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Report

Devonport Gateway Project

DEVONPORT GATEWAY PROJECT for

Cradle Coast Authority

MARCH 2003 March 2003 02.156

Cradle Coast Authority Philp Lighton Architects Pty Ltd

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Report

Devonport Gateway Project

DEVONPORT GATEWAY PROJECT for

Cradle Coast Authority A joint venture initiative with

Devonport City Council Port of Devonport Corporation Tourism Tasmania TT-Line Company Ltd

MARCH 2003 Revised

Philp Lighton Architects In association with

Inspiring Place Pty Ltd Terry Eaton Traffic Engineering

Philp Lighton Architects HOBART LAUNCESTON BURNIE 49 SANDY BAY ROAD, HOBART, 7004 Ph: 03 6234 9199 Fax: 03 6223 2433 philplighton@philplighton.com.au

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DEVONPORT GATEWAY PROJECT REPORT 1.0 Executive Summary.................................................................................3 2.0 Introduction..............................................................................................4 3.0 East Devonport Review ...........................................................................5 3.1 East Devonport Port 3.2 TT-Line 3.3 Recommendations 4.0 Urban Design ..........................................................................................7 4.1 Built fabric 4.2 Amenities 4.3 Devonport Planning Scheme 4.4 Recommendations 5.0 Traffic ......................................................................................................9 5.1 Introduction 5.2 Traffic arrangements 5.3 Street characteristics 5.4 Traffic control 5.5 Traffic signing 5.6 Ferry terminal facilities 5.7 Ferry / vehicle influence 5.7.1 Ferry departure 5.7.2 Ferry arrival 5.8 Pedestrians 5.9 Heavy freight vehicles 5.10 Carparking 5.11 Recommendations 6.0 Signage and Visitor Information ............................................................ 19 6.1 Review of Existing Visitor Signs 6.2 Arrival sequence of signs 6.3 Departure sequence of signs 6.4 Visitor Information 6.5 Review of existing visitor information services 6.6 Recommended Improvements to Visitor Signage and Information 6.7 Visitor signage 6.8 Visitor information 7.0 Landscape Design................................................................................. 33 7.1 Introduction 7.2 Tarleton Street 7.3 Wright Street 7.4 Norton Way 7.5 Murray Street 7.6 Wheeler Street 8.0 References ............................................................................................ 36

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Appendices A.

East Devonport circa 1884

B.

Arrival and Departure Audit

C.

Value Management Project Issues Summary

D.

March 2002 Tasmanian Visitor Survey

E.

Devonport City Planning Scheme – zoning plan

F.

Devonport City Council – proposed works Murray Street

G.

Road Design Norton Way

I.

Devonport Gateway Proposals -

Drawing 01

-

Drawing 02

-

Drawing 03

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1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The recommendations are based on the review of the relevant background reports, site visits and audits, consultation with stakeholders, attendance at the Value Management Seminar, and informal discussions with visitors and operations within the tourism sector. The key recommendations are – TRAFFIC AND PARKING • Retain the existing arrival and departure routes for light and heavy vehicles. This requires significant works to upgrade Murray and Tarleton Streets. • There is an option to develop Wright Street as the major feeder route to the terminal, this would required reconfiguring signage and incorporating service signage for local services, ie petrol stations, etc. • The existing parking infrastructure is adequate, subject to review of loading procedure by TT-Line. The present access layout directs traffic to exit via Murray Street. The actual volume is low at some 450 vehicles per hour, relative to the street capacity of some 600 plus vehicles per hour. SIGNAGE AND VISITOR INFORMATION • Upgrade directional signage to Ferry terminal, destination signage for new arrivals, including a Welcome to Tasmania and Thank You for Visiting Tasmania signs. Signage identifying local village shopping precinct and a review of signage for ‘i’ visitor information, which identifies the Devonport Visitor Centre as the primary visitor centre. BEAUTIFICTION • Initiate a review of the Devonport Planning Scheme to incorporate a commercial / business zone for Tarleton Street, and undertake a review of the village shopping precinct. • Initiate a streetscape study for the Wright Street village precinct and Tarleton Street. • Initiate a heritage review with local community groups to develop and promote the Torquay story, including Pioneer Park. VISITOR AMENITIES • Review the configuration of the TT-Line terminal and ticketing booth. • Coordinate the visitor information signage. • Coordinate signage promoting the village precinct, Pioneer Park and Wheeler Street. • Coordinate signage promoting the Devonport Visitor Centre as the primary visitor centre. Devonport City Council has been identified as the owner of the East Devonport development, and has initiated a special committee of Council. As a key stakeholder with links to all interested groups, this is an appropriate vehicle to ensure a holistic approach for design and implementation is undertaken.

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In addition, it is important to undertake further community consultation to provide strategic directions information, and incorporate local resident and business input. To implement a holistic approach will require ownership of the future directions proposed within the Gateway Project by the Devonport community.

2.0 INTRODUCTION 1 September 2002 heralded the change to the dual ferries, and in recognition that this would significantly increase visitor numbers and demand on existing infrastructure, the Devonport Gateway Project was initiated by the Cradle Coast Authority in association with the Devonport City Council, TT-Line, Port of Devonport Corporation and Tourism Tasmania. The Project Brief is to assess and review the East Devonport precinct, with the goal to ensure that all visitor arrivals and departures have a quality experience. The key issues associated with the visitor experience are – -

Beautification of the banks of the Mersey River from the mouth to the TTLine terminal

-

Directional, interpretational and motivational signage

-

Traffic flow

-

Parking facilities

-

Visitor facilities, including public toilets, parks, activities and experiences

-

Street beautification

On 24 and 25 September 2002, Devonport City Council initiated a Value Management Seminar to address forward planning issues associated with current development at East Devonport and the commencement of the twin Bass Strait ferry service. Participants included representation from East Devonport Trader’s Association, Cradle Coast Authority, Devonport City Council staff and councillors, DIER, Tasmania Police, Port of Devonport Corporation, Tourism Tasmania and residents. Key issues identified as value management outcomes, were – -

Traffic flow and Norton Way

-

Town planning and land use conflicts

-

Beautification

-

Visitor amenities

-

Community consultation

Devonport City Council were identified as the project ‘owner’ to facilitate future action, and in response, Devonport City Council have initiated a ‘special committee of Council’ to address the project strategies and implementation.

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3.0 EAST DEVONPORT REVIEW 3.1

East Devonport Port East Devonport has had a long association with the Bass Strait ferry, from the first trip into Devonport on 25 September 1959 by the Princess of Tasmania. This has seen an incremental demand on infrastructure with the slow expansion of the port over the years, culminating with the commissioning of the dual ferries in September 2002. Within the context of transport infrastructure on the Coast, Devonport has been the principle passenger Port, with Burnie and Launceston predominantly shipping freight. The Port of Devonport has undertaken significant recent expansion to increase freight handling. Accordingly, the wharf apron has been expanded and a new storage facility constructed. Both the container unloading, and freight forwarding will occur on site, whereas previously the freight forwarding was not in East Devonport. Bulk unloading will also continue at the East Devonport port. New freight handling infrastructure, will see the Port activity continue to significantly expand. This is further facilitated with the ongoing Highway 1 upgrading, making access into all areas of Tasmania more efficient. To accommodate the Port of Devonport Corporation’s future planning strategy, the Corporation have undertaken a land acquisition programme. This has seen a progressive loss of residential properties within the Murray Street / Thomas Street precinct. Accordingly, the Corporation has made application to Devonport City Council to amend the Devonport Planning Scheme to accommodate the increased Port zone, which came into effect on 24 February 2003. Port activity has continued from early settlement of Torquay to the present, and there is an interesting story to tell, however, there is very little interpretative information. The historic fabric of East Devonport is in variable conditional and the links to the past such as the Torquay ferry, pioneer graveyard and access to the foreshore are not easy to locate for short-term visitors. Within a Northern Tasmania regional context, East Devonport provides a central location into Tasmania for visitor arrival and departures. The commissioning of the dual ferries together with the Port freight expansion and the major road networks will facilitate growth. Accordingly, there will be increased usage of existing roads and infrastructure. The Torquay ferry operates from the Mersey foreshore, Thomas Street, and provides an on-demand east / west service. A trans Mersey ferry service has been in continual operation from before 1855, which was the year the first licensed service began. The service is predominately utilised by Devonport residents.

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3.2

Devonport Gateway Project

TT-LINE TT-Line operates dual ferry sailings for the peak period, arriving 6.30am / pm and sailing 9.00am / pm, and single sailings arriving 7.00am and departing 9.00pm. Activity associated with the ferries’ turnaround includes cleaning of the ferries in preparation for the next sailing by contract cleaners, typically cleaner numbers 35 approximately, loading and offloading of freight and vehicles, and quarantine inspection of vehicles disembarking. Activities within the TT-Line terminal include – Lower Level

- foyer space - service desk - public toilets - TT-Line Call Centre for bookings

Upper Level

- observation deck - waiting lounge - service desk - TT-Line administration

External functions comprise -

Carpark

-

Two lanes for incoming vehicles for loading

-

Ticketing booth

-

Bus and taxi lay by

-

Holding bay for vehicles for loading

-

Covered walkway for pedestrian access to the Ferry

-

Quarantine within the loading apron

-

Ferry crew carparking

Changes that have impacted on the operational procedures, include –

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Increased carparking demands by contracted cleaners coinciding with loading on dual sailing at peak periods. It should be noted that the Devonport Planning Scheme does not require any provision for carparking within the Port zone.

-

Rear loading and disembarking for pedestrians, discharges onto a space constrained footpath area.

-

The expanded TT-Line Call Centre, which operates 6.00am – 9.00pm and on weekends, increases carparking demand.

-

Anticipated growth of car vehicles transported increasing with Ferry capacity, 420 approximately per sailing. Currently estimated cars per trip, 280 – 330 per day, subject to seasonal fluctuation. Whereas previously, Spirit of Tasmania’s average car per trip was 333 per two days.

-

New centre aisle ticketing booth servicing both left-hand and righthand lanes.

-

Lay by carparking extending beyond Norton Way, and extending into Wright Street. Cradle Coast Authority Philp Lighton Architects Pty Ltd

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3.3

Devonport Gateway Project

DEVONPORT PORT RECOMMENDATIONS The following recommendations are made based on a review of the existing port operations with consideration given to visitor arrival and departure. 1.

Carparking management, refer Traffic.

2.

Review the internal planning of the existing TT-Line terminal (refer to Gateway Project Drawing), incorporating – a. Expanded ground floor foyer b. Connect the covered way for foot traffic into the foyer c. Relocate public toilets

3.

Expand the ticketing booth to two single booths, with all-weather protection, to facilitate processing and remove left lane bias.

4.

TT-Line remove staff carparking from public carparking and initiate meter control within the main carpark. This will also control long-term carpark use (ie, cars left in excess of 24 hours).

It is recommended that the TT-Line take overall responsibility for the coordination of the Devonport port recommendations, but with the involvement of Port of Devonport Corporation, Devonport City Council and Cradle Coast Authority. In addition, it is recommended the Port of Devonport Corporation and Devonport City Council partner community consultation to disseminate information within the local community.

4.0 URBAN DESIGN 4.1

Built Fabric The predominant built fabric characteristic of East Devonport is the Port activity on the Mersey foreshore, together with residential to the East and North. Tarleton Street is interspersed with light industrial / commercial development, as is Pardoe, Bass and Church Street. The village shop precinct is located on Murray / Wright Streets. This commercial precinct provides services for the local residents, ie supermarket, newsagent, bakery, pharmacy, post office and ancillary services, and some offices associated with Port activities. Tarleton Street, as the ‘main’ street, has several petrol stations, which can be accessed by arrival / departure visitors. The Murray / Wright Street village precinct is a bland, suburban shopping precinct in decline, as evidenced by the vacant sites, minimum services, quality of building fabric, and absence of public facilities. Tarleton Street is also a bland suburban street, as illustrated by adhoc commercial signage, vacant and untendered sites, buildings in poor repair, aboveground power poles dominating the streetscape, and impoverished streetscape landscaping. Recommendations Refer 4.3 Devonport Planning Scheme and 7.0 Landscape Design.

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4.2

Devonport Gateway Project

AMENITIES Visitor amenities for the ferry patrons are located within the TT-Line terminal, they include well-presented and clean public toilets, service / information, waiting lounge and public telephone. Signage identifying the location of the toilets is within the terminal, and outside the building the toilets are not clearly identified. The demand on these facilities has diminished with passengers remaining in their vehicles. Visitor amenities within the East Devonport precinct, include – •

Public open space on the Mersey foreshore at Wheeler Street, refer Landscape Design.

Thomas Street Pioneer Park, including public toilets maintained by Devonport City Council. The location of the toilets is not signed within the East Devonport precinct; however, the park has level access, parking -and some historical interest associated with the pioneer’s graveyard.

Village shop precinct – this area is not focused to providing goods / services to visitors, the bakery has undertaken recent refurbishment and offers limited outside seating, there is shortstay kerbside parking and no street furniture or landscaping.

Recommendation Refer 4.4 Recommendations. 4.3

DEVONPORT PLANNING SCHEME The pattern of built fabric, which determines the visual characteristics associated with each street, reflects the zoning as per the Devonport Planning Scheme. Historically, the village, which is zoned business local, was within a residential zone. The expanded Port zone has replaced the adjacent residential zone and now immediately adjoins the village shop precinct. The loss of residents, which historically have patronised this commercial precinct, may result in under utilised businesses, however, there may be new opportunities to provide visitor services. Consideration should be given to the interface between the adjoining port / business zone to adequately ensure a positive transition from the port precinct to East Devonport for new arrivals. Murray Street and Tarleton Street are the first Tasmanian town streets experienced for the first-time visitors to Tasmania, and should convey a positive impression. The Wheeler Street residential precinct is an area characterised by under utilising the river foreshore and undervalued residential properties. There is an opportunity to design this precinct as a short-term ‘waiting’ area for ferry patrons, which can also provide lifestyle services for local residents. Consideration should be given to enabling mixed-use activity to provide visitor services, such as café and retail. This would act as a catalyst to upgrade this area.

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4.4

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RECOMMENDATIONS Establish a buffer zone of local business and commercial zone, one property deep along the western side of Tarleton Street within the zone, currently light industrial. -

Review the village shop precinct within the context of East Devonport, given the change in use, demographics and traffic, this would be an opportunity to review, and if retained, consolidate development and retain on-street carparking and undertake a streetscape assessment and implementation study.

-

Implement a heritage review and community development initiative, incorporating –

-

o

Interpretive design elements

o

Walking trails utilising the Torquay ferry

Encourage mixed-use developments along Wheeler Street that can combine retention of the unique ‘old town’ character and provide services for visitors and the local community.

Also refer Landscape Design 7.6.

5.0 TRAFFIC 5.1

INTRODUCTION The report has been provided following a review of background information, site inspections and snapshot traffic data after a visit to the ferry terminal and environs on Monday, 3rd February (evening) and Tuesday, 4th February (morning).

5.2

TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS The layout for access to port facilities at East Devonport is based on separation between the general commercial/freight vehicle provisions and passenger-based needs. Major access to East Devonport from the Bass Highway is by off-ramps connecting to Tarleton Street at the intersection of the eastbound off-ramps, Tarleton Street and the new Port Access Road. Traffic control at this location is by traffic signals with traffic signing directing light vehicles to the ferry terminal via Tarleton Street and heavy freight vehicles to the new Port Access Road. Major new port cargo handling facilities are being installed on the west side of Wright Street with a new main freight access point being installed opposite Douglas Street. Freight traffic to the ferries travels via the Port Access Road, Wright Street and Norton Way to a separate heavy vehicle dedicated entry/exit for the ferry terminal area. The specified travel route for light vehicles is: -

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Departure Traffic - travel via Tarleton Street, Stephen Street, Wright Street and Norton Way to boarding vehicle queuing lanes at the terminal. Traffic use on this link north of the Wright Street/Stephen Street junction is combined with ferry-based heavy vehicles. Cradle Coast Authority Philp Lighton Architects Pty Ltd

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-

5.3

5.4

Arriving Traffic - exit the ferry terminal via a quarantine check facility to Murray Street and then Tarleton Street.

STREET CHARACTERISTICS -

TARLETON STREET - is a major collector street for East Devonport and is constructed to cater for one lane of traffic in each direction with kerbside parking on both sides. The construction standard is considered consistent with the functional use.

-

PORT ACCESS/WRIGHT STREET - this street is considered of a satisfactory standard in terms of street alignment and road width to cater for one lane of traffic in each direction plus kerbside parking.

-

NORTON WAY - is constructed as the ferry terminal access road with provision for one through traffic lane in each direction. Some 30 metres west of Wright Street an additional dedicated ferry terminal approach storage lane for boarding light vehicles has been provided. This traffic lane extends some 170 metres to the ferry terminal entrance.

-

MURRAY STREET - is the connecting link between the ferry terminal area and Tarleton Street. The street is constructed in width to provide for one traffic lane in each direction and kerbside parking. Heavy vehicle use (vehicles greater than 8 tonnes) is restricted from the section between Wright Street and the ferry terminal; this load limit supports the functional use to generally cater for light vehicles only.

-

STEPHEN STREET - constructed to provide for one traffic lane in each direction with kerbside parking on both sides.

TRAFFIC CONTROL Major traffic control facilities relating to movements on the main links to and from the ferry terminal include: Traffic Signals •

Bass Highway ramp links/Tarleton Street/Port Access Road

Tarleton Street/Torquay Road

Tarleton Street/Murray Street

Roundabout •

Murray Street/Wright Street

Give-Way Signs •

Wright Street/Stephen Street - priority to Wright Street.

Wright Street/Norton Way - priority to Wright Street (Note: Wright Street is a priority route)

Murray Street/Esplanade (priority to ferry terminal exiting light vehicles)

Discussion Assessment is that the overall traffic arrangements servicing the port area are satisfactory. In particular, the general separation between light and heavy March 2003 02.156

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vehicle routes is supported, subject to the upgrading of Tarleton Street (refer Sections 4, 6 and 7). Alternatively, utilising Wright Street as a common arrival route should be considered subject to review of existing signage (refer Section 6). Issues of concern are seen with the junction of Wright Street/Stephen Street, the junction of Wright Street/Norton Way and the extent of the ferry approach on-street parking provisions in Norton Way. Proposed Improvements

5.5

-

Upgrade definition of the Stephen Street/Wright Street junction by installation of a throat island in Stephen Street.

-

Wright Street/Norton Way - consider realignment to provide priority for movements between Norton Way and Wright Street (south).

-

Ferry approach on-street provisions - consider extension of the existing marked kerbside approach parking lane back into Wright Street to the Stephen Street junction (refer to discussion on departure vehicle queuing).

TRAFFIC SIGNING A review of traffic signing relating to the defined network for arriving/departing vehicles indicates:

5.6

(1)

Heavy freight vehicle routes are generally well served with direction signing other than the need for directional signing indicating the Bass Highway at the Norton Way/Wright Street junction with a reassurance sign in Wright Street.

(2)

Light Vehicle Route: -

Relocate the direction sign at Tarleton Street/Murray Street to the west side of the intersection, i.e. on the approach from the ferry. Provide an additional reassurance sign in Tarleton Street just south of Murray Street.

-

Increase the size of the Spirit of Tasmania symbol signs from present 1650 x 600 to 2450 x 950 (similar to the sign on Tarleton Street South at the Port Access Road) to increase sign conspicuity.

-

Relocate an upgraded "Spirit of Tasmania" symbol sign at Tarleton Street/Stephen Street to the Tarleton Street approach to the junction.

-

Relocate and adjust the Spirit of Tasmania symbol sign from Wright Street just north of Stephen Street to the Stephen Street approach to Wright Street.

FERRY TERMINAL FACILITIES The ferry terminal is constructed as an extension to Norton Way with traffic facilities including: -

Dedicated two-lane boarding vehicle approach queue to the ticketing booth (two-lane operation) with queuing space for some 40 cars.

-

Secured boarding stage area with capacity for some 160 vehicles.

-

Car park areas in proximity to the terminal with bus parking for 3 coaches and 82 car spaces.

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5.7

Devonport Gateway Project

-

Separate car park area at the corner of Murray Street / Esplanade for 33 car spaces.

-

Exiting facilities for light vehicles - 3 service facilities for quarantine inspection and merge area to a single queue at the approach to Murray Street. Traffic priority is accorded the exiting vehicles.

-

Combined entry/exit for freight vehicles as an extension to Norton Way away from light vehicle servicing facilities.

FERRY / VEHICLE INFLUENCE To ascertain the impact of the ferry service surveys were undertaken at the ferry terminal on the evenings of Monday, 3rd February 2003 (ferry departure) and the morning of Tuesday, 4th February (ferry arrival). 5.7.1

Ferry Departure -

Service Facilities for departing vehicles include approach queue space for some 40 vehicles in two traffic lanes to ticketing facilities for each lane beyond which a secured vehicle parking area is provided for some 160 vehicles.

-

Ticketing Procedure: Observations indicated a reluctance for motorists to fully utilize the ticketing facilities due to unfamiliarity with the process, i.e. follow a lead car and as the right hand lane requires ticketing via the passenger (offside) access. A measurement of queue lead-up and ticket servicing time for a sample of vehicles found a wide range of service times with variation from 17 seconds to 85 seconds, the average service time was measured at 32 seconds. The minimum service time suggests that an efficient system should be capable of servicing vehicles at an average service time of some 20 to 25 seconds (both channels) suggesting the present service facilities are operating at some 70% of practical capacity.

-

Vehicle Arrival: Survey data suggests vehicles start arriving at the ferry terminal some 3 hours prior to departure with some 30% of departing vehicles at the terminal some 2 hours before departure time. Some 50% of departing vehicles arrive between 7.00 p.m. and 7.45 p.m. and 20% from 7.45 p.m. to 8.30 p.m. This pattern suggests for peak vehicle loading (400 vehicles) some 120 vehicles are at the ferry terminal by 7.00 p.m. The general vehicle arrival pattern at the terminal and the generated queue for peak ferry loading based on the arrival pattern and the average 32 second ticket service time is shown on the attached Figures 1, 2 and 3.

Service Improvements: Observation and analysis of activities associated with the arrival of departing vehicles at the ferry terminal suggest: -

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The present ticket service could be improved by directing motorists to the ticketing booths and desirably supplementing the ticketing facilities by a valet-type service collecting and returning tickets to motorists. The traffic pattern suggests some Cradle Coast Authority Philp Lighton Architects Pty Ltd

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advantages by reduced on-street queuing if ticket servicing were upgraded for ferry loadings in excess of 300 vehicles.

5.7.2

-

Operating the ferry ticketing service facilities and the vehicle boarding store area from 6.40 p.m. for peak loads and generally from 6.45 p.m.

-

Based on the arrival pattern and the ticket service time and with ticket service commencement some 2 hours 20 minutes before ferry departure the maximum queue is estimated at some 70 vehicles. Estimates suggest this queue can be accommodated within the port loading queue area and the dedicated queuing lane provided on Norton Way.

-

Maximum vehicle arrival rate is estimated at some 300 vehicles/hour (peak 15 minute period). The addition of this traffic to the local traffic use on the East Devonport street network suggests capacity exists to accommodate this traffic at acceptable traffic service levels. Ferry Arrival

Data for the ferry arrival on Tuesday, 4th February found – Time (5 min. commencing) 6.55 7.00 7.05 7.10 7.15 7.20 7.25 7.30 7.35 7.40

Vehicles Exiting 11 8 15 28 31 43 32 41 47 3

Accumulated Exit 11 19 34 62 93 136 168 209 256 259

Observations at the exit facility were limited to outside the terminal area, beyond the quarantine inspection facility. The exiting volume is controlled by the quarantine service facility, the limits on the road geometry and the short merging area provided at the exit. Exit capacity is further reduced by the handing of tourist packages to motorists at the exit. Traffic safety is considered compromised by this activity at a dual vehicle queue situation. Observations -

Vehicle exit from the ferry is regulated by the quarantine check requirements with exiting volume averaging some 450 vehicles/hour. 256 vehicles were exited in 40 minutes (from 6.55 a.m. to 7.35 a.m.) on the day of the survey, suggesting a peak ferry light vehicle load could exit the port facilities in approximately 1 hour.

-

The arrival and vehicle discharge time occurred before normal morning peak traffic movements in East Devonport such that the level of on-street traffic service should be satisfactory. However, any delay in arrival to

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coincide with morning peak traffic activity in Tarleton Street would significantly reduce the level of traffic service. -

There are safety concerns with the handing of tourist information to motorists at the exit merge area. Observations of the arrival activity for vehicles exiting the ferry found that two attendants handed tourist information to selected tourists after they had exited the quarantine facility at the merge area. The assessment is that the attendant nearest Murray Street complicate and delayed the vehicle exit movement and increased the risk of rear end collisions and personal injury (refer Photo A5 – Arrivals). It is recommended that this activity be either relocated to within the port area or provided at a kerbside facility in Murray Street away from the exit merge area.

5.8

PEDESTRIANS Walk-on passengers are catered for by being set down and collected by cars and buses using the car park area adjacent to the ferry approach queue lanes. These passengers cross to or leave the ferry terminal building to access the ferry. A raised pedestrian crossing is provided across the queue lanes with the operation generally safe due to the low operating speed of vehicles in this area. Safety could be improved by the posting of speed limit signs on the queue lanes, suggest 20 km/h and the addition of pedestrian ahead warning signs. Arriving passengers are not at risk except at times of dual daily sailings as for normal daily sailings the approach queue area is closed to vehicles.

5.9

HEAVY FREIGHT VEHICLES These vehicles are catered for by a controlled entry/exit away from the light vehicle boarding facilities. There is some combined use of the heavy vehicle access way by vehicles and buses using the car park area provided for walkon passengers and ferry servicing personnel. Consideration could be given to further reducing the speed limit through the car park area. During the survey periods, semi-trailer activity was light and appears well catered for by the present layout.

5.10 CARPARKING Visitor and service employees are catered for by car parks provided in proximity to the ferry terminal. Spaces availableAt ferry terminal

60

Adjacent terminal exit

22

Corner Murray Street/Esplanade

33

Norton Way at vehicle boarding lanes Total

8 123

Observations during survey times found •

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At Ferry Terminal: Evening use was about 40 parked vehicles with up to 45 just prior to vessel departures. This car park is likely to be close to capacity during peak ferry use. Morning use was some 25 vehicles suggesting no concerns with arriving vessels. At other times throughout the day this car park is occupied by up to 45 vehicles. Cradle Coast Authority Philp Lighton Architects Pty Ltd

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Adjacent Terminal Exit: During ferry arrivals and departures some 1014 vehicles use this area with the area almost fully occupied during the day.

Corner Murray Street/Esplanade: During most times there is little use of this car park with some10 cars parked seen as typical of the use.

Norton Way at Vehicle Boarding Lanes: Use of this car park appears limited to the adjacent port activities. Occupancy was found to be about 60%.

Overall public car parking in proximity to the ferry terminal appears to be operating at some 70% occupancy with some 30 to 35 vacant spaces available at most times. Car parking is not assessed as a critical issue to address. 5.11 RECOMMENDATIONS An assessment of traffic use relating to ferry generated activities suggests: -

-

-

-

-

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Traffic considerations are not seen as critical to any decision relating to definition of the route through East Devonport for light vehicles to and from the ferry. Both routes utilising Wright or Tarleton Street are considered satisfactory, subject to implementation of the reports full recommendations. Sign upgrading and relocation of directional signing to and from the ferry terminal is seen as an improvement on the existing provisions. Estimates suggest the existing queuing facilities for vehicles boarding the ferry are adequate, provided the ticket servicing and carpark use are monitored to maximise the efficiency of this operation. The provision of extensive parking facilities to cater for operational shortcomings is neither functional or cost effective. Additional pedestrian warning signs and posting of a lower speed limit for the vehicle boarding queue area is suggested as prudent. The vehicles exiting volume from the ferry terminal is controlled by the service requirements at the quarantine check area with the exit volume of no issue for other on-street users in East Devonport except for a delayed ferry arrival coinciding with peak time traffic. The manual handling of tourist information at the exit from the terminal is considered hazardous such that the activity should be relocated away from the present location. The public car parking provisions are satisfactory with general use assessed at some 70% of capacity.

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6.0 SIGNAGE AND VISITOR INFORMATION This signage review provides an assessment of the existing visitor signage system and visitor information services for visitors upon arrival and departure from the East Devonport ferry terminal. It is based on a review of relevant background reports, various site visits during times of ferry use and informal discussions with some visitors and operators within the tourism industry. The report is also based on the traffic engineer report for the Devonport Gateway Project, which indicates that -

Murray Street – Tarleton Street remain the main route for visitors arriving at East Devonport by ferry;

-

Tarleton Street – Stephen Street – Wright Street – Norton Way is the existing return route for visitors leaving on the ferry; and

-

The alternative option of visitors returning along Wright Street – Norton Way should also be considered.

The Tasmanian Visitor Information System (TVIS) provides for the integrated approach to the dissemination of visitor information and signage to help visitors find attractions, facilities and services whilst touring the State. A draft Tasmanian Roadside Signs Manual has been prepared to provide a planning and development framework for tourism road-signs within the State. To work effectively for the visitor, the sign system must provide accurate and appropriate information to assist the visitor in finding their way efficiently and safely from and to the terminal. 6.1 6.2

REVIEW OF EXISTING VISITOR SIGNS Arrival Sequence of Signs The sequence of directional signs for visitors departing the East Devonport ferry terminal are shown in Photographs A1 to A7.

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Photograph A1

Photograph A2

Leaving the terminal onto Murray Street.

Signage and artworks providing welcome to Devonport at the entry to Murray Street

Photograph A3

Photograph A4

Round-about on intersection at Murray Street and Wright Street

Intersection of Murray Street and Tarleton Street. Sign should be located on left hand approach to Tarleton Street.

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Photograph A5

Photograph A6

Approach to intersection of Tarleton Street and Bass Highway connectors

Signage for visitors continuing onto Devonport and Burnie

Photograph A7 First sign with reference to Cradle Mountain on the Bass Highway after leaving the terminal

Whilst the existing signage system has met the basic directional requirements for visitors, a number of limitations have been identified. These limitations are: - There is no directional signage to the major visitor destination of Cradle Mountain until visitors are on the Bass Highway heading towards Devonport;

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The poor quality of the sense of arrival after leaving the quarantine inspection and also at Murray Street;

-

Poor placement of signs to assist visitors; and

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-

The directional visitor information signs to help lead visitors to the Devonport visitor information centre are not sufficiently prominent.

An additional issue in the long term will be the need to identify key visitor touring routes as part of the overall signage system within Devonport, including visitors departing the Spirit of Tasmania ferries from East Devonport. Signage to major visitor destinations The current signage system clearly identifies a number of the major visitor destinations for visitors arriving at East Devonport – directional signs along Tarleton Street and the connections to the Bass Highway clearly provide direction to Hobart, Launceston, Burnie and Devonport. However, the directional signage to Cradle Mountain is considered inadequate. Cradle Mountain is one of the prime visitor destinations in the State attracting 139,400 interstate and overseas visitors in 2001/02. In 2001/02 some 98,300 visitors departed the State using the ferry service at Devonport – representing 17% of the total visitor market. The Devonport ferries accounted for about 22% of the total holiday visitor market departures within the State. The importance of Devonport as a visitor entry point for the State has escalated with the introduction of the twin ferries in late 2002, and it is expected that the Devonport ferries may now be accounting for about 30% of total visitors arrivals during 2002/03. Currently visitors are required to make a decision on Tarleton Street to take the connection onto the Bass Highway to reach Devonport or Burnie before they find the first directional sign on the Bass Highway referring to Cradle Mountain (Photograph A7). It would be appropriate for Cradle Mountain to be listed on the main directional signs shown in Photographs A1, A3, A4, A5 and A6 so as to clearly assist visitors with their immediate directional information needs to travel onto Cradle Mountain. Sense of Arrival The Tasmanian Roadside Signs Manual refers to the role of promotional signs at major air and seaports for visitor arrival into Tasmania. The Devonport ferry terminal is nominated as an appropriate site and the Manual indicates the State Government should erect the signs. This sign could be located within the exit road off the ferry terminal site (just past the Quarantine check area) rather than on Murray Street, which already provides a welcome to the City of Devonport. The signs could be designed to convey the essence of the Tasmania’s branding of the island as a natural different destination – an island, clean, unpolluted, unique, friendly, traditional values etc. Few words, if any, may be needed on the sign. Photograph A2 shows the clutter of existing signs for visitors upon arrival at Murray Street. The mosaic walls and City of Devonport’s ‘Welcome to Devonport’ sign are largely lost amidst the various signs poles and signs. The signs need to be rationalized and priority given to the mosaic walls and ‘welcome’ signs as a way of enhancing the sense of arrival for visitors. Consideration could also be given to the potential for landscaping, street surface and lighting to strengthen the sense of arrival (refer to comments in the landscape plans). March 2003 02.156

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Some consideration could also be given to the use of a small sign promoting the facilities (e.g. food, post office, shops) available at the East Devonport commercial area that can be accessed off Murray Street. Placement of Signs The sign at the junction of Murray Street and Tarleton Street is located on the opposite side of the road to the approaching visitor and its visibility is partly affected by the traffic lights, vehicle movement etc. It would be better to locate the sign on the western approach to the junction to be more visible to visitors and ensuring they are prepared to turn right at the junction. Visitor Information Signs Currently the yellow on blue visitor “i” signs has been tacked onto the sign poles for some of the existing directional signs leading towards Devonport’s city centre and are located separate to the Devonport city signs. In many cases the signs are not visually prominent (e.g. Photographs A1 and A4) due to being positioned at a lower height to the main directional signs and because they are not clearly linked with Devonport as the destination – consequently visitors have to keep looking for the “i” sign as there is no reassurance that the centre may be located in Devonport. It would be preferable for the visitor “i” sign to be incorporated directly onto the major directional signs so that a visitor clearly associates the visitor information centre with all the directional signs leading to the Devonport city centre. These improvements to the visitor information signs would also clearly benefit the many touring visitors arriving at Devonport by other means than the ferry service. Key Touring Routes Currently the Cradle Coast Authority is preparing a touring route strategy for the Cradle Coast region. The Cradle Coast Touring Route Strategy is a key element of the Partnership Agreement between the State Government (represented by Tourism Tasmania) and the Cradle Coast Authority (representing Latrobe, Kentish, Devonport, Central Coast, Burnie, WaratahWynyard, and Circular Head Councils). The Strategy embraces the concepts of the Tourism Industry Framework outlined in Tourism 21, which provides the basis for achieving an integrated tourism strategy for the State, and focuses on the development of selected touring routes and clusters. These clusters and routes are to deliver a range of ‘core’ visitor experiences through the innovative linking of attractions, activities and associated support facilities. The themed touring routes are planned to give a strong purpose for visiting a region and undertaking a range of activities that help improve length of stay, employment and yield. The touring routes will require supportive infrastructure including a signage system1 for directing visitors onto the key touring routes. They are essential building blocks for presenting the Tasmanian tourism experience to visitors. The initial work being undertaken for the Cradle Coast region indicates the importance of Devonport as an entry point into the State and that the City is strategically located in relation to two possible key touring routes 1 Signage systems have been already been developed for a number of key touring routes within the State e.g. Heritage Highway (Hobart to Launceston), Great Western Tiers (Launceston to Mole Creek), Huon Trail (Huon Valley, Channel and Bruny island), Tamar Valley (Tamar Attractions).

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A key touring route extending along the entire coastline of the North West Coast (Devonport – Arthur River); and a key touring route connecting some major coastal towns, including Devonport to Cradle Mountain. Ideally the first key touring route (which may be called the Great Nature Trail) would be incorporated in the directional signage (possibly near the junction of Tarleton Road and the connectors to the Bass Highway) to indicate that the touring route is reached via the Bass Highway connector leading onto Devonport and Burnie. The signage system for the second key touring route (which may be called Cradle Country) may require tour route signage to be added on the Bass Highway (Photograph A7) directing visitors via Spreyton, and also at other possible locations on the Bass Highway outside of Devonport (e.g. via Latrobe, via Forth Valley). The above signage will require the approval of DIER and should be considered prior to any improvements to the existing signage system is planned. 6.3

Departure Sequence of Signs The sequence of directional signs for visitors arriving at the East Devonport ferry terminal to leave the State are shown in Photographs D1 to D17. Photographs D1 – D14 indicate the existing signage when approaching the terminal from the south (i.e. Hobart and Launceston) and photographs D15D18 indicate the signage for visitors when approaching from the north (i.e. Burnie and Devonport City Centre). The latter would also involve following the signs from D6 – D13 via Tarleton Street, Stephen Street, Wright Street and Norton Way. The existing signage along Tarleton Street - Stephen Street -Wright StreetNorton Way is considered to be adequate to meet the needs of visitors approaching the ferry terminal from both south and north on the Bass Highway. However potential improvements to the existing signage are -

Installing a larger sign at the junction of Tarleton Street and Stephen Street (Photograph D7) to aid visitors in making the important decision of taking a left hand turn to reach the ferry;

-

Reviewing the need for the existing signage to also direct freight down side streets given promotion of Wright Street for all freight traffic (e.g. Photograph D14);

-

Adding an additional sign may be useful at the junction of Stephen Street and Wright Street (Photograph D9) where currently there is one advance sign on Stephen Street to indicate the need to turn right (located part way down Stephen Street) and the only sign at the junction is orientated to those driving along Wright Street and thus is at 90 degrees to those visitors using Stephen Street);

-

Adding public amenities symbol signs (e.g. toilets, phone, first aid) to the directional sign at the entrance to Norton Way2; and

2 Traffic engineering advice suggests that the previous vehicle queues can now be managed at the ferry terminal site and along Norton Way. For any visitors waiting in their vehicles, the amenities sign would indicate that these facilities are

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-

Designing and installing a ‘leaving’ sign for visiting Tasmania on Norton Way aimed at inviting visitors to return – perhaps using some strong images of the core appeal values of Tasmania e.g. wilderness, heritage, food and wine.

The signage along Tarleton Street is currently located within a corridor of power poles, street lighting poles and a backdrop of extensive commercial signage. However, the sign colours (white on blue), the use of the ship shape within the sign and general size of the signs allow the signs to be seen by visitors travelling along Tarleton Street. However any future improvements to the streetscape of Tarleton Street (e.g. under-ground power lines, landscaping, sign control) would enhance the visibility of the signs along the street. An alternative to Tarleton Street is the potential to use Wright Street as the entry road to the ferry terminal. The potential advantages and disadvantages of this option as compared with the existing route are presented in the traffic engineers report. Use of Wright Street, as the main entry route, would require -

The removal of existing signage along Tarleton Street and Stephen Street;

-

The placement of new signage prior to the intersection of Tarleton Street, Wright Street and the connector off the Bass Highway to indicate use of Wright Street; and

-

Placement of reassuring signage along Wright Street.

available at the ferry terminal building. This avoids the current situation where public toilets are signposted and require visitors to walk a greater distance to Thomas Street.

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Photograph D1 Advance directional sign off Bass Highway approaching Devonport from Deloraine

Photograph D2 Directional sign on Bass Highway

Photograph D3 Directional sign on Bridge Street near turn-off to Ambleside

Photograph D4 Advance sign for separation of port freight and other vehicles

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Photograph D5 Sign prior to intersection of Tarleton Street, Wright Street and Bass Highway connection

Photograph D7 Turn-off sign at junction of Tarleton Street and Stephen Street

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Photograph D6 Directional signs to terminal on Tarleton Street

Photograph D8 Sign on Stephen Street leading to Wright Street

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Photograph D9 Junction of Stephen Street and Wright Street

Photograph D10 Sign prior to junction of Norton Way and Stephen Street

Photograph D11 Sign at junction of Norton Way and Wright Street

Photograph D12 Norton Way to terminal buildings

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Photograph D13 Entry to ferry terminal

Photograph D14 Signage along Tarleton Street prior to John Street

Photograph D15 Sign on Formby Road from the City Centre

Photograph D16 Sign at junction of Formby Road to Bass Highway connection

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Photograph D17 Sign on Bass Highway (Victoria Bridge)

Photograph D18 Sign on Bass Highway (Victoria Bridge) prior to connection to reach Tarleton Street

6.4

VISITOR INFORMATION

6.5

Review of Existing Visitor Information Service The Tasmanian Visitor Survey indicates that the main ways by which holiday visitors book their travel to the State in 2001/02 was by using 43.4% travel agent; 14.1% internet; 13.2% airline; 9.5% TT Line; 6.5% Tasmanian travel centre; 4.0% tour operator; and 1.9% motoring club. When making decisions about their travel plans within the State the client may have used a range of visitor information from these and other potential sources. In addition, a small visitor information centre and service is provided on the ferries to aid visitors with information needs whilst on the ship. Feedback from some visitors and operators suggests that with the introduction of the twin ferries and new operating times, not as many visitors are now finding the time or taking the opportunity to use the visitor information facility on the boat. Upon arrival at East Devonport vehicles with interstate number plates are then personally offered a welcome pack of visitor information after leaving the quarantine check area before entering Murray Street. The information included within the pack is included on a commercial basis with operators paying for the benefit of having their promotional material in the pack. Some visitors have indicated that they have no time to use the information pack and that they review the information material at a later time to find what is relevant to their needs. Accommodation operators have confirmed that they often find discarded material from the pack, presumably after visitors have chosen what information is of real interest to them. Whilst this may be a useful service at

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no direct cost to the visitor or tourism bodies, it is relevant to ask whether the service is the best way to reach the information needs of visitors on arrival. There is a need to review the existing information service and to see whether it is the best option for presenting the visitor with information that will meet their immediate needs and assist them in planning their journey within the State. For instance it may be beneficial to target the package of information to include the essential information needs of: -

An information sheet designed to answer the immediate information needs of visitors arriving at Devonport (e.g. how to find the visitor information centre, opening hours, eating places, short walks, public toilets, banks etc);

-

The proposed touring route brochure for the State showing the key touring routes and themed experiences within the State; and

-

A brief information sheet focusing on what visitors can do to care and protect the island’s natural and cultural resources.

There is currently a visitor information panel provided in a car parking area off Murray Street, which appears to be poorly utilized by visitors. It would be more appropriate to focus the priority for visitor information at the existing Devonport visitor information centre where there are professional skills and resources to cater for a wide range of visitor information needs. There is no need for any additional visitor information centres to be located in East Devonport, as it is far preferable to have one centre organised as the primary visitor information service and to use existing marketing resources efficiently. Many maps of Devonport do not indicate the promoted visitor route to and from the East Devonport ferry but rather just indicate the ferry terminal location. It would be logical to seek integration of the signage system with the printed material published on Devonport. 6.6 6.7

RECOMMENDED IMPROVEMENTS TO VISITOR SIGNAGE AND INFORMATION Visitor Signage The following recommendations are made based on the review of the existing signage system for visitors arriving and departing at the east Devonport ferry terminal. 1.

A “Welcome to Tasmania” sign be designed and installed by the State Government for visitors departing the ferry terminal prior to entering Murray Street.

2.

Improvements should be made to the entry at Murray Street to improve the sense of arrival to the City of Devonport, including possible rationalisation / relocation of signs, improved landscaping and installation of lighting.

3.

Consideration be given to a sign that promotes the available facilities and services within the East Devonport commercial area accessed off Murray Street prior to the junction with Wright Street.

4.

Cradle Mountain be included as a destination within the major destination signs leading to the Bass Highway.

5.

The visitor “i” sign be better integrated with the major destination signs leading to Devonport as a destination.

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6.

The sign at the junction of Murray Street and Tarleton Street be relocated to the left hand side approach to the junction.

7.

The signage for proposed key touring routes be considered prior to undertaking any major improvements to the existing signage system.

8.

A larger directional sign to the ferry terminal be used at the junction of Tarleton Street and Smith Street.

9.

A directional sign to the ferry terminal be installed at the junction of Smith Street with Wright Street.

10. A panel of symbols showing public amenities (e.g. toilets, phone) at the ferry terminal should be added to the directional sign at the entrance to Norton Way. 11. Existing signage be upgraded consistent with the promotion of Wright Street as the entry for port freight to East Devonport and the ferry service. 12. A visitor thank you sign inviting return visits be designed and installed on Norton Way. 13. If Wright Street is to be used in the future as the main entry point to the ferry terminal then action will be required to remove existing signs along the existing route and install new signs prior to the Tarleton Street – Wright Street intersection and along Tarleton Street. It is recommended that the Devonport City Council take overall responsibility for the co-ordination of an effective signage system at East Devonport but with the involvement of the TT Line, Port of Devonport Corporation, DIER, Cradle Coast Authority and Tourism Tasmania. 6.8

Visitor Information The following recommendations are made based on the review of the existing arrangements for providing visitor information to visitors arriving at the East Devonport ferry terminal. 1. The primary visitor information service for visitors entering through the Devonport ferry terminal should be the existing Devonport visitor information centre located on Formby Road which has the professional skills and resources to cater for a wide range of visitor information needs. 2. No additional visitor centres be developed within East Devonport for visitors from the ferry service. 3. Remove the existing visitor information signboard located within the car park off Murray Street, as it serves no major benefit for visitors leaving the ferry. 4. Review the existing commercial arrangements for handing out information packs to visitors at the ferry terminal with regard to providing critical information that is essential to the visitor needs (i.e. allow the States visitor information centers and other outlets provide information that the visitor can choose based on their needs). Consider the potential benefits from providing an essential information package that may include -

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• an information sheet designed to answer the immediate information needs of visitors arriving at Devonport (e.g. how to find the visitor information centre, opening hours, eating places, short walks, public toilets, banks etc); • the proposed touring route brochure for the State showing the key touring routes and themed experiences within the State; and • a brief information sheet focusing on what visitors can do to care and protect the island’s natural and cultural resources. 5.

Seek all future maps of Devonport City to show the entry and access routes to the East Devonport terminal as a marked route.

It is recommended that the Devonport City Council take overall responsibility for the co-ordination of visitor information in Devonport but with the involvement of the TT Line, Port of Devonport Corporation, DIER, Cradle Coast Authority and Tourism Tasmania.

7. 0 LANDSCAPE DESIGN 7.1

INTRODUCTION The landscape design provides an assessment of the existing streetscape characteristics, together with street beautification recommendations, including planting, design parameters, this should be read in conjunction with Gateway Project Drawings.

7.2

TARLETON STREET The route along Tarleton Street forms a major part of the journey in and out of East Devonport. As such, the character of the street has the potential to play a part in influencing the early and final impressions that the visitor has of Tasmania. The street is dominated by the power poles and cables running along its length, dominating all other features including street, visitor and business signage. The most significant action that could be taken towards changing and improving the character of Tarleton Street would be to bury the electrical services underground. The prominent power infrastructure limits the options for developing any significant streetscape features and in improving the visual amenity of the area for the benefit of visitors, residents and business operators. If fully undergrounding the power is not an option, moving all poles to one side of the street would allow for the development of some features, eg street trees, more visible signage and the potential for sculptural elements. The opportunity to continue the plantings of Banksia marginata from Murray Street should be investigated as a means of identifying the route outward from the ferry terminal. A detailed streetscape plan for Tarleton Street, including trees and signage that dovetails with the design characteristics of the greater Devonport area, including Victoria Parade, Riverside Plaza and the Bluff, should be developed.

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Devonport Gateway Project

WRIGHT STREET With Wright Street as the main access to the ferry terminal and port, the opportunity should be taken to implement a landscape treatment that is suited to the scale of the street and significance of the destination. Space exists along Wright Street to establish trees up to near the intersection of John and Wright Streets. Any existing landscape treatments should be reviewed and a cohesive planting regime developed, including reinforcing the existing plantings of small trees on the eastern side of Wright Street north of John Street. A planting selection based on Tasmanian endemic species could help develop a distinct character of the district and tie in well with the bluegums along Wheeler Street, the planting suggested for Norton Way, and the existing use of native species (eg, Banksia marginata) along Murray Street. Suggested species of trees for Wright Street include Eucalyptus viminalis (White Gum) and Eucalyptus globulus (Blue Gums). Platanus orientalis (Plane trees) have been recently planted along a section of Wright Street, after the intersection with Torquay Road, and are worth considering as a feature tree for use at selected locations along the route. The planting at the approach to the intersection of Wright and Tarleton Streets is inappropriate. Specimens of Agonis flexuosa are blocking view to major signage, and will grow to become trees if not severely pruned. More appropriately scale plants (shrubs) should be selected. The Agonis could be relocated to a position set back (approximately 10 metres) from their current location.

7.4

NORTON WAY The space along Norton Way provides an opportunity to develop a landscaped corridor that frames the view down to the ferry and partially screens the views into the adjacent freight yards. Rather than retaining the vacant character of left over space from the development of Norton Way, the opportunity to create an interesting streetscape should be taken up. Signage should be installed thanking visitors for coming to Tasmania and inviting them to return. The message could be incorporated into a feature developed with the input of an artist or created by them. The plantings along Norton Way could incorporate Tasmanian endemic species, planted in wide bands of contrasting height and foliage. The plantings could correspond with bands of red gravel topping added to the roadway surface in the vicinity of the visitor signage. The vegetation will eventually provide partial screening of views through to the port.

7.5

MURRAY STREET The opportunity exists to reinforce the gateway concept previously envisaged for this end of Murray Street. Mosaic walls have been built which depict themes relevant to the north coast. The mosaics appear lost against the background of cars and buildings, and amidst the array of signs and poles. One means of highlighting these features is to plant specimens of Banksia marginata immediately behind the walls to form a solid and dark backdrop to them, continuing the current planting of this

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species of Banksia used along Murray Street. Small Eucalypts (Eucalyptus pulchella) could be planted further along, but still close to the mosaic walls to visually reinforce the gateway. Lighting set into the ground could be used to highlight this feature for visitors arriving at night. To help further reinforce the notion of Murray Street as part of the gateway precinct, further streetscape options include – - Placing the powerlines underground to maximise opportunities for street tree development; - Developing a series of thematic art pieces to continue the character started with the mosaic walls – the themes could include regional or municipal history, industry and nature, and; - Replacing existing street lights with fixtures of a more village scale. Changes to the streetscape need to be considered as part of a wider study of visitor needs and perceptions of East Devonport, and could be linked to redevelopments within the village precinct. This should be coordinated with the banner poles and footpath widening proposed by Devonport City Council. This should be designed to accord with the change in use from residential to port zone, designing to accommodate the incremental loss of dwellings and transition to ‘village shop’ precinct. 7.6

WHEELER STREET Space exists in the carpark at the northern end of Wheeler Street to create openings in the paved surface in which a number of bluegums could be planted to extend the avenue and to provide shade for visitors and cars. Strong tree guards would help support the survival of any young trees. These guards could also introduce a design theme to the area that could be carried through in other parkland and street furniture used along Wheeler Street and the East Devonport district. The parkland along the Mersey River front at Wheeler Street consists of a strong line of Tasmanian bluegums (Eucalyptus globulus). The visual strength of this line is diminished by a number of large pine trees which interfere with the habit and form of the bluegums. Strong consideration should be given to removing the pines to restore the avenue, and to help maintain the vigour and form of the bluegums. Beneath the bluegums, banks of low shrub plantings could be formed that would be visible to passengers on vessels. The repeated forms with spaces between would appear as ‘waves’ along the parkland. In combination with the line of bluegums, the waves would create a strong visual impression. Night time lighting could be used to reinforce the sculptural character of the forms. One plant species recommended for use is the Tasmanian endemic Ozothamnus rosmarinifolius, which has profuse pink to red bush and flowers, and a low growth habit to maintain views through the park. This planting scheme would also be attractive to shore based visitors. The planting configuration should incorporate passive recreation of the area, and enable informal access to the foreshore for recreational activity, ie fishing, etc. Other vegetation planted beneath the Eucalypts should also be considered for removal and replacement with bluegums where gaps are left in the avenue.

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This would help achieve more open view through the park and across the river. These include Mestrosideros sp. and a specimen of Phoenix canariensis (Canary Islands palm). The palm could be relocated elsewhere in Devonport (or sold), as in its current location it will not have sufficient space for growth. The large Metrosideros excelsa may be relocated to the roundabout at the intersection of Murray and Wright Streets. Both moves would require professional arboricultural advice.

8.0 REFERENCES •

Devonport and Environs Planning Scheme 1984

•

Shifting Sands A history of the Mersey River, Devonport Fay Gardam

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Appendices A.

East Devonport circa 1884

B.

Arrival and Departure Audit

H. Value Management Project Issues Summary I. March 2002 Tasmanian Visitor Survey J. Devonport City Planning Scheme – zoning plan K. Devonport City Council – proposed works Murray Street L. Road Design Norton Way I.

Devonport Gateway Proposals -

Drawing 01

-

Drawing 02

-

Drawing 03

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