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AN IMPORTANT AUCTION OF CLASSIC SPORTS AND RACING MOTORCYCLES

Saturday, 17th February 2018


AN IMPORTANT AUCTION OF CLASSIC SPORTS AND RACING MOTORCYCLES

Saturday, 17th February 2018 ExCeL London Western Gateway Royal Victoria Dock London E16 1XL


AN IMPORTANT AUCTION OF CLASSIC SPORTS AND RACING MOTORCYCLES

Saturday, 17th February 2018 Auction at 2:00pm On View: Friday 16th February from 10.00am to 5.00pm Saturday 17th February from 9.00am to the start of the sale Admission by catalogue only (admits two to auction) For further information please contact: Coys London, Manor Court, Lower Mortlake Road, Richmond, TW9 2LL Telephone: 020 8614 7888 or Fax: 020 8614 7889 or E-mail: auctions@coys.co.uk www.coys.co.uk Auction and administration: Telephone and fax numbers for use during viewing and sale period Friday 16th February to Sunday 18th February. Telephone: 0345 300 9330 Fax: 020 8614 7881 Email: auctions@coys.co.uk Please note: This catalogue does not allow free access to the MCN London Motorcycle Show.


CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS DEFINITIONS 1. In these Conditions : 1.1. “Auctioneer” means the representative of Coys conducting the Auction 1.2. “Buyer” means the person to whom a Lot is knocked down by the Auctioneer 1.3. ”Buyer’s Premium” shall have the definition given in Condition 10.2 1.4. “Catalogue” includes any advertisement, brochure, estimate, price list and other publication 1.5. “Coys” means Coys of Kensington Automobiles Ltd. 1.6. “Expenses” in relation to the sale of any Lot means any of Coys’ charges and expenses for insurance, storage, illustrations, cataloguing costs, special advertising, packing and freight of that Lot and any VAT thereon 1.7. “Hammer Price” means the price in pounds sterling (or the currency in which the sale is conducted) at which a Lot is knocked down by the Auctioneer to the Buyer 1.8. “Motor Vehicle” means any item included or proposed to be included in a sale of motor vehicles 1.9 ”Net Sale Proceeds” means the net amount due to the Seller being the Hammer Price less the Seller’s Commission, any VAT thereon, Expenses and any other amount due to Coys from the Seller 1.10 “Purchase Price” means the Hammer Price together with VAT thereon, the Buyer’s Premium and any additional charges or Expenses due from any Buyer 1.11 “Reserve” means the minimum Hammer Price agreed between Coys and the Seller at which a Lot may be sold 1.12 ”Seller” means the person who offers the Lot for sale 1.13 ”Seller’s Commission” shall have the definition given in Condition 10.1 1.14 ”The Auction” means the auction sale in respect of which a Lot is consigned for sale 1.15. “The Lot” means any item(s) consigned with the view to its or their sale at auction 1.16. “VAT” means Value Added Tax applicable at the prevailing rate from time to time 2. GOVERNING LAW All transactions to which the conditions apply shall be governed by English Law, and the parties hereby submit to the exclusive jurisdiction of the English Courts and irrevocably agree to waive any right to assert that proceedings ought not to be brought in England and Wales on grounds of forum non conveniens. 3. COYS AS AGENT Coys sells as agent for the Seller (except where it is expressly stated to be selling as principal) and is not liable for any act or default by the Seller or the Buyer save where such act or default is due to the actual fault of Coys. All sales are to be presumed to be sales on behalf of private individuals unless specifically notified to the contrary in the catalogue, or elsewhere in writing. 4. COYS’ DISCRETION IN CASE OF DISPUTES BETWEEN THE BUYER AND THE SELLER If Coys is notified or becomes aware of the Seller’s alleged breach of any of these Conditions before it has remitted the proceeds of sale from any Lot to the Seller, it may at its sole discretion, withhold payment until that dispute is resolved. Coys may, however, deduct any sums that are due to it from the sum held. 5. LOSS OR INJURY Coys shall be under no liability for any injury, damage or loss sustained by any person or to any property while on Coys’ premises (including any premises where a sale may be conducted or where a Lot, or part of a Lot, may be on view from time to time) except for death or personal injury, damage or loss caused by the negligence of or other breach of duty by Coys, its employees or agents in the ordinary course of their duties to Coys. 6. NOTICES 6.1. Any notice by Coys to a Seller, Buyer or any other person may, in addition to such other methods as that person may accept, be delivered by email, hand or sent by first class mail or airmail and shall be deemed to have been duly received:(a) If emailed when dispatched;

(b) If hand-delivered, at the time of delivery; (c) If sent by mail, two business days after the date of posting if posted to an address within the country of posting and seven business days after the date of posting if posted to an address within a country outside the country of posting. 6.2. Any notice to Coys may be delivered by hand to one of its authorised representatives at Coys’ registered place of business or auction premises, or sent by first class mail or airmail to its registered place of business. Unless otherwise agreed in writing, Coys do not accept service of any notice by facsimile or email. 6.3. In proving service by delivery:(a) By hand, it shall be necessary only to produce a receipt for the notice signed by or on behalf of the addressee; (b) By post, it shall be necessary only to prove that the notice was contained in a pre-paid envelope which was duly addressed and posted first class or by airmail. 7. SELLER’S WARRANTIES AND REPRESENTATIONS 7.1. The Seller warrants and represents to Coys and the Buyer in the terms of sub-paragraphs (a) to (e) that:(a) The Seller is the owner of the Lot or is properly authorised to sell the Lot by the owner and is able to sell the Lot with full title guarantee (ownership) free from all encumbrances and third party claims, and that all taxes are paid. (b) The Seller has complied with all requirements relating to any export or import of the Lot as may be required, and has notified Coys in writing of any failure to comply with such requirements by the Seller or any previous owner of the Lot; (c) The Seller has notified Coys in writing of any material alterations to the Lot of which the Seller is aware and of any concerns expressed by third parties in relation to the authenticity, provenance, origin, age, condition or quality of the Lot and has provided Coys with all such information in the Seller’s possession; (d) In the case of a Motor Vehicle which may be lawfully used on a public road, complies with all statutory provisions and that there is in force any test certificate required by law in relation to such use, or the Seller has notified Coys in writing that any such vehicle cannot lawfully be used on a public road; (e) The Seller warrants that the information about the Lot given to Coys, including (for the avoidance of doubt and without prejudice to the generality of the foregoing) all information set out in the Auction Entry Form, and statements made about it, is true 7.2 The Seller of a Lot not in the possession of Coys on its premises or under its control warrants and undertakes that the Lot will be available and in a deliverable state on demand by the Buyer; . 7.3 The Seller hereby acknowledges that Coys has entered into this contract in reliance on the representations set out in Conditions 7.1(a) to (e) and the information set out in the Auction Entry Form. 7.4 The Seller shall indemnify Coys against any and all actions, claims, actual costs (including legal and expert costs, fees and disbursements), demands, expenses, fines, liabilities, losses, penalties and proceedings arising out of the falsity of any of the warranties and representations set out in Conditions 7.1(a) to (f). 7.5. If Coys has reasonable cause for believing that the Seller is in breach of any one or more of the warranties set out in this Condition 7, Coys may by giving notice in writing to the Seller decline to sell the Lot, and the Seller shall be liable to Coys as though the Seller had withdrawn the lot from sale without Coys consent. If the Lot is in the possession of Coys, it may retain it until any sums due to Coys are paid, the cost of storage being borne by the Seller. 7.6 The Seller shall further indemnify Coys in respect of any actual legal or other costs reasonably incurred by it in investigating any claim concerning the ownership of a Lot and/or the Seller’s right to sell the Lot, the accuracy of the description of the Lot contained in the Catalogue or in defending any claim relating thereto, and Coys shall be entitled to withhold the amount of such costs from any payment due to be made to the Seller in accordance with Condition 2.

8. VEHICLE REGISTRATION NUMBERS 8.1. If the Seller wishes to sell any Motor Vehicle but to retain the right to the registration number of the Vehicle (“VRN”) , it is the Seller’s responsibility to notify Coys in writing either on the Auction Entry Form or sooner. 8.2. It shall be the Seller’s responsibility to take all necessary steps to ensure that the current VRN is reserved and that a new number is allocated prior to the Motor Vehicle being sold at the Auction and if he does not do so, Coys shall not be responsible for any loss or damage whatsoever and howsoever arising (including for the avoidance of doubt arising out of Coys’ negligence) out of the Seller’s loss of the right to the VRN following the sale of the Vehicle. 8.3. Coys may, at its own discretion, (without any assumption of responsibility or duty towards the Seller or the Buyer) take such steps to facilitate the reservation or transfer of any particular registration number as it thinks fit in order to assist the Seller or Buyer but strictly on condition that no claim attaches to Coys for taking any such steps whether arising out of Coys’ negligence or any other cause whatsoever. 9. RESERVES 9.1. The Seller may place a reserve price (“Reserve”) on any Lot prior to the Auction and once placed by the Seller, it may not be changed without the written consent of Coys. All Lots will be sold without Reserve unless a Reserve has been agreed by Coys in writing. 9.2. Where a Reserve has been agreed, only Coys may bid on behalf of the Seller. If the Seller makes such bid, then the Auctioneer may knock the Lot down to the Seller without observing any Reserve and the Seller shall pay to Coys the Buyer’s Premium in addition to the Seller’s Commission and Expenses. 9.3. Where a Reserve is agreed, Coys may in its sole discretion sell a Lot for less than the Reserve but shall account to the Seller as if the Lot had been sold for the Reserve. 9.4. Where no Reserve has been placed, the Seller may bid either personally or through the agency of any person. 9.5. If no Reserve has been placed on a Lot, Coys shall not be held liable should the Lot be purchased for a price below any lowest estimated selling price of the Lot given in any Catalogue, save insofar as and limited to the extent that the same arises out of the actual fault or negligence of Coys. 10. COMMISSION AND EXPENSES 10.1. The parties hereby acknowledge that Coys shall be entitled to deduct from the Hammer Price a Seller’s Commission of 10% plus VAT (or, in the case of automobilia, 15% plus VAT) or such other sum agreed by Coys in writing, plus any Expenses, and any other sums due from the Seller to Coys. 10.2. The Buyer shall pay (and the Seller acknowledges Coys’ entitlement to) a Buyer’s Premium equal to 15% of the first £50,000 or €50,000 of the Hammer Price, and 12.5% upon such of the Hammer Price as exceeds £50,000 or €50,000, plus VAT. 11. PHOTOGRAPHY AND ILLUSTRATIONS The Seller permits Coys without payment to photograph and make illustrations of any Lot and to use at its discretion any photograph or illustration of or in respect of a Lot supplied by the Seller, whether or not in conjunction with the Auction. The copyright in all photographs taken and illustrations made of any Lot by or on behalf of Coys shall be the absolute property of Coys. 12. COYS’ ESTIMATES AND DESCRIPTIONS 12.1. Coys make no warranty or representation as to the anticipated or likely selling price of any Lot. Any estimate given by Coys, whether written or oral and whether or not printed in any Catalogue for the Auction, as to the estimated selling price of any Lot is a statement of opinion only and may be subject to revision from time to time at Coys’ sole discretion and should not be relied upon as an indication of the actual selling price. 12.2. Coys shall not be liable to the Seller for any error or mis-statement in or omission from the description of any Lot in any Catalogue where:(a) Coys have been provided with such description by the Seller or any person on his behalf; or (b) Coys have provided the Seller with a copy of such description prior to publication of the


Catalogue and neither the Seller nor any person on his behalf have notified Coys in writing within seven days of any error or mis-statement in or omission from the description. 12.3. Any Motor Vehicle is sold as a collector’s item and not as a means of transport. Buyers are specifically warned that any vehicle sold as such may well have had parts replaced and paint renewed or be made up of parts from other vehicles the condition of which may be difficult to establish. Coys has to rely on information as to date, condition authenticity, maintenance, repairs and restoration provided by Sellers and does not, and cannot, undertake its own inspection of vehicles or other Lots to establish whether the vehicle or other Lot conforms with the description in the catalogue. It is the responsibility of the Buyer to carry out such inspection as he thinks necessary. Unless a vehicle is described as wholly original, the Buyer may not assume that all or any part of it is original. 12.4. No warranty is given by Coys as to the accuracy of the description of any Lot in any Catalogue or as to the age, authenticity, suitability, provenance, attribution, origin, condition, fitness for purpose, merchantable or satisfactory quality of any Lot or roadworthiness of any Motor Vehicle, and any warranties or conditions that would otherwise be implied by the Sale of Goods Act 1979 in relation to the foregoing are hereby expressly excluded. 12.5. Coys has no duty to the Seller to investigate the accuracy of the description of any Lot provided by or on behalf of the Seller. 13. WITHDRAWAL OF LOTS 13.1. The Seller may by notice in writing to Coys withdraw the Lot from the Auction. In the event of such withdrawal, the Seller shall within 14 days of withdrawal pay Coys the sums set out in this Condition 13. All such sums shall be payable to Coys as remuneration for the services performed by Coys down to the date of withdrawal, and not by way of penalty or liquidated damages. 13.2 In all cases of withdrawal, including under 7.5 above, the Seller shall be liable to pay Coys 10% of the estimated value of the Lot, notwithstanding that commission of a lesser, or no, amount had previously been agreed, to reflect the time, effort, loss of publicity and buyer’s premium suffered by Coys. The estimated value shall be the higher of:(a) The Seller’s estimate of value as previously notified to Coys or, if more than one figure, the highest figure or if none; (b) The value estimated in the Catalogue, or if more than one figure is given, the highest figure; (c) If none of the above apply such figure as Coys shall reasonably estimate as the value. (d) Plus in each case VAT on such fee and Expenses. 13.3. In the event that the Lot is withdrawn from the Auction after the publication of the Auction catalogue, the Seller shall in addition to the sum set out in Condition 13.2, be liable to pay Coys a further sum equal to the Buyer’s Premium (as defined in Condition 10.2 above) that would have been payable upon the Lot realising the aforesaid estimated value at Auction, plus VAT. 13.4. In the event that the Seller withdraws the Lot from the Auction, the Seller shall arrange for collection and removal of the Lot at his own expense within two working days after the date of withdrawal provided that the Seller may not collect the Lot unless and until any withdrawal fee payable under Conditions 13.2 and 13.3 shall have been paid in full. 14. UNSOLD LOTS 14.1 Where any Lot fails to sell at the Auction, Coys will have the sole and exclusive right to sell the Lot by private treaty within 14 days of the Auction date. These terms and conditions (including, for the avoidance of doubt, Condition 9 as to Reserves) shall govern any such sale by private treaty. 14.2. Unless Coys elects to sell the Lot by private treaty in accordance with Clause 14.1, the Seller shall arrange for the removal of any unsold Lot by 1.00 pm the day following the Auction or by such other time as agreed by Coys. 14.3. Failure to remove any unsold Lot pursuant to Condition 14.2 above will entitle Coys to charge the Seller a reasonable storage charge per day. The Seller shall further reimburse Coys for

any reasonable removal, insurance and other expenses. 14.4. If within 28 days after the Auction the Seller fails to give instructions to Coys regarding the disposal of the Lot, Coys shall have the exclusive right at its election to: (a) sell the Lot by private treaty, or (b) by Auction without Reserve, in either case in accordance with these Conditions. In such case, Coys shall be entitled to deduct from any sale price all sums owing to Coys including the Seller’s Commission and any charges incurred under this Condition 14. 15. RISK AND INSURANCE 15.1 The Lot shall at all times remain at the risk of the Seller until ownership of the Lot passes from the Seller to the Buyer under these Conditions. At no time shall ownership of the Lot pass to Coys other than in accordance with clause 21.4(e)(iii). 15.2 Until such time as risk passes to the Buyer in accordance with Condition 18, responsibility for arranging insurance for the Lot shall remain with the Seller, whereupon it shall pass to the Buyer. In no case shall Coys undertake responsibility for arranging insurance. 15.3. Coys will not be liable for any injury, loss or damage caused by any Lot unless caused by the negligence of Coys, its employees or agents in the ordinary course of their duties to Coys or by the Seller’s negligence or other breach of the Conditions. The Seller or the Buyer (as appropriate) shall compensate Coys in full in respect of all claims and proceedings brought against Coys in respect of injury, loss or damage caused by the Seller’s or Buyer’s (as appropriate) negligence or breach of any obligation under the Conditions. 16. THE BUYER 16.1. The Buyer shall be the highest bidder at the Auction. The Buyer’s bid shall form the basis of the Hammer Price. Any dispute as to any bid shall be settled by the Auctioneer at his absolute discretion. 16.2. Every bidder shall be deemed to act as principal unless prior to the commencement of the Auction there is a written acceptance by Coys that a bidder acts as agent on behalf of the named principal, and that its principal has agreed to and/ or is bound by these Conditions; in which case he shall be jointly liable with the principal by these Conditions. 16.3. No person shall be entitled to bid at the Auction without first having completed and delivered to Coys a bidder’s registration form and bidders attention is drawn to the information in the Catalogue under the heading “General Information”. 17. ABSENTEE BIDS Whilst the interest of prospective Buyers are best served by attendance at the Auction, Coys will if so instructed execute bids on behalf of prospective bidders. Coys, its agents or employees shall not be responsible for any defaults beyond Coys’ control relating to telephone, fax or other absentee bids including without limitation any telecommunications fault or failure. 18. SALE 18.1. A contract of sale is made between the Seller and the Buyer on the acceptance of a bid by the fall of the Auctioneer’s hammer. Coys is not a party to the contract of sale and has no liability for any act or default by the Seller or the Buyer. 18.2. The Buyer shall :(a) Immediately upon a Lot is sold, give to Coys his name and address and, if so requested, proof of identity if he has not already done so; and (b) Pay to Coys as agent for the Seller the Purchase Price in accordance with Condition 20.1 unless credit terms have been agreed with Coys in writing before the Auction. 18.3. Full payment for all Lots must be made to Coys by means of bankers draft, cash, telegraphic transfer or debit card in pounds sterling or the currency in which the sale was conducted. Where the Buyer wishes to pay by cheque and Coys has agreed that the Buyer may do so, the Lot will not be released until the cheque has been cleared. 18.4. No Lot may be collected until the Purchase Price has been received by Coys and payments by a Buyer to Coys may be applied by Coys towards any sums due from that Buyer to Coys on any account whatsoever notwithstanding any

directions to the contrary by the Buyer or his agent whether express or implied. 18.5. The ownership of the Lot will pass to the Buyer only when the Purchase Price in cleared funds has been received by Coys. 18.6. Immediately a Lot is sold the risk shall pass to the Buyer notwithstanding that possession will not be given and ownership will not pass to the Buyer before payment of the Purchase Price in full and Coys will not be responsible for any damage to or the loss or destruction of the Lot or any injury, loss or damage caused by the Lot unless caused by the negligence of or other breach of duty by Coys, its employees or agents in the ordinary course of their duties to Coys. The Buyer will compensate Coys in full in respect of all claims and proceedings brought against Coys in respect of any loss or damage to the Lot or injury, loss or damage caused by it not arising from the negligence of or other breach of duty by Coys, its employees or agents in the ordinary course of their duties to Coys. 19. VALUE ADDED TAX VAT payable by the Buyer on the Hammer Price may be refundable by Customs and Excise on proof of export, but Coys makes no warranties in this regard. 20. PAYMENT OF SALE PROCEEDS 20.1 Unless otherwise agreed in writing by both Coys and the Seller, the Buyer shall pay Coys forthwith and in any event no later than 35 days from the Auction the Purchase Price. 20.2. Coys shall pay the Net Sale Proceeds to the Seller not later than 35 days after the Auction, or within five working days after receiving cleared funds from the Buyer, whichever shall be the later. Coys shall be under no liability as a result of or arising out of any delay or failure by the Buyer in making payment. 20.3 Unless an alternative method of payment has been agreed by Coys in writing, payment of the Net Sale Proceeds shall be made by sending to the Seller a cheque drawn on Coys’ client account by first class post at the Seller’s risk. 20.4. Coys may in its discretion withhold remittance of the Net Sale Proceeds to the Seller until such time as the Seller has deposited with Coys the V5 registration document in the case of a UK registered vehicle or, in the case of an unregistered, or non-UK registered vehicle, the appropriate documents of title (ownership) relevant and appropriate to the country of registration of the vehicle, and any other documentation relating to the vehicle in the Seller’s possession or control which he agreed with Coys to supply. 21. BUYER’S DEFAULT 21.1 In the event that the Purchase Price is not duly paid in accordance with Condition 20.1, Coys may hold the Buyer in default and shall as against the Buyer (a “Defaulting Buyer”) have the following rights, in addition to those set out in Condition 21.4 below: (a) As agent for the Seller, to charge interest at a rate not exceeding 5% per annum above the Bank of England base rate on so much of the Purchase Price as remains due and unpaid; (b) To retain any Lot sold to the same Buyer at the same or any other Auction and to release it only after payment of the total amount due; (c) To reject or disregard any bid or bids made by or on behalf of the Defaulting Buyer at any future auction or to require payment of a deposit before any future bid made by or on behalf of that Buyer; (d) To apply any money due or to become due to the Defaulting Buyer in or towards settlement of the total amount due and to exercise a charge on any property of the Defaulting Buyer which is in Coys’ possession for any purpose. 21.2. If the Buyer continues to fail to make payment of the Purchase Price in full within 14 days of it falling due under Condition 20.1, Coys may (if so instructed by the Seller, or acting of its own motion in accordance with Condition 21.4 below) without prejudice to any other rights it may have, exercise one or more of the following additional remedies: (a) To institute proceedings against the Buyer in its own name, or in the name of the Seller for damages or specific performance for breach of the sale contract; (b) To institute proceedings against the Buyer in its own name in respect of the Buyer’s Premium


and any other sums that the Buyer shall be liable to pay Coys; (b) To cancel the sale of that or any other Lot sold to the Defaulting Buyer at the same or any other auction notwithstanding the total amount due in respect of such other Lot shall have been paid; (c) To re-sell the Lot or cause it to be resold by public auction or private sale. 21.3. If the Buyer fails or refuses to pay the Purchase Price in full within 35 days of the Auction, Coys will notify the Seller who may instruct Coys as to the appropriate course of action, including (where permitted under Clause 21.2) but not limited to one or more of the courses of action set out in Condition 21.4 below. Such notice will draw attention to the 14 day limit for the provision of instructions as set out in Condition 21.4 below. Coys shall if instructed take reasonable steps to assist the Seller but Coys shall be under no obligation to institute proceedings in its own name or personally incur any cost or expense. 21.4. In the absence of any written instructions from the Seller to Coys within 14 days of Coys’ notice to the Seller served in accordance with Condition 21.3 above then Coys shall in its sole discretion be entitled to do any of the following in its capacity as the Seller’s agent and with the Seller’s full authority:(a) To agree terms for the payment of the Purchase Price with the Buyer; (b) To remove, store and insure the Lot at the expense of the Buyer; (c) To settle claims and/or proceedings made by or against the Buyer on such terms as Coys shall at its absolute discretion think fit; (d) To take such steps as Coys shall at its absolute discretion consider necessary to collect the monies due from the Buyer; (e) Where appropriate to rescind and/or terminate the sale and in its sole discretion: (i) Return the Lot to the Seller, and distribute any monies received to the Buyer in accordance with Conditions 21.5 and/or 21.6; (ii) Offer the Lot for re-sale, by Auction or private treaty, with or without Reserve; (iii) Purchase the Lot itself at the Hammer Price or such other price as may be agreed with the Seller, in which case property in the Lot shall pass to Coys and Coys shall remit the Hammer Price to the Seller within fourteen days of its election less any sums payable pursuant to Condition 21.5 below; (f) To appoint a solicitor and/or other agent to pursue any of the courses of action referred to in sub-paragraphs (a) to (e) above and the Seller authorises Coys to take any of the courses referred to in this Condition 21.4, including the issue and prosecution of proceedings on the Seller’s behalf and in the Seller’s name. 21.5. In the event that the sale contract for the Lot is rescinded because of the Buyer’s default aforesaid, whether as a result of the Seller’s instruction or Coys’ action taken under Condition 21.4, the Seller shall nonetheless (and without prejudice to any claim that he may have against the Buyer) be liable to pay to Coys the following sums: (a) Legal or other costs on an indemnity basis reasonably incurred by Coys in connection with such steps; and (b) Expenses; (c) The Seller’s Commission, by way of remuneration for the services performed by Coys down to the date of rescission, and not by way of penalty or liquidated damages. 21.6. Any monies recovered by and paid to Coys in consequence of Coys taking one or more of the steps referred to in Condition 21.4 against a Defaulting Buyer, or any of the Purchase Price as shall have been paid by the Defaulting Buyer, shall be applied to the payment of:(a) Legal or other costs reasonably incurred by Coys in connection with such steps; and then (b) Expenses; and then (c) The Seller’s Commission, by way of remuneration for the services performed by Coys down to the date of recovery, and not by way of penalty or liquidated damages. (d) Any balance remaining shall be apportioned pro rata as between the Buyer’s Premium, and any payable sums to the Seller; and then (e) Any balance thereafter to the Buyer. 21.7 In the event that any monies recovered do not cover the sums set out at Conditions 21.6(a)

to (c), any such shortfall shall be made good by the Seller to Coys on demand. 22. REMOVAL OF PURCHASES 22.1. The Buyer shall, at his own expense, remove the Lot purchased not later than the day and time specified in the “General Information” section of the Catalogue but not before payment in full to Coys of the Purchase Price whether in respect of this or any other Lot. 22.2. The Buyer shall be responsible for all removals, storage, insurance and other charges on any Lot not taken away at the day and time specified in Condition 22.1 above. 22.3. If the Lot is not collected by the Buyer within 2 days of the Auction, whether or not the Purchase Price has been paid, and whether or not the Buyer is consequently entitled to collect the Lot, Coys shall remove, store (either at Coys’ premises or elsewhere) and insure the Lot at the expense of the Buyer and only release the Lot after payment of the total amount due. 22.4. If the Buyer fails to collect the Lot within 14 days of the Auction, Coys shall notify the Seller who shall at his sole discretion elect to: (a) Cancel the sale of the Lot and take back possession of the Lot; or (b) Re-sell the Lot or cause it to be re-sold by public auction or private sale; or (c) Continue to remove, store and insure the Lot at his expense, but subject to being entitled to recoupment of such expenses from the Buyer, and subject to being entitled to elect (a) or (b) at any time thereafter. 22.5 In the event that the sale contract is cancelled, or the Lot is re-sold, in accordance with Condition 22.4 above, the same provisions shall apply as under Condition 21.6 above, “Buyer’s Default”, as regards any of the Purchase Price paid to the date of that cancellation or re-sale. 23. RESPONSIBILITY FOR LOTS PURCHASED 23.1. Subject to the Seller’s compliance with Condition 7.1(d), it shall be the responsibility of the Buyer to ensure that any Motor Vehicle purchased at Auction complies with the appropriate statute or regulation for driving, using or transporting it and for ensuring that any necessary test certificate is in force. In no case shall Coys be liable for any breach by the Seller of Condition 7.1(d) or by the Buyer of this Condition 23.1. 23.2. Subject to the Seller’s compliance with Condition 7.1(b), the Buyer shall be responsible for obtaining any export licence that may be required in connection with the Lot. In no case shall Coys be liable for any breach by the Seller of Condition 7.1(b) or by the Buyer of this Condition 23.2. 24. RESCISSION FOR SELLER’S DEFAULT 24.1 Should the Buyer become entitled to rescind the sale contract and/or reject the Lot and/or refuse to pay the Purchase Price as a result of any breach by the Seller of these Conditions, including in particular any breach of the warranties set out in Condition 7, the Seller shall be liable to pay the following: (a) Any legal or other costs reasonably incurred by Coys, on an indemnity basis; and (b) Expenses; (c) The Seller’s Commission; (d) The Buyer’s Premium. 24.2 Coys shall be entitled to retain the Lot until such sums as are payable under Condition 24.1 are paid in full by the Seller. 25. LIMITATION OF LIABILITY 25.1 Save as is expressly provided for in these Conditions, none of Coys, the Seller or the Buyer shall be liable for any loss of profit, loss of revenue, loss of use, business or interruption, loss of reputation, credit or goodwill, or any indirect or consequential damages whatsoever. 25.2 Without prejudice to Condition 25.1 Coys shall not be liable to pay to any other a sum greater than the estimated value of the Lot as defined in Condition 13.2; 26. FORCE MAJEURE 26.1 Should there be any event or occurrence outside the reasonable control of Coys, whether foreseeable (or foreseen) or not, which in the reasonable opinion of Coys shall prevent, hinder

or impede the Auction, its conduct, or the sale of the Lot at Auction, Coys may in its sole discretion cancel the Auction or remove the Lot from the Auction, in which case it shall as soon as reasonably possible notify the Seller of its decision accordingly. 26.2 Upon receipt of Coys’ notice as set out in Condition 26.1, the Seller may by notice in writing to Coys elect to: (a) Re-enter the Lot into the next auction to be conducted by Coys in respect of which the Lot is a suitable lot (as judged by Coys in their reasonable opinion); or (b) Instruct Coys to sell the Lot by private treaty within 14 days of such Seller’s notice, as though the Lot was an unsold lot at Auction for the purposes of Condition 14.1; or (c) Cancel this contract without any payment or penalty, save that where the Auction catalogue had been printed prior to cancellation, Coys shall be entitled to retain any cataloguing fee paid by the Seller. 26.3 In the event that the Seller does not make any election in writing under Condition 26.2 within 14 days of receipt of Coys’ notice, the right of election shall irrevocably pass to Coys who may elect for one of the three courses of action set out in Condition 26.2. In case Coys elects to sell the Lot by private treaty, the 14 day sale period shall in this case run from the date of Coys’ election. 26.4 Any sale of the Lot under this Condition 26.2, whether at subsequent auction or by way of private treaty, shall be in accordance with these Conditions. 27. MISCELLANEOUS 27.1. The benefit and burden of the Conditions may not be assigned by the Seller or the Buyer without Coys’ prior agreement in writing. 27.2. If any Condition or any part of any Condition shall be held to be unenforceable or invalid that Condition shall be severed, and such unenforceability or invalidity shall not affect the enforceability and validity of the remaining conditions or the remainder of the relevant condition. 27.3 These Conditions constitute the entire agreement between the parties and supersede all previous drafts, agreements, arrangements, understandings and conventions between them, whether written or oral, relating to the subject matter of this contract. 27.4 These Conditions may not be altered or varied unless with Coys consent in writing. 27.5 The Buyer and the Seller both acknowledge and warrant that in entering into this contract (and in the case of the Buyer, in bidding for any Lot) they do not rely and have not relied on any representations made by or on behalf of Coys, save where such representations have been confirmed or set out in writing signed by a partner of Coys. 27.6 No waiver of any rights arising under these Conditions shall be effective unless in writing. Any such waiver shall not be considered as a waiver of any subsequent breach, whether of the same or any other provision. 27.7 This contract is made for the benefit of Coys, the Seller, and the Buyer, and save where the Buyer acts as agent for a named principal in accordance with Condition 16.2, is not intended to benefit or be enforceable by anyone else. For the avoidance of doubt, any rights otherwise arising under the Contracts (Rights of Third Parties) Act 1999 are expressly excluded. 27.8. The headings and numbering used in the Conditions are for convenience only and shall not affect their interpretation. 27.9 In the event of any of the terms above being incompatible one with another, the term most beneficial to Coys shall prevail.


IMPORTANT NOTICE AND GENERAL INFORMATION FOR MOTOR CARS ANY MOTOR VEHICLE IS SOLD AS A COLLECTOR’S ITEM AND NOT AS A MEANS OF TRANSPORT. BUYERS ARE SPECIFICALLY WARNED THAT ANY VEHICLE SOLD AS SUCH MAY WELL HAVE HAD PARTS REPLACED AND PAINT RENEWED OR BE MADE UP OF PARTS FROM OTHER VEHICLES THE CONDITION OF WHICH MAY BE DIFFICULT TO ESTABLISH. COYS HAS TO RELY ON INFORMATION AS TO DATE, CONDITION AND AUTHENTICITY PROVIDED BY SELLERS AND DOES NOT, AND CANNOT, UNDERTAKE ITS OWN INSPECTION OF VEHICLES OR OT HER LOTS TO ESTABLISH WHETHER THE VEHICLE OR OTHER LOT CONFORMS WITH THE DESCRIPTION IN THE CATALOGUE. IT IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE BUYER TO CARRY OUT SUCH INSPECTION AS HE THINKS NECESSARY. GENERAL INFORMATION 1. Admissions Coys shall have the right to refuse admission to its premises or attendance at any of its auctions by any person provided it has reasonable justification in refusing entry. 2. Contract Prospective Buyers are advised to read the Conditions of Business carefully before bidding on any lot. 3. Viewing Viewing of all the Lots entered for the sale will take place on Friday 16th February from 10.00am to 5.00pm and Saturday 17th February from 9:00am to the start of the sale. 4. Bidder Registration To recognise bidders during the Auction all intending Buyers are required to complete a Bidder Registration Form giving full identification and appropriate references before the Auction which will enable them to bid by means of a number allocated to them. 5. Premium Buyers are reminded that a 15% Buyers Premium is payable on the first £50,000.00 of the final Hammer Price of each Lot, and 12.5% on any amount by which the Hammer Price exceeds £50,000.00. Buyer’s attention is drawn to Condition 17 of the Conditions of Sale. VAT at the standard rate is payable on the Premium by all Buyers. 6. Export Licences Export Licences may be required for any vehicle manufactured 50 years prior to the date of export from the UK and valued at over £35,000.00. It is the responsibility of the Buyer to obtain the licence and correct documentation prior to exportation of the vehicle. 7. Currency Bidding will be conducted in Pounds Sterling. 8. Payment Purchases can only be released when full settlement incluse of all charges of all invoices is received in cleared funds. Full payment for all Lots must be made to Coys of Kensington Automobiles Ltd by means of banker’s draft, cash, telegraphic transfer or debit card before the release of the vehicle unless prior arrangements have been made. Card payments cannot exceed £1,000 or the Euro equivalent. Where payment is made by cheque the vehicle will be released on clearance of funds. All cheques should be made payable to Coys of Kensington Automobiles Ltd. If paying by bank transfer, the amount received after either the deduction of bank charges or for the conversion to Pounds Sterling, must be no less then the amount payable on the bill of Sale. Please quote the Auction and the Lot number you purchased as the reference. Payments should be made immediately after the sale to Coys for which bank account details are as follows:-

Coys of Kensington Automobiles Ltd. Account (Auction Account) Account Number: 53662845 Sort Code: 40-07-31 Address: HSBC 100 Old Broad Street London EC2N 1BG United Kingdom IBAN: GB76 HBUK 4007 3153 6628 45 BIC: HBUKGB4141R 9. Collection of Motor Cars Removal of all Lots must be made from the auction site on Sunday 18th February from 6.00pm to 8pm. After this time all Lots will be removed to store at the owners expense. Purchasers of lots are advised to or Monday 19th February from 8.30am and 11am. Please contact Coys staff for all payment and collection arrangements. 10. Removal and Storage All motorcycles not removed in accordance with clause 9 above will be transported to our storage at the owner’s expense. The cost of transport of each Lot to storage is £125 plus VAT and the cost of storage is £10.00 per day. 11. Commission Bids Telephone and commission bids will be gladly accepted subject to prior arrangement with Coys. New customers will be required to pay a refundable deposit. 12. VAT Certain vehicles in this sale are not European registered, and therefore will attract VAT at either the UK rate, or should the European purchaser decide to import the car through a different European Community country, VAT at this country’s rate, such as Holland, where vehicles over 30 years of age attract a duty of just 6%. For further information regarding the simple import procedure necessary to register these vehicles or further advice please contact either Coys Head Office or our shipping agents, C.A.R.S. UK Limited, telephone number 01284 850950, fax number 01284 851077. 13. Further Information When an * appears in either the registration, chassis or engine number section of any Lot description it indicates that at the time of going to press information regarding those sections was not available. 14. Damage Any viewer who damages a Lot will be held liable for all damage caused and shall reimburse Coys or its agents for all costs and Expenses relating to rectification of such damage.


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An Auction of Select Sports, Sports Racing And Competition Cars And other Sporting Types Excel, London

17th February 2018 In Association with Historic Motorsport International


Lot 301

1952 Triumph 250 TWN Estimate: £4,000 - £6,000

In 1886, Siegfried Bettmann founded the Triumph bicycle factory in Coventry, England, and in 1896 he founded a second bicycle factory in his native Nuremberg, Germany, under the same Triumph name. Both factories branched out into making motorcycles: the Coventry factory in 1902 and the Nuremberg factory in 1903. In its early decades the Nuremberg factory produced models with the same 499 cc and 545 cc four-stroke engines as its sister plant in Coventry. Confusion between motorcycles produced by the Coventry and Nuremberg Triumph companies led to the latter’s products being renamed “Orial” for certain export markets. However, in the 1920s there was already an Orial motorcycle maker in Lyon, France, so the Nuremberg motorcycles were renamed again as “TWN”, standing for Triumph Werke Nürnberg. After 1913 the English and German factories diverged, with the Nuremberg works making motorcycles with 248 cc and 269 cc two-stroke engines. After the Second World WarTriumph made successful models including the 200 cc Cornet split single two-stroke and the split-single 1 cylinder 350 cc Boss. A split single has one “divided” cylinder (with 2 bores) but only one common combustion chamber and spark plug. Triumph/TWN’s production of split singles began with the BD250 in 1939 designed by Otto Rieze. In 1956 Max Grundig took over the Nuremberg Company, merged it with his Adlermotorcycle and typewriter business and terminated motorcycle production under the Triumph and TWN names. This very original and largely unmolested Triumph 250 is one of the last of the earlier and more desirable ‘Triumph Werke Nurnburg’ (TWN) Triumphs produced in Nurnburg A.G. Truly a collector’s piece, this 250 TWN has had the benefit of being in its current ownership for almost 20 years.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 302

2007 Harley Davidson Softail Special Estimate: ÂŁ15,000 - ÂŁ20,000

Based on an early model Softail Classic this lovely example was customised by a well known styling house. Other unique features of the build were the exhaust, seat and rear bodywork all which were created just for this bike. Having only been used to exhibit at shows the bike remains in absolutely excellent first class condition, all of the fittings are like new and the general build quality is very good. Offered with a UK V5C and various other documents this striking and unique custom Harley-Davidson is ready for new ownership.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 303

2014 Bimota Tesi 3D 40th anniversary edition Estimate: £15,000 - £25,000

Bimota first experienced international racing success in 1980 when Jon Ekerold, a true privateer, won the 350cc world championship on a Yamaha-powered Bimota. They also experienced success in the early years of the Superbike World Championship. Virginio Ferrari won the 1987 Formula TT title aboard a YB4 EI, partnering with Davide Tardozzi. Tardozzi won five races in the inaugural 1988 world superbike championship, more than any other competitor, but inconsistent results relegated him to third place in the final standings. After many years without success, the Australian rider Anthony Gobert caused a major shock in 2000 by winning a wet race at Philip Island on a Bimota SB8R. The Alstare team entered a Bimota package into World Superbikes in 2014 for riders Ayrton Badovini and Christian Iddon, however the bike initially did not have enough units in production to pass the championship’s homoglation rules. As a compromise, the bikes were allowed to enter from round 2, but ineligible for points until homoglation is achieved. The Tesi 3D 40th anniversary edition on offer is in fantastic condition. As a low mileage example there are only few minor blemishes to the motorcycle. Offered with all the relevant registration documents this genuine low mileage example is ready for the summer months.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 304

1989 BMW K75S Estimate: £16,000 - £22,000

The three-cylinder BMW K75 was developed alongside the K100, but was introduced a year after the K100 as a marketing strategy. The K75 engine had the same bore and stroke as the K100, yielding a displacement of 740 cc. Its crankshaft had 120° between the throws and was counterbalanced by balance weights added to the water pump accessory shaft, which ran at engine speed as is correct for a 120° straight-three engine. The balance shaft made the K75’s engine smoother than the K100’s engine. This highly modified and upgraded café racer was a base k75 motorcycle before having a no expense spared restoration by marque specialists who have adapted the looks of the K75 making it a true modern café racer. Offered in a fantastic colour scheme the BMW is in fantastic running condition and has very few blemishes to the body. A great chance to own a reliable and user friendly café racer that is a fraction of the cost of building one.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 305

1978 Bultaco Sherpa 350 T Estimate: £2,300 - £3,200

The origin of the Bultaco motorcycle company dates back to May 1958. Francesc ‘Paco’ Bultó was a director of the Montesa motorcycle company founded in 1944. After several years of steady growth and road racing success, in 1957 Montesa moved to larger facilities. This lovely example of the Bultaco Sherpa 350T is in good condition, the frame and bodywork are both in good condition but do show signs of use. Offered with a copy of the old Italian registration papers, original FMI certification and Italian PRA Visura.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 306

1981 Suzuki RV-90 Estimate: £3,000 - £4,000

Suzuki first introduced the ‘RV’ series of ‘all terrain’ motorcycles in 1971, commencing with the RV-90. Distinguished by its 10-inch-wide balloon tyres, the RV looked like a 2-wheeled dune buggy, but in truth it was more of a fun bike than a serious off-roader. 50cc and 125cc versions followed in 1973, the smaller RVs being distinguished by their spine frames and the latter by its cradle chassis. The big RV was powered by a de-tuned version of the TS125 trail bike engine producing 10bhp with a 5-speed gearbox, while the 4-speed RV-90 made 8bhp, weighed 84kgs, could tackle 30° inclines and had a speed range of 40-50mph. The subsequent arrival of three-wheeled ATBs and then quads spelled the end for the RVs. With only two owners from new, this RV-90 is fitted with a front crash bar and it has just 5,376kms (3,340 miles) showing on the odometer. According to the owner it is in very good original condition and it comes to sale with its Italian papers.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 307

Rudge Ulster to Grand Prix Specification Estimate: £10,000 - £15,000

Rudge-Whitworth found their move into motorcycle production a natural development, like many other long standing bicycle manufacturers. In 1911 the first production models appeared and some technically advanced features were quickly introduced, such as variable ratio gears etc., which belied the staid conservative impression some may have formed about the company, somewhat justified by certain anachronistic features still employed, such as belt drives, well into the twenties.

The 498cc. ‘Ulster’ racing machine was first listed in 1929, along with 248 and 348cc. sv and ohv JAP powered models. Supplied ready to race ex-works and comparatively inexpensive the Ulster went on to win countless honours in TT, GP and many other international events in later years. This fine sporting marque was very competitive in speedway, and also trials events in the hands, and feet, of Murray’s dad Graham (Walker) Rudge’s sales manager at the time.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


This fantastic example is built to works race specification, in beautifully restored condition the Rudge has been made to replicate the 1930 TT winning machine. Included in the sale is a comprehensive history file including a build sheet schedule. Based on a genuine Rudge Ulster this wonderful example is set up in a fast road specification and is ready to be used by a new custodian.


Lot 308

Triumph Bonneville Bud Ekins Desert Scrambler Specialbler Special Estimate: ÂŁ20,000 - ÂŁ30,000

This 2009 triumph was commissioned as a special edition model and one of only 3 made to celebrate the life of bud Ekins the stunt double and best friend of Steve Mc queen who passed away in 2008.

The two raced triumphs together throughout the 1960s. This bike is the modern-day equivalent of the sled racers that where raced by the two in the 1960s and was built by Brad Holstein on behalf of Triumph.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


The bike was given to Brad Pitt as a gift from who we believe was the Oceans 11 producer Jerry Weintaub with the petrol cap engraved with his birthday message. In good all-round condition the bike has been used only occasionally by the current owner. The Triumph retains its registration plates from the former owner Brad Pitt. Ready for the open road and summer months.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 309

1976 Laverda 3C Estimate: £13,000 - £16,000

During the late 1960s and early 1970s Laverda faced intense competition, not just from the Japanese makers with their flashy multi-cylindered superbikes, but also from more local rivals like Benelli, Ducati and Moto Guzzi. So, in 1968, and while launching its new range of 750cc twins, the Breganze company started work on Massimo Laverda’s brainchild – a new big-capacity three-cylinder motor. First revealed in prototype form at the 1969 Milan and Geneva shows, the chaindriven single overhead cam 1,000cc 120° triple was essentially a 750 twin with an additional cylinder.

Although pipped to market by Kawasaki’s spectacular Z1, the new 5-speed 3C could hold its own in any company. With 80hp and 86Nm of torque the 3C could match the Z1’s 130mph top speed, while its 214kg dry weight bettered the weightier Z1. The 3C’s conservative but brutish styling was appealing, as was its distinctive engine and exhaust note, while a sportier riding position, beefy forks and superior rear suspension units allowed it to out-handle the Oriental flexiflyers of the day. Although the big Laverda’s ventilated twin-leading shoe front brake was effective, drums had already become a little dated.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


This lovely example on offer has been subject to much renovation work throughout the last few years. Included in the paperwork is invoices of work carried out as well as the UK registration document. Presented in lovely condition the 3C is ready for a new custodian.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 310

1969 HERCULES K125 GS Estimate: £4,000 - £5,000

Sachs was the largest European manufacturer of 2-stroke motorcycle engines from the 1950s to the 1970s and its engines were used by many motorcycle manufacturers, the German maker Hercules being the most important. In the late 1950s Hercules (founded in 1886) was absorbed by the Fichtel & Sachs group and from then Hercules motorcycles were also marketed under the Sachs, DKW and Kieft brand names. Although the German BMW, Maico and Zundapp brands were accomplished in offroad competition during the 1950s and ‘60s, Hercules also sought success and in 1958 it took its first steps by offering an off-road conversion kit for its Sachs-powered 2-stroke K100/101 model. This was comprised of an Earles-type leading-link fork conversion and an upswept silencer. 1960 saw two off-road models launched; the K101 GS and the K175 GS, both with Sachs 2-stroke singles, high-level exhausts and well-padded single seats. In 1968 Sachs introduced its new 5-speed engines, and the GS range continued to be updated and expanded until the late 1970s. Although Hercules only won one major off-road title (in 1977), Hercules/DKW/ Sachs machines comprised much the field in small-bore motocross races from the late 1960s to mid ‘70s, and this legion of privateer riders won countless medals over the years. Preserved in good original condition, this 125 GS Hercules was the one the first to be fitted with the radially-finned Sachs 125 motor which became ubiquitous during the 1970s. It has also seen some competition us, as evidenced by the scrutineer’s marking on the headstock. It is to be sold on a Coys bill of sale.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 311

1973 KTM GS 125 Enduro Estimate: £4,200 - £5,500

KTM as it is today was formed in 2003, but the firm can trace its history back to 1934. The first KTM motorcycle, the R100, was produced in prototype form in 1951 and it was powered by a Sachs-built Rotax engine. KTM’s first international competition success was achieved with a gold medal in the 1956 ISDT, but it didn’t become heavily involved in off-road competition until 1965. Success in motocross and enduro fuelled further growth and by 1971 the workforce was 400 strong and there were 42 models in the KTM catalogue. In 1974 KTM won the 250cc Motocross World Championship for the first time – a feat the Austrian maker has repeated 14 times since, along with 13 other World MX titles, not to mention 16 Dakar rally wins plus three Moto3 road racing World Championships thus far. This 122cc Sachs-powered KTM GS enduro is the last version with aluminum mudguards and it was completely restored in 2014. It is offered for sale with historic certification.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 312

1965 Rickman Bultaco 250 Estimate: £6,000 - £8,000

As both Bultaco importers and top motocross riders, brothers Derek and Don Rickman helped forge the Spanish company’s growth in the early 1960s. Don Rickman finished 3rd in the 1963 British motocross GP riding a 196ccBultacopowered Rickman, and that bike would evolve into the 1965 Rickman Bultaco Petite Metisse 250. Unlike the popular Rickman frame kits for Triumph and BSA engines, the Petite Metisse was a complete bike. In 1966 Bultaco launched the Pursang Metisse Mk. 1. It was a crude copy of the beautiful Rickman, and Rickmans’ relationship with Bultaco ended soon after it was introduced. A little under 100 Rickman Petite Metisse were built, and although the Rickmans had agreed that they wouldn’t export the machine, a grey market soon developed. American champion Bud Ekins and motorcycle dealer Charlie Hockie imported 24 Petite Metisses (by having the bikes shipped to the US unassembled). The US-bound Petite Metisses were painted in British Racing Green instead of the original yellow. Finished in canary yellow, this beautiful Rickman Bultaco 250 is in superb condition having been restored by the Italian specialist Malanchini of Bergamo. It is to be sold on a Coys bill of sale.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 313

1980 Yamaha XS850 Estimate: £4,000 - £8,000

The XS range of motorcycles are usually referred to as “Triples” because of the three cylinders. The first 4 model years the bike displaced 750cc but was increased to 850 for the final 2 model years. There were various changes made to the model over the years. This example has come from a private collection and has been maintained and used regularly during this time. Described to be in good running condition the motorcycle on offer comes complete with a UK registration document. Ready to be used in the coming summer months.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 314

1986 Royal Enfield 250 Sports Crusader Estimate: £4,500 - £7,500

The 250cc class was important in the UK as it was the largest engine which a ‘learner’ could ride without passing a test. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, Royal Enfield produced a number of 250 cc machines, including a racer, the ‘GP’ and a Scrambler, the ‘Moto-X’, which used a modified Crusader frame, leading link forks and a Villiers Starmaker engine. The Clipper was a base-model tourer with the biggest-seller being the Crusader, a 248 cc pushrod OHV single producing 18 bhp (13 kW). This example has come from a private collection and has been meticulously looked after in the current vendors ownership. Offered with a Uk registration document and other invoices and documents.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 315

1991 Kawasaki GPZ305 Estimate: £1,000 - £2,000

The Kawasaki Gpz305 was a 306 cc twin cylinder air-cooled SOHC four-stroke motorcycle, produced in 1983 to 1994 by Kawasaki in Japan. The model evolved from the earlier ER250 model and used an overbored 61 mm × 52.4 mm version of the 249 cc engine first produced in 1979. The example on offer today has been part of a private collection for many years. During this time it has been recommissioned and presents itself in good working order. Offered with a UK registration document and Mot test certificate as well as bills of maintenance.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 316

1996 Honda RVF750R/RC45 Original UK specification Estimate: £25,000 - £30,000

It started well for Honda in the World Superbike Championship. A VFR750R (RC30) took the first two titles in 1988 and ’89, but then Ducati took a hat-trick of victories, followed by Kawasaki winning in 1993. Honda needed to hit back, and the 1994 RVF750R (RC45) was the bike to do it, although it took a little longer than intended.

The RC45 was a pure, homologation special from the ground up, but being hand-built by HRC it was produced in significantly lower volumes than its predecessor. It’d be easy to view the RC45 simply as an RC30 with sophisticated fuel injection as they both have a 16-valve DOHC 90° v-four motor in a twin-beam alloy frame with a single-sided swing arm, but the RC45 was pretty much all new. Developed jointly by HRC and Honda R&D, the narrower RC45 engine had relocated gear cam drives, new bore and stroke dimensions, new valve angles, new crankshaft, new frame, new upside-down forks, new brakes, and so the list goes on. On the road, in road-legal production trim, the sweet-handling 118bhp RC45 was peerless, but it carried a price tag to match – £17,780 was £1,580 more than Ducati’s 916SP homologation special, and £5,980 more than a 916 Strada.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


In competition, the RC45 swept all aside at the IoM TT for four consecutive years during the mid ‘90s, while also taking victory in the prestigious Suzuka 8-hour, Bol d’Or 24-hour and Daytona 200 races. Championships were won in World Endurance, and in the American and Australian Superbike series, but, for reasons various, it wasn’t until 1997 that the RC45 finally did what was primarily intended of it; lift the World Superbike crown. This RC45 is very original. Maintained meticulously throughout the current vendors ownership the motorcycle has seen service work and mot work. The paint and body are in good order as is the engine which is said to run very well. A fantastic example of one of Hondas most sort after models. Offered with a UK registration document and valid mot test certificate.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 317

1989 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 Estimate: £7,000 - £8,000

“The OW01 was ahead of its time when it came out in the late ‘80s,” says Steve Brown, an enthusiast who owns one of only 23 bikes that made it to his native Australia. “The frame was developed from the FZ750R but the aluminium was of much higher quality, so much so it wasn’t even anodised. It got an Öhlins rear shock with remote hydraulic preload adjuster, a six-speed gearbox, loads of magnesium and titanium parts, and a proper race motor.” VisorDown. Developed to win the 750cc superbike championship this example is from a private collection and is an original full power European specification motorcycle which is one of only 500 examples built. in good order the bodywork is excellent with very few blemishes. Supplied with a UK registration document.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 318

1989 Kawasaki Z1300 Estimate: £3,000 - £6,000

The Kawasaki Z1300 is a muscle bike with a water-cooled 1,300 cc straight-six engine that was manufactured by Kawasaki between 1979 and 1989. Previously referring to the Z1300 as an Autobahn stormer, when reviewing their ‘Machine of the Year’ competition results in 1979 after readers had voted for the Triumph Bonneville as the winner, UK weekly newspaper Motor Cycle News stated “Kawasaki, with their Z1300 — a superb example of technology by anyone’s standards — have gone overboard in many people’s minds”, adding that the Honda CBX, Suzuki GS1000, Yamaha XS1100 and Z1300 were “hyperbikes”. This carburettor example is presented in its original paint and has recently been imported from Europe. Offered with a UK registration document this Z1300 is ready for use.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 319

1975 Honda TL250 Estimate: ÂŁ1,000 - ÂŁ3,000

Sammy Miller started working with the TL125 and XL250 engine. The TL125 was the first Honda Trials attempt using the small 121,9cc two-valve sohc engine from the SL125 Trail Honda. Honda R&D team was placed at Sammy’s disposal to develop the new Honda Trials bike. He decided to start with the XL250, but found a lot of difficulties to adapt it from the Trails needs to Trials requirements. Big efforts where made to improve carburation, complete a new frame, new upper yokes, also replaced the rims for alloy ones, and a lot of work on the suspension definition. The silencer was also redefined too obtain the maximum efficiency. The example on offer today is presented with a 1974 millers development engine. The TL250 is a fantastic opportunity for restoration and would need just minor recommissioning work to enjoy as it is. Supplied with a u.k registration document.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 320

1986 Yamaha YSR 80 Estimate: ÂŁ1,000 - ÂŁ3,000

Yamaha YSR 50 and YSR 80 sport models goes on sale in Japan in 1986, and had the look of a re-shaped, scaled-down YZR500 factory racer that appealed to the spirit of race enthusiasts in a playful way. The 2-stroke single-cylinder engine had a maximum output of 7 ps for the 50cc and 8.8 ps for the 80cc This YSR 80 is ready to be enjoyed by a new owner. Previously part of a private collection the condition of the YSR 80 is good and the body work has very few blemishes for its age.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 321

1985 Yamaha TZ250N Estimate: ÂŁ5,000 - ÂŁ6,000

In 1981 Yamaha was ready to introduce an all new TZ250. Known as the TZ250H, this design incorporated the powervalves found on the 500, providing more of a sensible balance between power and reliability. The new engine ran backwards from the previous design, helping even further in reliability. The single casting crankcase was replaced with left and right case halves and power was then tapped from the center of the engine. This design yielded a lower piston speed resulting in less bottom end problems. The powervalves employed a mechanical-governor design which kept them closed up to 8,750 rpm, opening fully by 11,000 rpm. This allowed a free flow of all exhaust gases. This example produced in 1985 is one of the last models with a steel frame. Presented in good all round condition this example comes complete with paddock stand and has recently been recommissioned where work has been carried out to the engine which has had just 1 hour of running in since a rebuild.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 322

C.1982 Benelli 254 Quattro Estimate: ÂŁ1,000 - ÂŁ3,000

After its take-over by Argentine industrialist Alejandro de Tomaso, Benelli launched a range of new four- and six-cylinder sports bikes in the 1970s. Smallest of the range was the 250 (actually 231cc) Quattro which, when deliveries commenced in 1979, was one of the most expensive 250s on sale anywhere, its specification did however include cast alloy wheels, Brembo disc brakes and an electric starter. A couple of years later the model was restyled and renamed, becoming the 254 Quattro. The example on offer comes complete with Nova confirmation and is ready for a new custodian ready for further renovation work.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 323

1976 Suzuki GT750 Estimate: ÂŁ7,000 - ÂŁ9,000

In 1973 Suzuki the GT750K was announced with extra chrome plating and two 295 mm discs replacing the drum front brake. No other manufacturer was offering dual front disc brakes at this time, so this was quite a marketing coup for Suzuki. The following year the GT750L gained unitized/rack mounted 40 mm Mikuni CV type carburettors, a gear position indicator added to the instrumentation and redesigned side covers along with other detail changes.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


This 1976 Suzuki GT750 has come from a private collection. In superb condition this example is in good running order and presents very well with very few blemishes, the paintwork on the tank and chrome work is good. Offered with a UK registration document this example is ready to be used in the coming summer months.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 324

Gilera Saturno 350GILERA SATURNO 350 Estimate: £1,000 - £3,000

In 1935, Gilera acquired rights to the Rondine four-cylinder engine. This formed the basis for Gilera’ s racing machines for nearly forty years. From the mid-thirties, Gilera developed a range of four-stroke engine machines. The engines ranged from 100 to 500 cc, the most famous being the 1939 Saturno. Designed by Giuseppe Salmaggi, the Saturno was inspired by the pre-war Gilera VTEGS 500 cc “Otto Bulloni” yet was quite different due to its unit construction. The Gilera Saturno 350 was developed primarily for the European Market and the example on offer today is fitted with desirable TT exhausts, quick release front forks and Brembo brakes. Supplied with a Japanese logbook and Nova Confirmation.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 325

C.1965 Bsa C15 Trials Estimate: £2,000 - £4,000

The BSA C15 was a 250 cc single-cylinder ohv motorcycle manufactured by the British company BSA from September 1958 until 1967, and was BSA’s first fourstroke unit-construction bike. For most of that period, after the introduction of ‘Learner Laws’ in 1961, a 250 cc was the largest capacity solo machine that a learner could ride unaccompanied when displaying L-plates in the United Kingdom. A road-going Sports derivative was added in 1961, and off-road versions, for Trials and Scrambles, were also available in the range. The scrambler on offer is 250cc unit fitted to what is believed to be an Otta frame. Converted to magneto the c15 both starts and runs and is ready for a new custodian.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 326

1986 Suzuki RG50 Estimate: ÂŁ1,000 - ÂŁ2,000

The Suzuki RG50 was produced in a few different versions. The RG50 Gamma is a sport motorcycle powered by a two-stroke, single-cylinder engine of 49 cubic centimetres displacement, that has been around since 1986 and likely before. It is not currently in production. The motorcycle has a six-speed transmission. Its maximum speed on level pavement with no headwind is 120 km/hour, in 6th gear at 11000rpm. Fuel usage at full speed is average, at around 40mpg +/- 30%. The engine redlines at 10500 rpm, and engine torque below 7000 rpm is quite feeble. A first gear with higher-than-average speed ratio, combined with the feeble low-speed torque, makes it a fairly difficult bike to start from standstill.

As the miniature version of the GSXR range the RG50 is rare. This example is in good condition and ready to be enjoyed by a new custodian. Offered with a UK registration document.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 327

1966 Matchless 250GSR Estimate: ÂŁ1,000 - ÂŁ1,500

Matchless is one of the oldest marques of British motorcycles, manufactured in Plumstead, London, between 1899 and 1966. A wide range of models were produced under the Matchless name, ranging from small two-strokes to 750 cc four-stroke twins. Matchless had a long history of racing success; a Matchless ridden by Charlie Collier won the first single-cylinder race in the first Isle of Man TT in 1907. The 250GSR on offer has been converted to trials specification more recently and is supplied with a UKV5C registration document and relevant papers. A fantastic opportunity to acquire one of the best Matchless trials variants.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 328

1998 Vespa Piaggo 50 cc 695 miles from new Estimate: £900 - £1.200

In recent years, many urban commuters have purchased new or restored Vespas. A shortage of available parking for automobiles in large urban areas and the Vespa’s low running costs are two reasons for the increase in Vespa (and other scooter) popularity. The cultural use of the scooter as a recreational vehicle with a sub-cultural following in the US/Canada and parts of Europe & Japan has also contributed to the rise in Vespa ownership. Having covered a mere 695 miles from new this charming Vespa is ready to be used an enjoyed.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 329

2017 Indian Scout Sixty Estimate: £10,000 - £15,000

The Indian Scout is a motorcycle built by the Indian Motorcycle Company from 1920 to 1949. It rivalled the Chief as Indian’s most important model. The 101 Scout, made from 1928 to 1931, has been called the best motorcycle Indian ever made. This 2017 model is a tribute to the early Scouts as a limited edition example is offered unregistered and with delivery mileage this 2017 Scout Sixty has been displayed since new. In superb condition this Scout Sixty is one of just few ever built and is a fantastic opportunity to acquire such an example.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 330

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Circa 1960’s Lambretta Estimate: NO RESERVE

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 331

Circa 1950’s Mival Estimate: NO RESERVE

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 332

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Circa 1958 Benelli Leoncino 125 Estimate: NO RESERVE

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 333

1966 Triumph Tiger Estimate: £9,000 - £11,000

With the runaway sales success of the Triumph Speed Twin, Triumph turned to further developing the potential of this new parallel twin motor. The lighter and more powerful Tiger 100 was developed as a sports enthusiast’s machine and as with previous models the ‘100’ referred to its claimed maximum speed. The Triumph works were destroyed by German bombers in 1940 along with much of the city of Coventry bringing production of the Tiger 100 to an end until after the war but when Triumph recovered and began production again at Meriden the Tiger 100 re-appeared. The Tiger 90 was a development of the Twenty-one/3TA model, being a much sportier design in an attempt to capture more of the youth market. It was introduced with the bikini fairing and slim mudguard (as opposed to the bathtub and roman helmet of the 3TA), and had high-compression pistons to increase the power to that of the 5TA. The bikini fairing was dropped in 1964 and the bike was styled more like the 650cc Bonneville. This wonderful 3 owner example of the Tiger 90 has been fully restored with every conceivable part rebuilt, polished, painted, re-chromed, trimmed or powder coated. Since the rebuild the bike has been used very little. A beautiful example of a classic sports bike.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 334

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1974 MV Agusta 350 Scrambler Electronica Estimate: ÂŁ

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 335

2015 Harley Davidson War Eagle Estimate: ÂŁ20,000 - ÂŁ27,000

This superb example has been the subject to a no expense spared restoration to War eagle specification. The owner has upgraded many parts to make this one of the nicest war eagles on the market today. In excellent running condition the bike is fresh from restoration, a real head turner the chrome work is in excellent condition as it the paintwork which was done by marque specialists at the time of restoration. Offered with a UK registration document.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 336

1938 Ariel Square Four Estimate: £12,000 - £17,000

Another of Edward Turner’s innovative designs the Square Four was shown as early as 1930 at the Olympia Motorcycle Show. Originally an overhead-camshaft 500cc, it developed into a 600 before a total redesign saw it become the 1000 cc 4G. Post War telescopic front forks became available as was the plunger rear suspension frame and the cast-iron cylinder head and barrel was replaced by alloy components in 1949. Square Four production ceased in 1959 with all of the other Ariel four-strokes models in favour of their lightweight two stroke ‘commuter’ bikes, a tragedy for a superb and now much loved and revered motorcycle capable of achieving 100 mph. This 1938 Ariel Square Four has benefitted from an older restoration, and was subsequently a regular at many rallies and shows in the South of England, a trophy winner at Great Dorset Steam Fair and Vintage Motorcycle Club Weymouth to Weymouth event. A great riding classic with we feel good prospects in the classic motorcycle market.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 337

1996 Honda RVF750R/RC45 Original UK specification Estimate: £23,000 - £27,000

It started well for Honda in the World Superbike Championship. A VFR750R (RC30) took the first two titles in 1988 and ’89, but then Ducati took a hat-trick of victories, followed by Kawasaki winning in 1993. Honda needed to hit back, and the 1994 RVF750R (RC45) was the bike to do it, although it took a little longer than intended. The RC45 was a pure, homologation special from the ground up, but being handbuilt by HRC it was produced in significantly lower volumes than its predecessor. It’d be easy to view the RC45 simply as an RC30 with sophisticated fuel injection as they both have a 16-valve DOHC 90° v-four motor in a twin-beam alloy frame with a single-sided swing arm, but the RC45 was pretty much all new. Developed jointly by HRC and Honda R&D, the narrower RC45 engine had relocated gear cam drives, new bore and stroke dimensions, new valve angles, new crankshaft, new frame, new upside-down forks, new brakes, and so the list goes on. On the road, in road-legal production trim, the sweet-handling 118bhp RC45 was peerless, but it carried a price tag to match – £17,780 was £1,580 more than Ducati’s 916SP homologation special, and £5,980 more than a 916 Strada. In competition, the RC45 swept all aside at the IoM TT for four consecutive years during the mid ‘90s, while also taking victory in the prestigious Suzuka 8-hour, Bol d’Or 24-hour and Daytona 200 races. Championships were won in World Endurance, and in the American and Australian Superbike series, but, for reasons various, it wasn’t until 1997 that the RC45 finally did what was primarily intended of it; lift the World Superbike crown. This example is a European specification RC45 and is a low mileage example with service history from new. With all the relevant documents the motorcycle is supplied with a comprehensive history file. The RC45 presents very well with good bodywork and paint. Recently used and said to be in good all round condition this is surely a fantastic opportunity to acquire a rare low mileage example with good history.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 338

1994 Yamaha V-MAX Estimate: £3,600 - £4,200

The V-Max was designed by Atsushi Ichijo in a team led by Akira Araki with input from Ed Burke and John Reed. Upon its release in 1985, the V-Max garnered instant critical acclaim and earned the title “Bike of the Year” from Cycle Guide. Sold both in Japan and abroad, the V-Max was sold with only minor modifications from the 1985 model year until the 2007 model year. The V-Max was noted for its quick acceleration, but was also criticized for its poor cornering ability and soft suspension. Until 2008, the original V-Max was offered for sale through the Star Motorcycles division of Yamaha Motorcycles. Apart from a minor freshening to the bike’s specifications in 1993, when the bike gained a larger-diameter fork to minimize highspeed wobbling and drift, four-piston brake calipers, and other handling and safety related upgrades, the 2007 V-Max was almost the same as the original 1985 version This beautiful 1997 model V-Max has been in the custodianship of just one owner from new and is presented extremely well, and offered with a V5 document for onward registration.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 339

2008 Yamaha YZF-R1 Estimate: £4,400 - £5,200

The first R1 shook the motorcycle world by putting the 1000cc class supersports back on the map. Japanese competitors had launched 900cc models in the ‘90s aiming for the best compromise in power and in weight. Yamaha decided for a ‘no-compromise’ approach. The development team were given 3 clear targets: to make the highest power, the lowest weight and the most compact dimensions. What Yamaha’s engineers created was a new 998cc engine featuring a 5-valve design, big-bore 40mm downdraft carburettors and 4 into 1 exhaust featuring Yamaha’s EXUP system for improved midrange (which the first generation R1 was famous for). The engine featured a revolutionary new tri-axis design where the crankshaft, drive shaft and main shaft are not arranged in a horizontal line (as normal) but in a triangular layout so that the overall engine build could be much shorter. This more compact engine design enabled a layout with a very short wheelbase (1395mm) for excellent handling, combined with a very long swingarm which is beneficial for traction and stability. This layout structure is still up to date today, and many competitors have followed this development. This beautiful example is offered with a full dealer service history to support the mileage of 11,700 miles, with the most recent service at 10,645 miles. The F1 is fitted with a number of extras such as LED rear lights and indicators, an R&G Tail Tidy, Tube Tech exhausts, a carbon rear hugger, titax gold levers, double bubble black screen, and meta alarm with immobiliser. A stunning, well sorted bike which we are sure will be hugely enjoyable to master.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 340

1987 Kawazaki GPZ1000RX Estimate: £2,000 - £2,800

The Kawasaki GPZ1000RX (Ninja 1000R, model designation ZXT00A) was a motorcycle made by Kawasaki from 1986 to 1988. It had a 997 cc (60.8 cu in) fourcylinder, 16-valve, twin cam engine. The GPZ1000RX was to be the replacement for the original Ninja, the GPZ900R, but as it turned out the GPZ900R not only lived on alongside the GPZ1000RX, but outlived it. Just as the GPZ900R two years before, the 1000RX was the fastest production bike at the time. Until in 1988 the GPZ 1000RX was superseded by the ZX-10 “Tomcat”. Yet still the GPZ900R remained, even beyond the 1990 release of Kawasaki’s new flagship, the ZZ-R1100, until 2003.

This UK delivered example was first registered in July 1987, and has now become a very rare sight on the roads. The GPX benefits from a recent service and MOT, and pleasingly is a genuine and unmolested example of this increasingly collectible model.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 341

2003 Aprilia RSV Mille R Estimate: £3,400 - £4,200

The Aprilia RSV Mille was a sport motorcycle manufactured by Aprilia from 1998 to 2003. It was offered in three versions, RSV Mille, RSV Mille R, and RSV Mille SP. The first RSV Mille (ME) was made from 1998 to 2000, the updated RSV Mille (RP) from 2001 to 2002 and the last update was made in 2003. With a 998 cc 60-degree V-twin engine built by the Austrian company Rotax, the RSV Mille was the first large displacement motorcycle made by Aprilia that up to then had made up to 250cc engines. This same engine was used unmodified in the Tuono and in slightly modified form in the SL1000 Falco. In 2003, the gear ratios were changed to give a slightly closer ratio gearbox, the exhaust system was changed and the tail-piece and front mudguard were redesigned. The RSV Mille R is a lighter, higher spec. version of the standard Mille, introduced in 1999. It features Öhlins suspension, an Öhlins steering damper, forged aluminum wheels, carbon fibre front mudguard and a shorter subframe for one person use only (no passenger seat). This superb RSV-R features a number of extras such as a carbon rear guard, tail tidy, speedo cover, chain guard, fairing infill trims, seat cowl, exhaust bracket, rear lamp surround, heel plates, carbon airbox, and Miuu silencer. With under 1000 miles since the last service, the RSV is ready to be enjoyed right away.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 342

1981 Honda CX500 Estimate: £6,400 - £7,200

The Honda CX series motorcycles, including the GL500 and GL650 Silver Wing variants, were developed and released by Honda in the late 1970s, with production ending in most markets by the mid 1980s. The design included innovative features and technologies that were uncommon or unused at the time such as liquid cooling, electric-only starting, low-maintenance shaft drive, modular wheels, and dual CVtype carburetors that were tuned for reduced emissions. The electronic ignition system was separate from the rest of the electrical system, enabling the motorcycle to be push-started and ridden in case of a total electrical system failure. The CX series feature a crankshaft configuration aligned longitudinally with the axis of bike, similar to the Moto Guzzi layout. Unlike a “boxer” flat-twin, the cylinders protrude at an angle above the horizontal. The included angle of the CX is 80°, and the heads are twisted 22° so that the inlet tracts do not interfere with the rider’s legs. A camshaft nestles at the base of the V between the cylinders. The CX was the first V-twin motorcycle that Honda ever built. Designed and built by a Porsche engineer to a high standard, this stunning CX500 cafe racer was upgraded with a Yamaha R1 front end, custom wheels, tank, seat and cowl. The engine was completely rebuilt, and now shows 627 miles recorded. This fantastic CX500 is less of a motorcycle, more a work of art.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 343

1977 Yamaha FS1E Estimate: £3,200 - £3,800

The FS1-E was the UK model. Machines registered in the UK from 1 August 1977 were restricted to a maximum of 31 mph. Originally the FS1-E was built as a fivespeed transmission light motorcycle. It was originally called the FS1. Due to the regulations in Europe, the FS1-E was downtuned with a four-speed transmission. The Yamaha FS1-E has a 49 cc single cylinder two-stroke air-cooled rotary discvalved engine with a four-speed gearbox. The FS1-E was the FS1 with the suffix E, which stood for England (differing from the models sold in other countries as the FS1-E had more cycle parts in common with other UK-imported Yamaha models). Yamaha introduced various improvements such as a front disc brake (FS1-E DX model) over the years, and later an autolube model with a two-stroke oil tank and oil pump, with no need to manually mix two-stroke oil into the fuel tank. This FS1E has resided in a private collection on display for 20 years, and is ready now to to be recommissioned and enjoyed once more on the road. The “Fizzy”is offered with a UK V5 document, and is said to be in good order in all respects.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 344

1971 Honda SL70 Estimate: £1,800 - £2,200

The Honda SL70 Motosport, which was introduced in 1970, is a small street/trail motorcycle with a four-stroke engine, a four-speed manual gearbox, and a fullcradle frame. The bike was extremely popular with younger riders who used it off-road as a trail bike and mini motocrosser. For the latter role, it was essentially replaced by Honda’s XR75 in 1973. This lovely SL70 has enjoyed a restoration and repaint, and has since been on display in a private collection. The Honda is now ready to be enjoyed by its lucky next owner.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 345

1988 Yamaha YSR50 Estimate: ÂŁ2,800 - ÂŁ3,300

The Yamaha YSR50 was a miniature motorcycle that was produced and sold by Yamaha during the late eighties and early nineties. The bike featured an air-cooled 50cc two-stroke engine. The engine was sometimes swapped out for a larger variety. Its first production year was 1987, and it was last made in 1992. American Motorcyclist magazine stated its top speed was 38 mph. This well presented YSR was painted by specialist Dream Machine in Kenny Roberts colours, and has been displayed part of a private collection in recent years. The YSR is offered with a UK V5 document and current MOT.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 346

1989 Suzuki GB50 / GXR-50 Estimate: £2,800 - £3,300

RB50 GAG is an interesting small bike. It’s one of those mini bikes the Japanese motorcycle manufacturers introduced for about three decades ago. But unlike RV50 Van Van or the PV50, RB50 wasn’t a naked bike. No, it took the design from the racing track and its own GSX-R or RG/RGV Gamma models. The RB50 GAG (A-LA41A) was introduced in 1986 and there were four different graphics available: bomber styled white, rabbit ”Little Racing” pink, GSX-R replica blue/white (also called GSX-R50, the minigixxer) and red/white (see pictures below). All four shared the same machinery. The frame of the RB50 GAG was advanced. Like a ”real” racer, the mini-replica had also a welded aluminum box frame, hydraulic disc brake (at the front) and FullFloater aluminum box-type swingarm. This amazing survivor is unregistered with only 40 miles recorded from new. On display as part of a private collection from new, this is your opportunity to be the very first registered keeper of a unique collectors piece.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 347

1978 Honda Z50A Estimate: £1,200 - £1,800

The Honda Z50A was the second generation of Honda’s Z50 Series of mini bikes. Though its predecessor, the Z50M, was available in Europe and Japan a few years previously, in 1968, the Z50A-KO “Hard Tail”, sometimes referred to as the “High Bar” or the “Slantguard”, was the first of the Z50 series to be released to the American market. Upon its release this bike was considered to be a significant leap in technology in comparison to other mini bikes on the market at the time. This was partly because of its efficient 49 cc (3.0 cu in) four-stroke over head cam engine with semi-automatic transmission. Street legal lighting and lowered bars were added on the 1969/70 K1 “Short Tail”, the 1970/71 K2 “Long Tail”, and in 1972, after frame cracking became a growing issue, Honda incorporated rear suspension on the bike. The Z50A “Soft Tail” remained on the American market until 1978, when it was replaced by the Z50R. In Europe and Japan, the Z50A was renamed the Z50J in 1973, and remained on the market until 1999. This unregistered example resided as part of a large motorcycle collection in Maryland, United States, until being imported into the UK and kept on display as part of a private collection. The Honda is offered with UK taxes paid, and is ready for lots of fun either on- or off-road.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 348

1966 Yamaha YDS3-250 Estimate: £7,000 - £8,000

This great Yamaha YDS3-250 was originally delivered new to the Netherlands in 1966 and has had only 3 owners. The motorcycle is completely restored and is really in top condition. During the restoration the Yamaha was professionally repainted in the original colour combination. This included the rims and spokes which are now stainless steel and the bike has also been fitted with special rear shock absorbers. All the Chrome is in very good condition and many parts are re-chromed. The seating area has been restored with two-tone composition leather. The tank and other sheet metal parts have been restored and are in very good condition. This rare original in Yamaha YDS3 250 is a unique collector’s item!

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 349

1968 AJS 31 CSR Estimate: £11,000 - £14,000

This beautiful AJS 31 CSR has been completely restored to top condition. Everything has been completed to a great attention to detail, the revised “parallel twin” engine runs great and is equipped with new pistons, honed cylinders, valves, clutch, ignition and alternator. The second owner of this café racer bought the motorcycle in 1968, a few years later he converted it to circuit racer and actually raced in competitions! In around 1980, the AJS was disassembled and stored to build again in the future, the driver even had all new parts collected! Since completion the bike has not been raced. Due to age, in 2015 the previous owner moved to a nursing home and the motorcycle was sold in boxes to the new owner in Netherlands. He rebuilt the AJS, and renewed almost everything. The frame is powder-coated, stainless steel spokes fitted, front fork overhauled, beautiful spray job and so forth. In short this Café racer is perfect condition and is ready to be enjoyed for many more miles!

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 350

2016 Norton Domiracer Estimate: ÂŁ35,000 - ÂŁ45,000

This ultra rare and simply stunning norton domiracer #26 is an original british bike that can only be described as a true cafe racer masterpiece. It is a completely hand made british machine that radiates authenticity and charisma with each component completely hand crafted to the very highest specification over months including carbon air box, carbon front mudguard, carbon seat, race exhuasts (plus original road versions), brembo brakes, hand beaten tank, and more with all original parts included.

The bike on offer is number #26 of only #50 bikes ever produced and represents a unique investment opportunity to own a piece of british motorcycle history.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Registered early in 2015 this particular model was number 26 that rolled of the production line. The bike had been on display since new in the owners collection and has been used sparingly. Supplied with the factory handbook pack and the Uk V5C logbook, Domiracer No.26 is in immaculate condition, with c.450 miles showing on the clock this is a true collectors motorcycle.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 351

1952 BMW R25/2 Estimate: £7,400 - £8,200

With demand for cheap, reliable transport in post-war Europe on the increase, BMW’s single-cylinder range of motorcycles sold in unprecedented numbers, forging the Bavarian company’s reputation as a maker of high quality two-wheeled machines. With Allied restrictions preventing BMW from making anything of greater capacity than 250cc, the R24/25 series of the late 1940s and early 1950s was hugely popular in the local market. The single-cylinder R24 was essentially a pre-war design but when the R25 was released in 1950, it utilised a new welded tubular steel frame with sidecar mounts, along with plunger rear suspension and an improved engine. The R25/2 of 1951 was rated at 12 horsepower. With interest in classic bikes growing all the time, the early post-war BMWs are an ideal choice for someone looking to do club runs on weekends. This stunning R25/2 has enjoyed a nut and bolt restoration, with only 76 miles being covered since completion. The restoration was covered in Real Classic Magazine, and this bike can only be described as superb. A wonderful opportunity to own one of the nicest of this model available.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 352

1957 Sparta 250 Twin Estimate: ÂŁ1,000 - ÂŁ1,500

This very original Sparta 250 is found in very original condition. It has not been used in a number of years and would need some attention before it becomes road-worthy. As a result the motorbike is offered at a very modest reserve.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 353

1969 Triumph Bonneville 650cc Estimate: £8,000 - £10,000

The original Triumph Bonneville was a 650cc parallel-twin (two-cylinder) motorcycle manufactured by Triumph Engineering and later by Norton Villiers Triumph between 1959 and 1974. It was based on the company’s Triumph Tiger T110 and was fitted with that bike’s twin 1 and 3/16 inch Amal monobloc carburettors as standard, along with that model’s high-performance inlet camshaft. It was initially produced with a pre-unit construction engine which enabled the bike to comfortably achieve 115 mph without further modification. Later a unit construction model was introduced which was stiffer and more compact, including additional bracing at the steering head and swing arm. The steering angle was altered and improved forks were fitted a couple of years later, which, together with this increased stiffness enabled overall performance to match that of the Bonneville’s rivals. Later T120 Bonnevilles used a new frame which contained the engine oil instead of using a separate tank; this became known as the oil in frame version. The T120 engine, both in standard configuration and especially when tuned for increased performance, was popular in café racers such as Tribsas and particularly Tritons. With very period Burnt Orange over Silver paintwork and good chrome, this is a very nice example of this classic model - ready to enjoy right away.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 354

1920 Rudge Multi 500cc Estimate: £15,000 - £20,000

The first Rudge Whitworth motorcycle saw the light of day in 1910 and by 1911 the first example to have the remarkably successful, infinitely variable ‘Multi’ gear appeared. The success of the machine and its sound engineering can be judged by its victory in the 1914 Senior TT Race in the hands of Cyril Pullin at an average speed of 49.49mph – the first single-cylinder machine to win a TT. Rudge marketed the TT model in the early 1920’s, featuring sporting drop handlebars and a pedal-operated supplementary oil supply for use when the engine is working hard. Amazingly the clutch is recorded as containing no less than 64 plates. The 497cc engine featured inlet over exhaust valve configuration. The Multi saw active service in World War I, the Italian Army ordered a batch at the end of hostilities and the Multi was the model selected for manufacture in 1918 to get production underway, to re-finance the Rudge operation. By 1921 Rudge production was running at 30 machines a day and riders such as Bob Dicker and Bill Lacey kept the Rudge name in the headlines with successes at Brooklands and other events. This stunning Rudge has enjoyed a detailed restoration to concours standard, and is presented beautifully. Viewings of this rare and highly desirable machine are highly recommended

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 355

1966 Triumph TR6 Estimate: £7,000 - £9,000

The TR6 Trophy is a motorcycle that was made by Triumph, in Meriden, from 1956 to 1973, when it was replaced by the five-speed 750-cc Triumph Tiger TR7V. During this time, it was a successful model, particularly in the US. The competition variant, popularly known as the “desert sled”, won numerous competitions throughout the late 1950s and 1960s. The bike’s appearance in The Great Escape and Steve McQueen’s fondness for the model are well known. This is a very nice example of this now much sought after model. The TR6 was rebuilt by its last owner and runs very nicely, and is said to be a pleasure to ride. This wonderful bike has only become available to the passing of the previous owner. We are sure if you are seeking a TR6 then this lovely example is not to be missed.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 356

1960 Tribsa BSA 750cc Estimate: £8,000 - £10,000

The Tribsa, or Tri-B.S.A.,was a custom built café racer or off road motorcycle of the 1960s and 1970s. Its name was an amalgamation of Triumph and BSA. The purpose was to combine the best elements of each marque to give a superior bike to either. A Tribsa involved a Triumph parallel twin engine installed in BSA motorcycle frame. Although both the BSA A65 and the Triumph 650 cc twins engines were overhead valve (OHV) units, only the Triumph had twin camshafts, which facilitated tuning for greater power output. The BSA frame was a duplex-cradle design which was considered stiffer and stronger than the Triumph’s single downtube item. This Tribsa, fitted with a 750cc Bonneville motor, has come from a private collection and was regularly raced by the previous owner. Said to be a fantastic bike to ride, this is a very nice example of best of breed in the 1960s. Not to be missed.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 357

1975 Honda 750-4 Estimate: £7,000 - £9,000

The Honda CB750 is quite easily one of the top 10 most important motorcycle models of the 20th century. The CB750 was originally built to fulfill the requests of US and European Honda dealers who saw the potential for a larger capacity motorcycle to take on the likes of Harley-Davidson, Norton and Triumph. Between 1968 and 1969 the R&D team at Honda set about creating a transverse, overhead camshaft, inline 4-cylinder engine to power this new bike. This engine was mated to an all new 5-speed transmission, the engine was fitted with 4 carburettors (one for each cylinder) and was capable of 68hp, 44ft-lbs of torque, a top speed of over 120mph and a 1/4 mile time of 13 seconds. When the bike was first put on sale in 1969 the word “superbike” was coined to describe it, it came as standard with hydraulic disc brakes, a reliable engine, excellent handling and enough power to beat almost anything on 2 wheels (or 4). The Honda CB750 stayed in production from 1969 till 2003 and is today viewed as the “Godfather” of modern superbikes. This very clean looking 1975 Honda 750-4 shows just 17,000 miles from new, supported by a sheaf of older MOT certificates. A nice original example of an iconic motorcycle.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 358

1929 Sunbeam Model 2 Estimate: £6,000 - £8,000

Already established as makers of high-quality bicycles, the firm of John Marston Ltd, of Wolverhampton, introduced the first Sunbeam motorcycle, a 350cc sidevalve single, in 1912. The marque quickly established a reputation for sporting prowess, achieving second place in the 1914 Isle of Man Senior TT and winning the 1920 race. Overhead-valve engines were introduced in the mid 1920s, but early successes were achieved with sidevalve machines, most notably the 492cc ‘Longstroke’ that secured a debut win at the 1921 French Grand Prix. Although its very first machine had been a ‘350’, Sunbeam had abandoned the class in 1914 in favour of larger capacities, only returning to it in 1923 with an entirely new sidevalve design that would form the basis of all the overhead-valve engines that followed. The new 2¾hp engine first appeared in the essentially similar Models 1 and 2, the former being a foot board-equipped tourer and the latter a more sporting machine. This late 1929 Sunbeam Model 2 was owned by a film company for some time, primarily for the purpose of filming of the television mini series Harley & the Davidsons. The Sunbeam is said to run well whilst displaying a nice patina to the paintwork. A rare motorcycle and an interesting prospect for the next owner.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 359

1950 Norton Big Four Estimate: ÂŁ7,000 - ÂŁ9,000

The Model 1, or more commonly known as Big 4 was a Norton motorcycle made between 1907 and 1954 in various forms. With 633 cc (38.6 cu in), it was the largest and most powerful side valve engine, with plenty of low end torque in the model range, and was mostly used to haul sidecars. Approximately 4700 of the nearly 100,000 military bikes made by Norton during WW2 were Big 4 sidecar outfits. Designed to carry two or three men plus their fighting equipment over very rough terrain, the Big 4 was used for reconnaissance and carrying loads of ammunition to the front line troops. It was called Big 4 due to its power rating of 4 hp, calculated as tax horsepower. Calculated using current methods the horsepower rating would be 14 brake horsepower. This is a very nice Norton Big Four 600cc in very original condition. From a private collection, the Big Four shows 317 miles recorded. A lovely unmolested bike, and a great addition to any collection.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 360

1923 Motobecane 175cc Estimate: ÂŁ3,000 - ÂŁ4,000

This is a unique Motobecane from 1923 which signifies the first year Motobecane began production of motorbikes. This particular example is in very good condition and has been used for display purposes at numerous classic automobile events over the last 10 years.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 361

Kawazaki Z1 Cafe Racer Estimate: £9,500 - £11,500

The Kawasaki Z1 is a four-cylinder, air-cooled, double-overhead camshaft, carbureted, chain-drive, two passenger motorcycle introduced in 1972 by Kawasaki. Following the introduction of Honda’s CB750 in 1968, the Z1 helped popularize the in-line, cross-frame four-cylinder, a format that became well known as the Universal Japanese Motorcycle or UJM. The Z1 was noted for being the first large-capacity Japanese four-cylinder motorcycle to use the double-overhead-camshaft system on a production motorcycle. When it was introduced, only the MV Agusta 750 featured this system, and was a limitedproduction, very expensive machine, as opposed to the Kawasaki, which was less than half the price. This Z1 Cafe Racer was built by a retired marine engineer who took great care in developing the Z1 into the bike you see here. The frame was strengthened, braced and a JMC swingarm fitted. The motor was upgraded with a 1045cc Wiseco Big Bore kit, the head was gas flowed, 34mm carburettors were fitted, as was an oil cooler, carbon cans, Dymag 18” wheels, Pretec 6 pot calipers, Hyper Pro fork springs, SPA multi-function speedo/tacho, Harris Harrier Fairing, Cibie headlights, renthal sprockets, and Ohlins rear shock absorbers. As featured in Motorcycle News, Motorcycle Mechanics and Classic Bike, this is a stunning creation and a true testament to its talented builder.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 362

1967 Triumph Bonneville 650cc Estimate: £8,000 - £10,000

The original Triumph Bonneville was a 650cc parallel-twin (two-cylinder) motorcycle manufactured by Triumph Engineering and later by Norton Villiers Triumph between 1959 and 1974. It was based on the company’s Triumph Tiger T110 and was fitted with that bike’s twin 1 and 3/16 inch Amal monobloc carburettors as standard, along with that model’s high-performance inlet camshaft. It was initially produced with a pre-unit construction engine which enabled the bike to comfortably achieve 115 mph without further modification. Later a unit construction model was introduced which was stiffer and more compact, including additional bracing at the steering head and swing arm. The steering angle was altered and improved forks were fitted a couple of years later, which, together with this increased stiffness enabled overall performance to match that of the Bonneville’s rivals. Later T120 Bonnevilles used a new frame which contained the engine oil instead of using a separate tank; this became known as the oil in frame version. The T120 engine, both in standard configuration and especially when tuned for increased performance, was popular in café racers such as Tribsas and particularly Tritons.

This lovely looking Bonneville is presented extremely attractively with fantastic paintwork, and good chromework all round. The engine has been rebuilt and so runs very nicely, with new carburettors and cables where required. A prime example of a true classic.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 363

1950 Ariel VB 600cc Estimate: £7,000 - £9,000

By 1930 Ariel’s new single-cylinder range, designed by the great Val Page, had gained a rear-mounted magneto and its distinctive timing cover, and the basic engine design - though frequently revised - would last well into the post-war era. Both overheadvalve and sidevalve versions were made, though there was only one of the latter in Ariel’s post-war line-up: the 600cc VB, a long-stroke workhorse. First introduced for 1936 and intended for sidecar use, the VB was regularly updated along with the rest of the Ariel singles, gaining plunger rear suspension, a telescopic front fork and, finally, a swinging-arm frame as the 1950s progressed. Production ceased in January 1959 when parent company BSA decided to axe Ariel’s four-stroke models. This is a very nice original condition VB, from a private collection, showing a mere 1732 miles recorded. A great addition to the collection.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 364

1955 BMW R25/3 Estimate: £4,000 - £5,000

The R25/3 was the last R25 variant and got several updates compared to its predecessors (R25/2 and R25/1) as a newly designed aluminium Telescopic fork, stronger full-hub drum brakes, 18 ‘’ aluminium rims and a larger 24 mm Bing carburettor for more power. This is a wonderful matching-numbers example of the iconic BMW R25. As the car has never been completely restored it still retains a lovely amount of patina and originality, with many original features that have been preserved. The BMW runs great and is equipped with side-car preparation! Equipped with a new battery, this great R25 is ready to be enjoyed by its new owner.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 365

1964 Triumph 3TA Twenty One Estimate: £4,000 - £7,000

Triumph re-entered the 350 class in 1957 with the introduction of the Twenty One, its arrival ushering in Triumph’s unitary construction era. Readily distinguishable by its Shell Blue metallic finish and ‘bathtub’ rear enclosure – a feature later applied to Triumph’s larger models – the newcomer was renamed ‘3TA’ in September 1958. With just 18.5bhp on tap, Triumph’s smallest twin lacked the urgent acceleration of its larger brethren, but nevertheless was a capable tourer good for around 80mph while delivering excellent fuel economy. ‘One of the swiftest standard British-made 350cc roadsters tested by Motor Cycling, the Triumph Twenty One combines an untiring zest for high-speed cruising with safe handling and a remarkably economical fuel consumption,’ reported the ‘Green ’Un’. This superb example is a matching numbers 3TA and was produced in 1964. The current vendor has had the motorcycle fully restored during his ownership. The paintwork and frame are both in god condition as is the engine which shows the quality of restoration very well. Supplied with the rare bikini fairing and a triumph owners club certificate. A fabulous example of one of triumphs most sort after models.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 366

1977 Harley Davidson 1200FLH Electraglide Estimate: £10,000 - £14,000

Two important events in the lengthy development of Harley’s perennial v-twin occurred in the mid-1960s when the 74ci (1,200cc) FH and FLH Duo-Glide adopted electric starting (1965) and the revised ‘Shovelhead’ engine the following year. Now known as the ‘Electra Glide’ – without question one of the most evocative names in motorcycling history – Harley’s updated cruiser featured a new frame to house the large 12-volt battery and a reshaped primary drive cover to accommodate the electric starter mechanism. H-D was unable to afford the costs of developing an entirely new engine, so made do instead with a revised top end (the ‘Shovelhead’) featuring a larger aluminium version of the Sportster cylinder head, an improvement that liberated a further 5bhp.

This example has been the subject to much renovation work in recent years a full re spray of the tank and other panels has been completed and is presented in wonderful condition. Offered with a rare and original king size Harley two tone windshield a pogo seat and sprung floorboards. Offered with a UK V5C registration document and valid mot. An opportunity not to be missed.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 367

C.1981 Seeley Norton Commando 850Cc Estimate: ÂŁ12,000 - ÂŁ16,000

The Norton Commando was a British Norton-Villiers motorcycle with an OHV pre-unit parallel-twin engine, produced by the Norton Motorcycle company from 1967 until 1977. Initially having a nominal 750 cc displacement, actually 745 cc (45.5 cu in), in 1973 it became an 850 cc, actually 828 cc (50.5 cu in). It had a hemi-type head, similar to all OHV Norton engines since the early 1920s.

This Seeley Norton 850cc Commando engine is equipped with ex Jack Gow modified crankcases. Frame number RMT MK3 32R has been refurbished last year and has done around 30 miles during parade laps at the Bob McIntyre meeting in June 2017. Currently sitting on new race tyres, Scitsu Tach , Electronic ign, Wheel bearings, Front Spindle. Motor built by Ex J Gow mechanic John Leech. A fantastic opportunity to acquire a very well restored Seely Norton Commando.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 368

1975 SWM GS125 Estimate: £3,200 - £4,200

The Speedy Working Motors (SWM) was a motorcycle manufacturer of off road motorcycles from Lombardy Italy, active from 1971 to 1984. Founded by two fans, and Peter Sironi Fausto Vergani, based in Palazzolo Milanese, fraz. Paderno Dugnano, was born with the intention of competing with the best off road motorcycles of the time, manned by two-stroke engines, and almost all from abroad, with particular emphasis Sachs and Rotax. The model offered today it’s an beautiful and totally restored GS125, equipped with 6 speed Sachs 125 cc engine, ready to ride. Very rare and powerful off-road motorbike. Offered with Italian Historical certification including technical data sheet.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 369

1978 Ducati 900 SS Desmo NCR Replica Estimate: £19,000 - £26,000

The legendary NCR race shop in Italy built the Ducati 900SS offered here as a replica. ‘NCR’ stood for the names of its founders, ex-factory race mechanics Giorgio Nepoti, Rino Caracchi and Luigi Rizzi, although after Rizzi’s early departure the ‘R’ stood for Racing. NCR was founded in 1967 in the small town of Borgo Panigale on the outskirts of Ducati’s hometown of Bologna. Situated a stone’s throw from the Ducati factory, NCR functioned as the semi-official race team from the early 1970s, there being no direct works involvement at that time. The Nepoti/Caracchi philosophy was that everything could be improved, lightened or made more powerful, and like all truly great tuners they paid attention to the smallest detail in the knowledge that racing would inevitably expose any weaknesses. Their emblem, a speeding cartoon dog wearing a helmet, is known the world over.

The Ducati owners club-dating certificate states that the production date of this bike was 1978 and has added the following note ”One of Ducati’s most famous models, possessing great performance combined with excellent handling. This machine has been prepared in the style of race bikes of the period. Such bikes are much admired throughout the motorcycle fraternity”

This NCR Replica is based on the production 900SS model and has the ‘square’ engine cases. Bevel driven desmodromic with 5 gears. The frame has the homologation code DGM13715OM which is further evidence if the bikes provenance. It is built to endurance racing specification, featuring twin fuel fillers, open exhaust pipes and Campagnolo magnesium alloy wheels. The NCR race shop produced this stunning replica of one of the 4 machines that the race factory produced in 1978 for the classic bike campaign that included the historic comeback of Mike Hailwood winning the TT after an 8-year layoff. This beautiful Ducati was last offered for sale in the Bonham’s Paris Auction February 2014 by the previous owner with a reserve of £40,000 but due to poor attendance and the world still being in the depths of the worst recession ever known, the Ducati did not sell. Professionally restored 12 years ago in the previous owners workshop, the machine has seen minimal action over the past decade. The bike comes with a recent MOT and latest type of V5. Ready to be enjoyed and admired by the new owner.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 370

C.1953 Matchless G45 Estimate: £

At the 1953 Senior TT, eleven G45s went for the start and four reached the finish line, the following year brought a similar scenario, with 10 finishers from 14 starters. The G45 was superseded by the G50. This G45 has been in the ownership and raced very successfully by the well-known classic racer Malcolm Clarke. Meticulously maintained to the highest standards and came into the current owners ownership after having known Malcolm personally for over the past 20 years, and mentioned on several occasion when they used to meet up at various classic races events, that, he would give the current owner first refusal of the G45 when Malcolm finally hung up his leathers. Reluctantly now or sale due to pressure from his grandchildren’s’ housing needs. Malcolm Clark’s favourite track was Brands but he used to do rather well at the Goodwood revival on this bike. The photo showing the G45 in action with Malcolm aboard was taken at the Goodwood Revival. This G45 can only be described as in pristine race condition and has been prepared for the coming season, undergone a complete engine and gearbox overhaul including a very important modification to the rocker box oil feeds. The original crankcase have been replaced due to deteriation of the magnesium, so there are no engine numbers, A 5-speed gearbox, housed in a period style Burman housing completes the package. Matchless G45 In most cases, the Reynolds Tube Co number represents frame number on G45’s The RTC number 80/7/56 on this frame means it was batch no 80, the date of manufacture, the 7th month, 1956. This G45 is ready to race for the forthcoming season also b a worthy addition any serious motorcycle collection, The chance to buy a Matchless G45 very seldom comes along, this is a unique opportunity is not to be missed, with less than 80 G45’s being produced over a 3-year period from 1953 to 1956, now with only a handful of genuine G45’s in existence makes this bike a great investment that will only go one way.

Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 371

1954 Moto Guzzi 500CC Falcone Tourismo Estimate: £9,000 - £14,000

Arguably the Moto Guzzi Falcone is one of the most handsome motorcycles ever produced. Affectionately known as a “Bacon Slicer “ due to the exposed open flywheel, the big brother of the 250cc Airone which Guzzi produced on the banks of Lake Como in Italy from 1939 to 1957, In the early 1950’s the Falcone was one of the most expensive motorbikes on the market costing more that a Triumph Speed Twin ! Early versions utilised a cast iron cylinder and head that were replaced for the 1948 model season with aluminum items. The sprung frame featured telescopic units, but retaining the classic friction dampening to the rear suspension.

This Falcone was first registered on 2th February 1954 and correctly registered in the UK as an Historic Vehicle, so no road tax and no MOT is necessary. Very low Engine and Frame numbers FAA 52 and FAA70 , such an easy starter due to the fact of the large flywheel that assists the momentum plus having fitted a flat slide carburetor has solved all the inherent starting problems of the original. Apart from this one modification the bike is totally standard and is almost as good as the day it came out the Factory on Lake Como having travelled just 6 KM since the total nut and bolt restoration. All the hard work has been done and all the large amounts of money required to restore a motorcycle to this standard have been spent and now wants for nothing and ready for the new owner to enjoy.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


Lot 372

1955 Vincent Grey Flash Replica 500 CC Estimate: £

The Grey Flash is widely regarded as the holy grail of the Vincent Marque, with only 37 Grey Flash’s being manufactured from 1949 to 1951. The stripped down race version weighing only 150 KG and the road model with lights etc., slightly heaver. Building the Grey Flash racer was a bold move on the company’s part as Vincent was nearly bankrupt. Even bolder was fielding a team of 3 bikes for the 1950 Senior TT race. Although this effort gained a lowly 12th place, it showed that Vincent was still in business. Over the years many copies have emerged and have caused no end of controversy and quite understandably so as with only 37 bikes being made the Grey Flash truly is the holy grail of the Vincent Marque. This Grey Flash replica in beautiful condition both cosmetically and mechanically; it was featured at length in ‘The Classic Motorcycle’ June 2008 issue where it was given the most glowing report imaginable. Very well known bike with the Vincent owners club and much admired by all who have had the privilege to look at this masterpiece of engineering. The spec includes: – Alloy Tank which is believed to be an ex Works item, correct Close ratio Albion Gearbox, Twin finned Electron Front Brakes, Lightening Mk2 Camshaft, polished engine internals, the unique girdraulic fork has been lightened by machining a large grove down the back of the station plus masses of drill boles in the none loan bearing areas all exactly as the original and all for extra weight saving. This Grey flash is bar far the best replica we have ever come across and is definitely not just a Comet in a ‘Fancy Grey Dress’ Virtually undistinguishable from the original, the obvious clue being the frame and engine numbers; If one of the 37 ever came to market it would sell from anything between one and two million pounds. This very well known machine comes with a very large history file and great province. The chance to purchase of this magnificent machine is a once in a lifetime opportunity. I will be sorry to see this bike go, as it is such an inspirational piece of work that rarely comes our way. It must be said that out of all the bikes I have had in my unique collection this one is right up there at the top. The Grey Flash Rep comes with very large history files, boxes in fact ! are available on request to seriously interested buyers. The bike has seen very limited use since 2008. Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.

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Lot 373

1949 HRD Vincent Rapide Series C 998CC Estimate: £54,000 - £59,000

Production records show that this Rapide was actually manufactured in 1949 and first registered for the road on 12th July 1949, 1949 / 1950 being the transition year for HRD Vincent, being the year in which HRD changed their trading name to purely Vincent, this was due to the fact that impending legal problems were mounting against the HRD company by HD (Harley Davidson) the giant American firm who eventually bullied Vincent into submission, hence the name HRD was completely dropped in 1950. Evidence of the transition can be seen engine where the HRD, later models just had the Vincent name. With age patina that is a great asset when coming from a recent restoration. “ FPY 327 “ comes with original owners manual and handbooks. Factory records show that in 1949 model were produced with engine numbers from 1401 to 4980, production numbers being very low as Vincent’s were a small factory with their main interest being road racing competitions. This Engine number being 2080 is really a very low also the mating numbers being number 55 denotes a very early crankcase casting making this Rapide a very desirable investment that will only ever go one way. A rare find with early Vincents with only a few left in existence make this bike a very rarer find indeed. The works detailed are in no particular order but starting with the most important, the engine and gearbox, stripped and completely rebuilt using new parts supplied by Conways wherever necessary. Martin Quirk, was commissioned to do this work, a very well known and successful Vincent period Road Racer who only works on Vincents and is recognized throughout the Vincent fraternity ass being one of the top Vincents experts in the UK, and the world for that matter. New Cylinder Liners and pistons by Bob Dunn another great Vincent specialist, Forks and carbs completely stripped, parts renewed where necessary by Martin Ratby. Wheels and rims where respoked in SS by Central Wheels all paint work by Paintwork Express. This labour of love was over a period 12 year period and having only covered less than one mile will need careful running in at slow speed for at least 500 miles. Currently the oil being used is 10/30 fully synthetic Totally unmolested, original Amals, which is rare on these as most have Mon blocs fitted, 6 v electrics as the original The only deviation from standard is he 150 mph speedo compete the picture. This upgrade makes this Rapide very close in appearance to the Black Shadow. If you want the most original Vincent Rapide currently for sale on the Planet then you have just found it.

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Buyers should satisfy themselves prior to sale as to the condition of each lot and should exercise and rely on their own judgement as to whether the lot accords with its description. Coys accepts no liability for the accuracy of these particulars.


TRANSPORT AND SHIPPING For all motorcycle transportation after the sale please contact Coys transport partner Chas Mortimer on the number below. TRANSPORTER Chas Mortimer Motorcycle Transportation Chas Mortimer Ltd Unit 2 Threeways Motors Charing Hill Kent TN27 0NL dave@chasmortimer.co.uk phil@chasmortimer.co.uk Tel: +44 (0)1233 633623


The Carole Nash MCN London Motorcycle Show 2018  

AN IMPORTANT AUCTION OF CLASSIC SPORTS AND RACING MOTORCYCLES

The Carole Nash MCN London Motorcycle Show 2018  

AN IMPORTANT AUCTION OF CLASSIC SPORTS AND RACING MOTORCYCLES

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