reports to apply the lessons learnt to their own properties.

A key initiative has been a partnership project involving Cradle Coast NRM, the Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service and the Tasmanian Land Conservancy (TLC) at the Vale of Belvoir near Cradle Mountain. Sections of the Vale of Belvoir feature grasslands that are home to threatened orchid species and the ptunarra brown butterfly. In the past year, and with the assistance of Threatened Plants Tasmania and TLC volunteers, surveys of threatened flora and fauna were undertaken as a way of establishing baseline data of resident populations. This data helped inform the creation of a fire management strategy for the area which was completed by Jon Marsden-Smedley and Steve Leonard in March 2013. A monitoring strategy to determine the impacts of grassland disturbance was also drafted with support of Cradle Coast NRM Natural Connections incentives. Over the past three years, 43 volunteers have contributed 111 volunteer days to threatened flora surveys and six volunteers have contributed 32 volunteer days to threatened fauna surveys – all valuable contributions to the land and fire management strategies.

Farmers’ Soil Condition Studies The Cradle Coast NRM Farmers’ Soil Condition Study continued to provide technical and scientific assistance to landowners in the region to trial sustainable methods of managing soil health in real production systems. Projects that were initiated last year with grants of up to $10,000 each continued to be studied and results shared via field days in 2012/13. In the case of one Mooreville vegetable farmer, a trial was undertaken in potato crops comparing conventional fertiliser and weed control methods with natural composts (Aerated Compost) and compost teas (Actively Aerated Compost Teas). At the start of the study, and throughout the trial period, soils were tested and special brews of compost teas were developed to match the test results and be applied as liquid fertiliser. The farmer was assisted by an accredited Soil Foodweb consultant and demonstrations of compost methods were shared with 65 landholders from across the region at a field day promoted with the help of Cradle Coast NRM and held in December 2012.

This emphasis on monitoring will help the land managers gather feedback on different land management techniques and their effects on vegetation communities and threatened species.

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C O A STS GOAL: To protect and maintain or improve our coastal, estuarine and marine environments by ensuring a sustainable balance between economic, environmental and social values.

Here are some of the key coastal projects for 2012/13: Training volunteer whale rescue and seal minding teams The Cradle Coast NRM Land Manager Community Partnership Grants were put to good use across the region’s coastal areas, including by the Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service who are first responders to any whale and seal strandings. The Parks and Wildlife Service identified a need to engage more volunteers in stranding rescue efforts and set about developing a training program to up-skill local students, residents and holiday-home owners. The training provided practical information on safely caring for stranded whales; protecting elephant seals and leopard seals; information and access to specialist equipment; plus important base knowledge in marine conservation. Sixteen volunteers are now trained in Marrawah, 55 in the Devonport area, 39 in Ulverstone and from the latest grant round an additional 20 volunteers on King Island. The project included a marine education day with a Discovery Ranger for 123 King Island students. Seal minding skills were included in the course to help the First Response Teams effectively manage the natural occurrence of seals arriving on local beaches. Seals typically rest on the beach and the volunteers were taught seal biology, identification and how to care for these creatures while they’re in public areas. Increasing the number of penguin interpretation guides Community and visitor appreciation of the region’s Little penguin populations delivers a dual benefit in both conservation and tourism. From dusk during any night between October and March, volunteer interpretation guides attend the Little penguin colony viewing platforms at Burnie and Lillico Beach to assist visitors with questions and to raise awareness of the threats facing these iconic birds.

inducted following a public advertising period in the regional media which drew a high level of interest. Training was provided by Chris Mead of Creatures Tales and was supported by Peter Dann, Senior Researcher at the Philip Island Nature Park. A total of 30 people attended the interpretation training held at the end of September which was useful to both new volunteers and as a refresher for the existing guides. On King Island, a Land Manager Community Partnership Grant of $5,238 helped improve the management of a popular penguin viewing site at Grassy Harbour through community education and the promotion of best practice penguin viewing guidelines. Interpretation and warning signage was installed to raise awareness of Little penguins and improve traffic management to reduce penguin road-kill. Penguin interpretation talks were also provided to students and to visitors at the penguin colony as penguins came ashore. Land managers engage our coastal communities Round Three of the Cradle Coast NRM Land Manager Community Partnership Grants were rolled out this year with six recipient organisations sharing in over $20,000 to assist their community engagement projects. The Arthur River Parks and Wildlife Service worked to raise community awareness of the significant natural and cultural values of the west coast of Tasmania through three educational activities. Interpretation signage was produced to promote conservation and Aboriginal heritage values, as was signage to inform visitors to the coast of the shorebird and native animal populations in the area. The focus of these works was from West Point to Johnsons Head. In the Central Coast municipal area, $1,170 was awarded to improve and protect the dune system at Turners Beach from Mirror Bush weeds. A weed eradication weekend was held for the community to encourage removal of Mirror Bush from local private properties and to reduce the seed source infesting the dune habitat. A weed information display and flyer distributed to residents provided additional information on weed identification and control techniques. Participants were provided with a native plant giveaway as an added incentive to remove and replace the Mirror Bush. Over the three-year Grant program, $67,902 has been awarded to public land managers throughout the Cradle Coast region. ►

This year, with the assistance of a Cradle Coast NRM Community Grant of $2,050, an extra 20 guides were trained to join the Friends of Burnie Penguins and Friends of Lillico Penguins guiding rosters. The new guides were

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013


Round Three of the Cradle Coast NRM Land Manager Community Partnership Grants were rolled out this year with six recipient organisations sharing in over $20,000 to assist their community engagement projects.

Photograph by Belinda Colson

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By the end of the year, a total of 172.5 standard Clean Up Australia Day litter bags had been removed from all of the Beachwatch beaches and the number of beaches included in the Beachwatch program rose to 23.

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013


C O A STS

(c ont inued )

Monitoring resident shorebird populations

Beachwatch

The Shorebird Monitoring project continued to go from strength to strength this year with 100 volunteers showing their dedication to the coastal environment by maintaining their twice-yearly counts of seven shorebird species.

At the beginning of 2012/13, the Beachwatch program was established in the Waratah-Wynyard and Circular Head municipal areas. The lessons learnt from the successful program launch in Devonport the year before, set the new volunteer groups in the west of the region off to a sound start. By the end of the year, a total of 172.5 standard Clean Up Australia Day litter bags had been removed from all of the Beachwatch beaches and the number of beaches included in the Beachwatch program rose to 23.

Data from these counts is collated by project coordinator and ornithologist, Hazel Britton, with support from Cradle Coast NRM and then shared with BirdLife Tasmania, BirdLife Australia and the Tasmanian Natural Values Atlas to inform conservation program development. Local education and conservation efforts were also undertaken by Cradle Coast NRM this year including the hosting of a Beach Nesting Bird identification workshop in Burnie and the design and installation of shorebird interpretive signage at key beach sites where human disturbance was most prevalent. The project is still in its infancy with regards to establishing trend data, but the information collected over three years is still providing interesting insights to the region’s resident shorebird populations. Red capped plovers have proven to be elusive to the monitoring volunteers with a total of 153 adults seen in the breeding season count. The number of chicks and juveniles recorded did more than double from the previous season, albeit from a low base of five in 2011/12 to 11 in 2012/13, potentially attributable to the lower incidence of king tides and storm surges this year. Full results of the monitoring in the past year and since the project began can be found on the Cradle Coast NRM website.

Beachwatch is based on the ‘adoption’ of a local beach by a community group, school or social club such as Rotary, Lions, surf clubs or Guides and the commitment to pick up rubbish from the beach twice a year in August/September and February/March. As rubbish was removed from the coastal environment, the groups kept a record of the type and quantity of the various man-made materials found. These data sheets were collated by Cradle Coast NRM and forwarded to Tangaroa Blue Ocean Society where they are used to assess trends in marine debris and formulate strategies for reducing waste at the source. Data is also provided to Clean Up Australia and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) marine debris research project. Schools and youth organisations involved in the project participated in supplementary education sessions on the coastal environment and related activities such as intertidal beach rambles; a study of the effects of plastics on marine/coastal animals; shorebirds; coastal reserves and weeds. Volunteer groups in the Wynyard area were particularly active in sea spurge removal, in addition to their litter clean-up tasks.

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013

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W A TE R Cooee Creek Rehabilitation GOAL: To protect and maintain or improve our rivers, wetlands and groundwater environments by ensuring a sustainable balance between economic, environmental and social values.

Notes: Cradle Coast NRM did not receive funding for water projects from the Australian Government’s Caring for our Country for the 2012/13 period. Any projects undertaken were funded as part of Cradle Coast NRM’s Community Capacity, Skills, Knowledge and Engagement Program. Here are some of the key water projects for 2012/13: Protecting the Giant Freshwater Lobster Despite protection laws and public awareness campaigns, surveys of Giant Freshwater Lobsters undertaken for Cradle Coast NRM in 2012/13 revealed disturbing signs of illegal fishing. Fifteen surveys were completed in the region across four catchments between February and April 2013 to learn more about the population structure and lifespan of the threatened Giant Freshwater Lobster, Astacopsis gouldi. Pristine survey sites with the least human disturbance revealed the greatest number of lobsters and also returned the greatest number of recaptures, or lobsters who had survived in the area since previous survey counts dating back as far as 2004. Other site results were not so positive with few recaptures recorded. Signs of poaching at these survey areas led to the installation of photographic monitoring equipment to deter potential offenders. The cameras have not only helped to reduce poaching in problem areas but also provided an interesting insight to the usually undisturbed Giant Freshwater Lobster environment. In addition to site surveys and monitoring, Cradle Coast NRM has continued to support public education efforts regarding the Giant Freshwater Lobster this year with presentations and displays incorporated into the Hooked! workshops and Rural Living Round-up.

The Burnie City Council converted a $4,000 Cradle Coast NRM Land Manager grant into a communitybased project to rehabilitate the river bank environment of Cooee Creek. Burnie Polytechnic students experienced weed control first hand at the riparian site. Willows and gorse were clogging up the waterway which in turn was aggravating flooding events, increasing erosion and altering the creek’s course and health. The Council organised a working bee which was attended by 17 landowners, community group members and interested visitors. Participants learnt about the benefits of native vegetation in filtering run-off, reducing erosion and increasing Cooee Creek’s biodiversity. The event encouraged active involvement in planting in the natural environment, under the guidance of local experts, including members of the Cradle Coast NRM team. Jay Rowley from the Burnie City Council coordinated the revegetation of 400 native plants on the banks of the creek in the past year. The Council will maintain a watch on the area and curb the return of weeds. Awareness and teamwork protects the Burrowing Crayfish A group of Central North Burrowing Crayfish were conserved in the face of public earthworks this year, thanks to the careful planning and environmental awareness of the Devonport City Council and the support of Cradle Coast NRM. A planned upgrade to Spreyton Road in Spreyton revealed a community of threatened Burrowing Crayfish living in the path of the proposed earthworks. The council devised a plan of translocation where machine excavation and hand-sieving of soil successfully found more than 200 of the species. The Burrowing Crayfish were carefully transported and resettled in a new site at the Clayton Road Reserve. The Reserve will be maintained as a special Burrowing Crayfish habitat with native vegetation plantings, public events and educational material to raise the community’s awareness of these important contributors to the area’s biodiversity. Cradle Coast NRM assisted with community engagement activities via funding for interpretive signage, a community field day and bus transport so that local students could be involved. Devonport City Council Mayor, Ald Steve Martin, officiated at the Clayton Drive Open Day held at the beginning of summer which attracted 70 guests. Speakers included Burrowing Crayfish expert, Joanna Lyall, and zoologists from DPIPWE’s threatened species unit, Claire Hawkins and Karen Richards.

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013


Photograph by Anna Wind

Students embrace wetland conservation A learning trail at Somerset Primary School’s melaleuca wetland has been a welcome development for not only the students this year, but also the community and local sporting clubs. With the assistance of a Cradle Coast NRM School Small Grant, 100 native plants were added to a 1.2 kilometre trail, planted by the students to enhance the habitat of the resident Burrowing Crayfish, Engaeus fossor. The trail is now used daily for environmental and sustainability education activities and for fitness by people from around the area. Building upon a six year project, Strahan Primary School in collaboration with various community organisations has continued to rehabilitate the Manuka Creek that runs adjacent to the school property. Blackberry and Montbretia weeds were removed, native trees planted, and nesting boxes were installed for the local birdlife. Rising ecotourism numbers in the town fostered the need for a boardwalk in 2012/13, with interpretive signage installed to raise awareness of the Azure Kingfisher found in the area. Students were involved in researching information, taking photos, sketching and gathering samples to contribute to the design and finished product of the signs which were funded via a Cradle Coast NRM School Small Grant.

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013

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I N FO C U S PLA N TS AT- R IS K IN THE C RA D LE C O A S T A R E A ( P A C C A ) LOCATION: Region-wide. TOTAL FINANCIAL INVESTMENT: $13,567 PARTNERS: Threatened Plants Tasmania, Mark Wapstra and Brian French (ECOTas).

PACCA cards (short for Plants At-risk in the Cradle Coast Area) are a pocket-sized guide to the threatened flora that can be found across the Cradle Coast region. The cards have been prepared to give a ‘plain English’ insight to the habitats, forms and distinctive features of our region’s special plants. Images contributed by the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment; Threatened Plants Tasmania and the Hobart Botanical Gardens make the PACCA cards a truly collaborative production. To ensure that they’re as practical and useful as possible, each card in the 55-strong deck is waterproof, pocket-sized and numbered so users can take them all or just the ones required when out on a bushwalk or field trip. The cards include photos of the plants and their habitats and descriptions of their leaves, flowers and fruit (where applicable). The plant’s status on the threatened species list is shown, plus interesting information on the meaning of the plant name. A glossary, recommendations for further reading and information on collection permits make the PACCA cards the handiest threatened plant identification kit in the Cradle Coast. Cradle Coast NRM set about developing the PACCA cards to raise awareness of special flora and to highlight the importance of preserving biological diversity in the region’s landscapes. Some threatened species are naturally rare, occurring in only a few locations because their habitat is limited. Others are rare because their habitat has been modified or cleared, or disease, pest plants and animals have been introduced. As residents and visitors to the Cradle Coast region use the PACCA cards and become familiar with the threatened species found there, it is Cradle Coast NRM’s aim that awareness and actions to create and protect healthy, diverse habitats also grow.

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013


Cradle Coast NRM set about developing the PACCA cards to raise awareness of special flora and to highlight the importance of preserving biological diversity in the region’s landscapes.

Photograph by Karina Rose

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013

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CRADLE COAST NRM 2012/13 PROJECTS Completed in 12/13

Ongoing projects commenced prior to 12/13

Project

Status

in 2012/13

Funding source

LAND Regional Landcare Facilitator

Caring for our Country

Controlled traffic farming facilitation and promotion

Caring for our Country

Farmer Soil Condition Studies

Caring for our Country

Implementing Property Management Planning incentives

Caring for our Country

Biodiversity on Farms – Shelterbelt incentives

Caring for our Country

Sustainable Agriculture Program incentives

Caring for our Country

Tarkine natural values assessment associated with Tarkine tourism development

Regional Investment Proposal 2

Grassland management – land manager engagement

Caring for our Country

Threatened species field identification flip book

Caring for our Country

Biodiversity on Farms – Natural Connections incentive program

Caring for our Country

Community group facilitation and support*

Caring for our Country

Community group grants – biodiversity

Caring for our Country

Land Manager Partnership grants – biodiversity

Caring for our Country

School grants – biodiversity

Caring for our Country

Recreational users engagement – Mount Roland

Caring for our Country

Ecosystem services mapping – improving data analysis in priority areas

Caring for our Country

Implementing management plans for high conservation value areas

Caring for our Country

Control of sea spurge to protect the World Heritage Area

Caring for our Country

Regional Weeds Advisory Group – regional weed coordination

Caring for our Country

Management of Weeds of National Significant (WoNS) in the region

Caring for our Country

WATER River rehabilitation works – Inglis Flowerdale

Caring for our Country

Natural Connections incentive program

Caring for our Country

Biodiversity on Farms incentive program

Caring for our Country

Manuka Creek Boardwalk and signage

Caring for our Country

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013


Status

Project

in 2012/13

Funding source

COASTS Methodology to measure coastal condition

Regional Investment Proposal 2

Lavinia Reserve on-ground projects to rehabilitate and protect the coastal environment

Caring for our Country

Robbins Passage-Boullanger Bay tidal and sediment monitoring

Caring for our Country

King Island NRM Strategy implementation

Caring for our Country

Development and implementation of a weed management plan for Howie Island

Caring for our Country

On-ground works, management planning and communications activities by Six Rivers Aboriginal Corporation

Caring for our Country

Small grants to Aboriginal organisations

Caring for our Country

Aboriginal community engagement strategy

Caring for our Country

Aboriginal partnership development*

Caring for our Country

Aquaculture and kelp harvesting environmental incentives

Caring for our Country

Community group facilitation and support*

Caring for our Country

Community group grants – coastal

Caring for our Country

Land Manager Partnership grants – coastal

Caring for our Country

School grants – coastal

Caring for our Country

Community volunteer shorebird monitoring program*

Caring for our Country

Hooked! Community arts environmental education program

Caring for our Country

Beachwatch: Community groups and schools adopting local beaches*

Caring for our Country

Environmental education activities

Caring for our Country

*Cradle Coast NRM activities and initiatives that are persistent, regardless of fixed term funding arrangements.

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013

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CRADLE COAST NRM 2012/13 PROJECT SNAPSHOT

JULY

AUG

SEPT

ACROSS THE PADDOCKS

LINK AND LEARN

BEACH NESTING BIRDS

To celebrate National Year of the Farmer, Cradle Coast NRM launched a special e-newsletter aimed at the region’s farmers, commercial land managers and associated service providers such as field officers and agricultural consultants.

An event held at the Ulverstone Civic Centre to enable community groups to share their experiences, challenges and successes in caring for the environment.

A free workshop was held in appreciation of the Shorebird Monitoring project volunteers and featured special guest speaker, Meg Cullen of BirdLife Australia. Presented in Burnie – central to the Shorebird Monitoring area between Narawtapu National Park and Stanley – the workshop was attended by 48 people.

Known as Across the Paddocks, the web-based newsletter was issued every two months and featured practical information, contacts and resources on all things relating to sustainable agriculture. Editions were dedicated to soil health, biodiversity on farms and property management planning among others. The template also became a recognisable sign of the Cradle Coast NRM Land Program and was used to announce the opening of grant programs and upcoming field day events to the 230 recipients. Supported by the Australian Government’s Regional Landcare Facilitator Program.

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Representatives from 13 groups attended with presentations made by West Coast Weed and Fire Management Group, Friends of Lillico Penguins, Circular Head Landcare, Ulverstone Coastcare, Wynyard Landcare, Landcare Tasmania and the North West Environment Centre among others. Guest speakers from the Tasmanian Invasive Species Branch of DPIPWE and the Cradle Coast NRM Facilitator team also provided updates on programs and support services. The first-time event was well attended and revealed a desire to increase community engagement in environmental works and improve community group connections. Collaboration with DPIPWE Invasive Species Branch and the region’s Coastcare, Landcare and ‘Friends of’ Groups.

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013

Participants learnt about beach nesting birds from around Australia and saw footage of varying shorebird habitats, nest-sites and chick-rearing behaviours. The workshop provided valuable information to Shorebird Monitoring volunteers and encouraged interested community members to join the twice-yearly data collection project. Results of the shorebird counts are shared with BirdLife Tasmania and the Tasmanian Natural Values Atlas to help inform ongoing conservation and public education efforts. Collaboration with BirdLife Australia.


OCT

NOV

DEC

WEED SPREAD THREAT

FIELD NATURALISTS’ CELEBRATE

COASTCARE WEEK

An education campaign was launched targeting visitors to Mount Roland near Sheffield in the Kentish municipal area. With the use of strategically placed signs plus posters and walking track leaflets in the local Visitor Information Centre, bushwalkers were encouraged to ‘clean your tread to stop the spread’ of weeds.

King Island Field Naturalists, past members and interested local residents and visitors joined together to celebrate the group’s 50th anniversary. The four-day event combined field trips with social occasions and traversed the island to showcase its many natural features.

Coastcare Week in the Cradle Coast region received a big boost from LITTLE Committee member, Elliot Thorp, when he officially launched the summer-time event at a special ceremony in Devonport.

The ongoing campaign raised awareness of the risk of weed seed dispersal in the tread of hiking shoes and tyres, and attached to hiking gear including socks, trousers and shoe laces. Shoe cleaning equipment was also installed at key track sites around the Mount Roland Reserve and visitors were reminded to continue practicing good equipment hygiene wherever they walked in the region or state. Collaboration with the Kentish Council and Parks and Wildlife Service.

A key aim of the event was to inspire new membership and celebrate past achievements, particularly in the creation of reserves on the island. Participants enjoyed bird viewing at Shag Lagoon, Ramsar wetland walks, visits to biodiversity conservation project-sites and the Pegarah State Forest. A highlight of the celebration was a workshop presented by Miguel de Salas of the Tasmanian Herbarium on ‘How to be a botanist’ to build skills in plant identification. Collaboration with King Island Field Naturalists.

LITTLE is the Leading Integrated Taskforce Tackling Litter Everywhere, a Keep Australia Beautiful initiative. In conjunction with Devonport City Council Alderman Peter Hollister, Elliot used the launch celebrations attended by 35 guests to also announce the winners in Cradle Coast NRM’s School Coastcare Competition. The theme of the 2013 competition was ‘Get Hooked! into Coastcare’ to coincide with the popular Cradle Coast NRM community arts and environment awareness program. Collaboration with Keep Australia Beautiful, the region’s Coastcare Groups and the Devonport City Council.

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013

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CRADLE COAST NRM 2012/13 PROJECT SNAPSHOT

JAN

FEB

MARCH

DEVILS AT CRADLE

SCHOOL GRANTS PROGRAM

LAND REHABILITATION

Devils@Cradle received one of Cradle Coast NRM’s Community Biodiversity Grants to assist with the remote monitoring of the Tasmanian Devil in the Vale of Belvoir near Cradle Mountain.

A total of $66,228 was awarded for 43 projects across 37 schools in the Cradle Coast NRM School Grants Program.

A field day for landholders on the Rehabilitation of Degraded Land was held at Gunns Plains organised by the self-help group, Conservation Landholders Tasmania.

The grant enabled the installation of high resolution cameras which are checked and maintained by Devils@Cradle staff in cooperation with the Tasmanian Land Conservancy. Footage captured nightly interactions of the Tasmanian Devils in either video or photographs and the high quality images allowed for the identification of individual creatures and checking for signs of the Devil Facial Tumour disease. The data was forwarded to the Save the Devil Program to contribute to their significant studies. Collaboration with Devils@Cradle, Tasmanian Land Conservancy and the Save the Devil Program.

28

Students and teachers delivered a variety of educational and practical projects in schools across the region. Some of the projects included creating a worm farm and harvesting water from school buildings at the Penguin High School; revegetating the school’s front entrance with native plants at Shearwater Children’s Centre; learning about Giant Freshwater Lobsters at the Somerset Primary School; and making Aboriginal Studies’ resources at the Ulverstone Primary School. The Grants Program helps schools achieve environmental education goals and complements the in-school presentations delivered by Cradle Coast NRM Facilitators. Collaboration with educational institutions (primary, secondary and tertiary) and early learning centres.

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013

The full-day program featured author and former CSIRO scientist, David Tongway who shared his knowledge from 35 years of practical experience in restoring disturbed landscapes. The key message of the day was to fully understand how a landscape functions as a physical and biological system and to use this as the basis to developing a restoration plan. Jim McLeod from Oldina Nursery and author Sue Gray of ‘Living with Plants – A guide to Revegetation Plants for North West Tasmania’ also contributed to the field outing. Collaboration with Conservation Landholders Tasmania and the Tasmanian Land Conservancy.


APRIL

MAY

JUNE

ENERGY EFFICIENT OFFICE

SEA ELEPHANT RIVER

ARTS AND ENVIRONMENT

Cradle Coast NRM moved office to a site that combined the best of energy efficiency while retaining the heritage values of a landmark Burnie building.

Significant revegetation works around King Island’s Ramsar-listed wetlands were celebrated with a community native tree planting day.

Hooked! From the Mountain Dragon to the Handfish was a year-long community arts and environment project that culminated in an exhibition of more than 500 natureinspired fibre-artworks, seen by 2,000 visitors, at the Burnie Regional Art Gallery.

The building was once the Burnie Technical School and more recently housed the Burnie online access centre. The site is recognised under a Tasmanian Heritage listing and the renovation works were subject to heritage approval. Using a staged response to heating or cooling reduces office energy consumption. Each stage only operates if temperatures reach thermostat set points. Energy efficient LED lighting was also installed in the refurbishment, along with motion-detector triggered lighting in less-used parts of the office. Collaboration with the Australian Government as part of the Community Energy Efficiency Program.

Locals were invited to officially launch the access improvements made to the Sea Elephant River and Estuary with the opening of a parking area, walking track and directional signage. Weed control was undertaken across a seven-hectare area and 13 hectares have been enhanced with native habitat plantings. This project helped address the key threats facing the ecology of priority Ramsar wetlands in the Cradle Coast region, including the incidence of unauthorised camping. Collaboration with King Island NRM and the Parks and Wildlife Service.

In the lead up to the exhibition, Cradle Coast NRM delivered 16 workshops along the north west coast, engaging 230 participants with presentations from local wildlife and habitat experts. Exhibition opening guest speaker representing the Cradle Coast NRM Committee was Tina Alderson from Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service. Collaboration with BRAG, the Handweavers, Spinners and Dyers Guild of Tasmania, Tasmanian Alkaloids, Tasmanian Community Fund, Inspiring Australia, Leven Regional Arts and Tas Regional Arts, Devonport Regional Gallery, and Burnie, Latrobe and Kentish Councils.

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013

29


I N FO C U S S U STA IN AB L E A G R IC U L T UR E P R O GR A M LOCATION: Region-wide. TOTAL FINANCIAL INVESTMENT: $122,300 PARTNERS: Commercial farmers in the Cradle Coast region through funding from the Australian Government’s Caring for our Country.

The Sustainable Agriculture Program was a regional incentive program encouraging sustainable farm practices and productivity in north west Tasmania. Program applicants received funding of up to $5,000 each (excluding GST) to support education, planning and practical implementation of sustainable agriculture. The Program distributed more than $122,300 to 32 land owners across the region, following an application process in which 57 land owners expressed interest. Recipients used their funding to attend land management training courses, engage property consulting services, or undertake soil testing and nutrient budgeting. In the Inglis-Flowerdale catchment, 12 properties covering more than 2000 hectares combined into a single nutrient budgeting project overseen by agricultural consultants, Macquarie Franklin. Within the catchment, neighbouring properties have a vested interest in each farm getting their nutrient balance right. The flow-on effect of nutrient excess is felt beyond one property’s boundary and bottom-line. Boosting the management tools and decision making power of the 12 participating farmers was a key objective of the program which began by testing and mapping the existing soil nutrient levels. The nutrient maps and budgets were used to create fertiliser action plans for each farm. The action plan avoids financial and environmental damage and ensures that nutrient types and application rates are matched to actual needs; both when and where required. Excess nutrients are not only an unnecessary expense, but they also flush into rivers and streams causing problems for the plants, animals and people who depend on the downstream water. All of the Sustainable Agriculture Program participants continue to build their knowledge and skills so that they can better manage the natural assets of their farms now and into the future.

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013


Recipients used their funding to attend land management training courses, engage property consulting services, or undertake soil testing and nutrient budgeting.

Photograph by Shutterbirds

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013

31


The financial statements presented have been compiled from the audited financial statements of the reporting entity, the Cradle Coast Authority, for the year ended 30 June 2013.

C RA D LE C O A S T N A TU R A L R ES O UR C E MA N A GEMENT C O MP RE HE N S IV E IN COM E S T A T EMEN T For year ended 30 June 2013

Note REVENUE

2013

2012

$

$

Grant Income

1

2,386,542

2,571,064

Other Income

2

6,381

49,815

51,373

61,064

2,444,296

2,681,943

Employee Costs

1,038,265

1,059,784

Project Delivery and Consultancy

1,367,570

994,987

403,649

420,974

2,809,484

2,475,745

-365,188

206,198

Interest Income Total Revenue

EXPENSES

Other Operating Expenses

3

Total Expenses

Comprehensive Result

32

4

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013


The financial statements presented have been compiled from the audited financial statements of the reporting entity, the Cradle Coast Authority, for the year ended 30 June 2013.

C RA D LE C O A S T N A TU R A L R ES O UR C E MA N A GEMENT BAL A N CE S HE E T As at 30 June 2013

ASSETS

2013

2012

$

$

Current assets Cash at Bank

842,528

1,168,863

120

16,466

2,971

6,508

Total current assets

845,619

1,191,837

Non-current assets

-

-

Total non-current assets

-

-

845,619

1,191,837

Trade Payables

34,671

24,320

Superannuation Payable

18,847

17,992

Provision for annual leave

42,705

46,507

Provision for parental leave

10,000

10,000

PAYG payable

17,581

15,074

2,609

1,898

126,413

115,791

Provision for long service leave

30,971

22,623

Total non-current liabilities

30,971

22,623

TOTAL LIABILITIES

157,384

138,414

NET ASSETS

688,235

1,053,423

Accumulated Funds

1,053,423

847,225

Comprehensive Result

(365,188)

206,198

688,235

1,053,423

Trade Receivables Interest Accrued

TOTAL ASSETS

LIABILITIES Current liabilities

Payroll tax payable

Total current liabilities

Non-current liabilities

EQUITY

TOTAL EQUITY

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013

33


The financial statements presented have been compiled from the audited financial statements of the reporting entity, the Cradle Coast Authority, for the year ended 30 June 2013.

C RA D LE C O A S T N A TU R A L R ES O UR C E MA N A GEMENT NOTES TO F IN A N CIA L S T A T EM EN T S For year ended 30 June 2013 Note 1

Grant Income

2013

2012

$

$

Natural Heritage Trust

141,330

96,030

Dept of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry

151,000

318,701

2,089,667

2,156,333

4,545

-

2,386,542

2,571,064

DPIPWE* Dept of Premier & Cabinet 2

Other Income NRM North

-

13,509

NRM South

-

14,969

6,381

21,337

6,381

49,815

23,055

20,925

-

767

External contributions to projects 3

Other Operating Expenses Advertising Fringe Benefits Tax

14,440

13,220

Meeting, Planning & Forum Expenses

IT Support

4,375

11,180

Phone Faxes & Internet

4,537

6,406

25,507

28,935

5,732

13,497

Postage Printing & Stationery Recruitment & Relocation Costs Rent - Rates & Taxes

30,919

25,774

Sundries

14,924

11,193

Travelling Expenses

17,684

25,227

6,607

8,077

Audit Fees Communication Office Costs

38,356

36,479

132,182

117,298

3,319

6,770

Seminars, Conferences & Subs

537

480

Vehicle Expenses

Bank Fees

30,980

37,566

Committee Expenses

45,257

31,954

2,432

4,214

Sponsorship Capital Expenditure 4

2,806

21,012

403,649

420,974

Comprehensive Result Project Carry Over 11/12

1,053,423

847,225

12/13 Deficit**

(365,188)

206,198

688,235

1,053,423

Total Project Unexpended Funds * Includes DPIPWE, Caring for our Country 12/13.

** Funds received in previous financial year and expended in current financial year.

34

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2012–2013


Cradle Coast NRM would like to acknowledge the following photographers for their contribution to this publication: David McCormack, Don May, Karina Rose, Belinda Colson, Anna Wind, Mark Wisniewski, John Thompson, Kaare Wind, Shutterbirds, Tasnature and iStockphoto. Cover photograph by www.shutterbirds.com.au This report is printed on recycled paper Proudly designed by Emma Duncan, Red Bird Design


Cradle Coast NRM 1 – 3 Spring Street, Burnie PO Box 338 Burnie TAS 7320 Ph: 03 6431 6285 Fax: 03 6431 7014 nrm@cradlecoast.com Cradle Coast NRM is an independent committee hosted by the Cradle Coast Authority

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