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Natural Resource Management Coastal Values Mapping Project Vegetation and Fauna Habitat NRM North and Cradle Coast INTERPRETATION MANUAL JULY 2008 (NRM05)

Andrew North anorth@northbarker.com.au 163 Campbell Street Hobart TAS 7000

Philip Barker pbarker@northbarker.com.au

Telephone 03. 6231 9788

Facsimile 03. 6231 9877


NRM Coastal Vegetation and Fauna Habitat Mapping

SUMMARY This report provides interpretation of the data layers produced as an output of the project. For each of the data sets (layers) produced the method is explained, and the categorisation of data is illustrated in tables. Examples of maps for each of the data sets are also presented.

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Mapping and field assessment: Cassandra Strain and Sally Debnam assisted by Philip Barker, Ian Flockhart and Laurel Waddell. GIS and data management: Susan Jungalwalla. Analysis and reporting: Cassandra Strain and Philip Barker. Project conception and management: Philip Barker. Digital threatened fauna data: Forest Practices Authority. Images: Cassandra Strain (CS), Ian Flockhart (IF), Laurel Waddell (LW) and Karen Ziegler (KZ). Specialists consultation: John Ashworth, Phil Bell, Stewart Blackhall, Ray Brereton, Anne Chuter, Sib Corbett, Niall Doran, Clare Hawkins, Mark Holdsworth, Jean Jackson. Billie Lazenby, Peter McQuillan, Andrew North, Private Property Conservation Program, Tim Rudman, Richard Schahinger, Greg Taylor and David Ziegeler. Bird Records: Els Haywood, Bill Wakefield and Birds Tasmania. Community support: Landowners in West Coast, Circular Head, Waratah-Wynyard, Burnie, Central Coast, Devonport, Latrobe, West Tamar, Launceston and George Town Council areas who granted permission to access their land including Roaring 40s and Tasmanian Aboriginal Land and Sea Council.

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T AB L E O F C O NT E NT S 1 . INT R O D UC T IO N 1.1 AIM 1.2 STUDY AREA 1.3 GIS MAPPING Figure 1 – Study Area 2.

S T AG E 1 ME T HO D 2.1 VEGETATION COMMUNITY MAPPING 2.2 ENVIRONMENTAL WEED MAPPING 2.3 VEGETATION CONDITION ASSESSMENT Table 1. Condition classes 2.4 FAUNA HABITAT MAPPING 2.5 FIELD SURVEYS 2.6 COMPLETION OF MAPPING

3 . ST AG E 1 R E S UL T S

1 1 1 1 2 3 3 3 4 4 5 5 6 7

3.1 VEGETATION COMMUNITIES 7 3.1.1 TASVEG 7 Table 2 – Vegetation Communities in Study Area 7 Figure 2 – Vegetation Communities Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 3 – Weeds Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 4 – Vegetation Condition Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 5 – Significance of Fauna Habitat Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 6 – Significance of Vegetation Communities Error! Bookmark not defined. Figure 7 – Native Vegetation Viability Error! Bookmark not defined. 3.1.2 Conservation and Legislative Status of Vegetation Communities 12 13 3.2. ENVIRONMENTAL WEEDS Table 3 – Weeds In Study Area 13 3.3 VEGETATION CONDITION 15 3.4 FAUNA HABITAT 15 3.4.1 Threatened Fauna 15 3.4.2 Threatened Species Legislation 16 3.4.3 JAMBA and CAMBA Migratory Birds 18 3.4.4 Colonies Under Threat and Sensitive Breeding and Foraging Habitat 18 Table 4 – Significant Fauna in Study Area 20

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S T AG E 2 – AP P L IC AT IO N O F D E C IS IO N S UP P O R T T OO L S T O C O AS T AL V AL UE S D AT A

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4 . ST AG E 2 MET HO D

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4.1 SIGNIFICANCE MAPPING 4.1.1 Significance of Vegetation Communities Table 5 – Significance of Vegetation Communities 4.1.2 Significance of Fauna Habitat Table 6 – Significance of Fauna Habitat 4.2 VIABILITY OF NATIVE VEGETATION Table 7. The definitions of four viability classes

28 28 28 29 29 31 31

5 . ST AG E 2 R E S UL T S

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5.1 SIGNIFICANCE 5.2 VIABILITY OF NATIVE VEGETATION Table 8. Summary of viability analysis REFERENCES APPENDIX 1 – DETAILS OF URBAN AND PROJECT ORTHO-PHOTOS APPENDIX 2 – IMAGES OF VEGETATION COMMUNITIES APPENDIX 3A – CONSERVATION VALUES OF PLANT AND ANIMAL SPECIES APPENDIX 3B – CONSERVATION VALUES OF PLANT COMMUNITIES APPENDIX 4 - LEGISLATIVE IMPLICATIONS OF THREATENED SPECIES APPENDIX 5 – THREATENED NATIVE VEGETATION COMMUNITIES

33 33 34 35 38 40 51 52 53 55

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INTRODUCTION 1.1 A I M The aim of this project is the provision of accurate spatial information about coastal vegetation and fauna habitats to planning authorities such as the Cradle Coast NRM Committee, Councils and State Government agencies. This project has three specific tasks as outlined in the project specification: Stage 1. Coastal values (vegetation and fauna habitat) data collection and condition analysis. Stage 2. Application of decision support tools to coastal values data. Stage 3. Dissemination of data and training. This report provides interpretation of, and methodology behind, the GIS mapping layers created by this project relating to Stages 1 and 2. The report itself is part of Stage 3.

1.2 S T UDY A RE A The study area for this project is the majority of the coastal strip (between mean high water mark and 100 metres inland) of the Cradle Coast Natural Resource Management (NRM) Region, Tasmania (Figure 1). The length of coastline for the project is 720 km. The coastlines of West Coast, Circular Head, Waratah-Wynyard, Burnie, Central Coast, Devonport, Latrobe, West Tamar and part of Launceston and George Town Councils are included. The study area includes the north coast from Weymouth to Robbins Passage, Tamar estuary down to Tamar Island and the West Coast from Cape Grim to Arthur River and Sandy Cape to the southern tip of Ocean Beach, Strahan. Areas excluded from the study area are Narawntapu and Rocky Cape National Parks, Bell Bay area, Stony Head Artillery Range, Penguin Point to Tea Tree Point (Penguin), Blackman Point area (Burnie), Port Latta, all islands and a number of estuaries.

1.3 G IS M AP P I NG The outputs of this project are Geographic Information System (GIS) data sets and mapping layers using MapInfo. The data sets and mapping layers produced are:

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1.

Vegetation community based on TASVEG1 mapping units.

2.

Environmental weeds present.

3.

Condition of the native vegetation.

4.

Fauna habitat for threatened and other significant native fauna.

5.

Significance of vegetation.

6.

Significance of fauna habitat.

7.

Viability of coastal values.

TASVEG is the state-wide vegetation mapping project undertaken by Tasmanian Department of Primary Industries and Water

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Figure 1 – Study Area

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Stage 1 – Coastal Values Data Collection and Condition Analysis

2.

STAGE 1 METHOD The methodology for Stage 1 is described below.

2.1 V E GE T AT I ON C OM M UNI T Y M AP P I NG The mapping was carried out using MapInfo Geographic Information System (GIS). Using the coastline layer as supplied by Cradle Coast NRM, a 100 metre buffer was applied to determine the project study area. Vegetation communities were mapped within the 100 metre coastal strip by creating polygons and allocating vegetation community codes (TASVEG mapping units), viewed at a scale of 1:5000. This was carried out by overlaying the TASVEG, roads, geology and coastline layers over ortho-rectified aerial photographs in MapInfo. Vegetation communities were identified to a 1ha resolution or to 0.25ha where a threatened vegetation community was suspected. Existing mapping was utilised where available. The following reports of recent vegetation community mapping were referred to:  Blake, G. and Cannell, R. (2000). Tamar Estuary 2020 Strategy – Foreshore Vegetation Mapping and Analysis. Tamar Estuary 2020 Steering Committee.  Johnson, K., Gilfedder, L, Schahinger, R., Carter, O. and Sculthorpe, A. (2008). DRAFT Preminghana Natural Values. Private Land Conservation Program, Department of Primary Industries and Water, Hobart.  Robertson, L. and Sansom, I. (1999). The West, North-West Coastal Vegetation Management Plan. Parks and Wildlife Service, Tasmania.  Schahinger, R. (2005). Completion of identifying priority lowland temperate grasslands in the Cradle-Coast NRM region. Threatened Species Unit, Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment, Hobart.  Schahinger, R. (2002). Near-coastal native grasslands or northwestern Tasmania: community description, distribution and conservation status, with management recommendations. Nature Conservation Report 02/10, Nature Conservation Branch, Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment, Hobart. The ortho-rectified aerial photographs utilised for the project were a combination of Urban ortho-photographs at a scale of 1:24 000 dated from 16/12/2000 to 12/03/2004, Project ortho-photographs at a scale of 1:42 000 dated from 29/11/2000 to 1/03/2006 and high resolution ortho-photographs at a scale of 1:10 000 for the Heemskirk, Studland Bay and Woolnorth areas. For dates of the Urban and Project ortho-photographs utilised see Appendix 1. Based on all of the above, field maps and tables were prepared for each orthophotograph.

2.2 E NVI RONM E NT AL W E E D M AP P I NG The vegetation mapping used in this project is based on polygons and those polygons are described in Section 3. Each polygon indicates the extent of the single vegetation

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community within it. The apparent condition of a whole polygon could be attributed to, for example, the presence or absence of weeds within it. If this approach was followed, the apparent condition and viability of a whole polygon may be influenced by the condition and viability of a small portion of it. To overcome this issue a smaller scale assessment (1 ha) allows areas within a single polygon to be identified and assessed independently. A 1.0 ha (100m x 100m) grid has been placed along the coastal strip which was utilised for the weed mapping. For each 1.0 ha cell, the environmental and declared weeds present were recorded. 1.0 ha cells with weeds present are coloured yellow (Figure 3). If no weeds were present the cells are white. If the cell was not groundtruthed the cells are grey.

2.3 V E GE T AT I ON C ONDI T I ON A S S E S SM E NT The 1.0 ha (100m x 100m) grid placed along the coastal strip was also utilised for the vegetation condition assessment mapping. The method utilised2 was developed to be repeatable, applicable by inexperienced persons and has been tested and refined during its development to ensure the repeatability and ease of application. The condition classes are described in Table 1 below. Table 1. Condition classes Condition Class

Description

1

Vegetation structurally and floristically intact, weed invasion less than 10% cover. Vegetation structurally or floristically altered and or weed invasion > 10 % and < 50% cover.

2 3

Vegetation structurally or floristically altered and weed invasion > 50 % and < 90% cover.

4

Grossly altered vegetation structure in otherwise weed infested vegetation (> 90% weeds).

The condition descriptions above are intended to be mutually exclusive. The condition of the vegetation should be judged with regard to the three criteria contained in the condition description. The colours codes reflect those in Figure 4. 1. structural alteration 2. floristic alteration 3. cover of weeds (herbaceous and grassy) 4. The presence of any declared weeds results in the demotion from class 1 to 2 and for all classes is reflected in the viability score below (section 4.2). All ground-truthed mapping units are assigned to a condition class by tagging the 1.0 ha base cells in each mapping unit.

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North Barker 2003 Roadside vegetation quality maintenance performance indicator. Austroads.

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The colour coding applied in the vegetation condition assessment mapping, as with other similar rated mapping, illustrates the Condition Class of each 1.0 ha cell, with red the highest rating and pale yellow the lowest.

2.4 F AUNA H ABI T AT M AP P I NG A desktop survey was carried out for known threatened fauna habitat in the coastal strip utilising the following resources:  Bryant, S. & Jackson, J. (1999). Tasmania’s Threatened Fauna Handbook: what, where and how to protect. Threatened Species Unit, Parks & Wildlife Service, Hobart.  Forest Practices Board (2002) Threatened fauna manual for production forests in Tasmania. Forest Practices Board, Hobart.  Forest Practices Authority (2006) Threatened Fauna by 1:25 000 Map Sheet data. Unpublished data. Forest Practices Authority, Hobart.  Little penguin baseline Report, Cradle Coast NRM.  Birds Tasmania (2008) Birds Tasmania records. Unpublished data. Birds Tasmania, Hobart.  Expert opinion from fauna specialists from Department of Primary Industries and Water and Hydro Tasmania. Using a combination of the fauna habitat data above and vegetation community data, two fauna habitat GIS layers were created:  ‘Potential fauna habitat’ layer. Habitat of: threatened fauna, JAMBA and CAMBA listed species and species with sensitive breeding or foraging habitat, by TASVEG mapping unit, within 1:25 000 map sheets containing known localities or suitable habitat. This layer relates fauna habitat to vegetation communities that are known foraging and/or breeding habitat for a species.  ‘Observed fauna habitat’ layer. Threatened fauna habitat identified during field surveys where it is not obvious by the vegetation community.

2.5 F I E L D S URVE YS Ground-truthing was undertaken of vegetation communities, vegetation condition, threatened fauna habitat and environmental weeds present. Digital photographs of representative vegetation types were taken (see Appendix 2). The coastal strip was divided into 100 x 100 m grid squares and for each square the following was recorded:  Vegetation condition Assessment’).

assessment

(1-4)

(see

‘Vegetation

Condition

 Threatened fauna habitat where not obvious from vegetation community.  Species of declared and environmental weeds present.

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2.6 C OM P L E T I ON

OF

M AP P I NG

Following the ground-truthing, vegetation community mapping was completed in MapInfo:  Using ecological principals to determine TASVEG mapping unit for locations not ground-truthed,  Adjusting boundaries of polygons,  Adjusting TASVEG mapping units based on ground truthing or ecological principals. Data for each 100 x 100m grid square was imported into MapInfo; vegetation condition, weeds and threatened fauna habitat.

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3.

STAGE 1 RESULTS R ESULTS 3.1 V E GE T AT I ON C OM M UNI T I ES 3.1.1 TASVEG Vegetation communities have been attributed to mapping units as part of a statewide project known as TASVEG being administered through Department of Primary Industries and Water (DPIW). There are 158 TASVEG mapping units which are primarily vegetation communities that can be mapped from aerial photography, but also include non-vegetation mapping units such as Urban areas (FUR) and Agricultural land (FAG) (Harris and Kitchener, 2005). The TASVEG mapping has been completed as a first run for the entire state and mapped to a scale of 1:25000. The forest mapping part of that project borrows heavily from the Regional Forest Agreement Vegetation Map, which was based mostly on rule sets applied to previous Forest Inventory mapping. The accuracy of this mapping has been found to be moderate at best. The existence of statewide mapping allows for regional statewide area analysis. Supported by modelling of the vegetation cover prior to European settlement calculations have been made that estimate the extent of loss since that time. This has allowed for the determination of the status and conservation priorities at a statewide and bioregional scale. Some communities are considered as ‘threatened’ based on a set of criteria (refer Appendix 3). The vegetation community mapping carried out for this project was informed by the TASVEG map; but created a more accurate map of vegetation communities in the coastal strip. All polygons (areas) of vegetation were attributed TASVEG mapping units (see Figure 2 example). The vegetation communities mapped in the study area are listed in Table 2. This table also includes the conservation status of the vegetation communities, and the significance score used in the significance mapping (see Table 5). Table 2 – Vegetation Communities in Study Area TASVEG Code

Community Name

Conservation Status

AHL

Lacustrine herbland

Vulnerable

2

AHS

Saline aquatic herbland

Vulnerable

2

ARS

Saline sedgeland/rushland

Not threatened

3

ASF

Fresh water aquatic sedgeland and rushland

Vulnerable

2

ASS

Succulent saline herbland

Not threatened

3

DAC

Eucalyptus amygdalina coastal forest and woodland

Not threatened

3

DAD

Eucalyptus amygdalina forest and woodland on dolerite

Not threatened

3

DAM

Eucalyptus amygdalina forest and woodland on mudstone

Not threatened

3

DAS

Eucalyptus amygdalina forest and woodland on sandstone

Vulnerable

2

DAZ

Eucalyptus amygdalina forest and woodland on Cainozoic deposits

Vulnerable

2

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Significance

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TASVEG Code

Community Name

Conservation Status

DGL

Eucalyptus globulus dry forest and woodland

Vulnerable

2

DNI

Eucalyptus nitida dry forest and woodland

Not threatened

3

DOB

Eucalyptus obliqua dry forest and woodland

Not threatened

3

DOV

Eucalyptus ovata forest and woodland

Endangered

1

DOW

Eucalyptus ovata heathy woodland

Endangered

1

Not threatened

3

Rare/Vulnerable

1

DSC DVC

Eucalyptus amygdalina - Eucalyptus obliqua damp sclerophyll forest Eucalyptus viminalis - Eucalyptus globulus coastal forest and woodland

Significance

DVG

Eucalyptus viminalis grassy forest and woodland

Not threatened

3

DVS

Eucalyptus viminalis shrubby/heathy woodland

Not threatened

3

FAG

Agricultural land

Non-native

4

FMG

Marram grassland

Non-native

4

FPE

Permanent easement

Non-native

4

FPF

Pteridium esculentum fernland

Non-native

4

FPL

Plantations for silviculture

Non-native

4

FRG

Regenerating cleared land

Non-native

4

FSM

Spartina marshland

Non-native

4

FUM

Extra-urban miscellaneous

Non-native

4

FUR

Urban areas

Non-native

4

FWU

Weed infestation

Non-native

4

GCL

Lowland grassland complex

Not threatened

3

GHC

Coastal grass and herbfield

Not threatened

3

GPL

Lowland Poa labillardierei grassland

Not threatened

3

GSL

Lowland sedgy grassland

Not threatened

3

GTL

Lowland Themeda triandra grassland

Not threatened

3

MBS

Buttongrass moorland with emergent shrubs

Not threatened

3

NAD

Acacia dealbata forest

Not threatened

3

NAF

Acacia melanoxylon swamp forest

Not threatened

3

NAR

Acacia melanoxylon on rises

Not threatened

3

NAV

Allocasuarina verticillata forest

Not threatened

3

NBA

Bursaria - Acacia woodland and scrub

Not threatened

3

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TASVEG Code

Community Name

Conservation Status

Significance

NLM

Leptospermum lanigerum - Melaleuca squarrosa swamp forest

Not threatened

3

NME

Melaleuca ericifolia swamp forest

Rare/Endanger ed

1

OAQ

Water, sea

Not threatened

3

ORO

Rock (cryptogamic lithosphere )

Not threatened

3

OSM

Sand, mud

Not threatened

3

SAC

Acacia longifolia coastal scrub

Not threatened

3

SCA

Coastal scrub on alkaline sands

Not threatened

3

SCH

Coastal heathland

Not threatened

3

SDU

Dry scrub

Not threatened

3

SHL

Lowland sedgy heathland

Not threatened

3

SHW

Wet heathland

Not threatened

3

SLW

Leptospermum scrub

Not threatened

3

SMR

Melaleuca squarrosa scrub

Not threatened

3

SRC

Seabird rookery complex

Rare

1

SSC

Coastal scrub

Not threatened

3

WBR

Eucalyptus brookeriana wet forest

Vulnerable

2

WNL

Eucalyptus nitida forest over Leptospermum

Not threatened

3

WOL

Eucalyptus obliqua forest over Leptospermum

Not threatened

3

WRE

Eucalyptus regnans forest

Not threatened

3

WVI

Eucalyptus viminalis wet forest

Endangered

1

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3.1.2 Conservation and Legislative Status of Vegetation Communities Methods of assessing conservation status of vegetation communities and flora or fauna species are detailed in Appendix 3. Vegetation types have been classified according to TASVEG3. The conservation status of a vegetation type relates to its current extent compared with the modelled extent prior to European settlement. This has allowed an estimate of the extent of loss to land clearing to be calculated. A recent amendment to the Nature Conservation Act 2002 includes the listing of threatened native vegetation communities in accordance with their conservation status4. Listed communities are normally protected from clearance. The regulatory framework controlling clearance generally falls under the Forest Practices Act 1986 but in some instances is managed using other processes. Conservation status at the regional level has not been undertaken for all vegetation. However, a recent regional analysis has been completed for forest communities for the Forest Conservation Fund5. The State and Federal Governments are committed through the Regional Forest Agreement to achieving a Comprehensive Adequate and Representative (CAR) Reserve System (following JANIS criteria for reservation targets outlined in Appendix 3). Analysis of the reservation status6 of vegetation types in Tasmania (as per current TASVEG mapping) has also only been completed for forest communities as part of the Forest Conservation Fund7. No recent analysis exists for non-forest vegetation. The conservation significance of species is determined at a state and federal level by legislation (Tasmanian Threatened Species Protection Act 1995 and Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999), the implications of which are considered in the light of relevant legislation (Appendix 4). Table 2 above, lists the conservation status of vegetation communities present in the study area; rare, endangered, vulnerable and not threatened. The column ‘Significance’ refers to the conservation priority given to the vegetation communities for mapping purposes. A status of ‘1’ represents ‘rare’ or ‘endangered’ communities, ‘2’ represents ‘vulnerable’ communities and ‘3’ represents non-threatened communities (see Figure 6 – Significance of Vegetation Communities).

Harris & Kitchener 2005 DPIW 2006 5 FCF 2007 6 This measures current reservation levels against modelled areas of extent prior to European settlement. 7 FCF 2007 3 4

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3.2. E NVI RONM E NT AL W E E DS The environmental and declared weeds present in the study area were mapped (see Figure 3 example) and are listed in Table 3 below. A number of these weeds are listed as declared weeds under the Tasmanian Weed Management Act 1999. Table 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Weeds In Study Area Code

Scientific Name Status Common Name

MG BL CS VA TL BS MI PG CO HT MT EB CI ER SH SS FN MB

Ammophila arenaria marram grass Billardiera heterophylla bluebell creeper Calystegia silvatica great bindweed Centranthus ruber red valerian Chamaecytisus palmensis tree lucerne Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. monilifera boneseed Coprosma repens mirror bush Cortaderia selloana pampas grass

Environmental weed Environmental weed Environmental weed Environmental weed Environmental weed Declared weed Environmental weed Environmental weed

Cotoneaster sp. cotoneaster Crataegus monogyna hawthorn Crocosmia Xcrocosmiiflora montbretia Cytisus scoparius english broom Delairea odorata cape ivy Erica baccans erica Erica lusitanica spanish heath Euphorbia paralias sea spurge Foeniculum vulgare fennel Genista monspessulana montpellier broom

Environmental weed Environmental weed Environmental weed Declared weed Environmental weed Environmental weed Declared weed Environmental weed Declared weed Declared weed

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Code

Scientific Name Status Common Name

IV HO LL LJ LA AB MA HH OF CA PA BP PP PI SP PM PS BR BB CW WI SE

Hedera helix ivy Ilex aquifolium holly Leptospermum laevigatum coast teatree Lonicera japonica japanese honeysuckle Lupinus arboreus tree lupin

Environmental weed Environmental weed Environmental weed Environmental weed Environmental weed

Lycium ferocissimum african boxthorn Malva sp. mallow

Declared weed Environmental weed

Marrubium vulgare horehound Osteospermum fruticosum trailing daisy

Declared weed Environmental weed

Paraserianthes lophantha cape leeuwin wattle Paspalum dilatatum paspalum Passiflora tarminiana banana passionfruit Pinus pinnasta pine Pinus radiata radiata pine Pittosporum undulatum sweet pittosporum Polygala myrtifolia myrtle-leaf milkwort Psoralea pinnata blue butterfly bush Rosa rubiginosa briar rose Rubus fruticosus aggregate blackberry Salix fragilis crack willow Salix species willow Senecio angulatus scrambling groundsel

Environmental weed Environmental weed Environmental weed Environmental weed Environmental weed Environmental weed Environmental weed Environmental weed Environmental weed Declared weed Declared weed Declared/ Environmental weed Environmental weed

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Code

Scientific Name Status Common Name

RA RG SW WJ GO PW WA

3.3

Senecio jacobaea ragwort Spartina anglica rice grass Thinopyrum junceiforme sea wheatgrass Tradescantia albiflora wandering jew Ulex europaeus gorse

Declared weed Declared weed Environmental weed Environmental weed Declared weed

Vinca major periwinkle Watsonia meriana watsonia

Environmental weed Environmental weed

V E GE T AT I ON C ONDI TI ON

The vegetation condition for all 1.0 ha cells with greater than 50% native vegetation was assessed and mapped along the coastal strip as illustrated in the Figure 4 example.

3.4 F AUNA H ABI T AT Within the coastal strip a high variety of habitat types exists; from mudflats, saltmarsh, sandy beaches, rocky beaches, cliffs, grasslands, scrub, heathlands, and forests; providing a rich food source and diversity of foraging and nesting habitat. The study area contains the outlets of number of rivers and creeks and approximately half of the associated estuaries. The coastal strip provides habitat for threatened species, migratory species, species whose colonies are at risk and those with sensitive breeding habitat. The single most important shorebird area in Tasmania is the Robbins Passage/Boullanger Bay area (Stewart Blackhall pers. com.). On the Tasmanian mainland this area extends from south of Woolnorth Point east to the western tip of Anthony Beach, Stanley, including West Inlet. Other notable locations for avian fauna include Tamar Estuary and Wetlands, George Town Reserve, Anthony Beach (Seven Mile Beach), Ocean Beach, Henty River mouth, Moorland Point (Devonport), Forwards and Picnic Beach (Rocky Cape) and Bakers Beach (Narawntapu). 3.4.1 Threatened Fauna There are twenty-nine (29) threatened fauna species that have either been recorded in the study area or for which potential habitat exists. These species are listed in Table 4 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Significant Fauna in Study Area, and includes the conservation status of each species. An example of the fauna habitat mapping is provided in Figure 5.

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3.4.2 Threatened Species Legislation Tasmanian Threatened Species Protection Act 1995 Threatened flora and fauna species in Tasmania are listed in Schedules 3 (endangered) and 4 (vulnerable) of the Threatened Species Protection Act, 1995. Rare species that are considered to be ‘at risk’ are listed in Schedule 5 of the Act. These three categories are defined in Section 15 of the Act. 1. “An extant taxon of native flora or fauna may be listed as endangered if it is in danger of extinction because long-term survival is unlikely while the factors causing it to be endangered continue operating. 2. A taxon of native flora or fauna may be listed as vulnerable if it is likely to become an endangered taxon while the factors causing it to be vulnerable continue operating. 3. A taxon of native flora or fauna may be listed as rare if it has a small population in Tasmania that is not endangered or vulnerable but is at risk.” The Act provides mechanisms for protecting these species from threatening processes through the implementation of ‘recovery plans’, ‘threat abatement plans’, ‘land management plans’, ‘public authority agreements’, and ‘interim protection orders’. Section 51 (a) of the TSPA states that: “A person must not knowingly, without a permit - take, trade in, keep or process any listed flora or fauna”. The Act defines ‘take’ as including: “kill, injure, catch, damage, destroy and collect”. A land manager is therefore required to obtain a permit from the Tasmanian Department of Primary Industries and Water (DPIW) to carry out management that may adversely affect any of the species listed in the Act.

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Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 The EPBCA establishes a process for assessing actions that are likely to have impacts of national environmental significance. Such impacts include World Heritage Areas, RAMSAR Wetland sites of international importance; migratory species protected under international agreements, nuclear actions, the Commonwealth marine environment and nationally threatened species and communities. Threatened species are defined in several categories: 1. Extinct • If at a particular time there is no reasonable doubt that the last member of the species has died. 2. Extinct in the wild • If it is known only to survive in cultivation, in captivity or as a naturalised population well outside its past range; or • If it has not been recorded in its known and/or expected habitat, at appropriate seasons, anywhere in its past range, despite exhaustive surveys over a time frame appropriate to its life cycle and form. 3. Critically endangered •

If at a particular time, it is facing an extremely high risk of extinction in the wild in the immediate future, as determined in accordance with the prescribed criteria.8

4. Endangered •

If it is not critically endangered; and it is facing a very high risk of extinction in the wild in the near future, as determined in accordance with the prescribed criteria.

5. Vulnerable •

If at a particular time it is not critically endangered or endangered; and it is facing a high risk of extinction in the wild in the medium-term future, as determined in accordance with the prescribed criteria.

6. Conservation dependent •

If, at that time, the species is the focus of a specific conservation program, the cessation of which would result in the species becoming vulnerable, endangered or critically endangered within a period of 5 years.

An action that is likely to affect species that are listed in any of the above categories may require ministerial approval unless the Commonwealth Environment Minister has granted an exemption. The Act establishes a referral process to Environment Australia to determine whether an action requires a formal approval and thus would be required to proceed through the assessment and approval process. A referral must provide sufficient information to allow the Minister to make a decision. The proponent can guide the Minister in by making a substantiated determination as to whether or not the proposed activity would constitute a ‘controlled action’ under the definitions of the Act. The Minister is then required to make a decision within 20 business days of the referral. The Minister may decide

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an approval is not necessary if the action is taken in a specified manner in the referral document. The action may not require approval but may require a permit if undertaken on Commonwealth land. If an approval is required then an environmental assessment must be carried out. In such instances the environmental assessment approach will be determined by the Minister and may vary from preliminary documentation to a full public inquiry depending on the scale and complexity of the impact. Where an environmental impact assessment (EIA) is required under the EPBC, then EMPCA EIA process/principles to carry out EIAs (refer – Sections 73/74 EMPCA)] has been authorised under a bilateral agreement between the Commonwealth and Tasmanian Governments. 3.4.3 JAMBA and CAMBA Migratory Birds Habitat for a number of migratory shorebirds exists within the coastal strip. Some of these shorebirds migrate to/from the Australian mainland but a number migrate to/from much further afield including Siberia (Greenshank) and the Arctic (Ruddy Turnstone). The “Agreement between the Government of Australia and the Government of Japan for the protection of migratory birds and birds in danger of extinction and their environment” (JAMBA) lists in the annex, migratory birds protected by the Agreement. The “Agreement between the Government of Australia and the Government of The People’s Republic of China for the protection of migratory birds and their environment” (CAMBA) lists migratory birds protected by the Agreement. The two Agreements desire for the contracting governments to take measures to manage and protect the listed migratory birds and their environments. JAMBA and CAMBA listed species are also protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. The listed species recorded in the study are listed in Table 4. 3.4.4 Colonies Under Threat and Sensitive Breeding and Foraging Habitat A number of the species listed in Table 4 are considered significant for the following reasons: ♦

Colonies under threat; colonies of these species are prone to disturbance.

Sensitive breeding and/or foraging habitat; breeding and/or foraging habitat of these species or group of species are prone to disturbance.

The types of disturbance these species are prone to include human and stock disturbance and predation by pest animals (cats, dogs and rats).

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Table 4 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Significant Fauna in Study Area Scientific Name Common Name

EPBC Act

Accipiter novaehollandiae Grey Goshawk

TSP Act

Other significance

Priority nesting and foraging habitat includes mature blackwood swamp forest, wet forest (particularly in riparian areas) and mixed forest with a closed canopy, low stem density, open understorey and dense stands of tea tree or paperbark nearby. Other primary foraging habitat includes mixed forest (wet eucalypt forest/rainforest).

endangered

Accipiter novaehollandiae Grey Goshawk

Habitat

Priority nesting and foraging habitat includes mature blackwood swamp forest, wet forest (particularly in riparian areas) and mixed forest with a closed canopy, low stem density, open understorey and dense stands of tea tree or paperbark nearby. Other primary foraging habitat includes mixed forest (wet eucalypt forest/rainforest).

endangered

TASVEG Communities

Signifi cance

1

NAF NAR

4

WBR WNL WOL WRE WVI NME NLM

4 Aquila audax fleayi Wedge-tailed Eagle

Endangered

endangered

Comment

Large mature trees with a protected aspect within large tracts (more than 10 ha) of eucalypt or mixed forest.

DGL DOB DSC DNI WBR WRE WVI WOL WNL

Ardenna tenuirostris Short-tailed Shearwater

JAMBA

Coastal grassland, sand, dunes, headlands and islands.

GHC SRC OSM

Arenaria interpres Ruddy Turnstone

JAMBA CAMBA

Mud, sand and saltmarsh.

OSM ASS AUS AHS ORO

Nest sites should be treated as Significance 1 and must be protected. Nest sites could occur in blackwood dominated habitat embedded in extensive forest Nest sites should be treated as Significance 1 and must be protected. Nest sites could occur in tall trees on protected south-east slopes.

2 2

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Scientific Name Common Name

EPBC Act

TSP Act

Other significance

Habitat

TASVEG Communities

Bubulcus ibis Cattle Egret

JAMBA CAMBA

Occurs in streams, rivers and other water bodies including lakes and dams in northern Tasmania. Includes well-shaded flowing and still waters and deep pools with decaying logs and undercut banks. Smaller juveniles inhabit shallow fast-flowing stream habitats and favour habitats with large rocks or logs. Absent from the Tamar catchment. Occur in very small undisturbed streams and seeps and are usually located under rock slabs bordered by dense vegetation. Generally occur with grazing stock on lowlying grasslands with poor drainage. Will hunt along drainage ditches and tussock areas.

Calidris acuminata Sharp-tailed Sandpiper

JAMBA CAMBA

Sand, dunes, mud, river gravel shore and saltmarsh.

OSM ASS AUS AHS GHC

Calidris alba Sanderling

JAMBA CAMBA

Sand dunes, tidal mudflats and coastal lagoons.

OSM ASS AUS AHL GHC

Calidris canutus Red Knot

JAMBA CAMBA

Mud and saltmarsh.

OSM ASS AUS AHS

Calidris ferruginea Curlew Sandpiper

JAMBA CAMBA

Sand, mud and saltmarsh.

OSM ASS AUS AHS ASF

Calidris melanotos Pectoral Sandpiper

JAMBA

Coastal grassland and inland swamps.

GHC GTL AHS AHL ASF

Calidris ruficollis Red-necked Stint

JAMBA CAMBA

Sand, dunes, sand bar, mud, river gravel shore and saltmarsh. Lives in dry open forest and grassy woodland on basaltic clay soils. Prefer native ground cover and deep litter layer.

OSM ASS AUS AHS GHC ASF AHL

Astacopsis gouldi Giant Freshwater Crayfish Beddomeia sp. Hydrobiid Snail

Catadromus lacordairei Catadromus Carabid Beetle

Vulnerable

vulnerable

rare

100m buffer all streams and rivers on known mapsheets, except those flowing into Tamar catchment 20m buffer all streams and rivers on known mapsheets

Signifi cance

Comment

2

3

2 GHC ARS AHL ASF 2 2 2 2 2

vulnerable

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2 2

DAD DVG

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Scientific Name Common Name

EPBC Act

Ceyx azureus Azure Kingfisher

TSP Act

Other significance

Habitat Inhabits tree lined water ways, lakes, ponds and other wetlands with dense streamside vegetation. Nests are made in burrows excavated in banks beside freshwater or tidal watercourses, lakes and other wetlands.

endangered

TASVEG Communities

Signifi cance

1 100m buffer all waterways on known mapsheets

4

Dasyurus maculatus maculatus Spotted-tail Quoll

Vulnerable

rare

Egretta alba Eastern Great Egret

JAMBA CAMBA

Engaeus granulatus Central North Burrowing Crayfish

Endangered

endangered

Engaeus yabbimunna Burnie Burrowing Crayfish

Vulnerable

vulnerable Colonies under threat

Eudyptula minor Little Penguin

Sensitive breeding habitat

Habitat includes coastal scrub, riparian areas, rainforest, wet forest, damp forest and blackwood swamp forest (mature and regrowth). Structurally complex vegetation in good condition. Swampy areas, mouths of creeks with open or vegetated borders of Phragmites, sedges or tea tree, wetlands and saltmarsh. May occur in all community types including non-native communities such as pasture, urban land and weed infestations. May occur in all community types including non-native communities such as pasture, urban land and weed infestations. Fore and back dunes with a mosaic of tussock grass, coastal sedges, succulent herbs and shrubs. Weed infestations primarily of african boxthorn are also significant habitat in northwest Tasmania. Breeds and moults either in burrows or under dense vegetation as well as under boulders and man made structures.

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Comment

WOL WNL WVI WRE WBR DAD DAC DAS DAM DAZ DNI DGL DOB DOV DVG DVC DVS DSC NAD NAF NAR NME NLM SLW SSC

Maternal den sites should be treated as significance 2 and should be protected. Den sites could occur in suitable habitat in many communities e.g hollow logs, rocky outcrops or under stumps.

2 ASF OSM ASS ARS AHS All TASVEG communities on known mapsheets

1

All TASVEG communities on known mapsheets

2

4 SRC GHC SSC

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Scientific Name Common Name

Galaxiella pusilla Dwarf Galaxias

EPBC Act

Vulnerable

TSP Act

vulnerable

Gallinago hardwikii Japanese Snipe

JAMBA CAMBA

Haliaeetus leucogaster White-bellied Sea-Eagle

vulnerable

Hydropogne tschegrava Caspian Tern

Lathamus discolour Swift Parrot Limnodynastes peronii Striped Marsh Frog

Other significance

CAMBA JAMBA CAMBA

Endangered

Habitat

TASVEG Communities

Lives in slow-flowing waters such as swamps, wetlands, lagoons and drains or back waters of streams, amongst aquatic vegetation, as well as forested swampy areas. May also be found in temporary waters that dry up over summer, especially if burrowing crayfish burrows are present.

SCH AHL ASF NAF and 20m buffer all streams on known mapsheets

Fresh water sedgeland and mud.

ASF OSM AHS AHL

Signifi cance

Comment

2

2

Forest with significant old-growth eucalypt component within 5 km of the coast (nearest coast including shores, bays, inlets and peninsulas), rivers, lakes or complex of farm dams. Uses tidal reaches of estuarine waterways, moist grasslands and shallow flooded areas around the coast.

4 DAD DAZ DAC DNI DGL DOB DVG DVC WVI WOL WNL WBR WRE DSC 2 ASS ARS AUS GHC

endangered

Foraging habitat: within 5km of the coast (nearest coast including shores, bays, inlets or peninsulas), grassy forest dominated by Eucalyptus globulus or grassy or shrubby forest dominated by E. ovata. Edge of foraging habitat: between 5 & 10 km from the coast.

DGL DOV DOW WBR

endangered

Permanent and temporary near coastal dune locked wetlands.

AHF ASF AHL

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Nest sites should be treated as Significance 2 and must be protected. Nest sites could occur in many vegetation types in mature trees.

2

No known nesting sites known in the study area. On the north coast blue gums and black gums provide important foraging habitat including plantings and plantations.

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Scientific Name Common Name

EPBC Act

TSP Act

Limosa lapponica Bar-tailed Godwit Litoria reniformis Green and Golden Frog

JAMBA CAMBA

Vulnerable

Miselaoma weldi Stanley Snail

Neophema chrysogaster Orange-bellied Parrot

Other significance

vulnerable

endangered

Critically endangered

Numenius madagascariensis Eastern Curlew

endangered endangered

Numenius phaeopus Whimbrel

JAMBA CAMBA JAMBA CAMBA

Oreisplanus munionga larana Marrawah Skipper

endangered

Habitat Mud, sand, dunes, coastal grassland and saltmarsh. Permanent and temporary water bodies (streams, ponds, dams) with vegetation in or around them. Dogwood scrub, coastal shrubbery, dry open tea tree scrub, blackwood scrub and low Eucalyptus viminalis woodland on basalt. Only known from The Nut, Stanley. Mosaic of saltmarsh, pasture, grassland, moorland, scrub and heathland in coastal dunes, estuaries, islands and beaches within 10km of the coast. Also eucalypt forest in the south-west for breeding habitat.

TASVEG Communities

Signifi cance 2

OSM ASS AUS AHS GHC 2 ASF AHF OAQ 1 DVG SSC SLW

2 ASS ARS AHL SCH SCA GHC GSL GTL MBS

Vulnerable

Non-breeding range. Migratory route. Foraging.

1 Mud, sand and saltmarsh.

OSM ASS AUS AHS GHC

Sand and saltmarsh. Carex appressa sedgeland which is often found on the edge of wetlands, wet tea tree scrub/forest and wet forest communities.

OSM ASS AUS AHS GHC ASF AHL SMR NME WBR and 20m buffer all streams on known mapsheets

2 1

3

Perameles gunnii gunnii Eastern-barred Bandicoot

Comment

Grassy woodland, native grassland, mosaics of pasture and ground cover including shrubby weeds.

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DGL DAD DAZ DVG NBA GCL GPL

Nesting habitat should be significance 2. Although rare in its native midlands habitat, its niche has expanded to pasture-bushland interfaces in the north and south, where it is abundant.

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Scientific Name Common Name

EPBC Act

TSP Act

Other significance

Pluvialis dominica Lesser Golden Plover

JAMBA CAMBA

Pluvialis squatarola Grey Plover

JAMBA CAMBA

Podiceps cristatus Great Crested Grebe Prototroctes maraena Australian Grayling

vulnerable

Habitat Sandy and rocky shores, mudflats, wetlands, paddocks, saltmarsh, coastal golf courses, estuaries and lagoons. Sandy and rocky shores, inlets, estuaries and lagoons with large tidal mudflats or sandflats for feeding, sandy beaches for roosting. Lakes, rivers and estuaries. Sheltered estuaries and bays generally with deeper pools, sometimes found on inshore waters on exposed coasts. Does not come ashore in the study area..

OSM ORO ASS AUS ASF AHS AHL

Signifi cance

Comment

2

2 OSM ORO ASS AUS

2 ASF AHF 2

Pseudemoia rawlinsoni Glossy Grass Skink

rare

Rivers. Rushy grasses and low dense vegetation in moist situations along the margins of swamps and watercourses. Also occurs where dry sclerophyll forest meets wet heathland subject to frequent flooding.

Pseudomys novaehollandiae New Holland Mouse

endangered

Dry coastal heathland and open heathy forest.

Pseudomys novaehollandiae New Holland Mouse

TASVEG Communities

Vulnerable

vulnerable

Rivers

SCH

3 AHL ASF SHW SLW NME NLM 1

4 endangered

Dry coastal heathland and open heathy forest.

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SSC SCA DAC SAC

Potential foraging habitat where adjacent to shrubby coastal heath.

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Scientific Name Common Name

Sarcophilus harrisii Tasmanian Devil Schayera baiulus Schayers Grasshopper

EPBC Act

Vulnerable

TSP Act

endangered

Sterna nereis Fairy Tern

JAMBA

endangered

vulnerable

Habitat

Coastal heath, open dry sclerophyll forest and mixed sclerophyll forest/rainforest.

endangered

Stern bergii Crested Tern

Sterna albifrons Little Tern

Other significance

JAMBA

Stunted paperbark plants, sagg and coastal tussock grass. Bare areas such as sandy spits or rocky headlands with a very short ground cover of vegetation. Sand or shingle beaches, unvegetated sites near estuaries and nearby lakes, and estuarine and offshore islands. Breeds on sandy spits generally at the mouths of estuaries, amongst flotsam and jetsam with a scattered thin population of Cakile maritima, Spinifex or the occasional shoots of marram. Sand or shingle beaches, unvegetated sites near estuaries and nearby lakes, and estuarine and offshore islands. Breeds on sandy spits generally at the mouths of estuaries, amongst flotsam and jetsam with a scattered thin population of Cakile maritima, Spinifex or the occasional shoots of marram.

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TASVEG Communities

Signifi cance

Comment

4

Maternal den sites should be treated as significance 1 and be protected. Den sites could occur in suitable habitat in many communities e.g hollow logs, rocky outcrops or wombat burrows.

SCH SSC DAC DAM DAS DAZ DAD DGL DNI DOB DOV DVG DVS DVC DOW NAR NBA WBR WNL WOL WRE WVI 1 NME GHC 2 ORO OSM GHC GTL

1 OSM ASS AUS AHS SRC GHC

2 OSM ASS AUS AHS SRC GHC

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Scientific Name Common Name

Tasmaphena lamproides Keeled Snail

EPBC Act

TSP Act

Other significance

rare

Habitat

TASVEG Communities

Wet, mixed and old growth forests, some rainforest types, and swamp forests that are not permanently inundated. Blackwood and wet eucalypt forest containing fallen logs, thick scrub and understorey for shelter and varying topography appears to be the most suitable habitat.

WBR WOL WNL WRE WVI NAF NAR

JAMBA CAMBA

Saltmarsh, rocky shoreline and pebble beach.

ASS AUS AHS ORO

Tringa incana Grey-tailed Tattler

JAMBA CAMBA

Sand, dunes, mud, saltmarsh, river gravel shore.

OSM ASS AUS AHS ORO

Tringa nebularia Greenshank

JAMBA CAMBA

Mud, sand, dunes, river gravel shore and saltmarsh.

OSM ASS AUS AHS

Xenus cinereus Terek Sandpiper

Waders & Waterbirds

Beach-nesting Shorebirds

2

Recorded from lowland dry sclerophyll forest, wet eucalypt forest, non-eucalypt forest, scrub and urban environments. Eucalypt forests and woodland containing old-growth trees or isolated old-growth trees containing large hollows are essential for breeding.

endangered JAMBA CAMBA sensitive foraging habitat sensitive breeding habitat

Comment

3

Tringa hypoleucos Common Sandpiper

Tyto novaehollandiae castanops Masked Owl

Signifi cance

2 2

4 DAC DAD DAM DAS DAZ DNI DGL DOB DSC DOV DVG DVC DVS WOL WNL WVI WRE WBR

Nesting habitat. Nest sites should be treated as significance 1 and should be protected. Nest sites could occur in large main-stem hollows.

2 Tidal mudflats and beaches.

Tidal flats in lagoons and estuaries.

OSM GHC ASS ARS ASF OSM mud (not sand) around lagoons only

Sandy ocean beaches and dunes.

SRC OSM GHC ORO

4

4

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STAGE 2 – APPLICATION OF DECISION SUPPORT TOOLS TO COASTAL VALUES DATA

4. STAGE 2 METHOD 4.1 S I GNI F I CANCE M AP P I NG The purpose of this section is to identify and map significant vegetation and fauna habitat within the coastal strip. The significance of vegetation communities and fauna was rated based on conservation status. 4.1.1 Significance of Vegetation Communities To assess the significance of vegetation communities in the coastal strip the ‘Vegetation communities by conservation status’ (see Table 2) GIS layer is utilised. In this layer conservation status was applied to each vegetation community polygon. For vegetation communities ‘1’ (red) represents the highest significance and ‘4’ (pale yellow) the lowest. To enable significance mapping; ‘1’ represents ‘rare’ or ‘endangered’ communities, ‘2’ represents ‘vulnerable’ communities, ‘3’ represents non-threatened native communities and ‘4’ represents non-native communities. Table 5 – Significance of Vegetation Communities Conservation Status

Significance 1

Rare, Endangered

2

Vulnerable

3

Non-threatened native

4

Non-native

(Colour codes reflect those in Figure 6)

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4.1.2 Significance of Fauna Habitat To assess the significance of fauna habitat within the coastal strip the created fauna habitat GIS layers are overlain:  ‘Potential fauna habitat’ layer,  ‘Observed fauna habitat’ layer. For fauna, ‘1’ (red) represents the highest significance and ‘4’ (pale yellow) the lowest. A low rating for fauna habitat still represents a significant coastal value. Where multiple species occur, the highest level of significance was mapped. However, the GIS layer has ‘drop down’ lists indicating all habitats present. Figure 5 provides an example of the Fauna Significance layer. Table 6 – Significance of Fauna Habitat Significance

EPBC Act

TSP Act

1

CR, EN

e

2

VU

v

3

JAMBA/CAMBA

Sensitive Habitat

JAMBA or CAMBA or JAMBA/CAMBA

r

4

Sensitive breeding habitat or Sensitive foraging habitat Including species not listed on either Act and the non breeding habitat of some listed species.

(Colour codes reflect those in Figure 5) The significance of mapped fauna habitat was based on its conservation status and or its use as either foraging or nesting habitat. The following rules were applied to distinguish between foraging and nesting habitat in terms of significance and/or spatial mapping. 1. Eastern-barred Bandicoot – Has been demoted to significance level 3 for potential habitat. However, nest sites are significance level 2. 2. Grey Goshawk – Blackwood forests are mapped as significance level 1 whereas all other forests that may support patches of habitat were demoted to significance level 4. Nest sites may occur in suitable habitat and they are significance level 1. 3. Masked Owl – It is noted that nest sites are significance level 1. Forest types potentially supporting nest sites were mapped as significance level 4. 4. Orange-bellied Parrot - There are no known nesting sites within the study area. Thus potential habitat represents foraging habitat only and is demoted to significance level 2. 5. New Holland Mouse – Coastal heathland areas are core habitat and mapped as significance level 1 whereas all other potential habitats were demoted to significance level 4. Nest sites may occur in suitable habitat and they are significance level 1.

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6. Spotted–tailed Quoll – Vegetation community types offering potential denning habitat were mapped as significance level 4. Maternal den sites however are significance level 2. 7. Swift Parrot –There are no known nesting sites within the study area. Thus potential habitat represents foraging habitat only and is demoted to significance level 2. 8. Tasmanian Devil - Vegetation community types offering potential denning habitat were mapped as significance level 4. Maternal den sites however are significance level 1. 9. Wedge-tailed Eagle – Forest types in which some nesting habitat may occur in suitable situations were mapped as significance level 4 but it is noted that where nest sites occur they are significance level 1. 10. White-bellied Sea Eagle - Forest types in which some nesting habitat may occur in suitable situations were mapped as significance level 4 but it is noted that where nest sites occur they are significance level 2. The four significance categories in Table 6 are mapped in colour codes with data tables attached which describe the potential values at any location.

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4.2 V I ABI L I T Y

OF NAT I VE VE GET AT I ON

The aim of this assessment is to develop a classification system reflecting risk to the long-term viability of areas of native vegetation in the study area. Viability is distinct from condition in as much as condition is a statement of current character while viability is a statement of likely persistence of current condition or risk of it declining with and/or without management. Input Data 1. Condition of native vegetation. 2. Adjacent land cleared of native vegetation. 3. Mapped declared and environmental weed polygons. 4. GIS layers: roads, tracks, easements (GIS data provided by DPIW under licence). Method The definitions of viability are detailed in Table 7. Table 7. The definitions of four viability classes Viability Class

Explanation / management

Definition

1

Viable and self sustaining

Viable as a vegetation unit.

self-sustaining

2

Viable but at risk

Viable as a self sustaining vegetation unit but at some risk of degradation. This is likely to be due to the presence of, for example, a road, a house or some cleared land in the cell. Weed monitoring is recommended.

3

Management required and or high risk

A vegetation unit that requires significant management due to the presence of weeds and/or has additional exposure to risk of degradation through the presence of roads, houses or cleared land.

4

Not viable, but may be managed as a buffer area

Considerable degradation or at very high risk of degradation. These vegetation units may perform a function as a buffer to adjacent vegetation if they are managed appropriately. If they are not managed they represent a risk to adjacent vegetation.

(Colour codes reflect those in Figure 7) For the following assessment the 1.0 ha (100m x 100m) grid has again been utilised along the coastal strip. Using the 1.0 ha cell as the assessment unit each of the cells has been given a score based on the 4 attributes listed above. Where a 1.0 ha cell contained less than 50% native vegetation the viability was not assessed. The extent of a continuous viable area will be identified by the accumulation of neighbouring viable assessment units. The vegetation community boundaries and

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conservation significance of each vegetation type is ignored. Similarly, this assessment does not take account of any other conservation values such as threatened species. All possible combinations of the attributes were tabulated and a rule set applied to dictate the viability class (Table 7). Other than the condition score the attributes have been arbitrarily weighted as 2 for existence of environmental weeds and 1 for the existence of rice grass and 1 for the presence of roads and cleared land (Table 8). Viability class (1-4) was attributed to all possible combinations based on the rules: 1. Viability 1 if condition class 1 or 2 and no environmental weeds, roads or cleared land present. 2. Viability 2 if condition class 1 and any roads or cleared land present, or condition class 2 and both roads and cleared land present. 3. Viability 3 if condition class 1 with roads and cleared land present or class 2 and environmental weeds present or condition class 3. 4. Viability 4 if condition class 3 and weeds present or condition class 4. The colour coding in Table 7 was applied to the viability mapping to illustrate the viability class for each 1.0 ha cell.

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5.

STAGE 2 RESULTS 5.1 S I GNI F I CANCE Two significance layers were produced:  Significance of vegetation communities (see Figure 6 example),  Significance of fauna habitat (see Figure 5 example). The significance maps illustrate the distribution of significant vegetation communities and fauna habitat along the coastal strip.

5.2 V I ABI L I T Y

OF NAT I VE VE GET AT I ON

Within the study area 17% of 1.0 ha cells supporting native vegetation along the coastal strip are assessed as Viability Class 1, 24% Viability Class 2, 35% Viability Class 3 and 8% Viability Class 4. A summary of the viability mapping results is provided in Table 8 below. An example of the data set out in Table 8 is mapped in Figure 7. This map illustrates the distribution of viable cells as either scattered among exotic vegetation or less viable cells or else aggregated into a larger viable area. The larger areas are of greater importance for protection from fragmentation and are more easily managed. The possible combinations of scores for each 1.0 ha cell is measured by the condition of the vegetation, presence of environmental weeds, roads, easements, tracks and cleared land and the numbers of times they occur in the study area. The viability class reflects the rule set detailed in 4.2 Viability of native vegetation, with Viability Class 1 rated the highest and Viability Class 4 the lowest.

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Table 8. Summary of viability analysis Viability Class 1 2 2 3 1 2 2 3 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4

Condition Score 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4

Weed Score 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 2 2 2

Roads Score 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0

Cleared Score 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0

Number of Records 827 118 217 27 31 24 5 3 220 561 113 174 34 227 3 89 676 610 281 655 2 8 1 5 2 2 29 140 8 327 4

Staggered colours in Table 8 above, indicate changes from the condition class.

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R E F E RE NCES Agreement Between the Government of Australia and the Government of Japan for the Protection of Migratory Birds and Birds in Danger of Extinction and Their Environment. Australian Nature Conservation Agency, Canberra. Agreement Between the Government of Australia and the Government of the People’s Republic of China for the Protection of Migratory Birds and Their Environment. Australian Nature Conservation Agency, Canberra. ANZECC / MCFFA (1997). Nationally Agreed Criteria for the Establishment of a Comprehensive, Adequate and Representative Reserve System for Forests in Australia. A Report by the joint Australia and New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council (ANZECC) and the Ministerial Council on Forests, Fisheries and Aquaculture (MCFFA). Commonwealth of Australia, Canberra. Birds Tasmania (2008) Birds Tasmania records. Unpublished data. Birds Tasmania, Hobart. Blake, G, and Cannell, R. (2000). Tamar Estuary 2020 Strategy – Foreshore Vegetation Mapping and Analysis. Tamar Estuary 2020 Steering Committee. Blood, K. (2001). Environmental Weeds – A Field Guide for SE Australia. CRC Weed Management Systems, CH Jerram & Associates, Mt Waverley, Victoria. Brown, A.V., Calver, C.R., Corbett, K.D., Forsyth, S.M., Goscombe, B.A., Green, G.R., McClenaghan, M.P., Pemberton J., Seymour, D.B. & Vicary, M.J. (comp). (2005). Geology of Southwest Tasmania. Edition 2005.1. geological Atlas 1:250,000 digital series. Mineral Resources Tasmania. Bryant, Dr S. (2002). Conservation assessment of beach nesting and migratory shorebirds in Tasmania. Nature Conservation Branch, Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment, Hobart. Bryant, S. & Jackson, J. (1999). Tasmania’s Threatened Fauna Handbook: what, where and how to protect. Threatened Species Unit, Parks & Wildlife Service, Hobart. Buchanan, A.M. (2007). A Census of the Vascular Plants of Tasmania & Index to The Student's Flora of Tasmania. Web Edition for 2007. Tasmanian Herbarium, Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Sandy Bay. Calver, C.R., Corbett, K.D., Everhard, J.L., Goscombe, B.A, Pemberton, J., Seymour, D.B. & Vicary, M.J. (comp). (2005). Geology of Northwest Tasmania. Edition 2005.1. geological Atlas 1:250,000 digital series. Mineral Resources Tasmania. CARSAG (2002). Reservation Targets for Tasmanian Native Non-forest Vegetation. 31 July 2002. CARSAG (2003). Revision of CARSAG Forest Scores. Internal Memorandum from R.Knight to CARSAG 29th January 2003. Christidis, L. & Boles, W.E. (2008). Systematics and Taxonomy of Australian Birds. CSIRO Publishing. Commonwealth of Australia & State of Tasmania (1997). Tasmanian Regional Forest Agreement. Commonwealth of Australia (1999). Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. No. 91, 1999. Cradle Coast NRM. (2007). DRAFT Coastal Weed Strategy for the Cradle Coast Region. Cradle Coast Natural Resource Management Committee, Tasmania.

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Department of Mines. (1971). Beaconsfield Geological Atlas 1: 63 360 Series. Mineral Resources Tasmania, Hobart. Department of Mines. (1973). Frankford Geological Atlas 1: 63 360 Series. Department of Mines, Hobart. Doran, N.E. (2000). Burrowing Crayfish Group Recovery Plan 2001-2005. Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment, Hobart. FCF (Forest Conservation Fund) (2007). Conservation Value Index Technical Report. FCF Assessment Methodology Advisory Panel. Forest Practices Authority (2006) Threatened Fauna by 1:25 000 Map Sheet data. Unpublished data. Forest Practices Authority, Hobart. Forest Practices Board (2002). Threatened Fauna Manual For Production Forests in Tasmania, Revised Version October 2002. Forest Practices Board, Hobart. Harris, S. and Kitchener, A. (2005). From Forest to Fjaeldmark: Descriptions of Tasmaniaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Vegetation. Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment, Printing Authority of Tasmania, Hobart. Johnson, K., Gilfedder, L., Schahinger, R., Carter, O. and Sculthorpe, A. (2008). DRAFT Preminghana Natural Values. Private Land Conservation Program, Department of Primary Industries and Water, Hobart. Kirkpatrick, J.B., Barker, P., Brown, M.J., Harris, S., and Mackie, R. (1995). The Reservation Status of Tasmanian Vascular Plant Communities. Wildlife Scientific Report 95/4. Parks and Wildlife Service, Hobart. McClenaghan, M.P., Calver, C.R. & Vicary, M.J. (comp). (2005). Geology of Northeast Tasmania. Edition 2005.1. Geological Atlas 1:250,000 digital series. Mineral Resources Tasmania. North, A.J., Johnson, K., Ziegler, K., Duncan, F., Hopkins, K, Ziegler, D., Watts, S. (1998). Flora of Recommended Areas for Protection and Forest Reserves in Tasmania. Forestry Tasmania / Forest Practices Board / Parks & Wildlife Service, Hobart. Little Penguin Baseline report, Cradle Coast NRM. Orange-bellied Parrot Recovery Team. (1999). Orange-bellied Parrot recovery plan 1998-2002. Nature Conservation Branch, Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment, Hobart. Pinkard, G.J. (1980). Land Systems of Tasmania: Region 4 (North East). Tasmanian Department of Agriculture, Hobart. PLUC (1996). Environment and Heritage Report. Background Report Part C Vol I-V. For Tasmanian -Commonwealth Regional Forest Agreement. Tasmanian Public Land Use Commission, Hobart PLUC (1996a). Supplement to Environment and Heritage Report. Background Report Part C Vol V. For Tasmanian -Commonwealth Regional Forest Agreement. Tasmanian Public Land Use Commission, Hobart. Resource Management and Conservation Division. (2007). DRAFT Arthur-Pieman Conservation Area. Vehicle Tracks Assessment: Geoconservation and Biological Values. Parks and Wildlife Service, Natural Heritage Trust and Cradle Coast NRM, Tasmania. Robertson, L. and Sansom, I. (1999). The West, North-West Management Plan. Parks and Wildlife Service, Tasmania.

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Richley, L.R. (1978). Land Systems of Tasmania: Region 3 (Northwest). Tasmanian Department of Agriculture, Hobart. Rudman, T. (2003). Tasmanian Beach Weed Strategy for marram grass, sea spurge, sea wheatgrass, pyp grass & beach daisy. Nature Conservation Report 03/2, Nature Conservation Branch, Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment, Tasmania. Schahinger, R. (2005). Completion of identifying priority lowland temperate grasslands in the Cradle-coast NRM region. Threatened Species Unit, Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment, Hobart. Schahinger, R. (2002). Near-coastal native grasslands or northwestern Tasmania: community description, distribution and conservation status, with management recommendations. Nature Conservation Report 02/10, Nature Conservation Branch, Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment, Hobart. Tasmanian Land Conservancy, Community Solutions and Birds Tasmania. (2006). Draft Management Plan for the Robbins Passage/Boullanger Bay Wetlands â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Version 1. Natural Heritage Trust and Cradle Coast NRM. Tasmanian State Government (2005). Forest Practices Amendment Regulations 2005 Statutory Rules. Government Printer, Hobart, Tasmania. Tasmanian State Government (2002). Nature Conservation Act 2002. No. 62 of 2002. www.thelaw.tas.gov.au. Tasmanian State Government (1995). Threatened Species Protection Act 1995. No. 83 of 1995. Government Printer, Hobart, Tasmania. Tasmanian State Government (1999). Weed Management Act 1999. No. 105 of 1999. Tasmanian Vegetation Management Strategy (2001). Statewide non-forest vegetation priorities as determined by the TVMS Scientific Reference Group. DPIWE unpublished report. Threatened Species Section (2006). Schayers grasshopper Schayera bailus Listing Statement. Department of Primary Industries and Water. Vertebrate Advisory Committee. (1994). Native Vertebrates which are Rare or Threatened in Tasmania. Edition 1. Species at Risk, Tasmania - Vertebrates. Parks and Wildlife Service, Tasmania.

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A P P E NDI X 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; D E T AI L S

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U RBAN

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P ROJ E CT O RT HO -P HOT OS

Urban Ortho-photographs PHOTO_NUM 1335-153 1335-158 1335-162 1335-172 1335-148 1335-104 1335-83 1335-71 1335-59 1335-55 1335-47 1335-119 1335-130 1335-133 1335-138 1335-143 1335-42 1336-16 1336-24 1336-20 1336-22 1335-176 1335-188 1336-4 1335-186 1336-2 1336-13 1337-110 1337-100 1337-107 1337-120 1337-137 1337-122 1337-124 1337-126 1337-133 1337-141 1337-135 1337-143 1337-139 1338-126 1338-130 1338-134 1338-136 1338-119 1338-132 1338-113 1338-121 1338-123 1338-109 1338-111 1338-59 1338-57 1338-49 1338-55 1338-51 1340-201 1373-200 1373-194 1376-232 1378-14 1382-27

DATE_FLOWN 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 16/12/2000 20/12/2000 20/12/2000 20/12/2000 20/12/2000 20/12/2000 20/12/2000 20/12/2000 20/12/2000 20/12/2000 20/12/2000 20/12/2000 20/12/2000 20/12/2000 30/12/2000 30/12/2000 30/12/2000 30/12/2000 30/12/2000 30/12/2000 30/12/2000 30/12/2000 30/12/2000 30/12/2000 30/12/2000 30/12/2000 30/12/2000 30/12/2000 30/12/2000 30/12/2000 1/01/2001 27/11/2003 27/11/2003 15/01/2004 15/01/2004 12/03/2004

PHO_SCALE 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000 1:24000

PIXEL_SIZE 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre 0.5 metre

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Project Ortho-photographs M_PROJ_NO M458 A132 A132 A132 A132 A132 A132 A132 A143 A142 A142 A144 A144 A144 A144 A144 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143 A143

AP_TITLE NORTH WEST REVISION CENTRAL WEST 2003-04 CENTRAL WEST 2003-04 CENTRAL WEST 2003-04 CENTRAL WEST 2003-04 CENTRAL WEST 2003-04 CENTRAL WEST 2003-04 CENTRAL WEST 2003-04 CENTRAL WEST 2003-04 CENTRAL NORTH REVISION 2004-05 CENTRAL NORTH REVISION 2004-05 NORTH EAST REVISION 2005-06 NORTH EAST REVISION 2005-06 NORTH EAST REVISION 2005-06 NORTH EAST REVISION 2005-06 NORTH EAST REVISION 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06 NORTH WEST 2005-06

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AP_SCALE 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000 42000

FILM_NO 1334 1371 1374 1374 1374 1374 1374 1374 1374 1393 1393 1398 1398 1398 1398 1398 1403 1403 1403 1403 1403 1403 1403 1403 1403 1403 1403 1403 1403 1403 1403 1403 1403 1403 1405 1405 1405 1405 1405 1406 1406 1406 1406 1406 1406 1406 1406

NEG_NO 114 218 14 116 48 19 110 43 172 28 9 179 180 182 184 186 162 173 176 177 179 181 183 185 188 196 198 200 201 206 210 225 228 254 2 10 234 259 263 32 36 113 164 134 129 201 168

FLY_DATE 29-NOV-00 07-NOV-03 28-NOV-03 28-NOV-03 28-NOV-03 28-NOV-03 28-NOV-03 28-NOV-03 28-NOV-03 02-MAR-05 02-MAR-05 11-DEC-05 11-DEC-05 11-DEC-05 11-DEC-05 11-DEC-05 21-JAN-06 21-JAN-06 21-JAN-06 21-JAN-06 21-JAN-06 21-JAN-06 21-JAN-06 21-JAN-06 21-JAN-06 21-JAN-06 21-JAN-06 21-JAN-06 21-JAN-06 21-JAN-06 21-JAN-06 21-JAN-06 21-JAN-06 21-JAN-06 21-JAN-06 21-JAN-06 25-JAN-06 25-JAN-06 25-JAN-06 25-JAN-06 25-JAN-06 25-JAN-06 01-MAR-06 01-MAR-06 01-MAR-06 01-MAR-06 01-MAR-06

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NRM Coastal Vegetation and Fauna Habitat Mapping

A P P E NDI X 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; I M AGE S

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V E GE T AT I ON C OM M UNI T I ES

Lacustrine herbland (AHL), Conical Rocks (LW)

Lacustrine herbland (AHL), Mawson Bay (IF)

Saline aquatic herbland (AHS), Scamander Lagoon (CS)

Saline sedgeland/rushland (ARS), Kemps Bay, Leesville (LW)

Freshwater aquatic sedgeland (ASF), Baumea sp. dominated, Trial Harbour (CS)

Freshwater aquatic sedgeland (ASF), Phragmites australis dominated, Derwent River (CS)

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Succulent saline herbland (ASS), Robbins Passage (IF)

Succulent saline herbland (ASS), dominated by Sclerostegia arbuscula (shrubby glasswort), West Inlet, Stanley (LW)

Melaleuca ericifolia swamp forest (NME), Eucalyptus amygdalina coastal forest (DAC), Middle Point, Tamar (CS)

Eucalyptus amygdalina forest on dolerite (DAD), Shag Head, Tamar (CS)

Eucalyptus amygdalina forest on mudstone (DAM), Middle Arm, Tamar (CS)

Eucalyptus amygdalina forest on sandstone (DAS), Middle Arm, Tamar (CS)

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Eucalyptus amygdalina forest on Cainozoic deposits (DAZ), Tamar (CS)

Eucalyptus globulus dry forest (DGL), Yellow Bluff, North Bruny Island (CS)

Saline sedgeland/rushland (ARS), Melaleuca ericifolia swamp forest (NME), Eucalyptus obliqua dry forest (DOB), Deep Creek Bay, Smithton (LW)

Eucalyptus ovata forest (DOV), Tamar (CS)

Eucalyptus ovata heathy woodland (DOW), Donovans Bay, Tamar (CS)

Eucalyptus amygdalina â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Eucalyptus obliqua damp sclerophyll forest (DSC), Spring Bay, Tamar (CS)

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Eucalyptus viminalis â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Eucalyptus globulus coastal forest (DVC), Forwards Beach (LW)

Eucalyptus viminalis dry forest (DVG), north of Batman Bridge, Tamar (CS)

Eucalyptus viminalis shrubby/heathy woodland (DVS), Old Beach, Derwent River (CS)

Agricultural land (FAG) and forest, inland of Ahrberg Bay (CS)

Marram grassland (FMG), Ocean Beach (CS)

Plantations for silviculture (FPL), Tamar (CS)

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Spartina marshland (FSM) (Ricegrass), Duck River estuary (LW)

Extra-urban miscellaneous (FUM), Bell Bay, Tamar (CS)

Urban areas (FUR), Trial Harbour (CS)

Weed infestation (FWU) (sea spurge) and Acacia longifolia scrub (SAC), Mawson Bay (IF)

Coastal grass and herbfield (GHC), Spinifex sericeus(spinifex) grassland, Beechford (CS)

Coastal grass and herbfield (GHC), Austrostipa stipoides (spear grass) grassland, Robbins Passage (IF)

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Lowland Poa labillardierei grassland (GPL), Maxies Point (IF)

Lowland sedgy grassland (GSL), Bluff Hill Point (IF)

Lowland Themeda grassland (GTL) being infested with sea spurge (on right), Dodgers Point (IF)

Allocasuarina verticillata forest (NAV), Tamar (CS)

Bursaria â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Acacia woodland (NBA), Table Cape (CS)

Melaleuca ericifolia swamp forest (NME) with Spartina (ricegrass) marshland in front (FSM), Middle Point, Tamar (CS)

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Acacia longifolia coastal scrub (SAC), Heybridge (CS)

Acacia longifolia coastal scrub (SAC), Coastal grassland (GHC) with Lacustrine herbland (AHL) surrounding Saline aquatic herbland (AHS) (top right), Ocean Beach (CS)

Coastal scrub on alkaline sands (SCA), Two Mile Sands, Marrawah (IF)

Coastal heathland (SCH), Trial Harbour (CS)

Coastal complex on King Island (SCK), Sandy Cape (CS). Mapped as Coastal grassland (GHC) for this project.

Dry scrub (SDU) dominated by Leptospermum scoparium, north of Ahrberg Bay, (LW)

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NRM Coastal Vegetation and Fauna Habitat Mapping

Lowland sedgy heathland (SHL), Conical Rocks (LW)

Wet heathland (SHW), behind Fancy Bay, Bruny Island (CS)

Leptospermum scrub (SLW), Ocean Beach (CS)

Seabird rookery complex, Ocean Beach (CS)

Coastal scrub (SSC), Correa backhouseana dominated, Ocean Beach (CS)

Coastal scrub (SSC), Leptospermum laevigatum dominated, Mawson Bay (IF)

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Succulent saline herbland (ASS), Coastal grassland (GHC), Melaleuca ericifolia swamp forest (NME) and Eucalyptus brookeriana wet forest (WBR), Robbins Passage (IF)

Eucalyptus viminalis wet forest (WVI) and Freshwater aquatic sedgeland (ASF), Little Swanport River (CS)

Coastal creek, Trial Harbour (CS)

Marrawah skipper habitat â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Carex appressa (CS)

Burrowing crayfish habitat, Pipers Brook, Bellingham (KZ)

Marrawah skipper habitat â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Carex appressa beside Melaleuca ericifolia swamp forest (CS)

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i African boxthorn (Lycium ferocissimum), declared weed that also provides little penguin habitat (CS)

Lillico Beach, Little penguin habitat within the african boxthorn infestation (CS)

i Trailing daisy (Osteospermum fruticosum), environmental weed (LW)

i Scrambling groundsel (Senecio angulatus), environmental weed (CS)

i Tree lupin (Lupinus arboreus), environmental weed (IF)

Sea spurge (Euphorbia paralias) infestation, Dodgers Point (IF)

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NRM Coastal Vegetation and Fauna Habitat Mapping

Sea spurge (Euphorbia paralias), environmental/beach weed (CS)

i Sea wheatgrass (Thinopyrum junceiforme), environmental/beach weed (CS)

Interview River, north of Pieman River (CS)

i Sea wheatgrass (Thinopyrum junceiforme) infestation, Godfreys Beach, Stanley (LW)

Cape Grim (IF)

Coastal scrub (SSC) and Coastal grassland (GHC), north of Trial Harbour (CS)

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A P P E NDI X 3 A – C ONS E RVAT I ON V AL UE S S P E CI E S

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P L ANT

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A NI M AL

SPECIES OF NATIONAL SIGNIFICANCE Listed in Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 The EPBC Act has six categories of threat status for species: 1.

Extinct - If at a particular there is no reasonable doubt that the last member of the species has died

2.

Extinct in the wild - If it is known only to survive in cultivation, in captivity or as a naturalised population well outside its past range; or If it has not been recorded in its known and/or expected habitat, at appropriate seasons, anywhere in its past range, despite exhaustive surveys over a time frame appropriate to its life cycle and form

3.

Critically endangered - If at a particular time, it is facing an extremely high risk of extinction in the wild in the immediate future, as determined in accordance with the prescribed criteria

4.

Endangered - If it is not critically endangered; and it is facing a very high risk of extinction in the wild in the near future, as determined in accordance with the prescribed criteria

5.

Vulnerable - If at a particular time it is not critically endangered or endangered; and it is facing a high risk of extinction in the wild in the medium-term future, as determined in accordance with the prescribed criteria.

6.

Conservation dependent - If, at that time, the species is the focus of a specific conservation program, the cessation of which would result in the species becoming vulnerable, endangered or critically endangered within a period of 5 years

SPECIES OF STATE SIGNIFICANCE Listed in Tasmanian Threatened Species Protection Act 1995 (TSP Act) Threatened flora and fauna species in Tasmania are listed in Schedules 3 (extinct or endangered), 4 (vulnerable) or 5 (rare). These three categories are defined in Section 15 of the Act. 1.

Extinct - If no occurrence of the taxon in the wild can be confirmed during the past 50 years

2.

Endangered - If it is in danger of extinction because long-term survival is unlikely while the factors causing it to be endangered continue operating.

3.

Vulnerable - If it is likely to become an endangered taxon while the factors causing it to be vulnerable continue operating.

4.

Rare - If it has a small population in Tasmania that is not endangered or vulnerable but is at risk.”

Species that have been nominated and approved by the Scientific Advisory Committee for listing in the Act SPECIES OF REGIONAL OR GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE The following definitions are from three publications: Flora Advisory Committee 1994, Vertebrate Advisory Committee 1994, Invertebrate Advisory Committee 1994 Flora only - Species listed as rare but not necessarily ‘at risk’ (r3) Fauna only – Species requiring monitoring (m) Both – Species of unknown risk status (k) in Tasmania, or thought to be uncommon within region, or a species having a declining range or populations within the area. Species considered to be outside its normal range or of an unusual form as determined and justified in the body of the report. Species identified in regional studies as being of conservation significance that are not listed in current legislation Species that have been recognised but have not been formally described in a published journal that are thought to significant as determined and justified in the body of the report. Plant species that are not known to be reserved. To be so it must be known to exist in at least one secure Reserve. Secure reserves include reserves and parks requiring the approval of both Houses of Parliament for their revocation. They include: National Parks, Aboriginal Sites, Historic Sites, Nature Reserves, State Reserves, Game Reserves, Forest Reserves, Wellington Park, and insecure reserves in the World Heritage Area which is protected by international agreement under the World Heritage Convention.

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A P P E NDI X 3 B – C ONS E RVAT I ON V AL UE S

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P L ANT C OM M UNI TI E S

PLANT COMMUNITY RESERVATION STATUS Representativeness (Kirkpatrick et al, 1995 and North et al, 1998) •

Well Reserved - A viable area of a community is found within two or more reserves, or two or more viable areas are well separated within one reserve, or if all its known occurrences are within viable, secure reserves.

Poorly Reserved - A community is found in one or more reserves, but it does not satisfy one of the conditions required to be considered well reserved.

Unreserved - A community which is not known from any reserve

For this assessment, reserves include those areas considered to have the highest security of tenure. CONSERVATION STATUS OF FOREST COMMUNITIES The conservation status of communities was assessed based on the following criteria (PLUC 1996): Rare communities

R1 - total area generally less than 10 000 ha

R2 - total area generally less than 1 000 ha

R3 - patch sizes generally less than 100 ha

Vulnerable communities

V1 - approaching greater than 70 % depletion

V2 - where threatening processes have caused either loss or significant decline in species that play a major role within the ecosystem or have caused a significant alteration to the ecosystem process

Endangered communities

E1 - distribution has contracted to less than 10 % of pre-1750 range

E2 - less than 10 % of pre-1750 area remains

E3 - 90 % of area is in small patches and is subject to threatening processes REGIONAL CONSERVATION STATUS OF FOREST COMMUNITIES

The RFA Private Land Program and CARSAG have determined the conservation priority of forest communities using the Interim Bioregions (Version 5) of Tasmania. Communities have been placed into three categories of significance applying the Conservation status defined above for each community at a bioregional level and also considering 'old growth' values. This is useful for a range of users such as local government for natural resource management strategies, catchment planning, Bushcare, TASVEG 2000, community groups and land owners. •

Category 1 (HIGH) – Endangered communities, Vulnerable and Rare communities (old growth only)

Category 2 (MODERATE) – Vulnerable and Rare communities; and other forest communities (old growth only)

Category 3 (LOW) – Other forest communities.

In addition select communities have been ascribed higher priorities at a case by case basis where CARSAG have determined that the particular circumstances of a community require it to be of greater significance than the above method applies (CARSAG 2000) CONSERVATION STATUS OF NON-FOREST COMMUNITIES The conservation status of non-forest communities is currently being considered as part of the Tasmanian Vegetation Management Strategy (VMS) 1998 and will be determined on completion of the TASVEG 2000 Statewide vegetation mapping project. Interim Regional conservation priorities have been determined for the VMS (Tasmanian Vegetation Management Strategy 2000)

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A P P E NDI X 4 - L E GI S L AT I VE

I M PL I CATIONS OF T HRE AT E NE D S P E CI E S

TASMANIAN STATE LEGISLATION AFFECTING THREATENED SPECIES Threatened Species Protection Act 1995 Threatened flora and fauna species in Tasmania are listed in Schedules 3 (endangered) and 4 (vulnerable) of the Threatened Species Protection Act, 1995. Rare species that are considered to be ‘at risk’ are listed in Schedule 5 of the Act. These three categories are defined in Section 15 of the Act. 4. “An extant taxon of native flora or fauna may be listed as endangered if it is in danger of extinction because long-term survival is unlikely while the factors causing it to be endangered continue operating. 5. A taxon of native flora or fauna may be listed as vulnerable if it is likely to become an endangered taxon while the factors causing it to be vulnerable continue operating. 6. A taxon of native flora or fauna may be listed as rare if it has a small population in Tasmania that is not endangered or vulnerable but is at risk.” The Act provides mechanisms for protecting these species from threatening processes the implementation of ‘recovery plans’, ‘threat abatement plans’, ‘land management plans’, public authority agreements’, and ‘interim protection orders’. Section 51 (a) of the TSPA states that: “A person must not knowingly, without a permit take, trade in, keep or process any listed flora or fauna”. The Act defines ‘take’ as including: “kill, injure, catch, damage, destroy and collect. A land manager is therefore required to obtain a permit from the Tasmanian Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment (DPIWE) to carry out management that may adversely affect any of the species listed in the Act.

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NRM Coastal Vegetation and Fauna Habitat Mapping

Commonwealth of Australia Legislation Affecting Threatened Species Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 The EPBC Act establishes a process for assessing actions that are likely to have impacts of national environmental significance. Such impacts include World Heritage Areas, RAMSAR Wetland sites of international importance, migratory species protected under international agreements, nuclear actions, the Commonwealth marine environment and nationally threatened species and communities. Threatened species are defined in several categories: 1. Extinct • If at a particular there is no reasonable doubt that the last member of the species has died 2. Extinct in the wild • If it is known only to survive in cultivation, in captivity or as a naturalised population well outside its past range; or • If it has not been recorded in its known and/or expected habitat, at appropriate seasons, anywhere in its past range, despite exhaustive surveys over a time frame appropriate to its life cycle and form 3. Critically endangered •

If at a particular time, it is facing an extremely high risk of extinction in the wild in the immediate future, as determined in accordance with the prescribed criteria

4. Endangered •

If it is not critically endangered; and it is facing a very high risk of extinction in the wild in the near future, as determined in accordance with the prescribed criteria

5. Vulnerable •

If at a particular time it is not critically endangered or endangered; and it is facing a high risk of extinction in the wild in the medium-term future, as determined in accordance with the prescribed criteria.

6. Conservation dependent •

If, at that time, the species is the focus of a specific conservation program, the cessation of which would result in the species becoming vulnerable, endangered or critically endangered within a period of 5 years

An action that is likely to affect species that are listed in any of the above categories may require ministerial approval unless the Commonwealth Environment Minister has granted an exemption. The Act establishes a referral process to Environment Australia to determine whether an action requires a formal approval and thus would be required to proceed through the assessment and approval process. A referral must provide sufficient information to allow the Minister to make a decision. The Minister is then required to make a decision within 20 business days of the referral. The Minister may decide an approval is not necessary if the action is taken in a specified manner. The action may not require approval but may require a permit if undertaken on Commonwealth land. If an approval is required then an environmental assessment must be carried out. In such instances the environmental assessment approach will be determined by the Minister and may vary from preliminary documentation to a full public inquiry depending on the scale and complexity of the impact.

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NRM Coastal Vegetation and Fauna Habitat Mapping

A P P E NDI X 5 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; T HRE AT E NE D N AT I VE V E GE T AT I ON C OM M UNI T IE S

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Profile for Cradle Coast Tasmania

Natural Resource Management Coastal Values Mapping Project. Vegetation and Fauna Habitat.  

Natural Resource Management Coastal Values Mapping Project. Vegetation and Fauna Habitat. NRM North and Cradle Coast. Interpretation Manual....

Natural Resource Management Coastal Values Mapping Project. Vegetation and Fauna Habitat.  

Natural Resource Management Coastal Values Mapping Project. Vegetation and Fauna Habitat. NRM North and Cradle Coast. Interpretation Manual....