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CRADLE COAST NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE ANNUAL REPORT 2010 – 2011


Cradle Coast NRM Annual Report 2010 – 2011 Copyright Š Cradle Coast Authority 2011 No part of this publication may be reproduced without the express prior permission of the publisher. Published by: Cradle Coast Authority PO Box 338 Burnie TAS 7320 Ph: 03 6431 6285 nrm@cradlecoast.com

This report is produced to fulfil the statutory reporting obligations of the Cradle Coast NRM Committee under the Tasmanian Natural Resource Management Act 2002. The Committee is required to report on its activity to the Minister for Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment. This report covers the period from 1 July 2010 to 30 June 2011. The Cradle Coast NRM Committee acknowledges the financial support provided to it by the Australian and Tasmanian Governments.


C O N T ENTS Foreword

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Introduction

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Executive Officer Report

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Cradle Coast NRM Staff and Committee

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Land

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Coasts

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Community

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Water

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Cradle Coast NRM 2010/11 Projects

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Cradle Coast NRM 2010/11 Project Snapshot

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Cradle Coast NRM Financial Statements

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2010–2011

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Cradle Coast NRM continued to make a significant contribution and performed strongly over the year.

Photograph by Jenny Archer

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2010–2011


F OREWOR D by the Chair of the Cradle Coast NRM Committee On behalf of the Cradle Coast Natural Resource Management Committee I present the annual report for 2010 – 2011. A key focal point for the committee this year has been the completion of the Cradle Coast Regional NRM Strategy review and subsequent development of a revised document. This process was at times complex and challenging for both committee and staff but it was an invaluable experience for all concerned. In particular it highlighted the importance of quality data and information, the skill and capacity needed to interrogate it correctly and where the gaps lie. A great deal of consideration was also given to the language and presentation of the results and this is reflected in the final document. A strategy however, does not count for much without delivering on the ground. Cradle Coast NRM continued to make a significant contribution and performed strongly over the year, with the stability of staff and improved business processes helping us to deliver quality projects across the region within the prescribed schedules and budgets. This is a positive reflection of the work done in recent years at an operational level and also the renewed focus of the committee on the business of NRM. It was therefore disappointing that despite this strong performance the State Government has delivered very significant cuts to our future budgets. In spite of this development we are confident that we can maintain a strong and viable NRM organisation to service the needs of this region and we will be working closely with Government and stakeholders to ensure the best outcomes and maximise investment in these tough times. I would like to conclude by thanking the staff and committee for their hard work in this period. I would also like to acknowledge the long term contribution of Deputy Chair, David Henderson who left us in the scheduled turnover in this period, but also welcome back Eva Finzel, Geoff King and new member Peter Tyson. I would also like to thank the community of the Cradle Coast region for their ongoing support and participation in our activities. Rick Rockliff Committee Chairman

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I NTRO D U C TIO N The Cradle Coast region is remarkably diverse, bounded by 2,640 km of coastline and covering 22,520 square kilometres; approximately one-third of Tasmania. The region’s natural resources and landscapes are valuable for their ability to sustain primary industries, their ability to provide ecosystem services such as clean water and air and their intrinsic value as homes for animal and plant communities which also act as tourism drawcards. The region stretches from Narawntapu National Park in the East to King Island and Cape Grim in the far North West and to Port Davey in the South. Its Eastern border runs diagonally through Cradle Valley. The region incorporates the nine local government municipalities of Burnie City, Central Coast, Circular Head, Devonport City, Kentish, King Island, Latrobe, Waratah-Wynyard and West Coast. In 2000, these nine local government municipalities established a regional organisation known as the Cradle Coast Authority to facilitate the sustainable development of the Cradle Coast region by hosting and coordinating regional-level issues and projects. The Cradle Coast NRM Committee is an independent committee hosted by the Cradle Coast Authority. The Cradle Coast NRM team work with North West Tasmanian communities to improve natural resources such as our land, water and coasts to ensure a healthy future for the region. Cradle Coast NRM supports community and industry projects, facilitates funding and coordinates natural resource activities and information sharing. The Cradle Coast NRM annual report for 2010/11 outlines the achievements and project deliverables of natural resource management activities within the Cradle Coast region. Additional copies of this report can be obtained from www.cradlecoastnrm.com For information on the objectives and strategic direction of natural resource management in the Cradle Coast, refer to the 2010-15 Regional Natural Resource Management Strategy also available from www.cradlecoastnrm.com

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2010–2011


The Cradle Coast NRM team work with North West Tasmanian communities to improve natural resources such as land, water and coasts to ensure a healthy future for the region.

Photograph by Jenny Archer

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When we consider the diversity of the region, its environment and its people, it is clear that the only way to continue to deliver a quality program of NRM activities is in partnership with the community.

Photograph by Jenny Archer

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2010–2011


EX ECU TIVE O F F IC E R R E P O R T A year is a long time in NRM, a lot can happen. True to form, 2010/11 proved to be as dynamic and challenging as previous years. The early focus of the year was on the final development and accreditation of the revised Regional NRM Strategy. The experience of undertaking the review process, as much as the information itself, provided invaluable lessons which will certainly inform our planning and approach to future work. In particular I would highlight the opportunity to meet and discuss NRM issues with the community and stakeholders as a positive step in maintaining our awareness of regional needs. The challenge now is to translate these experiences and words into actions within our community and maximise investment opportunities from both traditional sources and emerging areas like the carbon economy. This focus has become more critical in view of the recently announced budget cuts. NRM is not immune from the economic hardship faced across our state and there is no doubt that the magnitude of the cuts has hit us hard. However I am confident that we have developed a strong business model and we have the right people in place to best maintain the quality of our front line projects and support for the community in these difficult times. We take confidence from the changes undertaken to our structure and operations in recent years, with strong performance in terms of delivering programs for our investors and increased focus on partnership development. The key is to build on this success by leveraging additional funds and diversifying funding sources. While we continue to deliver a range of projects via these traditional partnerships it is encouraging to see better integration of our work across industry sectors. The recent project partnership with Regional Tourism to survey self-accommodating visitors is a good example of how shared costs and resources can deliver mutual benefits. The capacity and skills to identify and develop more of these partnership opportunities, across all scales, remains crucial to the long term viability of a strong NRM program. With a large number of projects completed in this period it is hard to pick out personal highlights but it was pleasing to see the innovative work done in the project assessing coastal vulnerability in Robbins Passage and Boullanger Bay. Other highlights included the increasing amount of projects to support the work of the Aboriginal community and the long term work to build capacity and introduce new technology into local government to tackle the ever present weed menace. Finally I would highlight the work done on the Sea Elephant catchment on King Island, which represented one of the most significant revegetation projects undertaken in many years in one of the more remote parts of our region. None of these projects would have been possible without the support of project partners and the community of this region. When we consider the diversity of the region, its environment and its people, it is clear that the only way to continue to deliver a quality program of NRM activities is in partnership with the community. I would like to thank you all for your ongoing support and in particular thank the staff and committee for their dedication to the task in yet another year of change and uncertainty. Richard Ingram Executive Officer

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C RA D LE C O A S T N R M S T A FF A N D C O M M I T T EE Tasmania has three Natural Resource Management Committees established under the Tasmanian Natural Resource Management Act 2002 to represent the South, North and Cradle Coast (North West) regions of the state. Cradle Coast NRM is comprised of a Committee plus dedicated staff with expertise in agriculture, water, coastal and biodiversity management and community engagement. Collectively Cradle Coast NRM helps identify regional natural resource management priorities, prepare regional strategies, promotes NRM principles and supports the implementation of NRM activities. The Cradle Coast NRM team is based within the Cradle Coast Authority office in Burnie and is supported by the Authority’s finance, administration and communications staff. In addition to the core team, Cradle Coast NRM also supports the West Coast Council to employ a Project Officer in the West Coast Weed and Fire Management Group.

RICHARD INGRAM – EXECUTIVE OFFICER Leads the team and is the link between the Cradle Coast NRM Committee, Cradle Coast Authority and industry stakeholders. SUE BOTTING – OPERATIONS MANAGER Manages the strategic and technical aspects of NRM project delivery. ROSIE BRITTON – BUSINESS SUPPORT MANAGER Manages the business functions including contracting and reporting. BELINDA COLSON – COASTAL COORDINATOR AND FACILITATOR Implements coastal projects and coordinates short term visitor volunteers. ALISON DUGAND – BIODIVERSITY COORDINATOR Implements projects to ensure healthy ecosystems such as the Giant Freshwater Lobster habitat restoration and assists with regional weeds management. STACEY GROVES – ADMINISTRATION ASSISTANT (P/T) Supports the team with administration, newsletter production and web site maintenance. DIONNA NEWTON – FACILITATOR Works with the community, Coastcare, school groups and youth organisations to raise awareness of regional NRM issues and implement hands-on programs such as shorebird monitoring. KARINA ROSE – FACILITATOR (P/T) Works with Landcare, Coastcare, school groups and youth organisations to raise awareness of regional NRM issues, deliver environmental education and implement hands-on programs. MATT ROSE – COASTAL WEEDS OFFICER Assists land managers with weed control, revegetation and plant identification in coastal vegetation. ALICE RYDER – REGIONAL LANDCARE FACILITATOR Promotes Landcare and sustainable farm practices throughout the region. HANNAH SADLER – LAND COORDINATOR Works with producers, industry and extension professionals to develop and promote sustainable farm practices. JAMES SHADDICK – INFORMATION MANAGER Collects and maintains NRM data from regional projects and assists with the NRM regional strategic planning process. ANNA WIND – FACILITATOR TEAM LEADER Heads the facilitator team and works with Coastcare, schools, community and Friends of Penguin groups to raise awareness of regional NRM issues and implement hands-on programs and training. MARK WISNIEWSKI – FACILITATOR Assists community and school groups to be involved in NRM projects and implements hands-on programs such as seasonal revegetation works. During 2010/11 the Cradle Coast NRM team was also assisted by Anna Renkin, Land Coordinator.

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2010–2011


CRADLE COAST NRM COMMITTEE The Cradle Coast NRM Committee is comprised of nine members with extensive and diverse agricultural, cultural heritage, scientific, educational and forestry experience. The Committee meets monthly to guide NRM projects, define priorities and, as required, oversee regional NRM strategic planning. Committee members are appointed by a selection panel established through a public process for a term of up to three years. During 2010/11, David Henderson also served as Deputy Chair and Committee member.

RICK ROCKLIFF – CHAIR

SHANE BROAD – DEPUTY CHAIR

EVA FINZEL – COMMITTEE MEMBER

PETER TYSON – COMMITTEE MEMBER

BRETT NOBLE – COMMITTEE MEMBER

GEOFF KING – COMMITTEE MEMBER

HANK HORTON – COMMITTEE MEMBER

BILL WALKER – COMMITTEE MEMBER

SUE JENNINGS – COMMITTEE MEMBER

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LAN D GOAL: To protect and maintain or improve our natural, productive and urban landscapes by ensuring a sustainable balance between economic, environmental and social values.

Here are some of the key land projects for 2010/11:

Small acreage landholders big on interest and enthusiasm Bush blockers, hobby farmers, lifestylers, smallholders, greenchangers – there are almost as many names as there are numbers of small acreage landholders in the Cradle Coast region. Although they have small parcels of land, the fact that 55% of North West Tasmanian landholders surveyed by Cradle Coast NRM identified themselves as lifestyle or hobby farmers means that together they can have a big influence on the health of our region’s landscapes and natural assets. To cater for this significant segment of the community, this year Cradle Coast NRM produced an A-Z directory of all things NRM relevant to rural landholders. Titled the Rural Living Guide, it covered topics from animal welfare to waste management and everything in between. The Guide was distributed via the region’s Council offices and select real estate agents. Bringing the Guide to life was the objective of the Rural Living Round-up; a field day specifically for small acreage landholders held at the Burnie Polytechnic Farm School at the end of May. Almost 500 attendees heard presentations, participated in demonstrations and had their land-management questions answered by experts from a variety of Government, community group and commercial organisations. A survey carried out on the day revealed that 95% of landowners in attendance had learnt new information about caring for their properties; and most nominated the size of improvement in their knowledge in managing natural resources on their land as being ‘a lot’ with a rating of either 4 or 5 out of 5. The success of the day has ensured its place in Cradle Coast NRM’s 2011/12 calendar of events.

Field day shares the essentials on soil health This year saw the return of the popular Soil Essentials field day, with more than 80 farmers and agronomists attending the Forthside vegetable research facility to take part in a series of interactive workshops. Topics ranged from soil biology to controlled traffic farming and were applicable to cropping, grazing, dairy, forestry, orchard and vineyard land managers. The presentation line up included Joel Williams of Biological Farmers Australia on managing soil biology; Dr Bill Cotching of the Tasmanian Institute of Agricultural Research (TIAR) sharing steps to identifying soil health; Chris Grose of DPIPWE on soil condition evaluation and monitoring; John McPhee of TIAR discussing controlled traffic farming principles and results; Jason Lynch of Serve-Ag on biofumigation and cover crops; plus Sam Rees of Macquarie Franklin on cultivation techniques and soil impacts. Soil pits and displays around the Research Facility enabled interactive demonstrations and the chance for participants to ask questions of the experts.

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Soil health underpins the region’s agricultural production and its importance is reflected in the amount of information available to land managers. The Soil Essentials field day was hosted by Cradle Coast NRM to collate key information in a single event and provide an opportunity for participants to consider practical land management methods they can apply to their own properties.

A bond formed over bush-block ownership For the first time this year, ‘bush blockers’ or residents with native and/or covenanted bush on their properties were invited to a field day to share their experiences in managing natural values on private land. The field day at Erriba attracted 20 dedicated block owners who heard presentations from their hosts, Gail Hart and John Dennett, plus presentations on volunteer animal rescue and rehabilitation and DPIPWE’s program of vegetation monitoring. Representatives from the Department’s Protected Areas on Private Land Program were also on hand to provide information. Designed by Cradle Coast NRM to test the need and interest in establishing an informal network of bush block owners, the participants resolved to meet again and have continued to share information and resources on best practice land and biodiversity management since this inaugural field day.

Regional weed management plans in practice The region’s efforts in weed management were strengthened this year with the completion of the 2010 – 2015 Cradle Coast Weed Management Strategy. The Regional Weeds Advisory Group created the document to incorporate both coastal and inland areas based on a previous version written in 2005. The Strategy outlines goals and activities to prevent new weed infestations, ensure early control of weed incursions, reduce the impact of existing weeds, engage people in weed management activities, monitor progress and ensure compliance with the Weed Management Act 1999 and other relevant legislation. A program based on the Strategy’s principle of regional cooperation was launched to create, train and implement a cross-Council weed mapping and monitoring system. Handheld devices commissioned by Cradle Coast NRM were constructed with GPS technology to allow in-field recording of weed species and their distribution. Data can be uploaded into a State database to track progress and coordinate works across municipal boundaries. Weeds and Environmental Officers from six Councils participated in the training program which was jointly devised by Cradle Coast NRM’s Biodiversity Coordinator and Information Manager.

Natural Connections Grants focus on biodiversity Financial grants totalling $292,298 were awarded this year to 26 land managers and two community groups as part of the Cradle Coast Natural Connections Grants Program. The program was administered by Cradle Coast NRM targeting landholder and community projects that protected threatened species and their habitats. Individual grants up to $25,000 were provided for on-ground works that targeted species protection for the Orange Bellied Parrot, Giant Freshwater Lobster, King Island Scrubtit and Tasmanian Devil, and habitats including lowland grasslands, swamp forests and wetlands. As a result of the grants program,

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2010–2011


The Natural Connections Grants Program was based on the concept of ecosystem services, recognising that all elements of the environment are connected and that they interact to deliver benefits to people living in and visiting the region.

Photograph by Alice Ryder

50 kilometres of fencing was installed to protect riverbanks, remnant vegetation and vegetation corridors throughout the region, 146 hectares of weed control works were completed, 11,500 seedlings were planted and 774 hectares of land was included in protective works.

addresses the surrounding environment such as removing weeds that are hosts to pests, crop rotation and timing of planting. The third line of defence with an IPM approach is chemical control which considers pesticides with minimal effect on beneficial insects and uses chemicals in a supportive role rather than the main option.

The Natural Connections Grants included excellent examples of the community working together. In one project, eight land holders joined forces with Greening Australia to create 2 kilometres of continuous protective river works across their properties in Gunns Plains, to assist with conserving Giant Freshwater Lobster habitat, reduce erosion and assist with downstream water quality.

The training was delivered by Serve-Ag with IPM Technologies’ Jessica Page and entomologist Paul Horne. The entire series comprised of four introduction workshops in July and October, follow-up practical workshops in October and November and a wrap-up field walk in February.

The Natural Connections Grants Program was based on the concept of ecosystem services, recognising that all elements of the environment are connected and that they interact to deliver benefits to people living in and visiting the region. Benefits such as food production; water security; coastal stability; carbon storage; resilience to climate change; tourism and recreation; quality of life; and biodiversity conservation are important considerations for Cradle Coast NRM in managing the region’s natural resources.

Crop growers taking an integrated approach to pests Potato, onion, brassica and flower growers in the Cradle Coast region learnt new ways to tackle old enemies through a series of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) workshops coordinated by Cradle Coast NRM. The training helped growers identify pests and develop strategies that integrate a range of defences including the crop’s beneficial insects, surrounding environment and traditional chemical control methods. Integrated Pest Management is a control strategy in which a variety of biological, chemical and cultural control practices are combined to give long-term pest control. IPM aims to maximise the use of biological control which refers to the role that beneficial insects and mites play as natural pest predators. Learning to identify and encourage these species was an important part of the workshop training. Cultural control

Grassland field days focus on conservation North West Tasmania is home to some of Tasmania’s largest and most diverse grasslands. Two significant areas – 1,900 hectares South of Burnie and 500 hectares at the Vale of Belvoir – were the focus of a field trip organised by landholders Gunns and Tasmanian Land Conservancy. The two-day field trip was attended by local and interstate ecologists, botanists, grassland managers, foresters and field naturalists. Current and future management programs were discussed and knowledge gaps were highlighted in an effort to establish more research studies into grasslands ecology. The highland grasslands are an important asset for the region to understand and conserve as they are listed under the Nature Conservation Act as threatened in Tasmania. The field trip helped to collate knowledge and share best practices through informal discussions and formal presentations given by Tasmanian botanists Fred Duncan and Louise Gilfedder and eucalypt biologist Professor Brad Potts from the University of Tasmania.

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The training was attended by 15 community volunteers plus State Government and nongovernment organisation staff, all of who were certified as first-response whale rescuers at the completion of the day-long course.

Photograph by Belinda Colson

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2010–2011


C O A STS Another first-response whale rescue team in the region Learning how to safely move a life-size rubber whale was just one interesting part of Wildcare’s First-Response Whale Rescue training conducted in Marrawah this year. The training was attended by 15 community volunteers plus State Government and non-government organisation staff, all of who were certified as firstresponse whale rescuers at the completion of the day-long course.

GOAL: To protect and maintain or improve our coastal, estuarine and marine environments by ensuring a sustainable balance between economic, environmental and social values.

The enthusiastic participants heard the Parks and Wildlife Service relay information on whale ecology and biology and the Incident Control System which records whale strandings and outcomes. In supporting this training, Cradle Coast NRM also provided funding to purchase whale rescue equipment for use around the region including volunteer safety gear, whale mats and buckets.

Here are some of the key coastal projects for 2010/11:

Assessing coastal vulnerability in Robbins Passage and Boullanger Bay

Protecting rookery habitats on Howie Island

The tidal flats of Robbins Passage and Boullanger Bay in the Circular Head municipality were the focus of a University of Tasmania study commissioned by Cradle Coast NRM into the area’s vulnerability to sea level rise.

A large Pacific Gull rookery can be found on Howie Island located between Montagu and Robbins Island in the State’s North West. The rookery is under threat from invasive tree mallow and rice grass weeds which also impact migratory shorebirds that rely on the area as a resting ground and food source.

Although protected from major sea-swells, the bay area is still subject to the same net sea level rises of 1.4mm per year as measured at the Burnie tide gauge since records began in 1966. The study team undertook shoreline mapping, windwave exposure modelling and compared aerial time series photographs to examine the extent of erosion in the area. The study found that most of the area had been eroding at a rate consistent with sea level rise. Marsh shorelines have receded at the rate of around 22cm per year with the apparent onset of the erosion in the period 1968 – 1976. Vegetation has been affected with Melaleuca ericifolia root exposure and dieback; and saltmarsh – acting as a kind of horizontal seawall - is moving landward. Included in the scope of the study was the proposal for land management actions that support rather than restrict the area’s natural defences against sea level rise. Key messages from the study were tested with representatives from the local industry, government and community interest groups to ensure that the results of the study could be effectively communicated. Both the full research report (Circular Head Coastal Foreshore Habitats: Sea Level Rise Vulnerability Assessment 2010) and a summary are available for download from the Coastal projects page at www.cradlecoastnrm.com

Building fire resilience in Lavinia State Reserve Lavinia State Reserve on King Island has been the site of devastating fires in both 2001 and 2007, fuelled by the rich peat soils and diversity of coastal vegetation. To improve the area’s fire resilience and help protect natural values such as the Southern Hairy Red Snail and the King Island Scrubtit, Cradle Coast NRM supported the maintenance of a three kilometre firebreak in the reserve. The firebreak is an important component in the Island’s fire management plan which takes a holistic approach and considers both fire prevention and fire containment strategies. Works on the firebreak included weed control and vegetation clearance to improve fire truck access and reduce fuel. As part of the comprehensive fire management plan, the firebreak will help to restrict the spread of future fires in this environmentally significant reserve.

The North West Environment Centre was commissioned by Cradle Coast NRM to lead a project and engage the local community in on-ground restorative and weeding works. The 4.1 hectare island was busy with volunteers in the non-nesting season removing weeds and re-establishing native vegetation. Weed species were mapped to allow effective monitoring of eradication efforts and to assist the planning and timing of works. The North West Environment Centre coordinated the efforts after creating a work-plan based on the maps and prioritisation of the Island’s natural values. The team intends to monitor the impact of the weed removal by tracking and reporting bird breeding numbers and locations.

Coastal Weed Strategy legacy continues After 18 months of implementation works, Cradle Coast NRM’s Coastal Weed Strategy was wrapped up this year with its legacy living on in the region. The $195,000 project built on previous weed control investments and focused on invasive coastal weeds such as African Boxthorn, Blackberry, Boneseed and Bridal Creeper. The strategy implementation delivered weed control over 150 hectares and across 40 sites throughout the region’s coastal zone. The project relied upon a coordinated effort between all of the region’s coastal Councils plus the Aboriginal Lands Council of Tasmania, Six Rivers Aboriginal Corporation, Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service and Crown Land Services. More than 30 community groups contributed to on-ground works, involving more than 500 people in land management activities. In addition to weed removal there were native plant and weed identification workshops, tree planting, mapping training and plant pressing events to establish a herbarium. The Coastal Weed Strategy took a holistic approach to weed control to ensure that the knowledge associated with weed management lived on long after the end of the official strategy implementation. Actions from the Coastal Weed Strategy have been integrated into the Cradle Coast Weed Management Strategy 2010 – 2015, available for download from www.cradlecoastnrm.com

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COMMUNITY GOAL: To provide skills, education and funding (capacity) to community groups in the Cradle Coast region so they can establish working partnerships and successfully manage natural resources.

Funds of up to $1,500 per community group were put to good use with a variety of equipment purchases plus materials for weeding, planting, track and signage works. Other recipients included Granville Harbour Coastcare, King Island Natural Resource Management Group Inc, Latrobe Landcare Group Inc, Mersey Estuary Group, Mt Roland Rivercare Catchment Inc, Oldina Landcare Group Inc, Penguin Coastcare, Sulphur Creek/Preservation Bay Coastcare, Turners Beach Coastcare Inc, Turners Beach Friends of the Dunes and Wynyard Landcare Inc.

Here are some of the key community projects for 2010/11:

Working with schools and youth

Supporting Coastcare, Landcare and ‘Friends of’ groups

Young people in the Cradle Coast region are finding more ways to connect with natural resource education and interactive projects thanks to a growing social awareness of environmental issues and a concerted effort by Cradle Coast NRM facilitators.

Another productive year has seen Cradle Coast NRM facilitators assisting the region’s 50 community groups and engaging with more than 550 community volunteers. Friends of Burnie Penguins, with the assistance of community volunteers, were commissioned to count Little Penguins around The Nut in Stanley. The results have provided an important baseline for the Stanley Penguin Management Plan. A new community group, Turners Beach Friends of the Dunes, were supported with a start-up grant of $500 to control weeds at the Turners Beach Coastal Reserve. Once established, the group was also successful in obtaining a Cradle Coast NRM community group small grant to create an action plan to prioritise their weed control works. As an example of the revegetation support provided by Cradle Coast NRM this year, the Cooee to Camdale Coastcare Group received native seedlings and assistance from contractors when planting at Cooee Point. The plantings enhanced local Little Penguin habitats. Knowledge and technical advice was also shared via Cradle Coast NRM by directly delivering, or funding the delivery of, presentations on regional natural resource issues. The Circular Head Landcare Group Inc engaged Dr Richard Mount, Research Fellow at the University of Tasmania, to undertake both a student forum and a public forum in Smithton on the results of a study on sea level rise in Robbins Passage/Boullanger Bay. Cradle Coast NRM value and depend upon the contribution of volunteers to protect and maintain our land, coasts and waterways and are proud to continue our long-term support of these local custodians.

Popular and productive Community Group Small Grants The Cradle Coast NRM Community Group Small Grants program for 2010/11 delivered 14 grants totalling $19,175 to the region’s Landcare, Coastcare and ‘Friends of’ groups for activities contributing to the maintenance or extension of communitybased on-ground works. Grant recipients included Boat Harbour Progress Association Inc for the continuation of revegetation projects and weed eradication; the Friends of French’s Road Nature Reserve for the purchase of interpretive signage indicating car parks and a map of walks and points of interest; and the Friends of Lillico Penguins for the purchase of binoculars to enhance visitors’ penguinviewing experiences.

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Cradle Coast NRM again supported the Devonport City Council and Tasmanian Arboretum at Eugenana in this year’s hosting of Arbor Week celebrations. The packed calendar of events extended beyond a week and offered special presentations and tours right throughout May. Students gained practical insights into the Giant Freshwater Lobster, fungi, snakes and reptiles, wildlife rescue and weeds. Six schools from across the North West visited the Arboretum during the celebrations bringing 480 students to the park to learn about the role trees play in all aspects of our lives. The schools Coastcare Week Poster Competition launched in September with the theme Native Trees Help Biodiversity. Now in its fifth year, the competition attracted more than 120 entries from around the region examining the importance of rehabilitating coastal reserves; the benefits of biodiversity; and the relationships between coastal animals, birds, insects and plants. Fifteen local students and their schools were awarded prizes at a ceremony in December attended by 60 students, teachers and community members. Table Cape Primary School took out first prize for their poster titled Trees Matter: A Complete Life Support System. As part of Cradle Coast NRM’s program to create a library of natural resource management educational resources, work was completed this year on Coastal Discovery Booklets for lower primary, upper primary and teachers. The booklets cover the four topics of Habitats and Beach Environments, Native Plants and Weeds, Life in a Rock Pool and Marine Debris and Beachcombing. The Coastal Discovery Booklets were a Caring for our Country Community Coastcare funded project: Schools Caring for our Coast in North West Tasmania. They join a growing range of educational resources available for download from www.cradlecoastnrm.com

School Small Grants deliver big environmental benefit Over $31,800 in grants was awarded this year to 19 primary, secondary and farm schools as part of the Cradle Coast NRM small grants program. The successful schools used the grants for native tree and vegetable garden planting, equipment purchase, farm excursions and a range of activities that increased student understanding and involvement in caring for the region’s natural resources. The grants followed a public application process that generated 27 submissions from around the region. Example works included

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2010–2011


Six schools from across the North West visited the Arboretum during the celebrations bringing 480 students to the park to learn about the role trees play in all aspects of our lives.

Photograph by Karina Rose

water quality and ecology monitoring at Ferndene Nature Reserve by Penguin High School students; installation of a tap timer and drip irrigation system by Leighland Christian School students; and native plant revegetation and mulching to retain soil moisture around the school oval by Railton Primary School students.

Helping with post-flood clean up

Other recipients included Forest Primary School, Wilmot Primary School, Strahan Primary School, Wynyard High School, Sheffield School Farm, St. Brendan-Shaw College, Devonport High School, Tasmanian Polytechnic, Table Cape Primary School, Hillcrest Primary School, Smithton High School, Miandetta Primary School, Latrobe Primary School, Boat Harbour Primary School, Tasmanian Polytechnic Freer Farm and Sprent Primary School.

In Lower Mount Hicks in the Waratah-Wynyard municipality, the French’s Road Reserve walking track was damaged along with a bridge over Seabrook Creek. Repair works were assisted by the Council, Work for the Dole participants and students from Yolla High School.

The Schools Small Grants Program was such a success that it is earmarked for another round in 2011/12.

Currie Wharf area restoration

After the severe storm and flood events that affected the region in January, Cradle Coast NRM came to the assistance of many community groups working to repair the damage.

The temporary closure of the Reserve’s walking track didn’t stop the Friends of French’s Road Reserve from planning to make the path better than ever. Awarded a Small Grant from Cradle Coast NRM, the group is now constructing interpretive signage with a map indicating a circuit walk, distances and features. The walking track is scheduled for re-opening in October 2011.

Cradle Coast NRM provided funding to the King Island Natural Resource Management Group Inc to restore sections of the Currie Wharf area. This ongoing work creates a sustainable tourism and recreation demonstration site; promoting an appreciation of natural values via weed removal, native plantings and community awareness of weeds and other coastal issues.

Preserving the region’s rich cultural heritage

Collaborating with the King Island Council and King Island Ports, the group initially focused on the excavation and removal of the invasive weed, Boxthorn, which lined the path leading from the wharf to the boathouse. The first native plantings were of pigface to establish a resilient ground-cover and prevent erosion. Students then assisted in extending revegetation to include other shrubs and trees.

The Rubicon land was inhabited by the Punnilerpanner people for at least 10,000 years and being largely undisturbed has preserved a rich Aboriginal cultural heritage including campsites, middens, stone artefacts and quarry sites.

A public meeting was held in April to gain community input to the redevelopment work and volunteers from local groups and organisations assisted in site maintenance. Planning is underway for a story-board sign detailing the site’s history and recent improvements.

Marshalls Hill is comprised of 550 hectares of near-natural condition land near the Rubicon Estuary that is leased and managed by the Six Rivers Aboriginal Corporation (SRAC), formerly the Mersey Leven Aboriginal Corporation.

As recipients of a Cradle Coast NRM Devolved Grant in 2010/11, SRAC engaged the Central North Field Naturalists to compile an inventory of local flora and fauna. This work occurred in parallel to a cultural heritage survey to locate and document the numerous Tasmanian Aboriginal sites in the area. The combined information is now being used to create an area management plan and, post-implementation, lead to the development of cultural experiences for school groups and the community. SRAC is based at the Tiagarra Aboriginal Cultural Centre and Museum and includes members from the Devonport, Latrobe, Kentish and Central Coast municipalities.

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2010–2011

17


The State-listed threatened Swamp Paperbark Forest, Melaleuca ericifolia, was enhanced by the planting of 600 local native plants including grasses, sedges, rushes, groundcovers, shrubs and trees.

Photograph by Karina Rose

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2010–2011


W A TE R Inglis River revegetation and weed control Enhancing the riparian zone of the Inglis River in Wynyard has been the focus of another collaborative project funded by Cradle Coast NRM with the Waratah-Wynyard Council. Involving community and student volunteers plus Work for the Dole participants, the works have combined weed removal and revegetation through the Inglis River Reserve from the boat ramp at Jenner Street to the Inglis River bridge.

GOAL: To protect and maintain or improve our rivers, wetlands and groundwater environments by ensuring a sustainable balance between economic, environmental and social values.

By engaging the local community, the project aims to reduce native vegetation damage caused by firewood collection and the dumping of residential garden waste. The planting works have also stabilised the river banks to control erosion and helped to protect the Council’s waste water assets.

Here are some of the key water projects for 2010/11:

Leven River revegetation Riverside Avenue runs along the Leven River in Ulverstone and has been the site of collaborative restoration and revegetation works involving the Riverside Avenue Community Group, Tasmanian Polytechnic Conservation and Land Management students, Ulverstone High School students and Central Coast Council staff. Cradle Coast NRM provided funding and facilitator support to the group and the Tasmanian Landcare Association also provided a grant for riparian works. The Leven River banks are home to diverse native vegetation but in populated areas have been affected by weeds spreading from residential gardens. Contractors undertook weed control works along Riverside Avenue prior to the volunteers re-planting to give the native seedlings the best opportunity of surviving.

Using Clean Up Australia Day as a focal point, the Understorey Network hosted a walk-and-talk event on 6 March to share knowledge of native plants and weeds with 30 local residents. Wynyard Landcare also supported the event with an information stall. Weed management works have tackled blackberry and cotoneaster infestations plus the spraying of blue periwinkle and banana passionfruit. Yolla school students played an important role in the clearing of weeds in preparation for native plantings. The preparation and planting works continue and are expected to be completed at the end of August 2011.

The State-listed threatened Swamp Paperbark Forest, Melaleuca ericifolia, was enhanced by the planting of 600 local native plants including grasses, sedges, rushes, groundcovers, shrubs and trees. Polytechnic students assisted with benching the steep river banks and Central Coast Council staff helped local high school students with plantings. The Riverside Avenue Community Group’s restoration of the Leven River banks is ably led by members Jill Roberts and Maartje Deegan.

Volunteers enhance Sea Elephant River banks It was all hands on deck in the lead up to National Volunteers Week in May as 6000 native seedlings were planted along King Island’s Sea Elephant River and in Lavinia State Reserve. Volunteer crews organised by Cradle Coast NRM and Conservation Volunteers Australia came from Victoria to assist with the large revegetation project. The two-week program combined subsidised holiday travel and accommodation in return for the visitors participating in environmental works while on the island. Students from the Ballarat Clarendon College King Island campus also joined the planting efforts. The planting sites were carefully selected to provide a win-win for the visiting volunteers and for the local landscapes. The Sea Elephant River catchment and Lavinia State Reserve are not only very picturesque but they also support important remnant vegetation and much birdlife including the critically endangered King Island Scrubtit, Orange-bellied Parrot and endangered King Island Thornbill. Seedlings were all matched to local vegetation and sourced from a nursery on King Island and in Oldina. The mixed species included blackwood, currant bush, blue gum, celery top pine, dogwood and melaleuca. A focus of the Sea Elephant River planting was on private farmland to establish native vegetation and deliver shelter belt stock protection, biodiversity conservation and to minimise erosion.

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2010–2011

19


CRADLE COAST NRM 2010/11 PROJECTS Commenced in 10/11

Completed in 10/11

Ongoing projects commenced prior to 10/11

Project

Status

in 2010/11

Funding source

LAND Greenhouse gas mitigation focus farm contribution

Regional Investment Proposal 2

Dung Beetle surveys: Working with Polytechnic students to assess the effectiveness of introduction of exotic dung beetles

Regional Investment Proposal 2

Low input farming case studies (technical implementation). Pilot studies of four properties

Regional Investment Proposal 2

Control of isolated Weeds of National Significance (WoNS) King Island

Regional Investment Proposal 2 Caring for our Country

Tarkine vegetation surveys

Regional Investment Proposal 2

Tarkine natural values assessment associated with Tarkine tourism development

Regional Investment Proposal 2

Forecasting agricultural change for NRM

Caring for our Country

Farming sustainability – Future systems for intensive cropping (controlled traffic)

Caring for our Country

Climate Ready Farming Leaders

FarmReady

Regional Landcare Facilitator

Caring for our Country

Dairy Industry Nutrient Management Extension

Caring for our Country

Promotion and extension of sustainable farm practices

Caring for our Country

Needs analysis of the agricultural extension sector

Caring for our Country

Ecosystem services mapping: stage two

Caring for our Country

Regional weed coordination and support activities

Caring for our Country

Native habitat incentives

Caring for our Country

Integrated pest management workshops

Caring for our Country

Soil essentials field day

Caring for our Country

Welcome pack for rural landholders (Rural Living Guide)

Caring for our Country

Rural living round-up

Caring for our Country

Regional cropping industry profile

Caring for our Country

Agfest display

Caring for our Country

Small grants to school farms

Caring for our Country

Penguin Organic and Sustainable Living Festival display

Caring for our Country

Integrated weed management workshop

Caring for our Country

Vegetation condition assessment monitoring

Caring for our Country

WATER River rehabilitation works

Caring for our Country

Giant Freshwater Lobster monitoring and on-ground works to protect and improve habitat

State Government, Caring for our Country, Regional Investment Proposal 2

Threatened species works and monitoring

Caring for our Country

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2010–2011


Status

Project

in 2010/11

Funding source

COASTS Shorebirds data collation and community education

Caring for our Country

Methodology to measure coastal condition

Regional Investment Proposal 2

King Island wallaby exclusion trial

Caring for our Country

Sea Elephant estuary works, site plan and interpretive signage

Caring for our Country

Coastal weed strategy implementation for Cradle Coast region

Caring for our Country

Lavinia State Reserve on-ground projects to rehabilitate and protect the coastal environment

Caring for our Country

Communicating research findings into climate change impacts on Circular Head coastal foreshores.

Caring for our Country

Robbins Passage - Boullanger Bay tidal and sediment monitoring

Caring for our Country

COMMUNITY Aboriginal cultural values – communications products

Regional Investment Proposal 2

Community group MERI system – project management and reporting system for community groups

Regional Investment Proposal 2

Wynyard Landcare on-ground works

Regional Investment Proposal 2

Elliot District slump soil and coastal slip on-ground works

Regional Investment Proposal 2

King Island Facilitator support

Regional Investment Proposal 2

Penguin Organic Centre coordinator support

Regional Investment Proposal 2

Aboriginal community engagement strategy

Caring for our Country

Restoration of coastal biodiversity and penguin habitat

Caring for our Country

Youth participation activities – Coastal and biodiversity awareness education program – Arbor Week, surf clubs Little Nipper coastal awareness and Girl Guides programs

Caring for our Country

Emu Valley Rhododendron Gardens – native revegetation and interpretation signage

Caring for our Country

Rubicon Coast and Landcare – Rubicon Reserve protection and boardwalk

Caring for our Country

Devolved grants – to community groups and land managers to undertake activities contributing to national and regional NRM priorities

Caring for our Country

Short term visitor volunteer engagement

Caring for our Country

Aboriginal partnership development

Caring for our Country

King Island NRM Strategy implementation

Caring for our Country

Development of environmental educational resources

Caring for our Country

Clean-up Australia Day activities and supporting marine educational products for schools

Caring for our Country

Inglis River Reserve and coastal boardwalk community based environmental activities

Caring for our Country

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2010–2011

21


CRADLE COAST NRM 2010/11 PROJECTS Commenced in 10/11

Completed in 10/11

Ongoing projects commenced prior to 10/11

Project

Status

in 2010/11

Funding source

COMMUNITY continued Development and implementation of a weed management plan for Howie Island

Caring for our Country

Shorebird community workshops and counts

Caring for our Country

Penguin Management Plan for Stanley

Caring for our Country

Penguin monitoring at Stanley

Caring for our Country

Montane grassland field days

Caring for our Country

Mount Roland Precinct Study

Caring for our Country

Self-accommodating visitor interactions with natural values survey

Caring for our Country

Trefoil Island Management Plan

Caring for our Country

On-ground works, management planning and communications activities by Six Rivers Aboriginal Corporation

Caring for our Country

Small grants to Aboriginal organisations

Caring for our Country

Small grants to schools for environment and cultural projects

Caring for our Country

Schools revegetation program

Caring for our Country

Community group revegetation project support

Caring for our Country

Community Skills, Knowledge and Engagement program evaluation

Caring for our Country

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2010–2011


Photograph by Alice Ryder

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2010–2011

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CRADLE COAST NRM 2010/11 PROJECT SNAPSHOT

JULY

AUG

SEPT

UNDERSTANDING CLIMATE CHANGE

COMMUNITY HELPS WITH SHOREBIRD MONITORING

WEST COAST ALL SCHOOLS TREE DAY

The Climate Ready Farming Leaders continued to meet this year with day trips and interactive workshops exploring all aspects of climate change and its relevance to the agricultural industry.

More than 100 community volunteers are helping to count resident shorebird numbers via twice yearly surveys. The results enable the monitoring of species’ trends, early identification of population problems and increased public awareness of resident shorebird habitats. Based on the data, interpretive signs were added to key beaches between Narawntapu National Park and Stanley.

The fourth West Coast All Schools Tree Day was held in Queenstown with grade 3-6 students from all six West Coast schools helping to plant 700 trees at three sites around the town.

Two groups of 10 farmers in the Sassafras, Forth and Ulverstone districts are participating in the three year program. A selection travelled to Circular Head to visit the Woolnorth wind farm, a solarpowered farm at Redpa, a robotic dairy at Togari and the Cape Grim Baseline Air Pollution Station. Collaboration with Serve-Ag and RMCG through funding from the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry under FarmReady, part of Australia’s Farming Future.

Free workshops on resident shorebird identification were held to assist new volunteers. One featured special guest speaker, Golo Maurer; the Birds Australia Shorebirds 2020 Project Manager and migratory shorebird expert. Collaboration with Ornithologist, Hazel Britton through funding from the Australian Government’s Caring for our Country.

Since its inception, the annual event has involved more than 500 students in the planting of at least 3200 native West Coast species around the townships of Rosebery, Zeehan, Strahan and Queenstown. Collaboration of the West Coast Weed and Fire Management Group comprised of representatives from Cradle Coast NRM, West Coast Council, Parks and Wildlife Service, Forestry Tasmania, the Henty Mine, Renison Mine, Rosebery Mine and Mount Lyell Mine, Tasmania’s water and energy providers, State Government and local tourism operators. Photograph courtesy of Marty Bower

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Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2010–2011


OCT

NOV

DEC

RESIDENTS INPUT TO REGIONAL STRATEGY

VISITING VOLUNTEERS LEND A HAND

PROTECTING OUR THREATENED SPECIES

The Regional Natural Resource Management Strategy for the Cradle Coast was revised this year and reissued for the period 2010 – 15. As part of the Strategy’s development, its draft contents were presented to community groups, industry and residents at public forums held in Burnie, King Island and Devonport.

Visitors to the Cradle Coast region volunteered for track maintenance and revegetation work in the Dial Range south of Penguin. Six volunteers were engaged for a day’s work on tracks along creeks and gullies within the range.

As part of Cradle Coast NRM’s Natural Connections grants program, fencing along the Leven River was installed near Gunns Plains to protect the riparian vegetation and the habitat of Giant Freshwater Lobsters.

Consultation meetings were also held with Government representatives, Aboriginal community members and other associations working to care for the region’s land, waterways and coasts. Feedback from the sessions and an online submission process were integrated into the final document which is now available for download from www.cradlecoastnrm.com The Strategy was developed through funding from the Tasmanian Government.

Cradle Coast NRM’s Biodiversity Coordinator shared information on the Giant Freshwater Lobster to raise awareness of this threatened species and highlight the importance of the volunteer’s work to its conservation. This year the Short Term Visitor Volunteer program also delivered helping hands to weed control and revegetation works on The Nut at Stanley and on King Island. Collaboration with Conservation Volunteers Australia and the Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service through funding from the Australian Government’s Caring for our Country.

Off-stream stock watering points were added and invasive willows were removed from the river bank to provide native plants with the best chance of regeneration. This project was one of 26 applicants from the first Natural Connections round of grants. Collaboration with Greening Australia and private landholders through funding from the Australian Government’s Caring for our Country. Photograph by Ali Dugand

Photograph by Belinda Colson

Photograph by Raelee Turner

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2010–2011

25


CRADLE COAST NRM 2010/11 PROJECT SNAPSHOT

JAN

FEB

MARCH

NIPPERS BECOME BEACH DETECTIVES

INFORMATION TO THE PEOPLE

PLANTING SEEDS OF CHANGE

Burnie and Boat Harbour Surf Lifesaving Club Nippers took part in a fun NRM summer competition – Beach Detectives; finding the good, the bad and the ugly on their beaches.

Information displays featuring a wide range of NRM content, kids activities and farm mapping services manned by Cradle Coast NRM staff were present at the Organic Sustainable Living Festival in Penguin and at Agfest in Carrick.

Primary schools in the Cradle Coast region were issued free National Tree Day Kits to support classroom activities in the lead up to Tree Day celebrations. The Kits contained native seeds to grow Manuka Tea Tree, biodegradable pots to plant straight into the ground, fact sheets and a variety of classroom activities. The activities helped students explore how paper is made and recycled and how seeds germinate and grow.

The Nippers each received a Beach Detectives log book containing facts and photos of common and not-so-common beach creatures. Sightings were recorded over a six week period in both the books and on a poster displayed in the clubrooms. Nippers with the highest recorded sightings were awarded prizes of snorkels and masks so that they could continue to explore their beach long after the competition had ended. Collaboration with North West Surf Lifesaving Clubs through funding from the Australian Government’s Caring for our Country.

26

Popular at both events was Cradle Coast NRM’s Rural Living Guide which is an A-Z compendium of information useful to small acreage landholders. Soil art finger painting using a variety of coloured and textured soil from around the region was also a hit with young and old as it combined hands-on fun with education about different soil types and compositions. Collaboration for the Sustainable Living Festival was with the North West Environment Centre through funding from the Australian Government’s Regional Landcare Facilitator Program.

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2010–2011

A total of 100 kits were sent to primary schools. Seeds planted into pots this year will be ready to transfer into school gardens, pot and all, by next year’s Tree Day. Collaboration with the region’s primary schools through funding from the Australian Government’s Caring for our Country.


APRIL

MAY

JUNE

INTEGRATED WEED MANAGEMENT

PROTECTING PENGUINS FROM ROAD AND RAIL

An integrated weed management (IWM) approach to land management combines the use of complementary weed control methods such as grazing, herbicide application, land fallowing and biological control. IWM has also been shown to help combat herbicide resistance.

The one kilometre fence along the railway line at Sulphur Creek was upgraded to securely separate the resident penguin colonies from the railway and busy Bass Highway.

SURVEY OF SELF-ACCOMMODATING VISITORS

At a workshop on the topic held at Penguin, Cradle Coast land managers heard from University of Adelaide IWM expert, Peter Boutsalis. Participants learnt of local and mainland trial results and how such a coordinated approach could be adapted to different North West Tasmanian property conditions. Collaboration with Peter Boutsalis through funding from the Australian Government’s Caring for our Country.

The fence, originally constructed in 1999 by local community groups, was upgraded with new steel droppers, tightened wires and the filling of any gaps. Timing of the works was carefully planned to coincide with the winter months when Little Penguins have finished raising their chicks and have completed their moult. Collaboration with TasRail and the Central Coast Council through funding from the Australian Government’s Caring for our Country. Photograph by Karina Rose

Many visitors to the Cradle Coast region holiday in informal campsites in campervans, caravans, tents and self-contained vehicles. A survey was constructed to quantify these visitor numbers over summer and identify their interest in, and potential impact on, the natural values of the region. The study team travelled over the areas shown in the map above. A secondary purpose of the study was to determine visitor’s communication and information gathering preferences. This knowledge will be used in planning Cradle Coast NRM’s volunteer programs in an effort to engage self-contained campers in future environmental projects. Collaboration with the University of Tasmania and Cradle Coast Authority Tourism through funding from the Australian Government’s Caring for our Country.

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2010–2011

27


The financial statements presented have been compiled from the audited financial statements of the reporting entity, the Cradle Coast Authority, for the year ended 30 June 2011.

C RA D LE C O A S T N A TU R A L R ES O UR C E MA N A GEMENT C O MP RE HE N S IV E IN COM E S T A T EMEN T For year ended 30 June 2011

Note REVENUE

2011 $

Grant Income

1

2,558,000

Other Income

2

34,661

Interest Income

65,719

Total Revenue

2,658,380

EXPENSES Employee Costs

1,004,492

Project Delivery and Consultancy

1,670,457

Other Operating Expenses

3

Total Expenses

Comprehensive Result

545,790 3,220,739

4

(562,359)

Photograph by Karina Rose

28

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2010–2011


The financial statements presented have been compiled from the audited financial statements of the reporting entity, the Cradle Coast Authority, for the year ended 30 June 2011.

C RA D LE C O A S T N A TU R A L R ES O UR C E MA N A GEMENT BAL A N CE S HE E T As at 30 June 2011 2011 ASSETS

$

Current assets Cash at Bank Trade Receivables Interest Accrued

1,021,046 15,425 6,444

Total current assets

1,042,915

Non-current assets

Total non-current assets

TOTAL ASSETS

1,042,915

LIABILITIES Current liabilities Trade Payables

67,281

Superannuation Payable

28,296

Provision for Annual Leave

47,594

PAYG Payable

16,682

Payroll Tax Payable

22,083

Total current liabilities

181,936

Non-current liabilities Provision for Long Service Leave

13,754

Total non-current liabilities

13,754

TOTAL LIABILITIES

195,690

NET ASSETS

847,225

EQUITY Accumulated Funds

1,409,584

Comprehensive Result

(562,359)

TOTAL EQUITY

847,225 Photograph by Karina Rose

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2010–2011

29


The financial statements presented have been compiled from the audited financial statements of the reporting entity, the Cradle Coast Authority, for the year ended 30 June 2011.

C RA D LE C O A S T N A TU R A L R ES O UR C E MA N A GEMENT NOTES TO F IN A N CIA L S T A T EM EN T S For year ended 30 June 2011 Note 1

2011 Grant Income Natural Heritage Trust Dept of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry DPIPWE*

$ 50,000 184,000 2,324,000 2,558,000

2

Other Income NRM North NRM South External Contributions to Projects

14,718 7,672 12,271 34,661

3

Other Operating Expenses Advertising

20,499

Fringe Benefits Tax IT Support

514 13,992

Meeting, Planning & Forum Expenses

18,938

Community Capacity

61,139

Phone Faxes & Internet Postage Printing & Stationery Recruitment & Relocation Costs Rent - Rates & Taxes Sundries Travelling Expenses Audit Fees

7,442 24,727 3,557 24,500 9,289 39,216 2,950

Communication

53,442

Weeds Eradication

15,864

Office Costs Seminars, Conferences & Subs

123,330 12,236

Bank Fees

476

Vehicle Expenses

43,399

Committee Expenses

28,928

Sponsorship Capital Expenditure

2,241 39,111 545,790

4

Comprehensive Result Project Carry Over 09/10 Prior Year Adjustment ** 10/11 Deficit *** Total Project Unexpended Funds

1,453,584 {44,000} (562,359) 847,225

* Includes DPIPWE, Caring for our Country 10/11 and Caring for our Country Coastcare Grants. ** DPIPWE Invoice raised twice in 09/10 *** Funds received in prior financial year, however expended in 10/11 financial year. Photograph by Jenny Archer

30

Cradle Coast NRM annual report 2010–2011


Cradle Coast NRM would like to acknowledge the following photographers for their contribution to this publication: Jenny Archer, Belinda Colson, Alice Ryder, Karina Rose, Mary Viney, Brian Dullaghan, Marty Bower, Rosie Britton, Raelee Turner, Ali Dugand and Martin Finzel. Cover photograph by Jenny Archer. This report is printed on recycled paper. Proudly designed by Emma Duncan, Red Bird Design.


Cradle Coast NRM 30 Marine Terrace PO Box 338 Burnie TAS 7320 Ph: 03 6431 6285 Fax: 03 6431 7014 nrm@cradlecoast.com Cradle Coast NRM is an independent committee hosted by the Cradle Coast Authority

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