Page 1

tasteBUDS

L O C A L C H A T T A N O O G A F L A V O R

Celebrate the Season with Local Root Veggies FAL L /WIN T ER

20 1 5

C H AT TA N O O GA’S growchattanooga.org/foodguide

R EG I O N A L

GU I D E

TO

LO CA L LY

G R OW N

A N D

C R A F T E D

FO O DS

1


FRESH, LOCAL FOOD WHERE YOU SHOP AND EAT.

2

FARMERS FOCUS ON FARMING. WE FOCUS ON DISTRIBUTION.

ONE EASY ACCESS HUB FOR PURCHASING LOCAL FOOD.

growchattanooga.org/foodguide


contents

4

F E AT U R E S Local Food – Local Farms 4 The Things We Do for Food 6 Food Hubs: Providing Options for Farmers 8 The Southern Kitchen Series 10 Celebrate the Season with Local Root Veggies 12 Forgotten Fruit: the Paw Paw 15 A Community Takes Root 16 Lupi's Pizza: Farm to Table and Back Again 18 Taking the Romance out of Food Preservation 21

6 8 10 12

RECIPES Turnip Potato Gratin 11 Potato Focaccia Bread 13 Carrot Turmeric Soup 13 Roasted Rosemary Root Vegetable Salad 14 Quick Pickling 21

D I R E C T O RY In Season Produce Chart 23 Farmers’ Markets 24 Farms 27 Community Gardens 36 Food Artisans 38 Restaurants 40 Grocers 44 Resources Organizations 45 Food Shed Map 46

S TA F F A N D T H A N K S

15

Program Administrator: Andrea Jaeger Program Assistant: Anna Chill Program Intern: Grace Shields Contributing Writers: Olivia Harlow, Joel Houser,

18

Hilli Levin, Melanie Mayo, Jim Pfitzer, Hannah Shadrick, Grace Shields, Claire Sullivan

Photography: Widgets & Stone, Grant Dotson Studios, Shana Dubois, and Seth Shaffer Photography Design: Widgets & Stone Crabtree Farms Thanks: The USDA for supporting and funding the 2015 Fall edition of TasteBuds and the Steering Committee who guided the process: Dorris Shober, Padgett Arnold, and Tom Stebbins.

21

ON THE COVER Karen Persinger makes the most of her fall harvest by incorporating turnips into her family’s traditional potato gratin recipe (see pages 10-11). Featured are Circle S Farm blue tomatoes, Sequatchie Cove Nickajack Cheese, Cruze Dairy Farm milk, and fresh herbs from Crabtree Farms.

16 growchattanooga.org/foodguide

3


LOCAL

F OOD LOCAL

BY JOEL HOUSER The Land Trust for Tennessee

L

et’s face it — we love local food because it is just better. The thing is that we can’t have local food without local farms. A farm is a lot of things. It is the land, the farmers, inputs, roads leading in and out of the farm. It is the consumer. It is people and life. The farm is our past as well as our future. Farms feed us and clothe us. What could be more important than farms?

with many problems, the challenges seem to outweigh opportunities. This just isn’t the case with agriculture, however. We have solutions and you can be part of them.

We hear a lot about the problems that face agriculture and rural America. Farmers in the Chattanooga region face the same problems as farmers everywhere: inconsistent markets, an unpredictable climate, aging workers, global competition, and rising land costs with increased pressure from development. The list seems to go on and on. As

more loss than the national average. That is a staggering number and it was calculated in a time of economic uncertainty and a slow housing market. Now that we are experiencing the much-anticipated upswing of the economy, we can expect the rate of defarming to increase. Land is finite and the conversion of farmland to development is irreversible.

Agriculture is the top grossing industry in both Georgia and Tennessee. In Tennessee, it provides over 350,000 jobs and contributes $71.4 billion (with a B!) to the state’s economy annually. Food and fiber production are booming. As of now, as a sector, agriculture is a healthy industry and we would Beyond providing food and fiber, food security and a like to see it remain that way. On our current trajectory, local food supply, farms support our region in other ways. however, the future is uncertain. Though Agrarian landscapes in the valleys of our many problems that the industry faces can region help create our sense of place and “Building and maintaining (and will) be remedied, there are a couple reinforce our agricultural heritage. Farms the rural agricultural of threats that are more alarming. The largest support a viable rural agricultural economy economy is a delicious two threats to agriculture are the loss of and provide environmental and rural prospect; it simply farmland and the growing age of farmers. amenities. Furthermore, farmland offers requires eating local foods wildlife habitat as well as the potential Our present rate of farmland loss is damning. and using local goods.” for groundwater recharge and reduction In the last 5 years, Tennessee has lost of surface water runoff. 3,000 farms representing 600,000 acres of farmland, 11%

4

growchattanooga.org/foodguide


Partnering with Farmers to protect THEir land. Farmland forever... means Local Food Forever.

Nashville Office:(615)244.5263

www.landtrusttn.org

Farmland is ripe for development and asphalt is the final crop. This loss of farmland compounds the issues caused by the aging population of farmers. Nationwide, the average age of principal farm operators (the farmer) is 58.3, 17 years older than other American workers on average. In our tristate region, the average age is over 59 for each state. The high average age indicates that young people are not entering the industry at the same rate as prior generations. Beyond a shrinking population of farmers (think food security), this can be expected to lead to a loss of generational knowledge, idling farmland and a general reshaping of rural America. Questions of land use and subdivision of farms come with each generation, and the trends that we are currently seeing indicate that times, in fact, are not changing. Each of these two hurdles feed each other. As prime farmland is lost, remaining farmland becomes more valuable (classic supply vs. demand). As farmland becomes more valuable, young, beginning farmers are less likely to be able to afford to start a successful farm and farming career. Furthermore, valuable knowledge disappears with the disappearance of each passing farmer, reducing the likelihood of the next generation to create and operate successful businesses that put food on their table as well as yours. growchattanooga.org/foodguide

Chattanooga Office: (423)305-1783

Similar efforts can be used to both curb the rate of farmland loss as well as encouraging younger farmers to farm as a primary occupation. Efforts should focus on building and maintaining the rural agricultural economy as well as conserving farmland and improving access to it. Building and maintaining the rural agricultural economy is a delicious prospect; it simply requires eating local foods and using local goods. Farmland preservation can be accomplished through a variety of methods, but the most popular and permanent is through conservation easements. Agricultural conservation easements restrict development and subdivision rights on farmland, thus conserving it for future generations and lowering the market price of the property for future farmers. There are many ways to support our local farms. First and foremost, vote with your dollars. Buy local and patronize businesses that do. Support organizations that are working to solve the problem, such as Crabtree Farms (crabtreefarms.org) and The Land Trust for Tennessee (landtrusttn.org). Crabtree Farms has worked to connect Chattanoogans to our local foodshed since 1998 and The Land Trust for Tennessee has protected nearly 30,000 acres of farmland in Tennessee. Put an Ag Tag on your car, enjoy a day at a farm and take the long way home to appreciate the beauty and majesty of our region’s farmland. 5


— THE THINGS WE DO —

FOR FOOD By Jim Pfitzer

F

with a steaming cup of my own, a plate filled with eggs, sausage, and toast, and my first glass of milk, in... well, ever.

gain, or harder work than I had done since baling hay in high school. Based on how fit and trim Dave and his wife Verlinda were, my guess was the latter.

“I’ve already been down to the barn. Looks like we’re gonna have a calf today, so we will need to keep an eye on Momma. She might need help. We’ll milk first, then I’ll give you a tour of the two properties and show you what we are doing up here,” he began. “Have you had breakfast?”

Growing up, I had never found either the fat-free powdered milk of my early childhood, or the reduced fat milk of my adolescence very appealing and had stopped drinking it at all by my early twenties. What Dave poured from a half-gallon mason jar that morning, however, was nothing like what I had always called “milk,” and by the end of the meal, I had asked for and finished two refills of the delicious, creamy goodness.

Our agreement was simple. Every day I worked, I would get a jar of milk, a dozen eggs, a pound of meat, and a small hourly stipend that covered the expense of driving an hour-and-a-half each way to the farm plus a little left over. Some weeks I would work two days, some weeks three.

I quickly learned that while Farmer Dave was always ready to work, work was not always his top priority. In no time, I was sitting at the kitchen table

I didn’t know what work on Dave’s farm was going to be like, but if breakfast was any indication, this arrangement was sure to lead either to massive weight

armer Dave was waiting, coffee in hand, and looking ready to get started when I knocked on the back door. Although my watch told me I was on time, I suspected he had been ready to go for a while and I couldn't help feeling like I was late even at 5:00 am that Easter morning.

6

Working for my food was not a new concept. I did my first CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) work share at a small farm in California in the mid-nineties, and since arriving in Chattanooga in 2006, I had worked for boxes of produce at both Sequatchie Cove Farm and Crabtree Farms, but growchattanooga.org/foodguide


as a self-unemployed artist in the wake of the 2008 financial collapse, working for food had taken on a different level of importance for me, and it was clear from the start that working with Farmer Dave was to be a very different experience than my previous exchanges. With the sun still below the horizon, I sat on a stool beside one cow, Dave beside another. He showed me how to comb her to get rid of loose hair, dung, bugs, basically anything we didn’t want falling into the milk. Then, with a warm, soapy rag, we washed their udders, and gently dried them before removing the lids from the stainless milk pails. Farmer Dave made it look easy. In twenty minutes, his Jersey was stripped of milk, and he was taking over my work station. Embarrassed at my lack of productivity, I stepped aside and studied his hands as he pinched off the teats between thumbs and forefingers to keep milk from flowing back up into the udder, then squeezed the milk out, released, and began again. Right hand, left hand, right hand, left hand... Perfect rhythm. Milk safely in jars and refrigerated, we hopped in the truck and headed down the drive to find Momma cow standing under a tree near the milking barn. No calf yet, but even I could see that it wouldn’t be long. As we toured three hundred acres, Dave shared stories of three generations of farmers who had worked the land along the Tennessee River in Rhea County. I met hogs and beef cattle, walked hay fields, surveyed garden plots, and fed eighty or so chickens whose eggs would need gathering that afternoon. When, finally, we pulled back into the driveway three hours later, Momma cow was not to be seen. Looking a little worried, Dave stopped the truck and we made our way towards the barn. We found her under the same tree as before, lying on her side, exhausted. A single leg of the calf was protruding, and probably had been for a long growchattanooga.org/foodguide

time. With one leg out and one leg in, the calf was not going to move. Without our help, it wouldn’t make it, and Momma wouldn’t either. Not knowing if the calf was still alive or not, Farmer Dave quickly rolled up his sleeves. I followed suit. If this was to be a successful birth, that calf had to be reoriented, and to do that, she had to first be pushed back in far enough to pull the other foreleg out. I didn’t know what my role in this would be, but I was as ready as I could be for a forty-something who had no children of his own and no hands-on birthing experience.

“Nothing I could ever do on the little farm that feeds me now will ever quite compare to that first Easter morning with Farmer Dave.” In fact, prior to that Sunday morning, the closest I had ever come to experience birth firsthand was watching a giant snapping turtle slowly deposit dozens of eggs into a hole she had spent most of the night digging. Those eggs were much smaller and more uniform in shape than this calf, and yet the snapper had huge, sticky tears oozing down her cheeks. I could only imagine what this big momma must be feeling.

drink. With one arm, I held up the newborn that was probably a third of my body weight and twice as bony. With the other arm, I held the bottle at the right height to mimic the angle her neck would be if nursing from Momma cow. By the time I left the farm that evening with a week’s worth of milk, eggs and meat, Momma was on her feet and her new calf was properly cleaned and nursing. In the two-plus years I worked for Farmer Dave, I eventually became pretty good at milking the cows. Along the way, I dug potatoes, cut and raked hay, planted, weeded, staked and weaved tomato plants, harvested okra, administered homeopathic medicine to cows, castrated piglets, wrangled more than a few escaped pigs back into their pens, dragged chicken coops around the field, and more. That work ended when I ruptured a disc in my lower back, but trading work for food kept going for another couple years as I wrote newsletters and blogs for Crabtree Farms in exchange for my sustenance. These days I grow a sizable garden of my own, but nothing I could ever do on the little farm that feeds me now will ever quite compare to that first Easter morning with Farmer Dave, when I gave that weak little calf her first drink, and went home both hungry and very well fed.

Time stood still as Farmer Dave wrestled the calf back in. At times, he was shoulder deep as he struggled to reorient her legs to pull her back out. By the time the calf emerged, Momma was too tired to clean her new daughter, so I did my best with towels as Farmer Dave pulled, prodded, and coaxed the new mother, explaining that both cow and calf had to stand in order for nursing to happen. And nursing had to happen. Eventually it was me with a bottle feeding the exhausted calf its first 7


“One of the primary benefits [of Harvested Here] is that we are a convenient one stop shop for aggregating and providing local produce to the greater Chattanooga area,” says Whitney Marks, Coordinator of Sales and Marketing for the Harvested Here Food Hub.

F O O D

H U B S

Providing Options for Farmers

BY OLIVIA HARLOW

W

hat is it about buying local that is so special? Some would say it is the freshness of local products, the joy and anticipation of eating with the seasons, or because they can find items that might not normally be in conventional supermarkets. For others, it is having a one-on-one relationship with their farmers that makes buying local such an important part of life, and that holds true for the farmer, too.

Take, for instance, Stephanie Everett of Everett Heritage Farm. Everett grows heirloom vegetables that she sells both at the farmers market and to restaurants in the Chattanooga region. To her, it’s not just about making sales, but about making lasting connections with her customers. “We thoroughly enjoy seeing and talking with our buyers each week. It is fun, and a learning experience for both of us,” she says. “Sometimes a visit from a friendly farmer with beautiful, fresh food can uplift the whole kitchen staff, just the same as a compliment or recipe and new order from a chef can carry a farmer through to the next week.”

8

Though farmers crave opportunities to connect with buyers through farmers markets and by making personal deliveries to restaurant kitchens, the social aspect is not always timely or convenient. Farming generally requires physically demanding long hours, and the work can be exhausting. What’s more, because there is no set processing and distribution infrastructure for small farmers, it is oftentimes difficult for local products to reach the public on a broad scale. Chattanooga’s Harvested Here Food Hub, which opened in fall 2014, is providing an alternative to direct sales by serving as a middleman between busy farmers and local eaters in an effort to alleviate stress on farmers when time is slim and work is heavy.

All farms that collaborate with this hub are located within a 120-mile radius of the city. The Hub purchases the farm’s products, which are then sold in various markets. For example, Sequatchie Cove Creamery’s cheeses are sold through the Earth Fare Chattanooga grocery store and are utilized in several dishes at restaurants such as the Flying Squirrel, Easy Bistro, and Hennen’s. “It’s a simplistic way for farms to sell their product without the burden of outside stresses,” Marks says. “Many times farmers don’t want to deal with issues related to storage, marketing, sales and deliveries.” The many hub responsibilities mesh together to form a simple process for the farmer and an organized agenda for the hub. After an introductory conversation, hub staff members will visit the farm for an inspection. Once both parties are ready to move forward, a partnership is set in place. The farmer then has

Harvested Here has already partnered with twenty-four farms, offering a variety of services to make marketing and distribution easier for farmers. These services include aggregation and storage, distribution, marketing and sales services, crop planning and product grade packaging; all of this is to help connect farmers to restaurants, retailers and institutionalized kitchens.

growchattanooga.org/foodguide


24 hours after each harvest to transport their products to the hub. “So, for example, yesterday Sandabama Farm harvested squash, cabbage, and broccoli and delivered it to our office within hours,” explains Marks. After all marketing and sales facets have been taken care of, the hub will then send out product availability order forms to its customers, at which point buyers can send in order forms via email and arrange for delivery. While all of this is very convenient and helpful for the farmer, it’s also extremely beneficial for restaurants and other outlets seeking to provide local menu options. Partners communicate what foods they want and trust the hub will meet their needs in a timely manner. Rather than trying to track down a product from multiple sources, a chef can easily reach out to the hub for the product, which has been aggregated to bulk quantities. For example, if a chef needs several pounds of kale, he or she can easily reach out to the hub rather than spending time tracking down kale from multiple farmers. In the end, this simplicity, trust and organization can benefit all parties: the farmer, the restaurant and the consumer. In many ways, hubs operate to take on excess stresses, allowing farmers to focus primarily on the farm while meeting a seemingly unattainable demand. At the same time though, this takes away from the social interaction farmers love having with their buyers. Hence why Everett —and many others— still chooses to run things independently. Everett believes that if a farmer’s schedule allows them to sell directly, then they should do so. For her, not only do direct sales put a face to a fresh local product, but she strongly values the genuine relationships she builds

growchattanooga.org/foodguide

through doing so. “It’s never just about Everett Heritage Farm when we walk into a restaurant kitchen. The restaurants have welcomed us into their house and we want to know how they are doing, what items they are looking for, are they getting the right amount and quality from our farm each week, etc.,” says Everett. Another reason some farmers choose not to use hubs is cost-related. Using food hubs can sometimes cost farmers more money long-term. Bulk prices per pound of product may be lower than what a small farm, unable to provide large quantities of a product, can afford to sell it at. “A large farm may be willing to sell an item wholesale at $2.25 per pound, but a small farm can only afford to sell that same item at $3.25 per pound,” explains Everett. “When delivering to a food hub distributor one often has no confirmation of sale, or may be offered prices below the value of your product. A grower may be told, ‘we don’t know if we can get the price you want,’” explains Everett. “There is often no way to know what to expect from week to week. When you have 3,000 or 6,000 plants in the ground, you can’t wait. Instead, we pick up the phone and start calling restaurants,” she says.

Here is focused on selling high volumes in order to match prices. “We can’t pay as much per item, but if they want to sell us lots more, then we can match that price,” Marks explains. “If a farmer can sell us more, then we are able to offer a more competitive price to chefs and restaurants.” Marks clarifies that the hub’s goal is not to compete with efforts farmers make individually. Sometimes the intent of a food hub can be misinterpreted, especially in a well-established local food community. “It could easily be seen as competition to our farmers. Something we try to be transparent about is that we aren’t trying to take away from accounts they’ve already established,” Marks says.

“Whether a farmer chooses to utilize a hub or not is a personal choice. It is however, exceptional that food hubs exist as an option.” “When a food hub can build and maintain distribution lines that give growers advance notice, and build a fair trade price, and a quantity expectation that they can sell on a regular basis, and guarantee the cold chain for storage, it’s a win for all,” says Everett.

Marks explains that there is reasoning behind the pricing difference. In being a nonprofit organization, Harvested

9


— BY CL AIRE SULLIVAN —

10

Photo by Mandy Lamb Meredith

growchattanooga.org/foodguide


grow medicinal plants like oregano, catmint, lemon balm, chamomile, Echinacea, and lavender. “I love cooking, and I’m very interested in health and nutrition. Herbs in general are an extension of food,” says Persinger, “and I think it’s important to consider them as part of our nutrition.” She even admits to sprinkling ground turmeric, which is loaded with antioxidants, in the food she serves her four dogs.

K

aren Persinger is Italian by heritage, calm by nature, healthy by choice and Southern in spirit. Nestled in the undulating landscape of Lookout Mountain, GA, is Rising Fawn Gardens where Karen works with her husband, Steve, to harvest dozens of varieties of produce, flowers, and herbs. With rows of seasonal vegetables, sheltered lines of greens, and an intention to nourish their land—the Persingers farm for longevity.

While fried corn is still a regular in the Persinger household during the summertime, Karen often alters traditional family comfort food so the final product is both flavorful and filled with nutrients to foster wellbeing. Karen’s Turnip Potato Gratin is a nutritious spinoff of the heavy dish she grew up eating. “My mother would make a cream of mushroom

non-GMO animal feed. For more information, visit their website, www.risingfawngardens.com.

Enjoy this fall harvest dish as a new Thanksgiving side.

“My mother and father would always get together with the neighbors and do a big harvest of beans, tomatoes, and corn, then they would can everything.”

Kosher salt

growchattanooga.org/foodguide

Rising Fawn Gardens sells produce at the Main Street Farmers’ Market, and grows and sells

serves 6

2 cups half & half

Karen is currently enrolled in a class exploring the medicinal uses and healing qualities of herbs and flowers. During warm months, the Persingers

The result is a dish that synthesizes her past and present: childhood memories of Southern cooking and a current interest in mindful eating that utilizes all her land can offer. Karen’s approach to mealtime proves Southern cuisine can do more than warm the spirit, it can enliven the body too.

T U R N I P P O T AT O G R AT I N

Walking with care between rows of greens, Karen recalls childhood summers spent at her family’s lake house that serve as the backdrop for her first experiences with Southern cooking.

Karen’s Italian heritage influenced the cuisine she ate as a child, but her hometown of Birmingham, AL, exposed her to the hearty preparations of seasonal produce typical of the South. Creamed corn (which her family calls fried corn), pickled squash, fried green tomatoes and fried okra are among Karen’s favorite traditional Southern recipes.

soup to pour on top of scalloped potatoes, then top the dish with a buttered bread crumb topping,” Persinger recalls. Karen lightens the recipe by using half and half seasoned with garlic, thyme, and cayenne pepper. To make the most of her fall harvest, she substitutes half of the potatoes with turnips.

3 cloves local garlic, smashed

1 lb local turnips (about 2 medium), peeled and sliced very thin

1 bundle thyme (save a few sprigs for the top)

1 lb local red potatoes (about 5 medium); leave skin on and slice thin

Pinch of cayenne pepper

1 – 1 ½ cups grated Sequatchie Cove Cheese (either Nick-a-Jack or Gruetli. You can also grate Parmesan or leave the cheese out if you prefer!)

½ stick butter, plus extra for baking dish

Butter an 11 x 7-inch (or comparable) baking dish and preheat the oven to 375° F. Put the half & half, garlic, thyme and cayenne in a saucepan and season with salt to taste. Bring to a boil and then turn off heat. Let the mixture steep for 15 to 20 minutes. Butter the baking dish and layer in 1/3 of the sliced turnips and potatoes. Sprinkle 1/3 of the grated cheese over the turnips and dot with 1/3 of the butter. Remove the thyme and garlic from the half & half and ladle 1/3 of the cream over the turnips and potatoes. Repeat this process 2 more times until all of the ingredients are used up. The cooked garlic can be cut up and added in the layers. Strip additional fresh thyme leaves from stems and sprinkle on top. Cover the dish with foil, place on a baking sheet and bake in the preheated oven for 35 to 40 minutes. Remove the foil and bake for another 20 minutes, until golden. When done a fork should slide in and out of the center of the dish easily. Before serving, let the dish rest 10 to 12 minutes to allow liquid to absorb.

11


CELEBRATE THE

SEASON WI TH LOCA L ROOT VEGGIE S

Whether the occasion is a Thanksgiving dinner shared with extended family or a winter evening spent nestled in with close friends, the holidays provide opportunity for all to ground down in the comforting familiarity of their roots, year after year. As the leaves change and the temperature drops, the tomatoes, okra and eggplant that flood farmers markets during the late summer months are phased out by root vegetables like sweet potatoes, beets, carrots — and the less popular but still delectable turnips. We encourage you to embrace these seasonal staples at your dinner table; where comfort is found not only in spending time with the people who share your family roots, but also in the hearty warmth of these savory dishes. —

12

Photo by Mandy Lamb Meredith

BY C L A I R E SU L L I VA N

growchattanooga.org/foodguide


P O T AT O F O C A C C I A B R E A D yields 2 loaves Incorporating potato into this recipe creates a fluffy and moist loaf.

3 ⁄4 cups bread flour

2 heaping tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1 tablespoon active dry yeast

1 medium local russet potato 3

2 1

⁄3 cup warm water

⁄8 teaspoon sugar

4 tablespoons olive oil

Wash potato, pierce several times with a fork, and microwave for 5 minutes. Let the potato cool, peel the skin, and mash in a small bowl with a fork.

sized mixing bowl, place the ball of dough in the bowl, and seal with plastic wrap. Set aside in a warm area until the dough ball doubles in size, about 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, fill a small bowl with water and sugar. Top with active dry yeast, and set aside until frothy, about 5 minutes.

Preheat oven to 450° F. Place dough back on the floured surface and divide into two equal parts. Knead each half, form into a ball and place on a greased baking sheet. Cover with plastic wrap or a damp towel and set aside until each half doubles in size, about 30 minutes.

Combine bread flour, kosher salt, and 1 ½ tablespoons fresh rosemary in a food processor. Pulse to mix the ingredients, slowly adding the cooled potato. Add 2 ½ tablespoons olive oil to the yeast mixture, then slowly add the wet ingredients to the food processor to form the dough. Spread flour evenly across a clean surface and knead the dough until smooth, about 7 minutes. Grease a medium-

Remove towel or plastic wrap and press fingertips across the top of the dough, creating evenly spaced indentations. Brush with the remaining olive oil, then sprinkle across the surface kosher salt, black pepper, and the remaining rosemary. Bake 20 minutes, until golden brown.

CARROT TURMERIC SOUP serves 4-6 This warming soup is a simple dish that can be served as a side or a main. Adding turmeric to the recipe increases its nutritional value with its anti-inflammatory properites and antioxidants.

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 teaspoon ground turmeric

1 teaspoon kosher salt

2 local garlic cloves, chopped

10 med. local carrots, peeled and sliced

Freshly ground black pepper to taste

1 local onion, chopped

1 14-ounce can tomatoes

¾ cup low-fat Greek yogurt

Heat oil over low heat in a small saucepan. Add garlic, onion and turmeric and sauté until tender. Add the carrots and cook over medium heat for 5 minutes. Stir in the remaining ingredients, except for yogurt. Cover and let the mixture simmer for about 15 minutes until the carrots are tender. Use an immersion blender to puree the soup, slowly adding the yogurt, until smooth and serve with a drizzle of olive oil.

growchattanooga.org/foodguide

Optional: Chop leftover focaccia bread into 1-inch cubes, bake at 350° F until crisp and serve as a topping for the soup.

13


ROASTED ROSEMARY ROOT VEGE TABLE SALA D serves 4-6 as a side dish This root vegetable recipe makes the most of the fall harvest by incorporating kohlrabi and turnips in a flavorful and colorful side dish.

4 small local beets

2 medium-sized local kohlrabi

½ teaspoon kosher salt

6 medium-sized local carrots, peeled and sliced in 1-inch thick pieces

2 white local onions, chopped

Freshly ground black pepper to taste

2 cloves local garlic, diced

1 tablespoon chopped rosemary

2 medium-sized local turnips

3 tablespoons olive oil

¼ cup coarsely chopped walnuts

Preheat oven to 400° F. Individually wrap beets in two layers of foil and roast about one hour, until easily pierced with the tip of a knife. Let the beets cool and prepare the remaining root vegetables in the meantime. Use a potato or apple peeler to remove skin of the kohlrabi. Slice each kohlrabi in half and chop into one-inch thick wedges. Combine with carrots and onions in a medium-sized bowl. Rinse turnips, peel top layer of skin, and cut in one-inch wedges.

Meanwhile, peel and chop beets into one-inch cubes. Set aside in mixing bowl. Sprinkle rosemary evenly on each sheet pan of vegetables and continue roasting an additional 30 minutes, or until vegetables are evenly glazed and tender. Combine the beets with the roasted vegetables. Top with walnuts and serve warm or at room temperature.

Combine turnips with other vegetables, add garlic, olive oil, salt and pepper, and mix until vegetables are evenly coated. Spread on two greased sheet pans, and roast for 30 minutes.

14

growchattanooga.org/foodguide


f o rg o t t e n

fruit

S P O T L I G H T O N T H E PAW PAW: O U R L A R G E S T N AT I V E F R U I T S T O RY BY

“American Custard Apple.” “West Virginia Banana.” These are just a few colloquial names for the soft, fleshy, and pale-green paw paw (Asimina triloba). Our largest native fruit, paw paws range from three to six inches long and are indigenous to the temperate forests of the southeast. The paw paw fruit was long cultivated by Native Americans and first documented by Quaker naturalist John Bartram around 1736. Later, paw paws show up in journal entries from early explorers Lewis and Clark. Founding fathers George Washington and Thomas Jefferson were known to grow paw paw trees. Towns and lakes ranging from the South to the Midwest have been named after the unassuming fruit. It has even inspired a popular and enduring American folk song, “Way Down Yonder in the Paw Paw Patch.” The yellowish flesh of the paw paw has the bright, sweet flavors of mango and pineapple with the custardy smoothness of a banana. Paw paws are most commonly eaten raw, cut in half with the large flat seeds removed. They make excellent additions to chilled or frozen desserts like sorbets and smoothies, can be incorporated into breads and pies, used as a base for custards and tarts, fermented into wine, and even pickled. Lovers of “superfruits” will be happy to know that the fruits are rich in essential minerals, proteins, amino acids, antioxidants and Vitamin C.

Hilli Levin

What has caused this fascinating fruit to disappear into relative obscurity? The trees themselves, although hardy and largely disease-resistant, are difficult to plant in orchards as they prefer the partial shade and rich soils found near riverbeds. What’s more, ripe paw paws fall from the tree - they are not picked. Once ripe, fruits last only one to two days. Due to their short shelf-life, it is almost impossible to commercialize and offer these fruits at modern grocery stores. Paw paw fans instead turn to foraging, often competing with hungry squirrels and opossums for the fruits in the forests. Paw paw season begins in late July and typically runs through the first weeks of August. If you would like to sink your teeth into this treasured treat, try looking for them near riverbeds or question farmers at market. If a lucky farmer with paw paw trees on her property knows you are interested, she may bring a limited supply of the scrumptious fruits to market with you in mind. Intrepid home gardeners might even consider planting the hardy trees in wet, shady corners of their property. Within a few years, they will watch the progression from beautiful, purple-maroon blossoms in spring, to succulent fruits in fall, and help the paw paw regain its fame as an indigenous delight.

Despite their tasty appeal, and their rich and storied place in America’s history, the paw paw has all but disappeared from common knowledge: ask any group of young folk if they’ve eaten a paw paw and you’ll likely receive blank stares.

TOP LEFT:

John J. Audoban's depiction of a Yellow-billed

Cuckoo with Paw Paw in Birds of America B O T T O M R I G H T, L E F T T O R I G H T :

Still Life with Pawpaws by

Edward Edmondson, Jr., ca. 1870-75; Paw Paw fruit halved, Paw Paw flowers in Spring

growchattanooga.org/foodguide

15


A COMMUNITY

TAKES ROOT ••• BY GRACE SHIELDS •••

I

n the midst of a Main Street neighborhood, in the shadow of Missionary Ridge, lies an unexpected treasure. As the afternoon heat begins to settle over the grass, I sit with Father Peter Kanyi and Susannah Murdock in the Taking Root Community Garden under a shelter constructed to shade as well as to collect rain into large containers. A series of small garden plots bordered by backyard fences and auto service stations, this spot used to be an empty lot on a city corner. Now it is a fertile green space where local residents can grow. As its name implies, this is a space that offers cultural roots in the community and a place where people relocated to Chattanooga grow a sense of belonging.

16

Portrait Photography by Kim Livingood of Livingood Photography

growchattanooga.org/foodguide


Taking Root is an offshoot project of NEEMA Resettlement care of it printed across it in neat letters. Father Peter provides the gardeners with tools, seeds, and his knowledge Outreach, a program supported by St. Paul’s Episcopal of gardening, but insists that those who come to work on Church in Chattanooga. Founded by Father Peter Kanyi the garden are responsible for maintaining their own space. in 2010, NEEMA, the Swahili word for grace, provides “I tell them, you have a place where you can come and services for refugees and immigrants, both individuals cultivate,” says Father Peter. “Not me, but you.” and families, to help them “successfully integrate into American life,” while developing self-sufficient and stable In many ways, Father Peter has a foot in both worlds. A futures. Services include English and literacy classes, native of Kenya, he has worked with refugees since the counseling, help in finding jobs and housing, and now a 1970s. He came to America for seminary, with the goal of community garden where NEEMA students meet one working with the international community here. Father another, work together, and grow their own food. After their Peter ultimately settled in Chattanooga, and met a group of classrooms moved this year to the Youth and Family Development Department building on South Watkins Street, Burundian refugees who had been sponsored to relocate to the Scenic City. His interactions with this small community NEEMA became more involved with the Main Street opened his eyes to their needs as new arrivals in America. community and Taking Root was born. Because of its close Since then, Murdock says, Father Peter’s knowledge of a proximity to NEEMA, Taking Root acts as an extension, variety of cultures and his fluency in several languages has NEEMA’s very own “outdoor classroom.” Signs posted with allowed him to become a trusted resource in the community, tool, vegetable, and garden words reinforce vocabulary bridging the gap and helping these taught in classes to those learning families settle into their new lives. English for the first time. It also offers “The garden provides a But, as Father Peter points out, it is students a place to practice English common ground where anything but one-sided. “We are all in an informal, conversational setting. people from all walks of students of one another,” he says. Above all, the garden serves as a safe life can learn from one Father Peter and Murdock share the space where new arrivals to and another, share stories, dream that NEEMA’s work will help residents of the Chattanooga community strip away the labels so often placed alike can learn about other cultures and gain a sense of on others and instead help build a and customs. Many people who turn stability in the community culture of understanding and acceptance to NEEMA for help have fled countries we call home.” among Chattanoogans. They hope to torn apart by civil war or corrupt encourage the Chattanooga community governments. Susannah Murdock, to realize that, no matter which path life has taken us, we Chairman of NEEMA’s Steering Committee, explains how are all simply people. Here, it does not matter if you come feelings of fear and isolation are common among refugees, especially when culture and language barriers prevent these from Sudan, Guatemala, Kansas, or Ooltewah — everyone is welcome to grow in the garden. The vision for Taking Root individuals from connecting with those around them. is that everyone can bring what they grow and share a bit The garden provides a neutral and common ground where of their home culture with others. For example, if there is people from all walks of life can learn from one another, one family that wants to grow only okra, Father Peter will share stories and experiences, and gain a sense of stability help them find okra seeds. But he also encourages them to and security in the community we call home. see what others are growing and to try new foods, too. The For Muhammad Musa, a NEEMA student from Sudan, the garden acts as a perfect equalizer, where everyone is on the same footing. It is, in a very literal sense, a common garden has taught him more than just planting, something ground for people from different countries, races, religions, he was familiar with before moving here. He says working and experiences, and it unites them in a common goal. at Taking Root has taught him how to help others. It is not just his plot that he cares about; Musa spends long hours in Father Peter wants to see the community garden become a meeting place for anyone who wants to grow here, the garden tending to other plots that need looking after or given special care. For Musa and many others, it is the sense despite different work schedules and personal lives. “I look forward to a time when we can all be there together,” he says. of community and unity offered by this space that turns this act from a chore to a natural urge to look past oneself and You, too, can get involved with Taking Root by volunteering take care of those around them; to help others take root. in the garden or donating to the cause. For more information, There are 12 families who currently have plots at the garden. contact: Father Peter Kanyi or Susannah Murdock by calling 423-903-6707 or 423-718-0571 or by emailing Each plot has a small sign at the top of the vegetable row peterkanyi77@gmail.com or slrmurdock@yahoo.com. with the name of the person who is responsible for taking www.stpaulschatt.org/community-outreach growchattanooga.org/foodguide

17


LU P I ’S P I Z Z A

Farm-to-Table AND BACK AGAIN — BY M E L A NI E M AYO —

L

upi’s Pizza has been an institution in Chattanooga since 1996. It brought pizza culture to a then-struggling downtown area.Before Lupi’s there was no place in town where you could pick up a slice of pizza and a beer. It is now acknowledged as one of the best pizza joints in town, taking the prize for “Best Pizza” in the Chattanooga Times/Free Press “Best of the Best” awards for the past 6 years. From their fresh, hand-tossed crust to their gourmet sauce to their highest quality and often local ingredients, Lupi’s sets itself apart. But it’s not just about great pizza. Lupi’s is also committed to supporting a stronger, more tight-knit and sustainable local economy. Dorris Shober, owner of Lupi’s Pizza, is also co-owner of Flying Turtle Farm with her husband John. Lupi’s menu reflects Shober’s devotion to locally grown foods and is the product of her unique perspective of both restauranteur and farmer. While it is extra work to procure local ingredients, Shober feels it’s important to keep Lupi’s money in the local economy by supporting local growers. “Relationship with the farmers is key. We have to be able to depend on them, and the farms have to be able to depend on Lupi’s,” says Shober. Lupi’s began sourcing ingredients from local farms back in 2000 and last year they spent $75,000 on local food in their restaurants, including 2,000 pounds of heirloom tomatoes. Their menu proudly features other local products, including Sonrisa Farm stone ground wheat, Couture Cake glutenfree crust, and fresh, in-house made mozzarella cheese. Additionally, all the ground beef and ground sausage used at Lupi’s comes from Sequatchie Cove Farm, Beulah Farm and the Shober’s own 65-acre farm. The Shobers embrace sustainable growing methods and responsible livestock management techniques that limit the amount of inputs required to raise meat for the restaurant. According to John, their Berkshire/Hampshire pigs and Scottish Highland cattle are 100% grass-fed, “but they get more than just grass from the pasture. We keep a good mix of forages, including clover, and we use rotational grazing on the farm.” 18

Photo by Travis Hitchcock

Their sustainable management plan also includes an efficient composting system in which Lupi’s pre-consumer food waste, such as egg shells, veggies, old pizza and bread are fed to their farm pigs, which in turn are grown for ground sausage that goes back to the restaurant. Continuing to tighten the farm to table loop, the Shobers have big plans to expand into vegetable production this spring, growing vegetables as sustainably as they raise livestock. “We have about an acre and a half devoted to organic produce exclusively for Lupi's, but plan to use only half of that at any given time. The other half will be in cover crops,” says Shober. Between running Lupi’s restaurants and managing a 65-acre farm, the Shobers have their hands full, but their passion for local food is helping to close the loop between land and eater while strengthening the local community and economy. “Dorris and I are constantly marveling at how fortunate we are to be able to derive so much of our diet from right here on the farm. Eating fresh veggies picked moments ago is an experience we all need to know. Good in so many ways!” says John Shober. “I feel like I’m starting a whole other business,” says Dorris. “There’s no telling where it will take us!” growchattanooga.org/foodguide


Pho to by Sha na Dub ois

GREEN PEPPERS

Flying Turtle Farm Cloudland, GA

MOZZARELLA

Made in House

ZUCCHINI

Flying Turtle Farm Cloudland, GA

SAUSAGE

BASIL

Sequatchie Cove Farm Sequatchie, TN

Circle S Farm Rising Fawn, GA

CHEDDAR

Sweetwater Valley Farm Philadelphia, TN T O M AT O E S

Circle S Farm Rising Fawn, GA Crabtree Farms Chattanooga, TN growchattanooga.org/foodguide

19


growchattanooga.org info@growchattanooga.org 423-493-9155 x13

G R O W C H AT TA N O O G A’ S M I S S I O N IS TO INCREASE PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION OF LO CAL FOOD IN OUR REGION. We create the TasteBuds local food guide, the Downtown Local Food Map, and the Local Food Trade Directory as free resources for our community. We provide fresh local news and information each week on our blog, and encourage folks to eat closer to home with our TasteBuds 10% Challenge. Grow Chattanooga is made up of over 160 farm, farmers market, community garden, resource organization, restaurant, food artisan, and grocery store partners located within 100 miles of Chattanooga. Together, with our partners and our readers like you, we grow awareness of and access to local food while strengthening our local economy. Thank you for being a part of Chattanooga’s local food movement! Learn more at www.growchattanooga.org/howtogetinvolved or call 423-493-9155 x13. Grow Chattanooga is a program of Crabtree Farms that receives funding through partner dues, advertising revenue, private donations, and federal funds awarded under the Local Food Promotion Program of the Agricultural Marketing Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. You, too, can help support Grow Chattanooga by making a donation today.

Discover the splendor of Chattanooga’s area farms. One weekend only! Car passes on sale now at growchattanooga.org/foodguide/FarmTour

SEPTEMBER 19 & 20, 2015


TAKI N G T HE

ROMANCE OU T O F FO O D PRES ERVAT I O N BY HANNAH SHADRICK

W

e’re all guilty of it. We are scrolling through our Instagram feed and suddenly our breath catches. We see it: the sunlight streaming in a farmhouse window. On the butcher block countertop the cheesecloth has been gracefully pulled back to reveal homemade goat cheese. A serving knife is delicately poised, as yet unused next to the creamy block. The empty glass goat milk bottle is just out of focus in a back corner of the frame. With photos like these, the fantasy of homesteading can be all-consuming.

We follow those people who seem to have unending hours to devote to a life bookended by homemade kimchi and kombucha starters. The appeal is understandable: we all have an innate drive to root down, to create home. The slowed pace depicted in these posts is intoxicating; and yet, in our highly mobile, fast-paced modern world, few of us have the immediate time, skillset, or patience necessary to implement these idyllic scenes. Or -- what’s more likely -- we’re so overwhelmed by the barriers to entry (i.e. the skills we

growchattanooga.org/foodguide

don’t yet have) that we never even get started. We’re paralyzed, doomed to scroll through perfect pictures of homesteaded lives, dreaming longingly of the “one days.” But what if, instead of sighing wistfully and continuing to scroll, we took just one step toward scratching that itch for a slowed life? Or, more practically, we took ten minutes to prevent those cucumbers in our fridge from going in

the trash. Let’s take the romance out of modern homesteading, and tackle the “I have radishes coming out of my ears!” moments. Food preservation is not just for the talented social media photographers with thousands of followers. It’s also for us, the casually interested. And most importantly, it’s for right now. To get started, here is an easy recipe even the most novice of us can’t screw up.

QUICK PICKLING yields about two pints 2 lbs small local kohlrabi bulbs, radishes, or carrots, peeled and thinly sliced

½ cup water

½ local onion, thinly sliced

2 teaspoons mustard seeds

1 tablespoon salt

1 teaspoon ground turmeric

1 cup sugar

1 cup apple cider vinegar Toss vegetables with salt and allow to sit for an hour. Drain and pack into pintsized mason jars. Heat vinegar, water, sugar, and spices in a small saucepan over medium heat until sugar has dissolved. Pour brine over vegetables in the jars. Once cooled, place in fridge. Best if allowed to marinate for at least a day before enjoying. Keeps for a month in the fridge.

Photo by Julie Heavner

21


22

growchattanooga.org/foodguide


in season PRODUCE CHART JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC PLANTING DATES APPLES

October 1 – February 15

ARUGULA

March 1 – April 1; August 1 – October 1

ASPARAGUS

October 1 – February 15

BEANS

April 10 – July 20

BEETS

March; August 1 – September 15

BLACKBERRIES

October 1 – February 15

BLUEBERRIES

October 1 – February 15

BROCCOLI

March 1 – April 1; July 15 – August 15

BRUSSELS SPROUTS

July 15 – August 15

CABBAGE

February 20 – April 1; July 5 – August 15

CARROTS

March 1 – April 1; July 15 – August 14

CAULIFLOWER

March 1 – April 1; July 15 – August 15

CHERRIES

October1 – February 15

COLLARDS

March 1 – April 1; July 1 – September 1

CUCUMBERS

May – June

EGGPLANT

May – June

FENNEL

March 1 – April 1; July 15 – August 14

GREEN BEANS

May – June

FIGS

October 1 – February 15

GARLIC

September 1 – October 15

GRAPES

October 1 – February 15

GREEN ONIONS

March 1 – April 1; July 15 – August 14

HERBS

October 1 – February 15

HONEY

n/a

KALE

March 1 – April 1; August 15 – September 31

KOHLRABI

March 1 – April 1; August 15 – September 31

LEEKS

August 15 – September 31

LETTUCE

February 1 – April 15; July 1 – September 15

MELONS

May – June

MUSCADINE GRAPES

October 1 – February 15

MUSHROOMS

n/a

OKRA

May – June

ONIONS

February 1 – March 31

PEACHES

October 1 – February 15

PEAS, FIELD

May or June

PEAS, SNAP

February 1 – March 20

PEPPERS

May – June

POTATOES

March 1 – April 15

PUMPKINS

May – June

RADICCHIO

March 1 – April 1; August 15 – September 31

RADISHES

February 15 – April 15; August 1 – September 15

RUTABAGA

March 1 – April 1; August 15 – September 31

SALAD GREENS

March 1 – April 1; August 15 – September 31

SPINACH

March 15 – April 30; September 10 – 20

SQUASH, SUMMER

May – June

SQUASH, WINTER

May – June

STRAWBERRIES

October 1 – February 15

SWEET CORN

May – June

SWEET POTATOES

May – June

SWISS CHARD

March 1 – April 1; August 15 – September 31

TOMATOES

April 15 – June 30

TURNIPS

March 1 – April 15; August 1 – September 15

growchattanooga.org/foodguide

23


farmers markets AT H E N S FA R M E R S M A R K E T

106 South Jackson Street, Athens TN lmurphy@cityofathenstn.com Tues, Thurs 3-6p Lanie Murphy 423-744-2707

The Athens Farmers Market at Market Park is open June 16-October 30. The market is free to sellers. We are located in downtown Athens. Look for special market hours on Saturdays from 5p-close during our “Sounds of Summer” concert series.

BAT T L E F I E L D FA R M E R S MARKET

10052 Highway 27 N, Rock Spring GA bfmanager@battlefieldfmkt.org battlefieldfmkt.org Wed 3-6p, Sat 8a-12p

Visit our open air market for seasonal produce, eggs, meats, honey, artisan crafted treats, and more. As a “Wholesome Wave Georgia” Partner, your SNAP/EBT dollars go twice as far. Live music on Saturdays. EBT

B R A D L E Y C O U N T Y FA R M E R S MARKET

3110 Peerless Road, Cleveland TN Facebook: Bradley County Farmers Market Tues, Thurs, Sat 7a-2p Bill Maupin 423-728-7001

Bradley County Market is an open air market. It inspects farms that sell to ensure produce is locally-grown.

BRAINERD FARMERS MARKET

20 Belvoir Avenue, Chattanooga TN Facebook: Brainerd Farmers Market brainerdmarket@gmail.com Sat 10a-12p 423-243-3250

Offering local, organic, and sustainably grown produce. We encourage healthy food choices for Brainerd residents through educational and financial assistance projects for low income market patrons. Now offering double EBT every Saturday. EBT

C H AT TA N O O GA M A R K E T

1829 Carter Street, Chattanooga TN chattanoogamarket.org help@chattanoogamarket.org Sun 11-4p, Wed 3-6p Steve Brehm 423-648-2496

The Chattanooga Market: Open Sundays through November and Wednesdays seasonally at the First Tennessee Pavilion, downtown Chattanooga. Fresh farm produce, artisan goods, live music and themed events. Chattanooga Market is the region’s largest producer-only market, representing over 5,000 acres of local farmlands and attracting 300,000 visitors annually. ChattanoogaMarket.com for more details.

D OW N T OW N DA LT O N S AT U R DAY M A R K E T

245 North Thorton Street, Dalton GA downtowndalton.com veronica@downtowndalton.com Sat 8a-12p Veronica Rollins 706-278-3332 We are an open-air market in Downtown Dalton. The market is every Saturday of each month from May through August. Currently the market features fresh locallygrown produce, locally-grown plants, local art, photography, handmade clothing, knitted items, homemade soaps, upcycling (items made from recycled materials) and jewelry. EBT

FA R M T O TA B L E M A R K E T

200 North Hamilton Street, Dalton GA downtowndalton.com veronica@downtowndalton.com Thurs, 5-7p 706-278-3332

Plan your weekend menu and stock up on healthy, fresh, locally-grown produce!

L O O KO U T FA R M E R S M A R K E T

3800 Dayton Blvd, Chattanooga TN; Mon 4-7p 900 N. Sanctuary Rd, Chattanooga TN; Tues 4-7p 2000 Union Ave, Chattanooga TN; Thurs 4-7p 3917 St. Elmo Ave, Chattanooga TN; Fri 4-7p lookoutfarmersmarket.com Lori Carter 423-838-9804

Enjoy farm fresh, locally and sustainably grown vegetables, fruit, herbs, meat, cheese, eggs, honey, jams, bread, baked goods, nonGMO animal feed, farm to table meals, art, music, candles, soap, children’s activities, entertainment, and more. EBT

M A I N S T R E E T FA R M E R S MARKET

325 East Main Street, Chattanooga TN mainstfarmersmarket.com mainstfarmersmarket@gmail.com Wed 4-6p (Nov-March 4-5p) Laura Snell

We seek to provide small area farms with a profitable direct marketing opportunity while providing the Chattanooga community with a wide variety of sustainably and locally produced foods. EBT

24

growchattanooga.org/foodguide


farmers markets

EBT

Volunteers Accepted

ATM on site

EBT/Snap Accepted

Restrooms

Every Wednesday 4-6 pm April-November

4-5 pm December-Mar

tainably Rais & Sus ed F y l l a ood c o s L Fresh seasonal produce, artisan cheeses, pastured meats & eggs, fresh baked goods, grains, locally made beverages and specialty coffee, raw honey, & more...

325 East Main Street on Chattanooga’s Southside

mainstfarmersmarket.com M E N T ONE FAR M E R S M AR KE T

OOLTEWAH FARMERS MARKET

6139 Alabama Highway 117, Fort Payne AL Facebook: Mentone Farmers’ Market turnerhb2@gmail.com Sat 10a-1p Harriet Turner 256-638-1842

5829 Main Street, Ooltewah TN ooltewahnursery.com/farmers-market ofm@ooltewahnursery.com Thurs 3-6p (Nov-Mar 3-5p) 423-238-9775

We are a non-profit market offering local foods and artisan crafts.

A producers-only farmers market featuring only locally grown foods from family farms. Organic, heirloom, non-GMO choices available such as grass-fed meats, milk, breads, veggies, greens, mushrooms, free-range eggs, fruits, honey, nuts, and much more. Our market manager personally visits every farm to ensure that what you see is indeed locally grown so you can shop with confidence. Visit our website or Facebook to see our calendar of special events.

NORTHSIDE FARMERS MARKET ON MISSISSIPPI

923 Mississippi Ave. Chattanooga TN; Sat 10a-1p Facebook: Northside Farmers Market on Mississippi

leslie@northsidepresbyterian.org Leslie Morris 423-266-7497 Northside Farmers Market on Mississippi is located at Northside Presbyterian Church, 923 Mississippi Ave in North Chattanooga, a few blocks from Veterans Bridge. We offer locally produced, organic fruits and vegetables with a commitment to sustainable growing practices. We have wonderful baked goods, jams, jellies and honey, beeswax products, fresh flowers, candles, and coffee.

growchattanooga.org/foodguide

25


farmers markets ROOTED HERE: SOUTH C U M B E R L A N D FA R M E R S MARKET

SIGNAL MOUN TAI N FAR M E R S MARKET

39 Ball Park Road, Sewanee TN sewanee.locallygrown.net cumberlandfm@gmail.com Pick up Tues 4:30-6:15p Kir Strobel 931-592-3399

1210 Taft Highway, Signal Mountain TN (in the Pruett’s parking lot) signalmountainfarmersmarket.com signalfarmersmarket@gmail.com Thurs 4-6p Teresa Garland 423-902-8023

We are an online farmers market serving Sewanee, Monteagle, and surrounding communities. Customers choose from a variety of products from around 40 local growers and artisans. Ordering takes place online from Saturday evening to Monday morning. Pick up is at the Sewanee Community Center.

The Signal Mountain Farmers’ Market was established in 2011 to provide a venue for local farmers and artisans and also to provide locally grown, healthy food to the community. Find local produce, grass-fed beef, pasture chicken, free-range eggs, honey, artisan made cheese, fresh baked breads, cut flowers and more.

EBT

ST. ALBAN’S HIXSON MARKET

7514 Hixson Pike, Hixson TN stalbansmarket@gmail.com Sat 9:30a-12:30p 423-618-7716

Established in 2011 to provide locally grown and created food and items to the Hixson Area. We have grass fed beef, pork, eggs, honey, vegetables, fruits, fresh baked breads, herb and spice blends, herb plants, hand-made wood items, goat milk soaps, lotions, and candles.

T R E N T O N FA R M E R S M A R K E T

Veterans Park, Trenton GA Facebook: Trenton Farmers Market trentonmarketvendors@gmail.com Sat 9a-12p John Shober 423-987-0039

A rural market nestled in Lookout Valley. The market is a short, scenic, 20-minute drive from downtown Chattanooga and offers a nice change of pace for those needing a break from the city. Come see us! EBT

CommunityPie.com

BREAKFAST LUNCH SPECIALS HOMEMADE GELATO SWEETS TREATS CRAFT COFFEE

109 N Market St Chattanooga, TN (423) 648-6262

26

growchattanooga.org/foodguide


farms

EBT

Volunteers Accepted

Pick your own

Farm Stand

EBT/Snap Accepted

Agritourism

Public Access

2 A N G E L S M U S H R O O M FA R M

B & B FA R M

P.O. Box 443, Harrison TN 2angelsmushrooms.com info@2angelsmushrooms.com Michael and Angel Miller

827 Brock Road, Chattanooga TN julbig8@aol.com Michael and Julia Barnard 423-243-4866

We offer a variety of both wild and farmraised mushrooms as they are available in season, including Oyster, Shiitake, Wood Ear, and Chicken of the Woods. Each type of mushroom has its own unique flavor, and we invite you to taste the difference.

1191 Vander Ferguson Road, Graysville TN deerhunter18@aol.com Ken, Robin, and Johnny Hudson 423-322-5652

4 OA K S FA R M & P R O D U C E

7655 Highway 225 North, Chatsworth GA Facebook: 4 Oaks Farm and Produce jtridley@yahoo.com Jason and Andrea Ridley 706-264-0899

Locally owned by Jason and Andrea Ridley, 4 Oaks Farm and Produce is a family run farm that offers all natural farm grown produce, GMO and Hormone free meat, Free Range Poultry and more. Call to schedule a tour or to place an order. CSA

BAC K YA R D GA R D E N

Situated on 130 acres in Bledsoe County, Backyard Garden grows tomatoes, okra, beans, potatoes, squash, and more! We are family owned and operated and truly appreciate our valued customers!

BA RT O N C R E E K FA R M S

5726 East Green Hill Road, Rock Island TN jjducks@blomand.net Danny B. Roller 931-686-3326

Angus beef: dry-aged, all-natural, no added hormones. Now offering pork products.

CSA

Community Supported Agriculture Credit Card

B I G S YCA M O R E FA R M

3804 Redman Lane, Decatur TN Facebook: Big Sycamore Farm bigsycamorefarm@gmail.com Bert and Initia Vandermerwe 404-447-4014

We are a small farm growing non-GMO vegetables using sustainable methods, raising animals respectfully and living our dream of being self-sufficient. Find us at several area markets selling eggs, produce and baked goods. CSA

B I L LY B O B FA R M

10509 Corbett Drive, Soddy Daisy TN billybobfarm@gmail.com Billy McCurry 423-505-3587

We are a small, family farm growing all types of seasonal vegetables, chickens and turkeys. Come see us at the St. Alban’s Hixson Market.

T H E B L U E B E R RY FA R M

A L E X Z A N NA FA R M

315 Walker Road, Wildwood GA spiralquest.com suzanna@spiralquest.com Suzanna and Lawrence Alexander 706-820-9042

We are a fifty acre, Certified Naturally Grown, diversified farm. We garden in harmony with the Steiner-Findhorn philosophies, without the use of pesticides, herbicides, or fungicides. In the family farm tradition, we share our abundance at the Main Street Farmers’ Market.

A P PA L AC H I A N B E E

B E N E F I E L D A P I A RY

1907 Carolana Circle, Hixson TN donhbenfld@aol.com Donald Benefield 423-842-2262

I maintain about 100 hives, located in Hamilton and Sequatchie County.

B E R RY R I D G E FA R M

11024 Dolly Pond Road, Birchwood TN clayshooter99@gmail.com Tim and Leslie Phelps 423-290-0972

1943 Old Federal Road, Ocoee TN honeybeesrock.com diane@honeybeesrock.com Diane Ravens 423-338-1149

We are a small, family operated farm in Birchwood, TN. We grow blackberries, blueberries, tomatoes, and various other seasonal vegetables. We grow our fruits and vegetables in an organic fashion.

Appalachian Bee proudly presents our pure unfiltered Artisan Honeys. Over 20 years of experience in beekeeping and dedication to promoting the importance of honeybees has inspired our line of artisanal honey products. Nature’s finest honeys, 100% pure, never overheated, strained but unfiltered so all the pollen remains.

2465 Spring Place-Smyrna Rd, Chatsworth GA richards706@charter.net Randall Richards 706-270-1979

growchattanooga.org/foodguide

B E U L A H FA R M S

Your home for NON-Soy, NON-GMO pastured, free-range eggs and Berkshire pork. Our animals are fed a specially formulated diet designed with good natural ingredients: No hormones and no antibiotics (no animal by-products either) in their diet.

1363 Highway 151, Lafayette GA theblueberryfarm.com tbbf@theblueberryfarm.com Joe and Simone Kilpatrick 706-638-0908

Our farm is a u-pick farm and we welcome everyone! During blueberry season we are open every day except Wednesday. Our hours are from sunup to sundown. All of our berries are sold by the gallon and we supply 1-gallon containers to use in the fields. However, you should bring a large container or box to carry your berries home. We also offer u-pick muscadines in October.

B R A DY’S FA R M DI R E C T M E AT

4344 Double S Road, Dayton TN Facebook: Brady’s Farm Direct Meat LLC bradyfarmdirectmeat@outlook.com Curtis Brady 423-619-9874

My cattle graze on pasture grass on my 100 acre farm. I sell individual cuts and whole or half beef. My meat is USDA inspected, processed, frozen, and competitively priced. I sell at St. Alban’s Hixson Market year round. EBT

27


farms B R O C K H AU S FA M I LY FA R M

500 Brock Road, McDonald TN brockhausfarm.com brockfamily@brockhausfarm.com Ralph, Sandra and Jonathan Brock 423-479-1056

A family farm in McDonald, Tennessee offering cut flowers, a variety of produce, CSA, honey, sheep, and hayrides/wiener roasts. CSA

B R OW N D I RT FA R M

Whitwell, TN browndirtfarm.com browndirtfarm@gmail.com Brooke and Scott Brown 423-313-3527

We are a locally owned and operated farm in the Chattanooga area committed to producing high quality, good tasting fruits and vegetables. We never add chemical fertilizers or pesticides, or use GMO seed. CSA

B U R N S FA R M S

12733 Old State Highway 28, Pikeville TN burnsfarms.com burnsbeef@gmail.com Phillip, Gayanne, and David Burns; Sarah Bernard 423-582-7653

The herd at Burns Farms is born and raised in our pastures and never confined to a stockyard. We work with a USDA inspected slaughter facility that allows each customer to specify thickness and cut of beef. We offer whole, half, small packages, and individual cuts.

C E DA R L A N E FA R M S

5007 Browntown Road, Chattanooga TN bryantclaire@bellsouth.net Bryant and Claire Haynes 423-876-7359

Cedar Lane Farms produces food that is chemical pesticide and fertilizer free. We offer grass-fed beef by the side, eggs from free-range hens, and garden produce. With our home base located within Chattanooga City Limits, we’re working to bring fresh food to our local community.

CHARLIE’S APPLE ORCHARD Our Lookout Mountain grown fruit is handpicked at the peak of ripeness, then washed and packed for market the very next day. For the freshest fruit you'll ever taste, visit us at the Battlefield Farmers Market on Wednesdays and Saturdays.

C I R C L E S FA R M

10788 Highway 157, Rising Fawn GA circlesfarm.net plainandsimple@tvn.net Curtis and Letty Smith 706-398-7049

Curtis and Letty Smith own and operate Circle S Farm in Rising Fawn, GA. They manage 600 acres of pasture and a two acre market garden. Circle S Farm sells Certified Naturally Grown vegetables and fruits, and pasture raised eggs and beef. CSA

C L O U D C R E S T FA R M

39 Brown Road, Rossville GA cloudcrestfarm.com info@cloudcrestfarm.com Diane, Jim and Amy Johnson; Randy Fowler 423-827-5322

280 acres in Walker County, Georgia, 20 minutes from Chattanooga. We raise beef on grass only. Our hogs live their entire lives outdoors in woods/pasture, fed only non-GMO feeds.

C O LV I N FA M I LY FA R M

1045 JB Swafford Road, Spring City TN colvinfamilyfarm.com adamcolvin@colvinfamilyfarm.com Adam Colvin 1-866-865-8329

We are a small, family owned and operated farm that raises more than 50 different Certified Naturally Grown varieties of vegetables, herbs, grains and fruits. We sell at local Farmer’s Markets, and through our Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program. CSA

C O LYC O FA R M

100 CoLyCo Farm Lane, Chickamauga GA colycofarm.com colycofarm@gmail.com Steve and Deb Cooper 423-413-1806

C O NA S AU GA VA L L E Y FA R M

361 Liberty Church Road, Old Fort TN conasaugafarm@yahoo.com Charles McEntyre 423-790-4545

We have about 150 acres of rolling hills located in the far southeast corner of Tennessee. We raise grass fed beef, forest fed pork, and pastured laying hens to share with others at a reasonable price. Please contact us by email for more information.

C O U N T RY GA R D E N A PI A R I E S

124 County Road 884, Etowah TN countrygardenapiaries.com cwilson@countrygardenapiaries.com Aulton and Joyce Philips, Charles Wilson

Country Garden Apiaries produces pure, raw honey with nothing added and nothing removed. It is a natural healthful product that comes from East Tennessee wildflowers.

C R A B T R E E FA R M S

1000 East 30th Street, Chattanooga TN crabtreefarms.org info@crabtreefarms.org Mike Barron, Blake Harris, Sara Lanham, Paul Peterson 423-493-9155

Since 2001, Crabtree Farms has produced sustainably-grown fruits, vegetables, and nursery stock near downtown Chattanooga. All are welcome to learn and work on the farm through our volunteer and internship programs. Visit us at the Main Street Farmers’ Market or at our on-site farm stand. CSA

EBT

DAY S P R I N G FA R M

285 Brickell Avenue, Altamont TN dayspring@thebships.com Charles and Lynn Blankenship, Christia and Richard Crook 615-400-6998

Dayspring Farm is a family farm committed to using organic methods to improve our land and raise good food to share in our community.

We offer produce and meat naturally grown with organic practices for our community. CSA

28

growchattanooga.org/foodguide


farms

EBT

Volunteers Accepted

Pick your own

Farm Stand

EBT/Snap Accepted

Agritourism

Public Access

D E L M O NAC O W I N E RY & V I N E YA R D S

We finance country living.

600 Lance Drive, Baxter TN delmonacowinery.com barbara@delmonacowinery.com Barbara DelMonaco 931-858-1177

Conveniently located in middle TN, just an hour’s drive from Nashville, Knoxville, and Chattanooga. Tours, tastings and event space for you. We feature Tennessee products in our gift shop, and can ship our wine direct to consumers. Check out our website and Facebook page.

D I A M O N D 5 FA R M S

Call Farm Credit for home, lot or construction loans.

Lewisburg TN diamond5farms.com hello@diamond5farms.com Aaron and Nicole Smith 615-440-3017

Diamond 5 Farms raises grass-fed, free range lamb – NO growth hormone, NO antibiotic, NO GMOs. We use organic methods to raise our sheep on lush pastures. Our farm is located in beautiful Middle TN, close to Nashville, TN and Huntsville, AL. Our lamb is sold by the WHOLE or HALF SHARE. CSA

DIXIE DOES ALPINES

CHATTANOOGA OFFICE 7605 Hamilton Park Drive Chattanooga, TN 37421 423-510-9429

e-farmcredit.com

D E BA R G E V I N E YA R D S & W I N E RY 21058 Highway 193, LaFayette GA debargewines.com jdebarge@debargewines.com Raymond and Jane DeBarge 423-710-8426

Our vineyard is located on the slopes of the north end of Pigeon Mountain. We have a wine cellar and crush pad for initial processing of grapes. They are then transferred to our Southside winery where they are transformed into wine.

growchattanooga.org/foodguide

1334 Pierce Hill Road, Dayton TN dixiedoesalpines.com contact@dixiedoesalpines.com Bill and Becky Ensinger 434-944-0294

We raise dairy goats using sustainable methods and sell herd shares, chicken and duck eggs, herbs, canned produce and a variety of handmade skin care products including our premier product, natural goat milk soaps.

D O GWO O D FA R M

1211 Mayflower Road, Sale Creek TN dogwoodfarm2014@gmail.com Steve Postell 423-332-4266

Nestled in the rolling hills of northern Hamilton County is the home of Dogwood Farm. Resting comfortably between two ridge lines, it provides the excellent environment for free range chickens to produce exceptional eggs. They are fed only all natural grains and scratch products with no pesticides or animal by-products added and what Mother Nature provides during their daily ranging.

CSA

Community Supported Agriculture Credit Card

D O U B L E A FA R M

901 Pennwood Drive, Coalmont TN doubleafarmbeef.com doubleafarm@blomand.net Steve and Donna Ahearn 931-235-1605

We raise farm fresh beef without steroids or growth hormones. We offer USDA inspected beef as Family Packages or individual cuts of meat. All beef is packaged in vacuum-sealed freezer bags. Taste the fresh difference!

D OW N T O E A RT H

1737 East Varner Road, Hixson TN downtoearthtn.blogspot.com dte0853@epbfi.com Pat Stewart 423-400-5301

Offering greenhouse grown culinary and medicinal herb, vegetable, and edible flower plants, using sustainable, non-certified organic methods. Also offering teas, seasonings, bath brews and gardening-related gifts, including the new Garden Girl (copyrighted) t-Shirts. Open to the public and available for group presentations by appointment.

D U R H A M FA R M

675 Nellie Head Road, Tunnel Hill GA Ken and Rebecca Durham

Naturally grown, the way it used to be! Visit us at the Battlefield Farmers Market on Wednesdays and Saturdays, May through November, to check out our wide array of sustainably grown produce.

E AG L E S R E S T R A N C H

690 Eagle Cliff Drive, Flintstone GA eaglesranch1.tripod.com burton@eaglesrestranch.com Burton Brown 423-421-2890

Eagles Rest Ranch is USDA approved to sell all-natural, grass-fed Bison meat products, which are widely acclaimed for health benefits and distinguished by exceptional taste. We also have Therapeutic Horeseback Riding for special needs children.

29


farms E R M A’ S B E E S

East Ridge TN ermasbees@epbfi.com Dave and Phyllis Reed 423-413-7359

Our apiary is focused on producing high quality 100% pure honey from nectar of local flora sources, hand-crafted candles and decorative items of pure natural beeswax, and acclimatized queen and honeybee stocks for use by Tennessee beekeepers. Informative educational opportunities are available for individuals and groups.

FAR MS OF AVALON RABBI T RY

G E O R G I A W I N E RY

684 No Pone Valley Road, Georgetown TN farmsofavalon.com farmsofavalon@gmail.com Brent and Christana Tucker 423-520-6592

6469 Battlefield Parkway, Ringgold GA georgiawines.com info@georgiawines.com Patty Prouty 706-937-WINE

Family-owned and operated rabbitry, raising naturally, with no growth hormones or antibiotics. We provide ‘heart healthy’ meat for restaurants and consumers, breeding stock, and organic 100% natural fertilizer.

Georgia Winery invites you to have a taste of the South. Choose from over thirty different wines with complimentary wine tasting, experience a winery tour, relax in the vineyard, shop for unique gifts, and taste gourmet farm foods at Georgia’s First Farm Winery.

F I E RY F U N G I FA R M S

E V E R E T T H E R I TAG E FA R M

504 South Cedar Lane, Chickamauga GA Facebook: Everett Heritage Farm everettheritagefarm@gmail.com Stephanie Everett & Craig Savoie 415-637-9870

As a Certified Naturally Grown producer our crops are free of pesticides and chemical fertilizers. We grow heirloom vegetables using bio-intensive and heritage farming methods on land that has been our family farm for over 99 years.

FA L L C R E E K FA R M S

545 Walling Road, Spencer TN fallcreekfarms.net fallcreekfarms@gmail.com Brad, Dana, Ben, JoAnna, and Molly 931-946-2229

Fall Creek Farms is a growing family farm. We grow over 50 different varieties of fruits and vegetables. With our greenhouse and hoop systems we are able to grow many vegetables nearly year-round. We also provide grass-fed beef and lamb from a growing herd of heritage Devon cattle and Tunis sheep. E-mail us if you would like to receive our weekly e-mail wholesale updates. CSA

FA R M 5 8

8217 State Route 8, Dunlap TN farm58tn.com farm58tn@gmail.com Donovan Caughlin, Interns in Ministry

Preach the gospel, disciple the hurting, and raise food worth eating through sustainable agriculture. Raising Certified Naturally Grown vegetables, chicken, eggs and pork, all while investing in interns and families. CSA

30

392 Charlie Roberts Road, Pelham TN fieryfungi.yolasite.com/ drake@fieryfungi.com Katelin Hawkins, Drake Schutt 901-359-8655

We grow our mushrooms in an idylliclooking red barn, but inside it's all but idyllic! State-of-the-art growing equipment allows us to grow indoors all year round.

F LY I N G T U RT L E FA R M

2263 Yankee Road, Cloudland GA dorrisps@epbfi.com John and Dorris Shober, Tom and Rhiannon Maynard, Kristy Cranford 423-432-6465

Flying Turtle Farm, 65 acres located on Lookout Mountain 35 miles south of Chattanooga, produces grass-fed beef, pastured pork, and summer vegetable for local restaurants.

FORESTER FARMS AND APIARY

51 Forester Drive, Rising Fawn GA foresterfarmsandapiary@gmail.com Derek Forester 423-413-5370

Forester Farms and Apiary focuses on square-foot gardening and we have an apiary. We are constructing a honey house and specialize in wood ware for beehives.

FOUR STREAMS FAMILY FARMS

251 Cohulla Road SE, Cleveland TN 4streamsaquaponics.com 4streamsfarms@gmail.com Steve, Joey, Jeremiah 423-310-4610

Aquaponics. Offers monthly farm tours.

G I F F O R D FA R M S

Dunlap TN giffordfarms.com jimgiffordfarms@gmail.com Jim Gifford, Vernon Gifford, Kathlina Alford 423-316-3489

Gifford Farms is committed to providing our customers with sustainably-grown meat and produce. We invite you to visit our farm to see where and how your food is grown and discover a new way to buy produce down on the farm. CSA

GLO-N-GRO HYDROP ONICS

3488 Lower River Road NW, Georgetown TN glo-n-gro.com info@glo-n-gro.com Karen Stofer and Brenda Andrews 423-665-3291

We grow veggies in hydroponic towers using only organic methods. Free advice and training is available to those wanting to grow using the hydroponic tower method. We also sell the towers that we use.

G R AC E L A N D R A N C H

Sale Creek TN timnrenee4@aol.com Tim and Renee Grace 423-332-3863

Graceland cattle are raised on grass, sunshine, fresh water and mountain breezes. Our lean grass fed beef is high in omega-3 oils and rich in vitamins and minerals. We use no antibiotics or growth hormones. Processed beef is vacuum sealed at USDA inspected facility where customers may pick up their order.

growchattanooga.org/foodguide


farms

EBT

Volunteers Accepted

Pick your own

Farm Stand

EBT/Snap Accepted

Agritourism

Public Access

G U L L E Y FA M I LY FA R M

925 Red Clay Road, Cleveland TN gulleyfamilyfarm@gmail.com Lori Gulley 423-544-7374

Gulley Family Farm grows delicious vegetables using sustainable, biodynamic methods.

H A N E Y DA I RY

454 Old Charleston Road NE, Cleveland TN Facebook: Haney Dairy ahaney79@gmail.com April and Junior Haney 423-650-2592

Established in 1922, Haney Dairy is a family owned and operated Grade-A dairy farm. We offer farm fresh free range eggs and a small variety of non-GMO organic heirloom vegetables for our customers. We also have cowshares available to provide customers a share of fresh, raw milk.

H E A D R I V E R FA R M S

661 Griff Johnson Road, Menlo GA headriverfarms@gmail.com Jay Miller 423-280-6027

Head River Farms was stared in 1972. We are currently selling grass-fed beef and sell cattle within our region.

T H E H E A LT H Y K I T C H E N

678 Wheeler Road, Dunlap TN Facebook: The Healthy Kitchen jnellie@yahoo.com Joshua Nelsen, Mi Nelsen, Fred Nelsen, Ana Nelsen 423-774-2672

Sustainably grown fresh fruit and vegetable farm. We emphasize growing nutritionally dense foods. Feel free to drop by for a farm tour and to visit our farm stand.

HILLCREST ORCHARDS

9696 Highway 52 East, Ellijay GA hillcrestorchards.net applelan@ellijay.com Lynn and Janice Hale 706-273-3838

Hillcrest offers u-pick apples on weekends and fresh picked apples daily. Many agritourism activities. Also practices IPM.

growchattanooga.org/foodguide

CSA

Community Supported Agriculture Credit Card

H O E H O P VA L L E Y FA R M

127 Vance Bates Drive, Benton TN hoehop.weebly.com walterjbates@gmail.com Walter, Candyce, Aib, and Asa Bates 423-715-1697

Generally exceeding organic qualifications, our chickens and pigs get fresh pasture, sunshine and spring water. NO DRUGS. Ever! Our pork is USDA inspected and we process all poultry here on the farm. Visit our farm store/abattoir for fresh eggs, pork, chicken, and turkey. CSA

H U M B L E H E A RT FA R M S

25235 Mooresville Road, Elkmont AL humbleheartfarms.com humbleheartfarms@mchsi.com Paul and Leslie Spell 256-777-9268

Humble Heart Farms Goat Cheese is a product of the Tennessee River Valley. The "girls" come from a long line which produces excellent milk. We carefully provide our goats the best nutrition to provide the finest quality chevre (goat cheese).

I N T OW N O R GA N I C S A N D SUMMERFIELDS

197 8th Street, Monteagle TN Etsy: SummerFieldsFibers WWOOF: wwoofusa.org/farm/in-townorganics/ localharvest.org/store/M25863&ul jessandnatew@yahoo.com Jess, Nate, Eli, Stella, and Josiah Wilson 931-924-4539

In Town Organics and SummerFields are run by Jess, Nate, Eli, Stella and Josiah Wilson. In Town Organics is our Certified Naturally Grown produce operation in which we grow vegetables for our family table and we sell any extra we have. We specialize in salad mixes and garlic. SummerFields is our grass farm where we raise animals that eat grass and we sell grass fed lamb, wool, meat goats, goat milk, rabbits, chickens, and eggs.

K AC K L E B E E AC R E S

Harold Crisp Lane, Dayton TN Facebook: KacklebeeAcres kacklebee@gmail.com Ron Hoyt, Nancy Hoyt 423-775-7608

Our chickens free-range on pasture, where we rotate them onto fresh grass throughout the season. We provide non-GMO/soy-free chicken feed and natural supplements, too. The love and care they receive shows in the delicious eggs they provide. We use no hormones, steroids, chemical antibiotics, herbicides, fertilizers or pesticides.

K E N S I N G T O N FA R M F R E S H

4274 Kensington Road, Chickamauga GA Tony and Judy Rush 706-539-2545

We are a family-owned farm with a large variety of vegetables. If you would like to be put on our call list for special orders, just give us a call.

31


farms

L A M O N FA R M

L E E AND G OR D ON GR E E NS

3175 Michigan Avenue Road, Cleveland TN franklintaylor@bellsouth.net Frank Taylor and Randall Lamon 423-653-7635

leeandgordongreens.com leeandgordongreens@yahoo.com Joan and Gib Jones 423-316-4038

We have a variety of fresh produce throughout the growing season and into the fall. Autumn brings pumpkins, gourds, and ornamental corn. Come see a working farm in progress. You can purchase your produce at our farm stand.

We use the Hydroponic method of growing in our 5600 square foot greenhouse eliminating the need for soil. Through a custom blended nutrient solution and a controlled climate we are able to give the plants the perfect blend of food, environment and water. We use NO pesticides or harmful chemicals and recycle the water we use weekly.

L A N D B E F O R E T I M E ! FA R M

hensontrey@yahoo.com Trey and Katie Henson

A small family farm, we strive to work in harmony with the land by using sustainable, environmentally friendly methods in all we do. Visit us at the Main Street Farmers Market for free range eggs, several varieties of mushrooms, produce and herbs.

LAVENDER ’N’ RUST HERB FARM

374 Tarvin Road, Rock Springs GA lavendernrustherbs@gmail.com Ivana Patterson 423-290-5244

At Lavender ‘N’ Rust Herb Farm, we offer all things lavender! We sell herbs for culinary use, insect control in gardening, attracting pollinators, and honey production.

CSA

L O O KO U T H O M E S T E A D T E AC H I N G FA R M

525 Middle Road, Lookout Mountain GA lookouthomestead.com lookouthomestead@gmail.com Lori Carter 423-838-9804

We are a small, family-owned teaching farm growing year round in the ground, raised beds, and our high tunnel. Come “hit the hay” at our log cabin farm. Stay and enjoy a fresh, farm to table meal. Enjoy our sustainably grown vegetables, egg, honey, jams, and pickles through our year-round CSA or at the Lookout Farmers Market. Farm tours available; call for an appointment. CSA

L OW R E Y FA R M

L & M FA R M S

Dayton, TN nathan.lorenzen@regions.com Nathan Lorenzen and Jay Moultrie 423-244-1440

We are a small, family farm growing strawberries seasonally on 5 1/2 acres.

32

2416 Turkey Mountain Road, Rome GA lowreyfarms.com irober7033@aol.com Ivy Lowrey 706-295-1157

Lowrey Farms raises fresh produce, all natural Angus beef, and whole hog sausage. We pick fresh daily and sell it on-site at our farm stand. Watermelons, sweet corn, cantaloupe, zucchini, squash, tomatoes, okra, and more. Wholesale and retail.

M A H A DA FA R M S

1540 Lytle Road, Chickamauga GA mahadafarmsandexotics.com mahadafarms@aol.com Mel Koehler & Dianne Adams-Koehler 770-596-9611 (Mel) 404-310-0039 (Dianne)

Our farm offers free-range, hormone, antibiotic, and steroid-free meats as well as eggs from chickens, ducks, geese and turkeys. All seasonal produce is grown using only natural compost and fertilizers with no pesticides. Our goal is to learn a healthier lifestyle and share it with our community.

MAPLE SHADE

8509 Ooltewah-Georgetown Rd, Ooltewah TN lee@competitionathleticsurfaces.com Lee and Hilda Murray 423-238-9572

Maple Shade is home to the some of the happiest beef cattle in Hamilton County. Our sustainable farm is a great place for free ranging cows to grow in a pesticide and hormone free environment.

M I L D R E D ’ S M E A D OW S FA R M

152 Grove Street, Mentone AL Facebook: Mildred’s Meadows mildredsmeadowsfarm@gmail.com Domenic Fulginiti or DeLeslyn Stephens 256-634-0208

Here at Mildred’s Meadows Farm we specialize in naturally raised pigs, turkeys, and eggs. All of our animals are fed nonGMO grains and pastured on food plots. We have all naturally grown vegetables available when in season. We specialize in Duroc, Hampshire, Tamworth and other heritage breeds for quality pork products. We are a small **farrow to finish farm operation.**

growchattanooga.org/foodguide


farms

EBT

Volunteers Accepted

Pick your own

Farm Stand

EBT/Snap Accepted

Agritourism

Public Access

MORRIS VINEYARD AND WINERY

N E W N O R M FA R M

CSA

Community Supported Agriculture Credit Card

R AI NY K NOB R ANC H

346 Union Grove Road, Charleston TN morrisvineyard.com morrisvineyard@yahoo.com Eric and Carolyn Morris 423-479-7311

831 Red Clay Park Road, Cleveland TN newnormfarm.com admin@newnormfarm.com Kyle and Don Varnell 423-380-8220

10048 Old Kingston Road, Loudon TN rainyknobranch.com rainyknobfarm@bellsouth.net Randy and Holly Prosise 865-556-7548

Our vineyard is family-owned and operated. We grow blackberries, raspberries, blueberries, grapes and Muscadines. Some people come to pick their own fruits during the peak growing season, while others come to enjoy the picturesque view of the Appalachian Mountains and taste our specialty wines.

“A Family Farm Making Local Food Production the Norm - Again!” We are a family farm working to provide quality pastured pork, chicken, and beef to our families and friends. And, while not pastured, we’ve added delicious rabbit to our non-GMO raised meats. Won’t you be our friend?

We offer naturally raised pastured beef, pork, lamb, goat and eggs on our family-owned and operated ranch. Our pastures are maintained through rotational grazing without the use of herbicides or chemical fertilizers. We sell by the half or whole and by the cut.

M O U N TA I N S H A D OW S MUSHROOMS

Poe Rd, Soddy Daisy TN allencharris@epbfi.com Allen and Hollie Harris 423-802-3973

Naturally grown shiitakes and oyster mushrooms as well as foraged chanterelles, oysters, chicken of the woods. Also medicinal mushrooms as nature provides.

M O U N TA I N S O N G FA R M

4128 Alabama Highway 117, Mentone AL mountainsongfarm.com mountainsongfarm@gmail.com Brad and Amanda Solomon 256-997-3276

One way to describe our farm is people, pigs and produce. We have been pasture-raising heritage breed pigs and specialty produce since 2010. Our pork products are processed at a Mennonite owned USDA, certified humane facility. We strive to produce nutrient dense foods for our family and yours.

N E W DAW N FA R M

363 South Cedar Lane, Chickamauga GA newdawnfarmgeorgia.com newdawnfarm@gmail.com Alan and Carrie Chandler 423-693-4889

New Dawn Farm is located in McLemore’s Cove. Farmers Alan and Carrie Chandler raise pastured pork, grass-fed beef, and naturally grown vegetables and pride themselves on maintaining sustainable growing practices without the use of chemicals. They also manage a CSA program that begins in May and goes through October. CSA

growchattanooga.org/foodguide

OW L H O L L OW FA R M

307 Mountain Road, McDonald TN owlhollowfarm.org linda@owlhollowfarm.org Linda Swift 423-478-2407

A secluded farmstead of nearly 70 acres near Cleveland, TN, most of which is mature forest. The entire property is Certified Wildlife Habitat. Production is limited to 1/4 acre market garden, an experimental permaculture garden, wild nuts and berries, a mixed orchard, and a small flock of very contented laying hens.

PICKET T’S T ROUT RANCH

128 Trout Ranch Lane, Whitwell TN pickettstrout@yahoo.com Steve Pickett 423-949-8000

At Pickett’s we use only the most natural techniques available to hatch, grow and process our trout. We use no antibiotics, growth hormones or chemical components. Our trout are pesticide free and are only sold fresh, never frozen.

R A I N B OW H I L L FA R M

93 Bailey Road, McMinnville TN wroe@blomand.net Walter and Carol Clarke 931-939-3117

We sell fruits and vegetables on a retail basis at farmers market. We use organic growing practices and are on a program to be certified organic.

R E D A P P L E BA R N

3379 Tails Creek Road, Ellijay GA redapplebarn.com apples@redapplebarn.com Marvin and Barry Pritchett 706-635-5898

Come enjoy picking your own apples in Ellijay, GA. Visit the Pumpkin Patch, see the wild flowers and bring a picnic. Vegetables available in the late summer.

R E D C L AY FA R M

405 Red Clay Park Road SW, Cleveland TN Facebook: Red Clay Farm rshaffer1959@gmail.com Ron, Cynthia, and Seth Shaffer 423-596-1145

Certified Organic Farm growing seasonal produce. CSA

R I S I N G FAW N GA R D E N S

521 Cureton Mill Road, Rising Fawn GA risingfawngardens.com risingfawngardens@gmail.com Steve and Karen Persinger 423-991-1187

Rising Fawn Gardens is a Certified Naturally Grown family farm nestled between Lookout Creek and Lookout Mountain, focusing on fresh vegetables, fruits, sunflowers and nonGMO supplemental feed. CSA

R I V E RV I E W FA R M S

987 White Graves Road, Ranger GA grassfedcow.com wcswan@yahoo.com The Swancys: 678-910-2831 Riverview Farms Milling: 706-255-8861

Riverview Farms is a certified organic family farm located in NW Georgia. We grow pastured Berkshire pork, grass-fed beef, vegetables, grits, cornmeal, and grains. CSA

33


farms S A N DA BA M A FA R M S

2323 County Road 131, Bryant AL sonnypemberton1@gmail.com Sonny Pemberton and Stan Reeves 423-661-9545

Offering many mainstay crops, as well as many specialty crops and ornamentals.

S E Q UAT C H I E C OV E FA R M

320 Dixon Cove Road, Sequatchie TN sequatchiecovefarm.com bill.keener@sequatchiecovefarm.com Bill and Miriam Keener, Kelsey and Ashley Keener

We grow pastured raised beef and lamb, and offer pick your own blueberries. Visit our website for more information.

S E Q UAT C H I E H Y D R O P O N I C S AT C E N T U RY C E DA R S FA R M

P.O. Box 848, Whitwell TN sequatchiehydroponics.com cadepken@sequatchiehydroponics.com Craig Depken 423-718-8936 or 423-942-0777

Sequatchie Hydroponics is the vegetable production facility at Century Cedars Farm. We use hydroponic growing techniques to produce Romaine lettuce. Using the Sequatchie Hydroponics system for growing Romaine, we produce a head of lettuce consistent in weight, taste and color as well as a proper array of nutritional components.

S H E E R L A R K FA R M

367 County Road 327, Flat Rock AL sheerlarkfarm.com gentlemom@farmerstel.com Sherry, Larry and Erin Johnson; Cody and Bud Fielder 256-632-2465

We are a diversified family farm on Sand Mountain in northeastern Alabama. Our dream is to create and maintain a healthy, dynamic, sustainable ecosystem on these 58 acres in the Appalachian foothills. Through our stewardship, we strive to support our family and to offer wholesome, delicious, chemical-free foods to our community.

S O L AC E FA R M

281 Solace Farm Road, Coalmont TN Etsy: Solace Farm Homestead solacefarmhomestead.com amy@solacefarmhomestead.com Amy and Caleb Rae 931-235-7462

We are a small homestead, raising a variety of livestock, poultry, and vegetables for ourselves and for market.

SPE NCE R CH RIST IAN COMMUNITY

51 Army Camp Road, Spencer TN Kenton Martin 931-946-2267

First settled in 2012, our community is a one-stop shop for all your local food needs. Our produce and animals are sustainably grown with all natural methods. We use only horses to till the soil and harvest crops. Visit Old Dunlap Produce MondaySaturday for in-season chemical-free produce, local honey, sorghum, and more!

T H E D F O R D ’ S B L U E B E R RY PAT C H

100 John Deere Drive, Spring City TN thedfordsblueberrypatch.vpweb.com thedfordw5764@att.net Bill and Brenda Thedford 423-365-5764

We are a you-pick/we-pick, mom and pop operation focused on providing the highest quality, pesticide-free berries and customer satisfaction. Our season usually runs from around July first until the end of August.

T H R E E BA R N S S O U T H

692 Jones Crossing, Whitwell TN Facebook: Three Barns South amanda.abair@gmail.com Frank and Amanda Abair, and children, Francis and Nathalie 423-582-1179

We are a family owned farm in Whitwell, TN offering naturally raised, pastured meat rabbits, free-range eggs, goat milk shares, and seasonal turkeys. CSA

SPRI NG CRE E K VE GGI ES

T I C K I WO O FA R M

382 County Road 62, Riceville TN springcreekveggies.com 382cr62@gmail.com Troy Teets 423-920-2850

945 County Road 116, Athens TN tickiwoofarm.com paula.tickiwoofarm@gmail.com James and Paula Tapner 423-744-7304

Great Produce HERE! Our Family run farm gratefully provides heirloom and open-pollinated produce using sustainable non-certified organic and biodynamic methods. We specialize in unique varieties of traditional crops. We offer a unique flexible alternative to traditional CSAs for people who want to support a local farm.

Farm fresh eggs from hens on pasture.

TA N T H I L L FA R M

3698 Highway 337, LaFayette GA tanthillfarm.com mark@tanthillfarm.com Mark and Gina Tant 423-637-9793

WA L D E N R I D G E H O N E Y

P.O. Box 445, Sale Creek TN waldenridgehoney.com sales@waldenridgehoney.com Michelle and William Wells 678-354-8010

Old Fashioned Artisanal beekeeping methods are used to focus on quality and to highlight the character of nature’s best sweetener. Our Honey comes from our own apiaries and contains all the vitamins, nutrients, enzymes, and goodness that come naturally from the bees.

Our 100 year old homestead provides rich soil and a perfect environment for naturally grown, tasty, nutrient dense vegetables, fruits and herbs. We also have happy hens that are free ranging on pasture, fed 100 percent organic feed. CSA

34

growchattanooga.org/foodguide


farms

EBT

Volunteers Accepted

Pick your own

Farm Stand

EBT/Snap Accepted

Agritourism

Public Access

W H E E L E R’ S O R C H A R D A N D V I N E YA R D

806 Wheeler Road, Dunlap TN wheelersorchard.com wheelerorchard46@gmail.com Jane Wheeler Mauldin, Burton Wheeler, Brian Wheeler 423-315-1372

Growing over 10 varieties of popular apples for eating, preserving and baking as well as 30 varieties of grapes for multiple uses. Local, sustainably grown fruit picked JulyOctober. Try our unpasteurized apple cider!

CSA

Community Supported Agriculture Credit Card

W I L DWO O D FA R M

435 Lifestyle Lane, Wildwood GA Facebook: Wildwood Farm GA farm@wildwoodhealth.org Vaughn Sparrow, Daniel Trethewey, Chase Worsham 423-313-0287

We are a small farm using natural and sustainable growing practices. We would like to invite you and your family to visit us and stock up on some healthy produce for your table. You can pick your own, or we can have it ready for you. Just call us in advance so we can make sure we are ready to accommodate your needs!

W H I T E I V Y FA R M

1458 County Road 169, Higdon AL whiteivyfarm.com info@whiteivyfarm.com Shawn Schuster 256-632-2881

A 6-acre farm located on Sand Mountain, we use no chemicals, pesticides or herbicides on what we grow. Our animals are grass-fed and free-range, and our plants are fertilized by our animals. This year we’ll have USDA processed heritage turkeys available for your Thanksgiving meal! CSA

Z I O N GA R D E N S

330 Rippy Ridge Road, Normandy TN ziongardens.net ziongardens@gmail.com Risa Brown 615-653-3347

We are a small farming operation dedicated to clean, sustainable methods of growing. We grow a young leaf salad greens mix and heirloom cherry tomatoes specifically for market. We also grow custom salad mixes; up to 100lbs per week- let us know your favorite mix!

W H I T E OA K VA L L E Y FA R M

6920 White Oak Valley Circle, McDonald TN whiteoakvalleyfarm.com whiteoakvalleyfarm@yahoo.com Rachel Otto, Jonathan Otto

We are a small, family owned and operated farm which offers farm fresh vegetables in the spring, summer and fall. Our specialty is heirloom vegetables and seeds. A large portion of our farm is dedicated to heirloom seed preservation and production. We offer over 100 varieties of heirloom vegetable seeds through our website and seasonally at local farmers markets.

W I L D E R L A N E FA R M

336 Sagamore Drive, Tunnel Hill GA wilderlane.com wilderlane@yahoo.com Adam & Niki Davenport 678-457-9991

We are a small farm located in Tunnel Hill, GA that specializes in unique varieties and Southern heirloom vegetables.

growchattanooga.org/foodguide

35


community gardens

13 14 FRANKLIN

07

01 MARION

10

H A M I LT O N

16

04

09 06

08 15

05 03

02

11

DADE

12 WA L K E R

C AT O O S A WHITFIELD

36

growchattanooga.org/foodguide


community gardens 01

BAY L O R S C H O O L O R GA N I C GA R D E N

09

171 Baylor School Road, Chattanooga TN 423-267-8505 rfazio@baylorschool.org

02

BETHLEHEM CENTER UR BAN T EAC H I NG GAR DE N

1908 Chamberlain Avenue, Chattanooga TN 214-762-2153 emerson_burch@hotmail.com

10

B R A I N E R D BY G R AC E C O M M U N I T Y GA R D E N

11

12

B R I D G I N G T H E GA P F O R H E A LT H I E R FA M I L I E S GA R D E N

13

GA R D E N AT S P R I N G C R E E K

G L E N WO O D R E C R E AT I O N CENTER COMMUNITY GA R D E N

14

2610 East 3rd Street, Chattanooga TN 423-697-1284 odom_e@chattanooga.gov

07

G R E E N WAY FA R M C O M M U N I T Y GA R D E N

5051 Gann Store Road, Hixson TN 423-697-1284 jwheelx1@gmail.com northchick.org 08

School Garden

Public Access

17

W EST MANNI NG ST RE ET C O M M U N I T Y GA R D E N

504 West Manning Street, Chattanooga TN 423-756-4153 jon.fitch@me.com

Dig In! Community gardens have long provided Chattanoogans and their neighborhoods with a gardening play space for people to grow healthful foods, lasting friendships, gardening skills, beauty and a sense of community. Regardless of your ability and income, these Community gardens welcome you and provide the first steps toward neighborly engagement and food security. If you need the space, want to learn more, or just want to get your hands dirty this summer, use TasteBuds to find a community garden near you and get involved!

S A S FA R M

St. Andrew's-Sewanee School 290 Quintard Road, Sewanee TN 931-598-5651 sbergman@sasweb.org sasweb.org/farm

1312 Spring Creek Road, East Ridge TN 423-653-2337

06

LAKESHORE C O M M U N I T Y GA R D E N

1212 Dennard Drive, Dalton GA 706-278-8207 lcgarden1212@gmail.com acga.localharvest.org/garden/M2757

1201 Poplar Street, Chattanooga TN 615-498-4553 amykcovington@gmail.com

05

JE FFE RSON HE IGHTS

East 19th Street, Chattanooga TN 404-281-5802 mjspence89@gmail.com

4009 Sunbeam Ave, Chattanooga TN 423-698-2433

04

HILL CITY COMMUNITY GA R D E N

300 West Bell Ave, Chattanooga TN 901-606-9468 mlgroppe@gmail.com

200 West 38th Street, Chattanooga TN 423-266-1384 x 1 brandiallen@thebeth.org

03

H I G H L A N D PA R K C O M M U N I T Y GA R D E N

Volunteers Accepted

S T . A L BA N ’ S C O M M U N I T Y GA R D E N

7514 Hixson Pike, Chattanooga TN 423-618-7716 gdclark503@comcast.net

15

S T . ANDR EWS C E N T E R C O M M U N I T Y GA R D E N

1918 Union Avenue, Chattanooga TN 703-801-7643 worship@mercyjunctioncenter.org Facebook: St. Andrews Center

H *A RT GA R D E N

110 East Main Street, Chattanooga TN 423-521-4707 ellen@hartgallerytn.com 16

TA K I N G R O O T C O M M U N I T Y GA R D E N

2401 East Main Street, Chattanooga TN 423-903-6707 or 423-718-0571 peterkanyi77@gmail.com slrmurdock@yahoo.com growchattanooga.org/foodguide

37


food artisans A P PA L AC H I A N B E E

1943 Old Federal Road, Ocoee TN 423-338-1149 honeybeesrock.com Thurs-Mon 10a-6p

Appalachian Bee proudly presents our pure unfiltered Artisan Honeys. Over 20 years of experience in beekeeping and dedication to promoting the importance of honeybees has inspired our line of artisanal honey products. Nature's finest honeys, 100% pure, never overheated, strained but unfiltered so all the pollen remains.

B L U E I N D I A N KO M B U C H A

Chattanooga, TN 423-227-3288 Facebook: Blue Indian Kombucha

We are Chattanooga’s flagship kombucha tea. Handcrafted using locally sourced ingredients, we strive for our kombucha to be the best tasting, most innovative kombucha on the market. Find Blue Indian Kombucha at farmers’ markets and visit our Facebook page for a current listing of tap locations.

C L A R K ’ S BA K E RY AT S T O N E CAV E

207 Stone Cave Loop, Unit A, Dunlap TN 423-949-4333 clarksretreat.com Sun-Wed 8a-5p, Thurs 9a-5p, Fri 9a-12p CST

We specialize in whole grains and plantbased baked goods. Founded to provide people with healthy, natural food without additives found in commercial products, we seek to educate based upon Biblical principles and provide products with goodfor-you ingredients.

D E BA R G E V I N E YA R D S & W I N E RY

1617 Rossville Avenue, Chattanooga TN 423-710-8426 debargewines.com Tues-Thurs 1-6p, Fri-Sat 1-8p, Sun 1-6p

We create wine using grapes from our vineyard on Pigeon Mountain and western vineyards. Visit our tasting room in Chattanooga’s Southside to enjoy our wines.

38

D E L M O NAC O W I N E RY & V I N E YA R D S

600 Lance Drive, Baxter TN 931-858-1177 delmonacowinery.com Mon-Sat 10a-7p, Sun 12-5p

Conveniently located in middle Tennessee, just an hour's drive from Nashville, Knoxville, and Chattanooga. Tours, tastings and event space for you. We feature Tennessee products in our gift shop and can ship our wine direct to consumers. Check out our website and Facebook page.

G E O R G I A W I N E RY

6469 Battlefield Parkway, Ringgold GA 706-937-WINE georgiawines.com Mon-Sat 10a-6p

Georgia Winery invites you to have a taste of the South. Choose from over thirty different wines with complimentary wine tasting, experience a winery tour, relax in the vineyard, shop for unique gifts, and taste gourmet farm foods at Georgia’s First Farm Winery.

H U M B L E H E A RT FA R M S

25235 Mooresville Road, Elkmont AL 256-777-9268 humbleheartfarms.com

Humble Heart Farms Goat Cheese is a product of the Tennessee River Valley. The "girls" come from a long line which produces excellent milk. We carefully provide our goats the best nutrition to provide the finest quality chevre (goat cheese).

T H E L O CA L J U I C E RY & KITCHEN

48 East Main Street, Chattanooga TN 352-516-4040 thelocaljuicebar.com Mon-Sat 7:30a-6p, Sat-Sun 9a-4p

Experience fruits and vegetables like never before with our 100% Organic, cold-pressed juices, smoothies and seasonal dishes. Our team works extra hard to preserve the nutritional integrity and freshness in everything we make.

M A I N S T R E E T M E AT S

217 East Main Street, Chattanooga TN 423-602-9568 mainstreetmeatschatt.com Mon-Fri 11a-7p, Sat 11a-4p

All meat comes from local farms. Our beef and lamb are 100% grass-fed and the beef is dry-aged to improve tenderness, flavor, and juiciness. Our pork, chicken, and turkey are outdoor-pastured with non-GMO feed. We make our own lard, bone broths, bacon, sausages, fully cured ready-to-eat salamis and pates. Visit our website for a current listing of our farmers.

M O R R I S V I N E YA R D A N D W I N E RY

346 Union Grove Road, Charleston TN 423-479-7311 morrisvineyard.com Mon-Sat 11a-7p, Sun 12-7p

Our vineyard is family-owned and operated. We grow blackberries, raspberries, blueberries, grapes, and muscadines. Some visitors come to pick their own fruits, while others come to enjoy the picturesque view of the Appalachian Mountains and taste our specialty wines.

M O U N TA I N S O N G FA R M

4128 Alabama Highway 117, Mentone AL 256-997-3276 mountainsongfarm.com

One way to describe our farm is people, pigs and produce. We have been pasture raising heritage breed pigs and specialty produce since 2010. Our pork products are processed at a Mennonite owned USDA, certified humane facility. We strive to produce nutrient dense foods for our family and yours. Our products can be purchased online, Monday through Sunday.

SEQUATCHIE COVE CREAMERY

2216 Coppinger Cove Road, Sequatchie TN 423-619-5867 Facebook: Sequatchie Cove Creamery

Our Artisan Farmstead Cheeses are made with raw Sequatchie Cove Farm cow's milk and aged a minimum of 60 days. Our 5 styles - Cumberland, Dancing Fern, Gruetli, Nickajack and Shakerag Blue - are available seasonally at retailers and restaurants around Chattanooga, and weekly at the Main Street Farmers Market.

growchattanooga.org/foodguide


food artisans S O U T H E R N S QW E E Z E

1209 Tremont Street, Chattanooga TN 423-805-4440 southernsqweeze.com Mon-Fri 7a-6p, Sat 8a-4p

We offer cold-pressed, all natural juices, light lunches, and healthy snacks. It is a priority for us to seek out as much local produce as possible before we seek it anywhere else.

YO U R TA B L E I S R E A DY. Locally sourced cuisine, creatively prepared, from the farm to your table.

1 2 0 1 S . B ro a d S t . • C h a t t a n o o g a 4 2 3 . 4 2 4 . 3 70 0 • BroadStreetGrille.com

growchattanooga.org/foodguide

39


restaurants

1885 G R I L L

T H E B L U E P L AT E

COMMUNITY PIE

3914 St. Elmo Avenue, Chattanooga TN 423-485-3050 1885grill.com Mon-Fri 4-10p, Sat 11a-10p, Sun 10a-4p

191 Chestnut Street, Unit B, Chattanooga TN 423-648-6767 theblueplate.info Tues-Fri 7:30a-9p, Sat-Sun 8a-9p

850 Market Street, Chattanooga TN 423-486-1743 communitypie.com Sun-Thurs 11a-10p, Fri-Sat 11a-11p

1885 Grill is committed to using local food, both for quality purposes and to support local farms. Under the leadership of Charlie Loomis, our Head Chef, 1885 has been able to foster relationships with our local food hub, farmers, and producers. We look forward to continuing to grow these relationships.

As a homegrown Chattanooga restaurant, we are pleased to support local farms and suppliers. We proudly serve the best from River Ridge Farms, Signal Mountain Farm, Sweetwater Valley, Bluff View Bakery, Niedlov's Bakery, Clumpies Creamery, Benton's Smokehouse and Chattz Roasting Company.

Specializing in authentic Neapolitan and traditional New York Style pizza making, we combine this with both traditional and non-traditional toppings that celebrate high quality and locally sourced ingredients. We also serve hand crafted, homemade gelato from our sister restaurant Milk & Honey and have a huge selection of craft beers.

2 12 M A R K E T R E S TAU R A N T

212 Market Street, Chattanooga TN 423-265-1212 212market.com Lunch: Mon-Sun 11a-3p Dinner: Mon-Thurs 5-9:30p, Fri-Sat 5-10p, Sun 5-9p

Celebrating 23 years of local foods and green practices- located across the street from the Tennessee Aquarium. Offering lunch, brunch, and dinner with seasonal menus. Daily features at 212market.com. Solar, bike friendly, bakery, wine list, outdoor dining, kids menu…and more!

ALLEIA

25 East Main Street, Chattanooga TN 423-305-6990 alleiarestaurant.com Mon-Thurs 5-9:30p, Fri-Sat 5-10p

Alleia, the fulfillment of Chef Daniel Lindley’s vision of offering simple, Italian inspired cuisine while incorporating regional flavor, opened in April, 2009. Exceptional ingredients imported from Italy and quality produce delivered from local farms make this a reality at this Southside eatery.

40

EASY BISTRO

B R OA D S T R E E T G R I L L E

1201 Broad Street, Chattanooga TN 423-424-3700 chattanooganhotel.com/dining/broad_ street_grille Breakfast: Mon-Sun 6:30a-10:30a Sunday Brunch: 11a-2p Lunch: Mon-Sat 11a-2p Dinner: Mon-Sat 5p-10p

Our field-to-table concept uses local fresh produce to provide a more nutritious and scrumptious meal and is present in our menus. Our talented culinary team is committed to providing guests with incredible seasonal cuisine and the freshest, local products in the market.

C LY D E ' S O N M A I N

122 West Main Street, Chattanooga TN 423-362-8335 clydesonmain.com Sun- Wed 11a- 11p (Kitchen) 11a-12a (Bar) Thurs-Sat 11a-12a (Kitchen) 11a-1:30a (Bar)

203 Broad Street, Chattanooga TN 423-266-1121 easybistro.com Dinner: Mon-Sat 5-10p, Sun 5-9p Brunch: Sat-Sun 11a-4p

At Easy Bistro & Bar, our commitment to using local food is simple. We use local whenever possible not only in dishes but in cocktails as well. We never sacrifice ingredients and are passionate about serving the best local product no matter what time of year.

T H E FA R M E R’ S DAU G H T E R

1211 Hixson Pike, Chattanooga TN 423-315-9560 thefarmersdaughterchattanooga.com Tues-Sun 7a-2p

The Farmer’s Daughter is a farm-to-table cafe located in North Chattanooga. We feature a simple breakfast and lunch menu using seasonal, locally sourced ingredients. We believe in supporting and cultivating a sustainable future for farmers, artists, small business-folk, and families. As well as serving food, we will host culinary workshops, a pop-up functional art gallery, and other community oriented events. growchattanooga.org/foodguide


restaurants

F LY I N G S Q U I R R E L

Catering

IVYWILD

55 Johnson Street, Chattanooga TN 423-602-5980 flyingsquirrelbar.com Tues-Thurs 5p-2a, Fri-Sat 5p-3a, Sun 10:30a-3p

36 Ball Park Road, Sewanee TN 931-598-9000 ivywildsewanee.com Thurs-Sun 5-9p

Food from the earth, touched by hands that care, sold to people who appreciate the time and energy that went into it. You grow it for us and we will showcase our passion by highlighting what can be done with locally grown food.

IvyWild is a Progressive American restaurant with an ingredient-driven menu emphasizing fresh, seasonal, and local products whenever possible. We believe it is our direct responsibility to make inroads in the causes of humanely raised, sustainable, and local ingredients.

G R A N FA L L O O N

400 E. Main St. Suite 120, Chattanooga, TN 423-602-7314 granfallooncha.com Mon-Sun 7a-12a

Cafe by day, an entertainment venue by night, we offer a place to build a sense of community and commonality for everyone seeking food, drinks, music, and conversation. Incorporating local and sustainable practices.

growchattanooga.org/foodguide

L A CA B R I O L E

1341 Burgess Road, Chattanooga TN 423-821-0350 lacabrioleusa.com

La Cabriole offers authentic French cuisine in a quaint country setting. Open by reservation only, the menu changes weekly. Using the freshest and finest locally grown ingredients, your dinner may be prepared especially for your dietary needs. Enjoy a 7-course fixed price menu. Bring the wine of your choice. Cash or checks accepted.

L O CA L 19 1

J U L I A’ S

24 University Avenue, Sewanee TN 931-598-5193 juliasofsewanee.com Mon-Sat 11a-3p

At Julia’s, everything is made with the freshest local ingredients and love. From our big burritos and our awesome Cubans and Vietnamese banh mi sandwiches to our wonderful homemade sweets!

191 Chestnut Street, Chattanooga TN 423-648-6767 Facebook: Local 191 Tues-Wed 10a-10p, Thurs 10a-11p, Fri-Sat 10-12a, Sun 10a-9p

Opened in 2011, Local 191 is downtown's waterfront bar. Primarily open air, Local 191 is built around enjoying the view. Featuring affordable bar food made from locally-grown ingredients, Local 191 brings the best of America's metropolitan bar tradition to the local food scene.

41


restaurants

How Fresh? Farm Fresh

Farm Fresh Favorites. St. Elmo

3815 St. Elmo Avenue Chattanooga, TN 37409 (423) 822-6656 - (MOJO)

1800 Dayton Blvd 1414 Jenkins Rd Chattanooga, TN 37421 Chattanooga, TN 37405 (423) 296-6656 - (MOJO) 423.870.6656 - (MOJO)

mojoburrito.com LUPI’S PI Z ZA PI E S

406A Broad Street, Chattanooga TN 423-266-5874 9453 Bradmore Lane, Suite 109, E. Brainerd TN 423-602-7499 5504 Hixson Pike, Hixson TN 423-847-3700 1414 Jenkins Road, Ooltewah TN 423-855-4104 2382 North Ocoee Street, Cleveland TN 423-476-9464 lupi.com Tues-Thurs 11a-10p, Fri-Sat 11a-11p, Sun 11:30a-9p

Locally owned and operated for 19 years, we strive to carry local products whenever available. All year, local ground beef, ground sausage, cheddar cheese, and wheat flour is served, and local eggs and honey are used; during the growing season Lupi’s serves local tomatoes, green peppers, basil, cucumbers, and zucchini. Lupi’s has been awarded Chattanooga’s best pizza year after year!

42

M A I N S T R E E T M E AT S

BlushAd-MojoFarmFresh.indd 217 East Main Street, Chattanooga TN 423-602-9568 mainstreetmeatschatt.com Mon-Sat 11a-3p

Red Bank

East Brainerd

/mojoburrito MOJO BUR R I T O

1

All meat comes from farms within an hour of the shop. Enjoy lunch Mon-Sat from 11am-3pm, or pick-up something to take home and warm-up from our grab and go case. Our menu features all local meat, locally-made bread, and house-made sides and fixings.

MILK & HONEY

135 North Market Street, Chattanooga TN 423-521-3123 milkandhoneygelato.com Mon-Sun 6:30a-10p

Where pure gelato, craft coffee, and fresh fruit popsicles are made from scratch by hand daily- with honor and respect for each ingredient and the people who helped them grow.

8/14/13 12:22 PM St. Elmo | 3950 Tennessee Avenue | 423-822-MOJO Red Bank | 1800 Dayton Boulevard | 423-870-MOJO E. Brainerd | 1414 Jenkins Road | 423-296-MOJO mojoburrito.com Sun-Tues 11a-9p Wed 11a-9p (Red Bank 11a-10p) Thurs 11a-9p (Red Bank 11a-10p) Fri-Sat 11a-10p

Mojo Burrito believes in supporting the local farming community. We were founded on fresh food. Mojo Burrito buys as much local produce as we can get our hands on. You can buy many other local products at all of our locations, too.

M O U N TA I N G OAT M A R K E T

109 Main Street, Monteagle TN 931-924-2727 Facebook: Mountain Goat Market Mon-Sat 9a-9p

Committed to using as many local foods as possible, and constantly seeking new farms and people to work with our growing business. growchattanooga.org/foodguide


restaurants N I E D L OV ’ S B R E A DWO R K S

Catering

S T . J O H N ’ S M E E T I N G P L AC E

215 East Main Street, Chattanooga TN 423-756-0303 niedlovs.com Mon-Fri 7a-6p, Sat 7a-4p

1274 Market Street, Chattanooga TN 423-266-4400 stjohnsrestaurant.com Mon-Thurs 5-9:30p, Fri-Sat 5-10p

Handcrafted artisan breads and pastries and sweet goods; local coffee and espresso drinks; from scratch soups, salads and sandwiches.

Meeting Place, as well as St. John's is committed to using the highest quality, freshest, and seasonal ingredients available to create a variety of small plates and entrées to encourage conversation and stimulate the senses.

PUB L IC HO USE & T H E S O C I AL

1110 Market Street, Chattanooga TN 423-266-3366 publichousechattanooga.com Lunch: Mon-Fri 11a-2:30p, Sat 11a-3p Dinner: Mon-Thurs 5-9p, Fri 5-10p, Sat 5-10p

Our menu plays to the comforts of good, solid food, while applying the principles of premium food products to a casual setting.

ROLLI NG J’S MOBI LE B IS T RO

423-800-1282 rollingjsmobilebistro.com Facebook: Rolling J’s Mobile Bistro

Family Owned and Operated, Southern Gourmet Food Truck with a seasonally driven menu featuring locally grown and raised products whenever possible. Visit our website/FaceBook page for new menus, locations, and events near you!

R O O T K I T C H E N & W I N E BA R

313 Manufacturers Rd, Ste 119, Chattanooga TN 423-648-9160 rootkitchenandwinebar.com Tues-Fri 11a-10p, Sat 11a-11p, Sun 11a-3p

S T . J O H N ’ S R E S TAU R A N T

1278 Market Street, Chattanooga TN 423-266-4400 stjohnsrestaurant.com Mon-Thurs 5-9:30p, Fri-Sat 5-10p

St. John's Restaurant is committed to using the highest quality, freshest, and seasonal ingredients available to create dishes that are clean, simple and delicious. Guests from around the world come to take pleasure in the quality, ambiance and attention to detail St. John's graciously offers.

TAC O M A M AC I TA

T E R R A M A E A P PA L AC H I A N BISTRO

122 East 10th Street, Chattanooga TN 423-710-2925 terramaechattanooga.com Sunday Brunch: 11a-2p Dinner: Mon-Thurs 5-9p, Fri-Sat 5-10p

Our cuisine is inspired by the familiar foods and time tested recipes of the Appalachian Mountains, handed down, generation to generation, lovingly prepared with the freshest ingredients. We prepare familiar dishes with influences from around the world, always attempting to honor the essence of the ingredients and original recipes.

U R BA N S TAC K

12 West 13th Street, Chattanooga TN 423-475-5350 urbanstack.com Sun-Thurs 11a-10p, Fri-Sat 11a-11p

Urban Stack takes pride in our community and region, working with local farms and vendors for the absolute best quality of meats and ingredients available. We have a wide variety of meats that are either all-natural, organic, grass fed, free-range or from sustainable and humane farms.

109 North Market Street, Chattanooga TN 423-648-6262 tacomamacita.com Sun-Thurs 11a-10p, Fri-Sat 11a-11p

Taco Mamacita features a full bar with patio and a modern, eclectic menu where the taco is supreme. Everything is made fresh, in house daily.

We nurture our community's well-being by creating and selling locally sustainable products that convey our love for food and our commitment to offering a pleasing and nutritious experience.

S O U T H E R N S QW E E Z E

1209 Tremont Street, Chattanooga TN 423-805-4440 southernsqweeze.com Mon-Fri 7a-6p, Sat 8a-4p

We offer cold-pressed, all natural juices, light lunches, and healthy snacks. It is a priority for us to seek out as much local produce as possible before we seek it anywhere else. growchattanooga.org/foodguide

43


grocers E A RT H FA R E

1814 Gunbarrel Road, Chattanooga TN 423-855-2511 earthfare.com Mon-Sun 7a– 10p

Earth Fare is a full scale, all-natural, organic grocery store and café committed to supporting our local farmers by stocking products from within a 100-mile radius. Sign up at www.earthfare.com to receive weekly newsletter containing deals and coupons and be sure to register for the Tomato Bank rewards program.

H A RV E S T E D H E R E FO O D H U B

2009 Curtain Pole Road, Chattanooga TN 423-551-4222 harvestedhere.org orders@harvestedhere.org Mon-Fri 8a-5p

Our mission is to strengthen and secure the future of a healthy regional food supply by providing local farms with services that connect their food to the Chattanooga community. We provide aggregation, packaging, storage, marketing, and distribution services to farmers, connecting them to regional restaurants, retailers, and institutional kitchens.

Food Hub

MOONEY’S MARKET AND EMPORIUM

1265 West Main Street, Monteagle TN 931-924-7400 Facebook: Mooneys Market and Emporium jkthomas@usit.net Mon- Sun 10a-6p

Using local products means fresher, more nutritious and tasty and supports our local rural economy. We offer a selection of natural, organic, and gourmet foods, featuring local vegetables, fruits, coffee, eggs, bread and cheese. Our Emporium offers local art, handmade items, year, books, stones, gift items, antiques, and supplies and plants for organic gardening.

M O U N TA I N G OAT M A R K E T

109 Main Street, Monteagle TN 931-924-2727 Facebook: Mountain Goat Market spenserduncan@outlook.com Mon-Sat 9a-9p

MGM is committed to using as much local food as possible. We are constantly seeking new farms and people to work with our growing business.

ROOTED HERE: SOUTH CUMBERLAND FOOD HUB

13912 Highway 41, Tracy City TN 615-653-3347 rootedhere.locallygrown.net rootedhere@locallygrown.net

Serving Sewanee, Monteagle, Tracy City, and surrounding area restaurant and schools with local food from our local farmers. Most products are grown naturally and sustainably and the meats, eggs, and cheeses are antibiotic and hormone free. Online ordering on Mon and Wed; deliveries on Tue and Fri.

V I L L AG E M A R K E T

5002 University Drive, Collegedale TN 423-236-2300 villagemarketcollegdale.com Mon-Thurs 7a-9p, Fri 7a-4p, Sun 8a-6p

We are a completely vegetarian, full line natural and conventional food supermarket located across from Southern Adventist University, offering a large selection of groceries, produce, natural foods, gluten free products, bulk foods, and supplements.

M A I N S T R E E T M E AT S

217 East Main Street, Chattanooga TN 423-602-9568 mainstreetmeatschatt.com Mon-Fri 11a-7p, Sat 11am-5pm

All meat comes from local farms. Our beef and lamb are 100% grass-fed and the beef is dry-aged to improve tenderness, flavor, and juiciness. Our pork, chicken, and turkey are pastured with non-GMO feed. We make lard, bone broths, organ meats, bacon, sausages, fully cured and ready to eat salamis and pates. Offering local cheese, eggs, jams, jellies, and seasonings.

44

growchattanooga.org/foodguide


resource organizations A L A BA M A S U S TA I NA B L E AG R I C U LT U R E N E T WO R K

C R E AT I V E D I S C OV E RY MUSEUM

T H E LAND T RUST FOR TENNESSEE

PO Box 2127, Montgomery AL 256-743-0742 Alice Evans, Executive Director info@asanonline.org asanonline.org

321 Chestnut Street, Chattanooga TN 423-756-2738 Liza Blair, Arts Manager llb@cdmfun.org cdmfun.org

736 Georgia Ave, Suite 505, Chattanooga TN 423-305-1783 Joel Houser, Southeast Regional Director jhouser@landtrusttn.org landtrusttn.org

Our mission is to support conservation practices, families who grow and consume natural food and fiber, and the communities where they live. It’s all about farms and food!

Our Culinary Corner offers weekly, hands-on kitchen lessons for children ages five and older. These lessons emphasize using locally grown, seasonal foods when preparing healthy meals. CDM kitchen lessons are designed to encourage sensory development, language art skills, and fine motor skills while also introducing children to the benefits of eating seasonal foods.

We conserve the agricultural heritage and prime farmland of southeast TN to ensure the future of local food and to protect the character of our communities. We primarily use donated conservation easements, through which land is voluntarily and permanently protected and kept intact through the generations.

FA I R S H A R E U R BA N G R OW E R S

Chattanooga TN info@noogamade.org noogamade.org

CHATTANOOGA SUSTAINABLE FA R M E R S

P.O. Box 267, Chattanooga TN 256-632-2465 Sherry Johnson, President gentlemom@farmerstel.com chattanoogasustainablefarmers.org

The mission of the CSF is to support our member farms by creating and supporting a vibrant social, business, and farm practices network. Our recommended member “best farm practices” for the health of our community include the planting and growing of non-genetically modified plants grown without toxic, synthetic chemical inputs and free-range, unstressed animals living healthy lives.

C R A B T R E E FA R M S

1000 East 30th Street, Chattanooga TN 423-493-9155 Sara McIntyre, Executive Director info@crabtreefarms.org crabtreefarms.org

Crabtree Farms was founded in 1998 to bring urban sustainable agriculture to Chattanooga. Our mission is to connect Chattanoogans with our local foodshed. We serve the greater Chattanooga community through education and advocacy programs that teach about growing food sustainably and choosing local produce, and we create the TasteBuds local food guide you are reading now!

1800 Roanoke Avenue, Chattanooga TN 786-202-3686 Brenda Trigg fairsharegarden@gmail.com wedigfairshare.org

Fair Share Urban Growers works to address food insecurity, poverty, and hunger in the center city neighborhoods of Chattanooga, using sustainable agriculture as a method to move residents beyond charity towards selfreliance. Food growing coop, community gardens, and urban farms demonstrate creative ways to eat more economically.

HIXSON HIGH SCHOOL AG R I C U LT U R E E D U CAT I O N

5705 Middle Valley Road, Hixson TN 423-847-4800 ext. 248 Lee Friedlander, Agriculture Science Teacher friedlander_l@hcde.org hixsonageducation.info/contact-us.html

Hixson High School is the only school in Hamilton County to offer a comprehensive Program of Study in Agriculture Education. Our curriculum focuses on Horticultural Production and we strive to offer our students a hands on, multidisciplinary approach to learning that engages all kinds of learners.

N O O GA M A D E

Nooga Made is a grassroots organization and trademark that exists to identify, promote, connect, enhance, and certify creations that are proudly made right here in Chattanooga, TN.

SOUTHEAST TENNESSEE T O U R I S M A S S O C I AT I O N

1000 Riverfront Parkway, Chattanooga TN 423-424-4222 Jenni Veal, Tourism Coordinator jveal@sedev.org southeasttennessee.com

Our free mobile app “Travel Southeast Tennessee” connects users with agritourism events; farms and markets; nurseries, gardens, orchards; organic farming organizations; wineries; corn mazes; lodging on a farm, and a plethora of information on all things agritourism for Southeast Tennessee.

UNIVERSITY OF T E NNESSE E EXT E NSION

6183 Adamson Circle, Chattanooga TN 423-855-6113 Tom Stebbins, UT Extension Agent tstebbins@utk.edu utextension.tennessee.edu/hamilton/pages/ default.aspx

We publish research based information on the production, marketing, and use of sustainable food crops in Tennessee.

growchattanooga.org/foodguide

45


CHATTANOOGA’S

A foodshed is the area where food is both produced and eaten. It includes the farmland where the agricultural products we eat are grown or raised, the route the food travels, the markets it is sold in, and finally the individuals who eat it! By connecting Chattanoogans with our local foodshed, we are working towards the goal of having a substantial portion of the food consumed by Chattanoogans grown by our local farms and gardens.

FOODSHED

10 0 m il e ra d ius

JACKSON

FENTRESS

OVERTON

SMITH WILSON

PUTNAM

MORGAN

DEKALB RUTHERFORD

ANDERSON KNOX

CUMBERLAND

WHITE

ROANE

CANNON WARREN

VAN BUREN

LOUNDON

BLEDSOE

BLOUNT RHEA

BEDFORD

COFFEE

GRUNDY

MARSHALL MOORE

MONROE

MC MINN

MEIGS

SEQUATCHIE

GILES FRANKLIN

LINCOLN

BRADLEY

MARION

LIMESTONE

DADE MADISON

POLK

HAMILTON

JACKSON

WHITFIELD

UNION

MURRAY GILMER

WALKER

MORGAN

CHATTOOGA

DEKALB

MARSHALL

TOWNS

FANNIN

CATOOSA

GORDON

LUMPKIN PICKENS DAWSON

FLOYD CHEROKEE

BARTOW

CHEROKEE

FORSYTH

ETOWAH POLK COBB PAULDING

Farms

HARALSON

CALHOUN

Urban Areas 50 Mile Foodshed

CLEBURNE

100 Mile Foodshed

46

growchattanooga.org/foodguide


thanks to our sponsors

SUPPORT TASTEBUDS Please consider supporting the production of the TasteBuds local food guide so we can continue to promote our outstanding local farms and food. Crabtree Farms relies on financial support for the production and distribution of this publication. It’s easy to make a difference; donations can be made online anytime at growchattanooga.org/ foodguide or by check to Crabtree Farms: P.O. Box 2250, Chattanooga TN 37409. If you’d like to learn more about other ways to support Chattanooga’s Local Food Program, please contact Andrea Jaeger at ajaeger@crabtreefarms.org or 423-493-9155 x13. Donations are tax-deductible.

growchattanooga.org/foodguide

47


TWO TEN JACK

48

growchattanooga.org/foodguide

Profile for crabtreefarms

TasteBuds Fall/Winter 2015 edition  

TasteBuds is Chattanooga's free guide to local food. Read about our region's food producers and the local businesses who support them.

TasteBuds Fall/Winter 2015 edition  

TasteBuds is Chattanooga's free guide to local food. Read about our region's food producers and the local businesses who support them.

Advertisement