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Living In The Cowichan Valley

What’s on The Menu? Local Chefs’ Share Seasonal Recipes • Chemainus ArtBeat Calls For Friday Night Artists •Mad Hats & Teapots Margit Nellemann Studio

JUNE 2012 Issue 43

FREE 1


DINE WITH US Tues, Wed & Thurs 6pm - 8:30pm Till June 21st (closes for the season) Come Sample the program in the

Days & Hours of Operation Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday 6pm - 8:30pm

GET SERIOUS ABOUT FOOD

Reservations Required 250 743 0548 www.cc.viu.ca/kelseydining

reservations@viu.ca

LEARN WHERE YOU LIVE. Study under a professional chef to get your Professional Cook Level 1 training at Vancouver Island University. 20 weeks will give you basic necessary skills to perk your interest in the Food Industry.

Apprenticeship training also requires 400 hours industry experience. Tuition $2100 COME DINE WITH US Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday 6pm - 8:30pm until June 21st (closes for the season - re open in September) Dining Room located in Frances Kelsey Secondary School - 953 Shawnigan/Mill Bay Road

Reservations Required 250 743 0548 or by e-mail reservations@viu.ca

For more information: www.viu.ca/apprentice/ProfessionalCook.asp

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Now taking applications for August 27, 2012 or January 28, 2013 intakes.

Or call 250 746-3509

Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley


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Published by Cowichan Valley Voice Magazine Sheila & Richard Badman Contact us at: editor@cowichanvalleyvoice.com 250 746 9319 - 936 Arbutus Avenue, Duncan V9L 5X4 Copy Editor Maeve Maguire Advertising Enquiries Please Call Adrienne Richards 250 510 6596 or 250 748 0926 e-mail adrienne@cowichanvalleyvoice.com *Non Profit Community Ad Rates available please enquire. COMMUNITY CALENDAR LISTINGS ARE FREE! Please upload your information through our website Please include: Date & Event Title IN SUBJECT Be advised that space is limited to up to 2 spots per business and is prioritized by 1st sent, 1st printed. Next EVENTS deadline June18th for July 2012 Issue. E-mail to: events@cowichanvalleyvoice.com Valley Voice magazine reserves the right to exclude any submitted listings due to space. Valley Voices Bill Jones, Bruce Wood, Jo Ludwig, Maureen McGillvary, Allan Aikman, Rick Dennis,Victor Vesely, Pam Stiles, Larry McIntosh, Debbie Modeste, Dee Kinnee, Roger Foucher, Ajay Appelaar, Brock McLeod, Margit Nellemann, Joanne Sales,, Sandra Greenaway, Chris Clarke, Jean Crowder, Nicolette Genier, Sheila Badman, Cari Burdett, Su Robinson, Joy Story, Peter Oliphant, Raelynn Gibson, Leah Boisvert, Simon Pidcock, Grant Waldman, Lynda Allen, Kenzie Cuthbert, Robyn Radcliffe, Darbi Aichitson, Sue Darlington, Sheila Jones, Joanne & Everett, Sharon Manason, Tracey Paleczka ,Vivi De Graff, Julia Star, Gil Pollard, Sue McKitrick & The Lovely Georgia Nicols We welcome your story ideas & photo submissions, however Valley Voice magazine reserves the right to omit and edit all submissions for space, clarity, content and style. The opinions expressed in Valley Voice Magazine do not necessarily reflect those of the editor, publishers or other authors. Valley Voice Magazine is distributed through 450 + select locations throughout the Cowichan Valley- Malahat, Mill Bay, Shawnigan Lake, Cherry Point, Duncan, Cowichan Bay, Crofton, Chemainus and Salt Spring Island and to Cowichan Lake, Ladysmith,Victoria, Tofino and from the Victoria International Airport Arrivals Hall. Cover Image Local strawberries for sale at the market.

Visit us online at www.cowichanvalleyvoice.com

We’re excited to announce that Valley Voice is now being distributed from the Victoria Airport... a gateway to the Island! Advertise NOW to over 27,000 local readers and visiting tourists from over 400+ locations! Contact Adrienne Richards for info about prime placement ad spots for tourist season

Now Booking July 2012 Issue 44 AD Deadline: June 18th 250 748 0926 / 250 510 6596 cell adrienne@cowichanvalleyvoice.com

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PAGES

Our Community Sansum Point Campaing: Denise Modeste 6 June Community Calendar 7 Buy Local, Buy Fresh Map 14 South Cowichan Tennis Club Turns 125 15 All About Our Pets 21 Green Upgrades to Your Home 24 Dee Kinnee’s Chemainus Report 30 Websites, Emails and Verbal Lint 38 Crowder’s Corner 38 Westcoast Men’s Resource Centre 40 Cowichan Valley Feature Listings 44 Cowichan Valley Directory 46-47 Local Food and Recipes Are You Seriouss About Food? 5 Cowichan Eating w/Bill Jones Local Strawberries 8 Walkabout the Salt Spring Market: Duck Creek Farm 10 Teafarm Iced Tea 11 Merridale Pizza Dough 12 Bruce Wood’s Seasonal Asparagus with Hollandaise 13 Farmhouse Poultry Red Curry Drumsticks 13 Cowichan Bay Seafoods Baked Ling Cod 14 Speltacular Spelt 16 Wild Foods - Local Berries & Cherries 18 Farm & Garden Pages Happy Birthday Makaria Farm 18 Cut June Broom in Bloom 18 Growing Food in Deer Country 19 Raising Poults 20 Events House of Hayday Grand Opening 27 ArtBeat in Chemainus 28 Yogis of Tibet Movie Screening 30 I Love Tap - Lynda Allen Studio 31 Kemal Evans - Canada Day 31 Art, Music, Theatre Talking Arts:Mad Hatter & Teapots 25 CRAFTby Cowichan Valley Artisans 26 Imagine That! Artist Lorraine Taylor 26 Visions Studio Art Tour 29 Artists in Support of Our Youth 31 One Voices for One World 35 Sport, Recreation & Healthy Living Cowichan Bay Whale Report 17 Big Tree Excursion with Honeymoon Bay Retreats 23 Green Living: Many Hands Make Light Work 37 Impact Golf Golf Tips from The Pro 38 Cycling Cowichan 38 South Island Fishing Report 39 Learn to Sail with MBYC 40 Body, Mind & Soul Three Secrets to Communication 34 Community Farm Store Pages 36 To Learn Big, Chat A Little 41 Coaches Corner 43 June Horoscope with Georgia Nicols 45 Outnumbered! Sue McKitrick 45

Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley


Are You Serious About Food? Professional Cooking Training Begins This Summer

VIU

students enrolled in the Professional Cook Training Program have their hands on the finest foods the Valley has to offer. Using organic and locally sourced foods the cooks in training work creatively to serve up gourmet meals to the public at the Kelsey Dining Room, located in the Frances Kelsey Senior Secondary School in Shawnigan Lake.

VIU Student in Training

Students learn all the basic skills for work in a professional kitchen, including knife handling, terminology, a variety of cooking methods, learning how to follow recipes, how to weigh and measure foods accurately plus major techniques and principles used in cooking, baking and food preparation. Upon completion of Level 1 students can proceed to Level 2 apprenticeship training and/or continue to working towards a diploma in Culinary Arts or seek their Professional Cook Red Seal. The Cowichan Campus Culinary Arts program, has been a Cowichan Valley Institution for 15 years. The Kelsey Dining Room menu is made up of complex skills that reflect servings being made fresh from scratch. The school cures and smokes their own bacon and salmon, produce all the menu items, including pastry, soups, stocks, meat, fish and fresh pasta. Allan Aikman head chef of the program tells us “Our graduated students our involved in a number of Cowichan Valley food service establishments already. Supporting our dining room is supporting the students training which in the long run is supporting the Cowichan community.” Interested in taking your culinary skills to the next level? Contact VIU for more information. 250 746 3509.The Kelsey Dining Room closes June 21st for the season so don’t niss your chance to eat a delicious 3 or 4 course meals for under $20!

Providence Farm Hoedown Party

Tickets $75 each or $65 if purchased in a book of 10. 1843 Tzouhalem Rd 250-746-4204 This well attended, fun filled evening includes live music, a full course country dinner, live and silent auction, and a real old fashion barn dance all in Wild West style. The lovely Vanessa Elton at the Hoedown

Dust off yer boots, git yer tickets and grab yer partner! It’s Hoedown Time! That’s right the Providence Farm Hoedown is back this year.

This is the main fundraiser for Providence Farm; a 400 acre working organic farm dedicated to restoring the spirits of adults with mental and physical challenges.

Interested in contributing to the Valley Voice? E-mail us at editor@cowichanvalleyvoice.com

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Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley


Community Calendar

June 2012

1 6 -9pm

Damali Wine Release Party Damali Lavender & Winery 3500 Telegraph Rd, Cobble Hill

11 8pm

Richard Grainger - Fine UK balladeer/troubadour Duncan Garage Showroom $15 Door/ $12 Advance

1 - 30

Silk Paintings by Lorraine Taylor and Clare Carver Imagine That! 251 Craig St, Duncan

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Cowichan Valley Green Party Meeting Location TBA For information clmmontgomery@shaw.ca

1 7pm - 9pm

CIS Community Dance Night FREE Girl Guide Hall, 321 Cairnsmore St., Duncan

12 7:30pm

Cowichan Consort Concert www.cowichanconsort.com Christian Reformed Church, 930 Trunk Rd, Duncan

2 - July 1st

Metamorphosis/Notion of Motion Ladysmith Waterfront Gallery 610 Oyster Bay Drive

14 5:30pm - 7:30pm

Structural Health Class with Lorene Benoit (strong bones and flexibility) Duncan White Spot $15 250743-0544

2 1 -4pm

Queen’s English Tea Party Celebrate the Diamond Jubilee Waterwheel Park, Chemainus

15

Joseph & the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat OPENS Chemainus Theatre Festival 1800 565 7738

2 7:30pm

Cowichan Consort Chamber Concert Sylvan United Church, Mill Bay Admission by donation

15

Family Music Night w/ guitarist Brad Prevedoros from Galiano Is ArtHouse 1756 Wilmot Ave, Shawnigan Lake

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Family Golf Day: Clinic, 9 holes, BBQ, Prizes $49 for 1 adult and 1 kid Arbutus Ridge Golf Club 250.743.5000

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9am - 2pm

65th Annual Community Flower and Garden Show $2 Cobble Hill Hall Pancakes 8am www.millbaygardenclub.com

4 - 29

The Story of Cedar Art Show Portals – The CVAC Centre of Arts, Culture and Heritage

16 All Day

Cowichan Fish and Game Swap Meet and Open House ‘The Range’ 2945 Robertson Rd Glenora 250-715-0029

4 6 -8:30pm

Opening Ceremony w/ Animal Kingdom Performers and Artist Reception Portals Gallery, Island Savings Ctr

16 9:30am 11:30am

Pancake Breakfast Chemainus Seniors Drop In Centre 9824 Willow Street

4 7pm

Yogis Of Tibet Movie Screening Fundraiser for Tibet Duncan United Church Heritage Hall

16 9am - 4pm

Introduction to Horticultural Therapy Workshop O.U.R Ecovillage - 1565 Baldy Mtn. Road, Shawnigan Lk

4 7-9pm

CIS Community Dance Night FREE Kids Welcome! Quw’tsun Cultural Centre200 Cowichan Way 250 748 3112

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Fathers’ Day BBQ at the Orchard Cookhouse Merridale 1230 merridale Rd 250 746-7621

5 - July 28

Organic Master Gardener Course Fee $695 1565 Baldy Mtn. Road, Shawnigan Lake 250-743-3067

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Arbutus Ridge Golf Club Fathers’ Day Brunch $12.95-$27.95 based on age Reservations 250.743.5000

6,13,20,27 1-2pm

Women’s Writing Group FREE Cowichan Library Info:ythedges@hotmail.com

17 7-8:30pm

Sacred Chant Circle with Sadie Rivendell Yurt sdbartram@gmail.com 250-748-2089

6 8pm

Old Man Luedecke / Del Barber - clawhammer banjo Duncan Garage Showroom $20 Door/ $17 Advance

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National Aboriginal Day

7,14,21,28 2-7pm

Thursday Farmers Market Cobble Hill Hall Fairgrounds Vendors call: 250 510 8343

21-23

Velo Village Event Cyclists / June 23 Bike Only BC Ferry to Salt Spring Island For info www.velovillage.ca

8 7:30pm

Concert for a Summer’s Eve FREE T.Gil Centre for Performing Arts, Brentwood College School

22 opening 6 -9pm

Madhats & Teapots Margit Nellemann Studio Rivendell Yurt sdbartram@gmail.com 250-748-2089

9 7pm

Shake Rattle ‘n Roll Fundraiser CTV Bruce Williams Chemainus Theatre Festival 1800 565 7738

22 5 -9pm

ArtBeat Street Party Opening Night Streets of Chemainus

9 10am-2pm

Cowichan Valley Trail and Holmes Creek Clean Up Between the Sherman Road & Skinner Road trailheads

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Providence Farm HOEDOWN Fundraiser $75 or Book of 10 $65 each Providence Farm, More info 250 746-4204

9 9am-1pm

House of Hayday Constant Crave Coffee GRAND OPENING Crossroads Ctr Trans Can Hwy & Koksilah

23 8 -2pm

Chemainus Summer Fest Parade, BBQ and Face Painting Victoria and Willow St, Chemainus

9 7-9pm

Community Drum Circle and Drum Sale! By donation The Hub, 2375 Koksilah Road, Cowichan Stn 250-748-6750

26 7pm

Ladysmith Camera Club “Night Photography Insights” Hardwick Hall, High Street, 3rd Ave, Ladysmith $5

9 8am 8pm

One Day LifeSpan Retreat www.VIRetreats.com # 4 Johnny Bear Road, Duncan For info 250 710 7594

28 8pm

Big John Bates - high energy rockabilly band Duncan Garage Showroom

10 3pm

Long Table Salmon Dinner on the Vineyard $85 PP Unsworth Vineyards RSVP to Amusé Bistro at 250.743.3667

29 - July 2 10am - 5pm

Visions Art Studio Tour www.visionsarttour.ca

10 2:30pm

Concert for a Summer’s Afternoon By Donation T.Gil Centre for Performing Arts, Brentwood College School

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Summer Fest Opening Performances including 100 Voices Choir City Square, Downtown Duncan

10 5pm

Pamela Tessman Jazx Vocalist / Merridale Pizza Night Merridale 1230 merridale Rd Reservations 250 746-7621

- 3:30pm

July 1 11:30

Chemainus Canada Day Family Festival w/ Rick Scott, Petting Zoo and Pony Rides www.VisitChemainus.com

10 2pm

Keating Farm Estate Guided Tour 5250 Miller Road Glenora 250-737-1401, $7

1 6 -8 pm

Kemal Evans - Summer Concert Series Ladysmith Amphitheatre, Transfer Beach

10 10am -1pm

Opening Event VI Retreat Garden Everyone Welcome # 4 Johnny Bear Road, Duncan For info 250 710 7594

Ongoing

Year-round studio tour of 14 artisans www.CowichanValleyArtisans.com

Various Shows 6 - 8pm

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Cowichan

EATING Local Strawberries

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predict this will be a good year for strawberries in the valley. The warm early spring, plentiful rain and the nice heat snap in May - all bode well for a good crop of my favourite springtime treat. The strawberry is an interesting plant. Technically, the strawberry is not a true berry, it is a flesh package that surrounds many achenes (seed pods), each containing a single seed. The strawberry is a member of the rose family, in the genus Fragaria, and is cultivated all over the world. Most commercial varieties stem from the Fragaria ananassa (Garden Strawberry) strains. We also grow a white alpine strawberry in the farm that is very delicate, floral and sweet. It is excellent for munching right off the vine, but too delicate be picked for commercial harvest. It is a variant of the wild strawberry (Fragaria vesca) which grows wild all over the valley. The white cultivars are beautiful plants to grow as ground cover. Fresh strawberry leaves also make a nice tea, packed with phyto nutrients and reported to be a “relaxing” beverage.

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There are many great outlets for fresh strawberries in the Cowichan. Last year we really enjoyed the products from

Makaria Farm and Alderlea Farm. You can also head down to the Duncan farmers market for a selection of local berries starting in June and running through to the fall for some of the ever bearing varieties. For me the best berries are the first ones that arrive in the spring. I keep walking by the (now year long) displays of Mexican, Chilean and Californian strawberries, waiting for that first burst of local strawberry flavour. I never get tired of the local strawberries. All season long we enjoy them as snacks, added to salads, baked in cakes, made into salsa and perhaps the ultimate – made into the best strawberry ice cream you can find. And we don’t stop at ice cream, we have experimented with strawberry sorbet over the years and have decided there are three clear winners. One is plain old strawberry sorbet, made with pure berries and a little sugar syrup (or you can use maple or honey). The second is strawberry and mint sorbet. The mint adds a refreshing hit to the sorbet that makes your mouth tingle with delight. The third winner is the combination of strawberry and lavender. It might sound odd, but the

Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley

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floral notes of the lavender brings the strawberries to a whole new level of flavour that is somehow greater that the sum of the parts. In other words it is incredible to taste.

is great as a refreshing dessert and can also be used to make an elegant frozen cocktail by adding a dash (or two) of rum or tequila. You’ve just turned your sorbet into a margarita.

Making ice cream and sorbet does require a little bit of equipment. You can now buy relatively inexpensive tools from Kitchen Aid (attaches to their mixer) and Cuisinart (stand alone ice cream / sorbet makers) for under $100. Or you can go old school Italian and make a simple Granita. This is essentially a frozen puree of fruit and sugar that is stirred to form large crystals of ice. It

Strawberries also freeze well. This is a good way to take advantage of the bumper crops that come in a good year. Remove the hull (stem) and freeze in a zip log bag. They will keep for several months and be ready for the next batch of jam, granita or margarita! Bill Jones is an author, chef and food consultant who can be found at Deerholme.com

Strawberry Granita Bill Jones, Deerholme Farm

If you like you can add this recipe to a sorbet maker for a fine grained, smooth sorbet. If you freeze it in a tray you will get coarser and crunchier crystals.

1/2 cup (125 mL) 1 tbsp (15 mL) 6 cups (1.5 L) (about 1-1/2 lb/750 g)

Granulated Sugar Lemon Juice Hulled Strawberries,

In small saucepan, add the sugar and 1/4 cup (50 mL) water. Bring to a boil, simmer for 1 minute. Remove from heat and let cool completely. Stir in lemon juice. In food processor, add the strawberries and puree until very smooth. Add the mint syrup and pulse to combine. Pour into 8-inch (2 L) square glass casserole dish. Freeze for about 2 hours, stirring occasionally to make fine crystals and to remove the frozen puree from the edges of the dish. After about 4 hours, the granita should be fairly frozen. Cover with plastic wrap and chill fro another 2 hours before serving. Can be frozen for about 1 week, you will have to scrape the frozen puree with a fork or large spoon to get small flakes of ice. As an option you can add 1 oz of rum or tequila to the granita to give you finer crystals and a hint of bite to the final product. Mint Variation: 1 cup (150 mL) fresh mint, chopped Add the mint to the sugar and water, bring to a boil, steep for 15 minutes then strain and continue with the recipe. Lavender Variation: 2 Tbsp (30 mL) fresh lavender flowers Add the lavender to the sugar and water, bring to a boil, steep for 15 minutes then strain and continue with the recipe.

NEW LOCATION and LIQUOR LICENSE! 3106-115 Fulford-Ganges Rd in Grace Point Square, Salt Spring Island

Hours of Operation Tues-Sat 11:30-3pm / 5:30 to close (+/-9) Sunday 11:30am-2pm / 5:30-close Monday Lunch only 11:30am - 3pm Reservations or Take Out 250 931 3399

YUM! We Love Strawberry Season!

Interested in contributing to the Valley Voice? E-mail us at editor@cowichanvalleyvoice.com

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alley Vines to Wines owners Pat and Peter Dicken remember the days when they would be wary of dinner guests saying, “I brought you a bottle of wine I made.” Often it was a scary proposition and they would put away the wine for tasting later --- or in some cases never! Nowadays, with the substantial increase in quality of kits available Pat and Peter look forward to trying wines others have made from kits. Photo Peter & Pat Dicken

Good Wine You Make Yourself

“Our entry into the business was through a voyage of discovery,” Pat says. “Peter had severe reactions to commercial red wine and did not understand why people enjoyed them.” As a result, the couple tried making their own wine at home. “We started with a Vieux Chateau du Roi and experienced an “aha” moment when we found Peter could enjoy a glass of red without the side effects of commercial wine.” After trying most brands of wine kits available, they settled on Winexpert because it produced the wine they enjoyed the most. When they decided to buy a ferment-on-premises business, they looked for a store that was authorized to sell Winexpert products. Valley Vines To Wines did just that. They have owned it for more than 10 years. Thinking about making your own wine without the mess and hassle? Peter gives us some insider information on wine making at Valley Vines. “The start-up costs for new equipment to make your wine at home is about $85. Kit prices range from about $60 to over $150, and usually provide you with 30 bottles of wine. Valley Vines and Wines can make your wine for an additional $60 (roughly). Cheaper kits usually take 4 to 5 weeks to make and the fuller wines generally take 6 to 8 weeks. “Our liquor license only lets us assist you with your wine making and store your wine as it goes through the process. You need to purchase the product, start the manufacturing, bottle and remove the product. It takes about five minutes to purchase and start the wine, and 20 minutes to bottle. Sampling the product prior to purchase is illegal and impractical; therefore, we offer a guarantee that as long as you give the product the time needed to mature, if it does not meet your expectations, we will replace it for you.

rosettastonekitchenware.com

250.709.0720

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Other in-house services include fruit wine kits and coolers, ciders and sparkling product kits. For more serious wine drinkers, Valley Vines provides bulk ageing in oak barrels from Okanagan Barrel Works in Oliver BC. “Our barrels impart very little oak to the wine Valley Vines To Wines but the benefit of letting the wine Mill Bay Centre, Mill Bay 250 743 4647 breathe through the oak comes through in the finished product.” www.valleyvinestowines.com

Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley


Taste of Tea

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s a kid I was a big iced tea fan. Florida introduced me to traditional black tea sweetened with lots of sugar, lemon and ice. The southern United States is believed to be the origins of iced tea and the first written recipes date back to the early 1900s. Green tea was first used for iced tea until WWII when black tea became the norm. Approximately half of the tea consumed in Canada is ‘ready to drink’ (cold bottled). Americans drink 6.8 billion liters of iced tea, which represents eighty five percent of the total tea consumption in the US. Making your own iced tea is easy, better for you and will rival the taste of powdered or bottled tea. There are two ways to make iced tea. The first is to brew your tea as you normally would hot and then add ice to ‘instantly’ cool your tea. Use the general rule of one teaspoon per cup (230ml) of water for black and green teas, two teaspoons for herbal infusions and double the amount of tea to factor in the water content of the ice. The second technique is to brew your tea with room temperature water and allow the tea to steep for several hours, or ideally overnight. A variation on this is to brew your tea in a glass container using the heat of the sun… also known as ‘sun tea’. Try black, green, oolong or rooibos as a tea base then add fresh tastes from your garden or other foraging. The different mints, including apple mint and spearmint are always great for iced tea. Get creative with lemon balm Victor Vesely is a tea and pineapple sage and think farmer and purveyor of fine and fun organic edible flowers to float on top teas. www.teafarm.ca adding beauty to your summer concoction. Sweeten to your own taste.

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Walkabout The Salt Spring Market community. He and Sue have a stand in the Saturday and Tuesday markets, and Sue can be seen at many Island festivals in her beautiful frocks, celebrating everything from Beltane to the grape harvest. Farmer John Wilcox, Duck Creek Farm

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ating seasonally is not just the smart, sustainable way to eat. Eating in season celebrates the arrival of our favourite fruits and vegetables and helps us to revel in anticipation of what more is to come. One of my favourites at this time of year is asparagus. And who better to grow this green harbinger of spring than John Wilcox of Duck Creek Farm? This year we have been buying all John’s crop of asparagus and

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using it in many ways in the kitchen.

I always look forward to my deliveries from John and our talks about what is coming next from this bucolic Island paradise. If you are cycling to

the Island, Duck Creek Farm also offers affordable stays surrounded by nature in a peaceful Tipi or in a selection of bicycle camping spots. Check out their website at www.duckcreek.ca or call 250 537 5220 for more info.

John and his partner Sue Earle have 13 acres of organic fruit trees, basil, potatoes and garlic (among many other things). Their greenhouses extend the growing season well into the winter. John’s passionate involvement in many agricultural issues on the Island makes him a wellknown, often iconoclastic figure in the local food

Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley

Bruce Wood is chef/ owner of Bruce’s Kitchen in Ganges on beautiful Salt Spring Island. www.bruceskitchen.ca


“It’s fresher from here”

Red Curry Chicken Legs Same idea as Tandori chicken but with a Thai flavour. Traditional Thai food uses coconut milk but since coconuts do not grow on Vancouver Island we tried yogurt. Yogurt is a natural meat tenderizer, makes a nice tangy crust and adds very little fat, making these legs a very tasty guilt free treat.

Ingredients

Duck Creek Farm Asparagus with Hollandaise Courtesy Bruce Wood, Bruce’s Kitchen

There are many classic flavour marriages in the culinary firmament and tender spring asparagus with hollandaise is one of them. These bright green stalks are a harbinger of spring. 24 stalks fresh asparagus 2 tbsp. white wine 2 tbsp. good quality olive oil sea salt and feshly milled black pepper 4 tbsp. white wine vinegar half

8 black peppercorns 2 bay leaves 1lb. butter 4 egg yolks 1 shallot, peeled & split in

Pre-heat the oven to 400 degrees. Trim the asparagus and toss with the olive oil, salt and pepper. Place on a baking sheet and roast for 8 minutes or until tender, remove from the oven, cool and reserve. In a heavy bottomed saucepan, over medium heat melt the butter, the butter will begin to faom, when the foam subsides cook the butter until it has lightly browned and smells like hazelnuts. Strain through cheesecloth or a clean paper coffee filter. Keep the clarified butter warm. Place the shallot, bay leaf, peppercorns and white wine vinegar in a pan and boil until reduced by half. Cool and strain into the egg yolks. Add the white wine to the bowl with the eggs. Place the bowl containing the eggs over a pan of simmering water and beat until the egg yolks are light and frothy. Remove from the heat and slowly beat in the warm clarified butter, season to taste. Reserve until needed. Spoon the hollandaise over the asparagus. Serve immediately.

Amount

Island Farmhouse Poultry Skinless Chicken Legs Island Farms Plain Yogurt Thai Red Curry Paste (to taste -3 being very hot!) Fresh Ginger, grated Garlic finely chopped Salt Sugar Juice and rind of one lime

6 1 Cup 1 - 3 tsp 1 Tbsp 1 Clove 1 tsp 3 tsp

Method Mix all the marinade ingredients well. Score the legs with three cuts diagonally across each leg and place in marinade. Refrigerate for up to 24 hours. Cook in a very hot oven 450F or BBQ for the first 15mins and then reduce heat to 350F until juices run clear. 1615 Koksilah Road Cowichan Bay BC 250-746-6163 • www.farmhousepoultry.ca Chicken available from Country Grocer, 49th Parallel, Duncan Butcher, Chemainus Foods, Crofton Foods and Thrifty Foods

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excellent eaten cold. When you are buying the cedar for the plank make sure it is untreated. *BBQ Salmon cedar planks available at Cowichan Bay Seafoods.

LIVE CRAB • FRESH FISH • LOCAL SPOT PRAWNS AND MORE! Summer Hours Open 7 Days a Week

Baked Ling Cod with Garlic Butter Lemon Sauce

Ling cod is a white fish with a sweet mild flavour. Very versatile it can be grilled, baked, pan fried or steamed.

Amount

Fish Olive oil Salt and Pepper

Ingredients

1 (2-pound) fillet of ling cod

Garlic Butter Lemon Sauce 1/2 Cup Clam Juice 1/2 Cup Dry Sherry 1/2 Cup Milk 1 Tbsp Minced Garlic 1 Tbsp Minced Shallots 1/2 Bay Leaf 1 Tbsp Unsalted Butter 1 Tbsp Flour 3/4 pound (3 sticks) Unsalted Butter 1 Teaspoon Salt 1 Teaspoon Pepper 1 Tbsp Lemon Juice

Prepare the Sauce 1. Mix clam juice, sherry, whole milk, garlic, shallots, bay leaf and reduce by half on medium high in a small saucepan. 2. In a separate saucepan prepare the roux. Heat one tablespoon of butter in the saucepan on medium heat until it is foamy. Sprinkle in the flour, stirring a couple of minutes with a metal whisk until well mixed but not browned. 3. Slowly add the reduced mixture to the roux, stirring quickly to incorporate. When you first add some of the mixture, the roux will bubble up. Just keep adding the mixture and keep whisking to incorporate. 4. Lower the heat to low. Slowly whisk in the butter, 2 tablespoons at a time. Add lemon juice, salt, and white pepper. Add some more clam stock if the sauce is too thick. Prepare the Fish 1. Arrange an oven rack so that when the fish is on a baking pan in the oven it will be 4 to 5 inches from the heat. Preheat the oven to 350°F. 2. Rinse the fillet in cold water, cut into 2 (1-pound) pieces. Remove any bones with fish-bone tweezers or (spotless clean) pliers. Lay out flat in a aluminum foil lined baking pan. Rub some olive oil over both sides of the pieces, enough to coat. Sprinkle both sides with a few shakes of salt and pepper. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, until just done. To test, use the tip of a knife to gently cut into the thick est part of the fillet. The fish is done when the fish has just turned from translu cent to opaque at the center. Once you pull the fish out of the oven it will continue to cook for a few minutes.

Cowichan Bay Seafoods

Savour The Flavour of Fresh, Local Fare

T

he Cowichan Green Community (CGC) is thrilled to launch the third edition of the Buy Local! Buy Fresh! Map - the most comprehensive directory for sourcing year-round local food in the Cowichan Region! Spanning from Shawnigan Lake to Cedar, this year’s map includes fourteen new farm listings, along with restaurants, farmers’ markets, and shops where local food can be purchased and enjoyed. The map features a diverse range of products from

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10 am to 5:30pm

asparagus to octopus. Including mainstays such as carrots, apples, tomatoes, and potatoes, the map also highlights where more unique products, such as blackberry port and fresh stinging nettle, can be purchased. Raelynn Gibson, Mapping Coordinator at CGC says, “Here at CGC, we are passionate about food – this is evident when you take a look at our projects and initiatives as they are aimed at creating and maintaining healthy and strong food systems. We are

1751 Cowichan Bay Rd, Cowichan Bay 250-748-0020 E-mail: info@cowichanbayseafood.com

so lucky here in this Valley our farmers not only produce great food, but they orchestrate interesting and fun events that take place right on their farms for all to participate. How cool is that?” The Buy Local! Buy Fresh! Map reflects CGC’s mandate to improve food security in the Cowichan region. It makes food producers more visible in the region, supports their growth into the market, and links consumers to local food. Raelynn continues, “Food is central to our existence, and not only should healthy, fresh, and affordable food be available to all, food should

be honoured and celebrated. We promote the local food movement, and access to food, because we believe it is a cornerstone in building resilient communities.” The map will be available to pick up from the Cowichan Green Community’s office at 181 Station Street in downtown Duncan, as well at various businesses, farms, and tourist destinations throughout the Cowichan Valley.

Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley

Raelynn Gibson resides in Duncan, baking cookies and growing veggies.


What’s Going On In

Members of South Cowichan Lawn Tennis Club at the original Pimbury Farm location (1888)

Cowichan Bay? South Cowichan Lawn Tennis Club Turns 125 this June!

Celebrating 125 Years of Tennis in the Cowichan Valley

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ucked away behind high green fences, close to the village of Cowichan Bay, you will find the lush grass courts of the South Cowichan Lawn Tennis Club. We are one of the oldest lawn tennis clubs in the world and the oldest club in Canada still playing on grass. The club was founded in 1887 a mere 10 years after the All England Club, or Wimbledon as it is more commonly known, and in 1992 was designated a BC Heritage site. The original location of the club was on the Pimbury Farm, a short distance to the east. There being room for only two courts, G. T. Corfield, a founding member, offered the club the use of a portion of his farmland and in 1906, six courts were laid out and a players’ pavilion built with play commencing the following year. Each year we host a number of large tournaments where hundreds of tennis players from around the world continue to gather

to play and share in the spirit of fun, friendship and competition. This year the club hosts our 125th annual Vancouver Island Grass Court Championship, quite an achievement given that Wimbledon celebrated their 125th tournament only last year. The club is run and staffed by volunteer members. We take great pride in showing off our beautiful facilities... the 7 grass courts, the clubhouse and our lovely herbaceous gardens nestled in the shade of two majestic maple trees. We welcome new members of all ages and abilities and encourage visitors, playing and non-playing, to stop by and appreciate the past and present of this local, hidden gem. Located at 2290 Cowichan Bay Road. For more information on how to become a member visit website is www.scltc.bc.ca or call 250-746-7282.

Submitted by Su Robinson

Submitted by Su Robinson

Fresh Organic Artisan Pastas & Pasta Sauces SUMMER COOKING CLASSES June 8

SOUTH EAST ASIAN VEGETARIAN Chef Heidi Fink $70 + tax June 19 FRENCH BISTRO Chef Ryan Zuvich $65 + tax June 26 4 COURSE LOCALLY SOURCED MEAL Chef Brock Windsor (Stone Soup Inn) $65 + tax July 23 SUMMER’S BOUNTY – CREATIVE WAYS WITH SEASONAL VEGETABLES - Deborah Fahlman of Kilrenny Farm $45 + tax July 31 THE ODD BITS Don Genova $65 + tax Check kilrennyfarm.com for details & call 250-743-9019 to register.

Interested in contributing to the Valley Voice? E-mail us at editor@cowichanvalleyvoice.com

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The SPELTacular Alternative to Regular Wheat

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pelt is a grain that is as old as time itself and is now making a serious comeback as a superfood in North America. Compared to wheat, it is higher in protein and B complex vitamins, and is a superior fiber source. The complex carbs contained in spelt are an important component in blood clotting and stimulating the immune system. With high water solubility, nutrients are easier to digest. Those who avoid wheat because of mild allergies are able to tolerate spelt even though it contains gluten. Spelt has very brittle gluten content and though this is a negative factor when proving dough, it is definitely a positive for folks with mild gluten allergies, as it makes it easier to digest. (If you have similar allergies, it is important to get your doctor’s advice before adding spelt to your diet.)

An Unparalleled bread experience

A tough outer husk protects the spelt grain, making it more difficult to prepare for milling and, in turn, slightly more expensive than its distant cousin, wheat. However, this tough outer husk also protects the spelt from pollutants and insects, which allows growers to not only avoid using pesticides but also makes it unnecessary to create hybrid or genetically modified strains of spelt. Because

Spelt kernels

of this, spelt is considered ecologically ideal for human survival in the future. It is a tenacious grain that will grow under the harshest of conditions. Baking with spelt is similar to baking with other flours. The texture of the flour is compared to soft red wheat. You can use it as a complete or partial replacement of regular flour in your favourite recipes. However, due to the higher solubility, you may have to reduce the amount of liquids in the recipe. Spelt also makes a great alternative side dish; just boil and season as you would rice. Store spelt grains in a cool dry place and use freshly ground flour immediately or store it in the fridge.

Check out our NEW Rustic Loaf made with Vancouver Island wheat.

Cowichan Bay 746-7664

Mill Bay 929-1119

Visit truegrain.ca for hours of operation. 16

Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley

Pam Stiles is a Cowichan Valley lover of all grains and can be found at www. healthykitchens.com


What’s Going On In

Cowichan Bay?

Spyhopping Whales & Harbour Seals

Transient Orca Whale Encounters

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here are approximately 450 individual transient (mammal eating) orca whales that frequent the waters of southeast Alaska and British Columbia. These transients genetically differ from our resident (fish eating) J, K, and L pod orcas. DNA research shows that the transients and residents were genetically split over 100 000 years ago. Besides their feeding behaviour, transients live singularly or in small groups and residents live in large family pods for life. You never know what you will experience while watching transients, as their behavior and travel patterns are very unpredictable. I have been lucky enough to experience numerous transient kills over the past 10 years. These hunts are truly spectacular. Transients hunt like a pack of wolves. Twice I have had Harbour Seals jump into my boat to evade the mammal eating orcas. The first time this happened was in the Georgia Strait. We were out watching two families of transients socializing and feeding. The orcas had passed by our boat and were 600 meters north of us when a very wide-eyed

harbour seal popped up right next to our boat. The next thing I knew, this 200-pound harbour seal was sitting on my feet growling and hissing at me. It was ten minutes before he decided to hop back into the ocean. The second harbour seal wasn’t so lucky. On a tour out of Cowichan Bay we ran into a group of transients right at the mouth of the bay. We spent an hour watching them as they swam towards Maple Bay. Peoples’ attention was just starting to wane as the seal surfaced 100 meters from the boat. The seal charged towards the boat nearly ending up in a woman’s lap who was seated in the back. As the seal rested on the pontoon of our Zodiac as the orcas circled and spyhopped (pop they heads out of the water) to look directly at the seal. The seal rolled off the boat thinking the orcas were gone. He made it about ten feet from the boat and was then pulled under by one of the female transients, never to be seen again. Simon Pidcock is Owner/Operator of Ocean Ecoventures in Cowichan Bay www.OceanEcoVentures.com

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on the farm

become a Cowichan institution. Looking back after five years, we see the results of our continuous investments in our farm and the extraordinary support we’ve received from our customers and community. Thank you

with MAKARIA Farm

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n June 1, Makaria Farm turns five. It’s hard for us to believe. When we bought the farm I was still working for the provincial government. The office work was interesting and challenging, but at the end of the day I didn’t feel like I had accomplished anything. For me, farming is the opposite: I can see the results of my work clearly, even if it takes a few years. In June of 2007 I took the week off work and spent it on our new farm: 10 acres of pasture with an old sheep barn and some overgrown fruit trees. I shoveled manure and straw out of the barn and made a compost pile at the base of the pear tree. Five years later we still see the results of that week’s work each fall in bumper harvests of pears. The former barn continues to do yeoman’s duty as my tool shed. Over the next few years we installed deer fencing and

Makaria Farm’s orchard is born! 2008

an irrigation system, planted an orchard, and built greenhouses and sheds. We started a Community Supported Agriculture program, established a presence at farmer’s markets, and hosted workshops to teach ourselves and our community about growing grain on a small scale (which Heather is now writing a book about). Now, when I walk through the orchard that started as small sticks that fit in the back of our small pick-up truck, I can’t reach the tops of the trees or stretch my arms beyond their breadth. They were laden with blossoms this spring and are forming their first crop of fruit as I write. These past few weeks I brought our own asparagus to market for the first time: we started the plants from seeds four years ago. In May we had our fourth annual organic tomato plant sale, which has

to all those who have helped Makaria Farm make it to its fifth birthday. Brock McLeod and Heather Walker own and operate Makaria Farm. www.makariafarm.com

Wild Berries And Cherries On The Way

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lossoms on the berries and fruit are looking pretty good; it’s a banner year for Saskatoon berries, cherries, pears and raspberries. Tent caterpillars are on the move and liking apple trees --- a lot. If your apple trees get hit, try tasting rose hips from cultivated old varieties of roses as they can be exceptionally fine tasting, similar to a small late-season apple with concentrated sugars and a very nice flavour not found in big apples.

Indian plum is exquisite in taste when well ripened and shriveling. Dandelion seeds have a taste like a nut liqueur; simply pinch off some of the seeds and eat only the seed. Hairy Cats Ear with its chocolate flowers will soon be waving hello from peoples lawns. Pick, eat, and save the flowers for winter tea and for the children as they Roger Foucher is a wild will love them and, as there food enthusiast who is persuaded by all the are no concentrated sugars, creatures around us these flowersnacks won’t over that they see it right. stimulate kids or give them cavities.

cut JUNE Broom in bloom It’s June – and these are the last days to cut broom! Here are some tips: Don’t let any yellow flowers go to seed. If you don’t have time to cut the plant to the ground, at least cut off the yellow flowers. Stop the spread! Until the seedpods form, the cut plant can be cut, moved, and even composted. Once the seed pods form, be careful not to spread the seeds. If you cut it to the ground in June, it will still die, but leave it where it

was, or pile it on top of itself in an already infested area. Sometimes you can just cut and drop, or place in the forest. Stop the car and cut down those single or small groups of broom. Don’t let that small cluster become a forest of broom! Cut broom in June? Yes! www.broombusters.org

Makaria Farm’s orchard in 2012.

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Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley

Joanne Sales is a blueberry farmer, writer & founder of Broombusters in Qualicum Beach


Growing Food in Deer Country

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rowing food in the Cowichan Valley definitely has its challenges and grazing deer is perhaps the greatest. Aside from putting up a 6 foot fence that can cost thousands of dollars to install, here are two methods that won’t break the pocketbook, but will allow you to grow, at least some of your own food. The first method was discovered after a fit of frustration with a newly planted dwarf fruit tree that continued to be stripped of its flowers and leaves. Instead of fencing in just the apple tree, a small garden was designed around the apple tree encompassing an area of 10 feet by 10 feet. Wooden stakes were driven into the ground and a roll of 4 foot high chicken wire was attached to the stakes. A gate was created out of sticks and attached to the stakes as well. This temporary fix has withheld the test of time for three years now and so far, has not had one deer has jumped into it. In the past three years, the apple tree has thrived and the little garden continues to produce food for

a family. Another method for growing food that has been successful against grazing deer is a raised bed with a cage like lid that is hinged on one side. The cage is made with sturdy stucco wire, pvc plumbing pipe and a strong rope that holds it in place while you work on the bed. Both the rain and the sun can go through the wire making it the perfect deer proof raised bed. In the winter, poly could be attached, extending the season to a year round garden. For more information on the Deer Proof Raised Bed, contact growfood@shaw.ca

Farm and arden Pages

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At Grow Food, we feel growing food is the most important contribution we can all make to a sustainable future and overcoming challenges will be met by finding new solutions. “If you like to Eat – GROW FOOD!” Joy Story, helps people grow food! Check out her on-line Magazine and Newsletter growfoodnetwork.com

Interested in contributing to the Valley Voice? E-mail us at editor@cowichanvalleyvoice.com

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Raising Poults

5 and replace the 100 watt bulb with a 60 watt bulb to prevent picking.

Turkey poults have a reputation for their will to die, especially in the first week of life. But careful preparation before the poults arrive will help you minimize early losses.

for the first week. Preheat the brooding area to 95 - 100 degrees F 24 hours before the poults arrive using a red brooder lamp over the centre of the area. After the first week the temperature can be slowly reduced by 5 degrees F per week.

Area: Brood poults in a round enclosure bedded with coarse shavings. Provide Light: The brooding area 6 square feet per 10 poults needs to be bright so the for the first week. Do not poults can find the feed and bed with fine sawdust as the waters.for A 100 light Made on the Island thewatt Island poults will eat it and starve. bulb should be kept on for 23 hours per day for the first Temperature: New poults two days. Reduce the hours require high temperatures of light slowly to 14 by day

Water: Place a gallon waterer per 50 poults at the edge of the brooder area. Adding vitamins, apple cider (1tsp/ litre) and brown sugar (1tsp/ litre) will give the poults a good start. Make a fresh batch each day. Marbles in the waterer attract the poults to drink and will prevent them from drowning. If you have an automatic waterer, provide ½” per poult. Feed: To help the poults find the feed, place it where it will be easily found such as an egg flat on the floor. If you use a feeder, provide 2”

of space per poult. Start with 29% Turkey Poult Crumbles; a 20 kg bag should last 12 poults about 4 weeks. If the poults are being raised in an area that previously had chickens or turkeys use a feed medicated against Blackhead. If you receive chicks on the same day as your turkey poults you can house some chicks with the poults. The chicks will teach the poults the location of feed and water making their first few days easier. Submitted by Joanne and Everett of Top Shelf Feeds.

Enviro.Week - local & natural growers THURSDAY FARMERS MARKET 2-7pm In The Field, Cobble Hill Hall thursdayfarmersmarket@yahoo.ca

Large or small we feed them all. Hours of operation Sun 10 - 4pm Mon - Sat 8:30am - 6pm

2800 Roberts Rd. Duncan (250) 746-5101, Fax (250) 597-0312

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100% Fresh

100% Locally Owned and Operated

Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley


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Sheila Jones with dog on beach

About our Pets Sheila Jones offers holistic consultations for both people and pets. www.holisticnc.ca

HOT WEATHER TIPS FOR PET CARE Now is the time to think about hot weather - no matter how long it is in arriving. Even if you leave your vehicle windows open at this time of year, when you return, it will be warmer inside than out. You may have an animal who “likes the heat” - fair enough, Tommy, my old rescue dog (basically hairless - another story), will search for any patch of sun to lie in, but an overheated (heat prostration) animal can die or leave your animal with brain damage. It takes only minutes for the vehicle to become like a furnace, and parking in the shade makes little difference, as the sun moves around. *Most important, always carry a large container of water with you - you have your water bottle - your animals need one, too. Wait until cooler times of the day to walk or exercise any animal, big or small. Their paws will burn quickly on hot surfaces and domestic animal’s bodies are closer to the ground, and therefore will heat up quickly. Older, overweight and snub-nose pets, especially those with heart or lung diseases, should be kept indoors and preferably in an air conditioned space during extreme temperatures.

same - RESPECT. Also, there are beaches for NO animals, or some restrict them to one area only (read any posted notices upon arriving). Carry your “pooh” bags with you and always pick up and carry your bag until you find a bin close by. I know it’s “stinky”, but I’ve had to take mine either in the car or hanging outside my driver’s door to find a commercial one on our way home. If you’re not ready to leave, drop the bag by the driver’s door of your car, then take it with you when you go. If you notice your dog may be wanting to do his “business” while in the water, this is not a good thing for the ocean, lake, pond or river environment. Call them out and have them do it on the ground where you are able to pick it up (not bury it). If your animal’s deposits are left in the water, the toxins are highly dangerous for anything living there so please be aware and do your part to help with this. Have fun, be safe.

Rob’s Lighthouse Eatery & Art Gallery Fresh, friendly, affordable and pet-friendly! • Fish, Veggie and Beef Burgers • Fresh-cut Fries • Fish & Chips • Lavazza Espresso and more!

Dine In on our heated patio or Take Out!

BEACH TIPS

Cowichan Bay Waterfront

If you are having a picnic or spending time in one place, always have an umbrella or find a place with access to shade for both you and for your pet. Have access to water, Weekly Meditation at VIU Cowichan Campus Website: www.VIRetreats.com as well. It’s always fun to have pets at the beach with you, but note that beach rules and dog park rules are much the VI Retreat Garden, Nichiren Buddha Society www.VIRetreats.com 778. 422. 0155

“From our path of vision we free ourselves from unbalanced desire, perceiving true nature” Namaste 2012 Retreat Schedule, Reserve Your Space Now: One Day LifeSpan - Sat. 09 June Buddha In the Park - July 21, 22, 23; Moon Glow Silent Retreat, Fri. 31st August

Weekly Meditation • Buddha Services • Spiritual Counseling • Nichiren Buddha Society www.VIRetreats.com

Vancouver Island Retreat Garden, Peace Center

Phone 778 422 0155

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Helpful Garden Making A Difference

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ommunity means different things to different people or even several things to one person. Personally, I’ve lived in blink and you’ll miss it small towns, bustling high-density urban areas and in big city downtown high-rises. I’ve lived on tropical islands and now on this island, Vancouver Island. Here is where I’ve found a community that is meaningful to me, that gives me a sense of common interest and goals. Trust me, I never thought I’d be here living a great life in Mill Bay, but you never know where life will take you, where the adventure leads you. My adventure led me to an amazing spouse and a terrific group of local people who have a common passion and interest in gardening and growing and making our personal environment reflect our individual vision.

AhZenya the newest salon and spa in the Cowichan Valley

Join us for a relaxing ZEN EXPERIENCE

• Full Hair and Esthetics Services • Joico hair color and products • Natural Sugaring Hair Removal • Onsite Gel Nail Artist

Felting Workshop Spring Mobile - June 3 12-4pm $35 + $10 Materials Fee

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Create this sweet spring decoration. Learn wet felting techniques for the flower and dragonfly wings. Then needle felt bees and any other creative ideas you want. Butterfiles, fairies, so many possibilities. No experience necessary. Visit nanc-studio. blogspot.com for more info.

One of these visions is community. Belonging, helping, building and sharing. The Mill Bay Garden Club does this for the entire community each year with the 65th annual Community Flower and Garden Show at Cobble Hill Hall.

feature access to Master Gardeners and several dozen garden and plant related vendors outside the hall. Inside is the amazing flower competition. Judged by the Vancouver Island Horticultural Judges Group and featuring 73 different divisions of classes from cut flowers and vegetables to floral design and several special classes for kids, this competition is open to all gardeners and sees entries from all over the region.

A silent auction featuring items up for bid donated by local businesses and individuals accompanies the indoor Flower Show. And, for the first time, a portion of the proceeds will go back to the community in the form of a donation to the Mill Bay Food Bank. So come and see what community is all about on Saturday June 16th from 9:00 am. to 2 pm. The Mill Bay Rotary Club begins the day with an outdoor pancake breakfast at 8 a.m. The Lake Bay Hills Ladies Hospital Auxiliary will hold their annual Strawberry Tea inside the hall.

This two-day event is a huge undertaking and involves many of your neighbours in one of the largest events in the South Cowichan Valley. We invite you all to come and see what we’re doing, growing and selling. The show this year will

Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley

Ajay Oppelaar is an experienced horticulturist and President of the Mill Bay Garden Club. Contact him at arkengardens@gmail.com


Tim Erickson and Keith Mackenzie stand in front of the Cheewhat Cedar. The largest Red Cedar in the world. It has a circumference of 62 feet (18.9 m.) at chest height.

Big Tree Excursion

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alking down the trail felt like a journey to another world, where giant moss covered trees towered above. Technology and the busyness of civilization were immediately replaced by a sense of awe and wonder. Emotions soared as old large trees laid down on the forest floor. They gave their life to nurse new seedlings, giving them a chance to join the ranks of their great ancestors. Perhaps in order to appreciate our world we need to experience it. We have what could be a world renowned rainforest in our own back yard. When traveling to tropical destinations or foreign countries there is an interest to explore the new sights and sounds. There are some amazing things to see right here on Vancouver Island. Honeymoon Bay on Lake Cowichan is the gateway to the rainforwww.rainwaterconnection.com

est right here on our island. Some of the largest trees in Canada and in the world can be seen on a guided full day excursion. Honeymoon Bay is no longer a place to go at the end of the road. It is a destination spot at the beginning of a journey to some of the best of what nature has to offer. A full day excursion is facilitated by local guides who can give a glimpse into the history and legends of the area while traveling to these inspiring places. A packed lunch and transportation is included. Upon returning there is a salt water hot tub and exquisite meal waiting to be enjoyed. Take a day and experience the island like you never have before. There are two trips to choose from for people with various levels of fitness. Call Honeymoon Bay Retreat at: 1-888-749-4252 for more information. BOB BURGESS Tel 250.246.2155 Gulf Islands Rainwater Connection Ltd. Thetis Island, BC Email: bob@

rainwaterconnection.com

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ith the onset of summer I always like to plan projects that involve freshening and updating the exteriors of tired looking buildings. Quite often all that is needed is a fresh coat of paint with a new colour scheme. Something we’re seeing more and more each year is that many folks have a desire to redo siding – they’re saying goodbye to the vinyl siding from the 80’s that has faded and warped. An excellent option that has delighted our clients is a return to the beauty of natural cedar siding or locally harvested Douglas Fir. For an environmentally friendly

Top Image; Galvalum ‘Cool-Roof’

wood finish, we have the Cedar Mill in Cobble Hill coat in ‘Lifetime Wood Treatment’, an organic preservative made locally that gives the wood a silvery patina of age. This gives the wood that Japanese Wabisabi feeling – authentic, natural beauty. If your roof needs to be replaced, consider a metal roof. This is very west coast, low maintenance and allows you to have some fun with colour. I used a great new ‘Blackberry’ colour that is deep and rich. A metal roof and the addition of rusty boom chains

DESIGNI NG

green

‘Green’ upgrades for your home’s exterior

from the salvage yard all help to reclaim water easily for your garden and other. For energy efficiency, try a ‘CoolRoof’ concept. A Galvalum corrugated metal roof for reflecting heat gain which can save 5 to 10 cents a square foot in cooling costs. Recycled concrete sidewalks are all the rage for a random entry. Then look for that perfect sandstone or basalt slab for the threshold from Al at Hillside Stone. Add some black accents in gutters and then add life to your carefully planned exterior transformation with some greenery. How about something simple and

dramatic, like a bit of ‘contained’ bamboo and crushed rock. You’re done and your home has been renewed with character and beauty. Enjoy the summer!

Image Above; Lifetime Wood Treatment on cedar siding for a Wabi-sabi look David Coulson is a local certified Built Green design builder. He has a staff of 25 that have built throughout the island for over 20 years.

For full design/build service, give us a call

 250.746.5372 • coulsondesign@shaw.ca • www.davidcoulsondesign.com  24

Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley


Margit Nellemann Studio and Gallery June 21 – July 22 10am – 5pm Opening Reception Thursday June 21st 6-9pm 8350 Richards Trail, North Cowichan 250 748 3811 www.margitnellemann.com Art exhibit features functional and nonfunctional teapots and imaginative chapeaus.

Talking Arts • Mad Hats & Teapots

has been involved with woodworking for 30 years. Originally, his interest was in designing and making ad Hats + Teapots marks experimental musical instruments. the second in a series of After a few years of making four exhibits centered around functional items, he turned to the the four seasons. The advent artistic side of woodturning. One of summer is met with great anticipation and inspires a season focus of Art’s work in recent years has been teapots. In 2005, Art was of festivities and pleasure. asked to make a teapot for the Playing along with the theme famous Kamm Collection. Since then of summer, Margit Nellemann he has designed and made several Studio and Gallery is delighted series of non-functional wooden to be showing exceptional art teapots.Art has demonstrated at in three different mediums. In reverence of lightness and joy of national and regional symposia. His work has been seen in numerous solstice, Art Liestman, Ulrieke exhibitions and is available through Benner and Margit Nellemann several galleries across North offer an amusing feast for the America. senses.

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Art Liestman is a woodturner living in Coquitlam, B.C. Art

Ulrieke Benner, Salt Spring Island, studied Textile Design in Germany

and Massachusetts. Her work is in fine galleries and exclusive clothing boutiques in Vancouver, New York, Santa Fe, Chicago, and California. She has exhibited in the Philadelphia Museum of Art Show as well as in a variety of shows in Europe and Japan. The fabric for all Ulrieke’s clothing is hand made. In her ‘art to wear’ she uses fine merino wool for hats and purses. For the scarves and clothing she felts the wool into silk in a wet-rolling technique. The rich colors she uses produce striking creations that are distinctive and unique. Margit Nellemann, Vancouver Island, is a self-taught ceramic artist. Margit creates one-of-akind, hand-built pieces ranging from functional objects to sculptural art. Margit’s ceramics are built using a combination

of coiling and slab work. Years ago, Margit discovered the teapot and she has since created an extensive family of extremely entertaining tea vessels. The playful theme of this show allows all three artists to showcase some of their favourite work: teapots and hats! Images; Top Left Ulrieke Benner with hat lover Top Right; Teapod 2 by Art Liestman, Below Art Liestman. Mid Right; Mehndi Teapot by Margit Nellemann. Bottom Image; Margit Nellemann Making Teapots

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craft

Original Work by Lorraine Taylor, Mum

A couple of years ago I visited a non-juried, community hosted art show. As was to be expected, it was a thoroughly enjoyable mixed bag: work by talented (and some not so talented) up-and-comers among that of wizened masters. While taking in the show, I ran into an old friend who dryly noted that “Some of the artists here have not yet mastered their craft”. Thus an epiphany: a good work of art is always well crafted: each brush stroke, each hammer blow, word or note is exactly where it is supposed to be. Recently, I walked into a gallery and unexpectedly came across another friend’s paintings. To my surprise, I found that her works were utterly out of place among all the other paintings. Intrigued, I retraced my steps and walked from painting to painting, again and again. Eventually I realized that while all the paintings were well crafted, her paintings were very challenging. I had to think, and look some more, perhaps a little closer and think again. I came to understand that art is not only well crafted, but also always interesting; one never tires of re-viewing it. As a corollary, I also came to understand that good craft, while always engaging, is appreciated without re-view, without constant re-conceptualization; its enjoyment is easy and smooth and satisfying without any distraction or confusion. And the finer the craft, the easier, smoother and more satisfying the experience of it.

Arbutus table with ebony accents, by Michael Moore Brochures are available at Experience Cycling, 482 Trans Canada Highway, Duncan, and at the Duncan Garage Cafe and Bakery, 101-330 Duncan Street, Duncan. www.cowichanvalleyartisans.com

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Silk Painter Lorraine Taylor

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orraine Taylor has lived in the Cowichan Valley for over 40 years, where she raised her family of three, nursed in the Cowichan Hospital and the Community Wellness Centre and was one of the founding members of Imagine That! Artisans’ Cooperative in 1994. After moving to Chemainus in 1999, Lorraine opened the Oakleaf Gallery. “For years I have enjoyed encouraging others to find their passion and pursue their dreams. I certainly never considered myself to be an artist. However I have always enjoyed working with colours and when I saw the vibrancy of the dyes moving about on silk cloth I immediately knew that this was to become my new passion. “ “Today’s paints, dyes and techniques offer endless possibilities for this beautiful art form and for me it provides an opportunity to just experiment with colour. I love it! It is play as well as therapy for me! I am still learning and stretching the possibilities of painting on silk with each piece I create. A life-long, and mostly self-taught crafter, Lorraine was mentored by Imagine That! member, and silk painter extraordinaire, Clare Carver. “I would encourage others who might want to flex their artistic muscles Hemingway Writer’s to give silk painting, orEliza any other artistic endeavour a try -- Class just for the fun of it!” Lorraine isTh a member of the newly-formed ursdays, 6pm - 7:30pm Chemainus Artists Group and finds that “meeting a group Cowichan Library, in Duncan situation provides opportunities to talk about andwelcome share our love FreeEveryone for creating beautiful things. This www.elizahemingway.com sharing, feedback, support and Details: encouragement from others helps our artistic process.” Lorraine’s work will be on display at Imagine That! Artisans’ Designs, 251 Craig Street in Duncan for the month of June. Eliza Hemingway Art and Design Studio 9752-F Willow Street, Chemainus Hours: Open 11-4 Thursday to Saturday Studio now open for 2012 Season. email: elizahemingway@shaw.ca Phone: 250-324-2212

Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley


Trendy Treasure Hunters Unite

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he Cowichan Valley by its very nature is about rural living, community, sustainability, and recycling.” Says Sharon Manason owner of House of Hayday, the Valley’s newest home furnishings and knick knack consignment store. From her research and sales she is finding that this demographic likes “retro and trendy”. Thinking of bringing something in to sell? Look first online or through a current magazine to gauge which colors are popular and get an idea of what people are filling their homes with. “60s retro has really gained a foothold, and the dated colors of that era are resurfacing in a fresh, new way. Aqua, teal, turquoise, coral, orange, lime green – all are finding their way back into our lives. And wood that is no longer available is also very popular. You might have a teak credenza stuck in a corner of the garage filled with old paint cans: we’ve sold one. Scandina-

vian-style occasional chair with white and orange striped fabric hiding in a corner of the basement? We sold two of those in less than a week.” She shares enthusiastically. “In the past three months we’ve sold random items that would surprise even the most eclectic among us. Here’s just a sampling: three venetian paper weights, a Ritz cracker vintage collectible tin, an up-cycled half-moon table painted duck-egg grey, a silver pie lifter and salad tongs, an Ontario lake country colorized photo circa 1958, a patio table with six chairs, three curio cabinets (yes! these are hard to find – bring yours in if you aren’t using it!) and an oval, glass coffee table held up by four rearing horses cast in brass (?). Indeed. Have you got a treasure hiding at your home that you’d like to bring in? House of Hayday’s grand opening on Saturday, June 9th 9-5 with live music, dance demonstrations, food, an artisan market and some great door prizes. Sun FM will also be on site doing a remote location from 9 until 1 pm. House of Hayday / Constant Crave Coffee Trans Canada Highway @ Koksilah in the Crossroads Centre 250.597.2021.

Beautiful up-cycled rocking chair and side table by Blackberry Lane. Many more similar items available right now.

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Home Cleaning Gift Certificates available for Family & Friends!

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by the Tzinquaw Youth Dancers. Following the ceremony will be the Artists Reception.

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rom the moment of birth, to the time of passing, cedar has traditionally played a vital role in the life of the First People of the Pacific Northwest. In celebration of June, National Aboriginal Month the Cowichan Aboriginal Film Festival is co hosting The Story of Cedar Art Show with the Cowichan Valley Arts Council. The show features 10-12 Coast Salish carvers, cedar weavers, drum makers and artists who either work with cedar, or who have incorporated elements of cedar, “the tree of life”, into their work. Each week, one of the participating artists will provide a demonstration of their craft, as well as share their thoughts on the work they do and the stories behind their pieces. Opening Ceremonies will feature the acclaimed Animal Kingdom Performers from Port Alberni, Nuu chah nulth youth whose performance bring forward teachings on the environment and all that surrounds us. They will be welcomed to the traditional lands of the Cowichan people

Honeymoon Bay Every Saturday Outdoor Market Every Saturday 10am - 2pm May - Thanksgiving

For market info call Bob at 250-749-7233 or 250-510-1113

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During the show, the public are invited to take part in creating a community art piece “The River of Roses”. Make a cedar rose at one of the workshops, and add it to the community art piece, along with a thought, poem, or comment you would like to include. Elders may also be there to share their knowledge and their experience. To support this event, a special raffle is taking place, featuring a traditional cedar hat woven by Corinne Baker and a cedar rim elk hide hand drum made by Jorge Lewis, with a red tail hawk design by Tina Lewis. The draw for these two beautiful pieces will take place at Portals, 12:00 pm on June 21, during the National Aboriginal Day Celebrations. Tickets available at Portals (746-1633), Film Cowichan (746-7930), or at The Duncan Farmer’s Market on Saturdays during the month of May. Please check website for weekly updates on activities. www.cedar.cowichan.net

The Story of Cedar Art Show June 4-29th Opening Ceremonies 6 - 8:30pm June 4th Portals Art Gallery Island Savings Centre

www.cedar.cowichan.net

Look for in-season local produce, plants, flowers, sewing, baking, preserves, handmade soaps, bodycare, arts & crafts and more! Follow the signs to the Coffee Mill Cafe in Honeymoon Bay.

Local Muralists Headline Gala Inaugural ArtBeat evening

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rtBeat, an art walk and street party, comes to south Willow Street in Chemainus! This event features high calibre artists, creative demonstrations and a sparkling line-up of entertainment, every Friday evening from 5 to 9pm. Shops and eateries will stay open late to join the festivities.. Phil Mavis, of The Willow Street Café brought the idea to the community. “I recently visited Hanapepe, Hawaii, The town sprang to life in the evenings with an artwalk, entertainment, dining and shopping,” says Mavis, “It seemed like a perfect idea for Chemainus.” The community loved the idea. Collaborators such as the Chemainus Valley Cultural Arts Society (CVCAS), Willow Street merchants and individual volunteers, got together to bring ArtBeat to life. “We welcome locals and visitors to experience all that Chemainus has to offer,” says Kathy Wachs, Chair of CVCAS. “We’re closing the street to create a pedestrian friendly, party ready, environment”

Connie Greig-Manning

Cim MacDonald, is an award winning painter and photographer. She is the Curator of the Chemainus Murals. Cim painted three murals, #32 The Telephone Company, #38 - Passing the Torch and #2 in the Emily Carr Series – First Nation Villages. Artists from the Malahat to Nanaimo and the Gulf Islands are invited to download ArtBeat’s Call For Artists at www.cvcas.com Musician and performers, if you’re interested in busking at ArtBeat, please contact Kathy at kathywachs2@gmail.com

On June 22, Gala opening night, ArtBeat will feature two of Chemainus` most accomplished artists and muralists, Cim MacDonald and Connie Greig-Manning. Cim and Connie will greet people, display their paintings and demonstrate their techniques. Connie Grieg-Manning is a painter, illustrator and web designer. She works in oil, textiles, mixed media and more. In 1992, Connie painted mural #31, The Lumber Barons, which she restored in 1996 and 2011.

Cim MacDonald

ArtBeat Opening Night Friday, June 22 6 - 8:30pm Call for Artists www.cvacs.com

Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley


Carol Borrett Watercolours and Acrylics

Sue Coleman

Watercolours 5378 Gore -Langton Rd Duncan 250 748 8332 www.suecoleman.ca This award winning artist has earned international recognition for her distinctive watercolor paintings. Sue paints a wide variety of subjects from misty west-coast scenes, wildlife and landscapes, to ‘Interpretive’ Northwest Coast Indian images, which have been reproduced and sold to collectors worldwide.

Catherine Fraser Painter 5412 Gore-Langton Rd Duncan 250 748 2067 catherinefraserart@ shaw.ca A professional painter since 1983. Her Fine works are depicted using a variety of mediums: watercolors, acrylics, pastels, and mixed media paintings on paper or canvas. Images are representational and abstract, painted outdoors and in the studio. New local and Scottish landscapes. Come and learn about “touch drawing”.

1162 Maple Bay Rd Duncan 250 748 5224 www.westcoastwatercolour.com Carol paints in both watercolour and acrylic. Her realistic paintings reveal her fascination with water, boats and reflections. They capture the many varied moods of the coastal area and way of life. Carol paints out of her home studio in Maple Bay. The studio is open year round. Call ahead to avoid disappointment.

Rene Deerheart Jeweller & Wood Carver 4735 Cowichan Lake Rd.

Duncan 250 715 0207 www.deerheart.com Rene’s current focus is on jewellery using metal clay in silver, copper, & bronze, as well as knitted wire mesh tubes, riveted & etched copper sheet pendants with oil slick patinas, ornamented Japanese obi brocade ropes, & kumihimo cords with pendants.

Donna Birtwistle Water Colour Paint & Pencils 2423 Mill Bay Road Mill Bay 250 743 2758 This image was done with water colour pencils & paint. Her neck is stretched above the trees as she munches the top tender leaves and watches the golden sunset. Everything is calm at the end of this day.

Terry Harrison Glass and Fabric 1213 Royalta Rd Mill Bay 250 743 3862 www.members.shaw. ca/harrisonglassart If you are already familiar with Terry’s Glass Art - exquisite flowers painted on glasses, plates, bowls, glass accessories and tiles - then you’ll love those same brilliant blooms painted on Wearable Art - shirts, pants, shells, suits, aprons, bags, hats, sandals and table linens.

Michele Heath Silversmith 4373 Kingscote Road Cowichan Bay 250 743 3769 www.micheleheath.ca Michele makes one-ofa-kind sterling silver jewellery. Each piece is individually designed and hand-fabricated so that its owner can wear something truly original and unique. Her work is often inspired by Nature and frequently incorporates local or exotic stones that she shapes and polishes herself. Commissions are welcome.

Studio Tour June 29 - July 2 Clare Carver Silk Artist 1840 Koksilah Rd, Cowichan Bay 250 597 4506 www.pillotalk.ca Pillotalk Studio offers silk paintings in the form of pillows, small pillows, scarves, cushions, wall hangings, small bags and eyeglass cases. Studio open by appointment or by chance.

Cowichan Valley’s Visions artists and artisans welcome you to their studios for their annual summer Studio Tour from Friday, June 29 to Monday, July 2, 2012. Fifteen studios will be open, some of them with guests, so that 20 artists will be showing, demonstrating and selling their work during the four-day event. All these Visions artists’ studios are open year-around, some by appointment, but during the Studio Tour all artists taking part will have their studios open at the same time, from 10 am to 5 pm each day of the tour. Free year-around brochure/maps are available from Visions artists, libraries, community centres, visitors’ information centres. You can also download the brochure/maps from the Visions website www.visionsarttour.ca

Other artists on the Visions Art Studio Tour are: Barb Trowbridge - Silk Painter, Edward Epp - Painter, Carolyn McDonald - Painter, Joanne Kimm - Silversmith/Illustrator, Ken Broadland - Woodturner, Rosemary Danaher - Pottery/ Jewellery/Painter, Lyndsay Hunley - Potter, Mollyanne Baker - Painter, Susan Jean Whyte - Jewellery artist, Bev Thompson - Printmaker, Susan Murray O’Connor - Fibre Art, Eve Whitehead - Handweaver/Jeweller

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The demand for copies of the Valley Voice are growing with each issue and we can barely keep the stands filled!

To Our Avid Reader Enjoy the convenience of the Valley Voice every month right to your own mailbox! Consider supporting this independent magazine by subscribing to the Cowichan Valley Voice. Interested? Send a cheque for $40 (payable to Valley Voice) to 936 Arbutus Ave, Duncan BC V9L 5X4. Or call us at 250 746 9319 to pay with VISA or MC. In return you will receive 12 Issues of the Valley Voice annually and never miss a month.

Documentary - Yogis of Tibet The Duncan Support Group for the Tibet Resettlement Project is hosting a Tibetan movie, music and information evening at 7 pm on Monday June 4th at the Duncan United Church Heritage Hall.

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Tibetan Monks any Tibetans are still risking their lives to cross the Himalayas to seek refugee status in India and Nepal. The seeds of the Canadian Tibetan Resettlement Project were sown in 2007, when the Dalai Lama asked Prime Minister Stephen Harper if Canada would offer Tibetans living in exile the opportunity to emigrate to Canada. In 2010 the request was granted and the Canadian government announced an initiative that would see Canada welcome 1,000 Tibetans Refugees from the destitute and disputed area of Arunachal Pradesh, India.

The evening will feature the fascinating movie, “Yogis Of Tibet”. Since the invasion of Tibet over 50 years ago, the Tibetan culture has systematically been destroyed. One of the most profound losses is the tradition of the great master yogis. This amazing historical, spiritual and educational film will someday be the last remnant of information about these ancient practices. There will be door prizes and a silent auction and Tibetan tea and snacks. Tibetan musician, Jamyang Yeshi will perform. Jamyang Yeshi was born into a nomadic family in the Amdo region of Tibet and escaped across the Himalayas in 1998, settling in Dharamsala, India. Jamyang Yeshi has since immigrated to Canada and now lives and works in the Cowichan Valley. Sue Darlington of Small World Imports will be there with the newest stock of handmade Tibetan carpets and other gift items from the Tibetan Refugee community of Boudhanath in Nepal. She is donating 20% of any carpet sold through this project to the Tibet Resettlement Fund. For more info visit www.smallworldimports.ca.

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Famous in Chemainus

Sat June 2, Queen’s English Tea Party, Celebrate the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee with live music, royal entertainment and refreshments. 1- 4pm. Waterwheel Park.

Music in the Park - every Tuesday @ 7pm in Waterwheel Park June 5, Ed and Gail Peekeekoot - Foot-stomping fiddle to virtuoso classical guitar Queen Elizabeth’s Coronation June 12, Skellig – Celtic Rock June 19, Tropic Mahem – beach party June 26, Tuber - funky Wed June 6, Chemainus Market - Home grown, made or baked. Every Wed in Waterwheel Park. 11am-4:30 pm Sat, June 9 – Shake Rattle ‘n Roll - Join CTV’s Bruce Williams at Chemainus Theatre’s 1950’s sock hop complete with live music, finger food, auctions and hula hoops. 7pm. Tue June 12, Legion Twilight Shuttle, 28th annual, 5k race around the little town! Fun for all. 7pm. June 15, Joseph & the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, A Broadway Musical. Chemainus Theatre Festival. Sun June 17, Mural Magic. See the new 3D, sound enhanced, mural, depicting Lenora Mines at Mount Sicker. On the wall of the Silver Mine. Chemainus Rd at River Rd. Sun, June 17, Father’s Day Pancake Breakfast - the full meal deal at Chemainus Legion Hall. Entertainment by Flashback Freddie and door prizes for Dads! 8 am-noon. Sun June 17, The Joy of Music Making - music by Victoria Conservatory’s Young Musicians. 2 pm. St. Michael’s Church. Fri June 22, ArtBeat! 5-9pm. Willow Street party, all summer long. Featuring artists, entertainment, unique shops and eateries. Sat June 23. Chemainus Summer Fest – 8am Pancake breakfast. Parade begins 11am at Victoria and Willow St. BBQ lunch. Entertainment and activities for all. Waterwheel Park until 2:30ish Sun July 1, Canada Day in Chemainus – 11:30am-3:30pm Waterwheel Park. Family fun with awesome entertainment, petting zoo, pony rides, cake, crafts, art exhibit & more. More information at visitchemainus.com or chemainus.bc.ca

Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley

Dee Kinnee is the Marketing and Event Coordinator for the Chemainus BIA. ChemainusBIA@gmail. com


I LOVE TAP

Sat June 2nd 7pm Mercury Theatre Adults $10 Kids free For tickets 250 748 0934

Artists in Support of Our Youth Shake Rattle ‘n Roll Fundraiser

Sat June 9 Get ready for tap solos, trios Doors 6:30pm and group numbers as perChemainus Theatre formed by Lynda Allen Tap Festival Studio. Watch the `Little Tickets $80 Tappers`4-6 yrs dancing to 1 800 565 7738 `Happy Feet` to the adult recreational groups with dancers in their 60`s and 70`s, all ages Poodle skirts and blue suede have smiles from ear to ear! shoes welcome! Island SavThe students will be tapping ings and Cowichan Sound & to classic jazz songs and the Cellular present Shake, Rattle advanced ladies will perform ‘n Roll – a 1950’s sock hop an Acapella. A highlight of benefitting the Chemainus the show will be a percussion Theatre Festival. On Sattap dance “Rhythms” choreourday, June 9th, bebop with graphed using a Djembe Drum Emcee Bruce Williams (CTV for accompaniment. This piece Vancouver Island) for a noswill be performed by first talgic evening of live rock ‘n place winners of the Island Muroll music, popular 50’s finger sic Festivals- four incredible foods, malt shop shakes with boys ranging in age from 10-13 a twist, hula hoop, costume year old. This troupe also had and dance contests, auctions, the honor of being asked to perand more! Come in costume form at the Cowichan Theatre or come as you are! Doors and Port Theatre in Nanaimo. open at 6:30pm. Tickets on Also in the show is jazz blues sale at 1.877.565.7738 vocalist Melissa Flint accompanied by Dale Manason on guitar. And last but not least our guest `Hoofer` from Courtenay, is 16 year old Cody Rodgers. Cody is an incredible improvisational tap dancer. (Youtube Eliza Hemingway Art and Design Studio Cody Rodgers Telethon 9752-FTap) Willow Street, Chemainus He is a musician who speaks Hours: Open 11-4 Thursday to Saturday rhythms with his feet. When Studio now open for 2012 Season. he dances, one justemail: sits inelizahemingway@shaw.ca amazement! See you there! Phone: 250-324-2212 www.cvacs.com to download

June 22, 23 and 24 10am -5pm 801 Wharncliffe Rd. Duncan 250 737-1888 Each year Bernadette McCormack opens her studio for art shows and sales. This year Hummingbird Studio is teaming up with Community Options Society (www. coscowichan.ca) to celebrate art and music and fundraise for the vital youth services (13-19 & young parents). COS been providing free counselling, mediation, life and job skills training since 1973. The art show and fundraiser event opens with a Friday Night Happening (6-9pm) at Hummingbird Studio in Duncan. The show will feature painter Bernadette McCormack, glass artist Brandi Keddell, dinnerware and decor artist Susan Whitham. Plus local musicians will be performing throughout the weekend. . A portion of the sales will go directly to support COS operations. Come join in the fun! Visit www. bernadettemccormack.com for more information.

Kemal Evans

Sunday, July 1st 6 - 8pm Ladysmith Amphitheatre Transfer Beach, Ladysmith By Donation Kemal Evans combines original songwriting with infectious melodies and danceable rhythms. His sound is a mix of soul, rock, hip-hop and reggae. From acoustic grooves to free-style rhyming, his live shows are always exciting and fresh. Following his 2008 debut CD “No Pressure System”, Kemal formed the Kemal Evans Project (KEP). The KEP is best described as original and captivating with amazing harmonies. Although the KEP’s music makes for a shaking good time, beneath the bright, highly rhythmic surface, there is a soulful thoughtfulness. Performing with the KEP or as a solo artist, Kemal will reach out and move you. Ladysmith Amphitheatre Concerts in The Park are held on Sundays and run from 6pm to 8pm, weather permitting. The donations raised at the concerts support the Ladysmith Resources Centre Association.

Eliza Hemingway Writer’s Class Thursdays, 6pm - 7:30pm Cowichan Library, Duncan Free- Everyone welcome Details: www.elizahemingway.com

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ETC! Celebrates 1 Year Anniversary

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mpressed by the eclectic mix of shops and restaurants in Chemainus’s Willow Street area, Holly and Barb decided to open the doors of their great shop Etc! one year ago this June. As their name suggests – there is more to Etc! than meets

the eye. Besides being the only specialty bead shop between Victoria and Parksville they also carry hand dyed silk scarves, hand crafted soaps and lotions, Dogsbody all-natural pet care (made in-store) and a line of fun pet toys tested “tuff-enuff” by

4 YEAR ANNIVERSARY SALE! ALL WEEK LONG • JUNE 11th - 16th 40% off selected items June 11th 20% off off selected items until June 16th

DIETS DON’T WORK! HYPNOSIS DOES

THE SECOND HANGER CLINICAL BOUTIQUE CONSIGNMENT

April SPECIAL Trim Life Weight Release Program Eliminate stress eating * Never feel Guilty or Deprived 4 Sessions ,Trim Life Workbook, Four CDs Reg $350 - Book by the end of march - receive all this for $189!

PIONEER SQUARE MALL, MILL BAY 15-850 SHAWNIGAN-MILL BAY RD 250 743-7802

thesecondhanger@shaw.ca Accepting quality, fashionable and designer clothing for premium consignment.

SUSANcan DUMAS-RYAN Everything be achieved OWNER OPERATOR with hypnosis. Stress Reduction Depression Phobias

Weight Loss Dependencies Live Smoke Free

Diets Don’t Work— The Power of the Mind Does. Lori Austein Clinical Hypnotherapist 250 743 5685 • laustein@shaw.ca

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Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living theMin Cowichan FREEin15 Phone Valley Consultations

Also available: Stress Reduction, Dependencies, Relationship, Fears, Depression and Live Smoke Free p


The Gold the resident Irish Wolfhounds – Olde Want to learn? The beading Shoppe Josh and Bella. studio offers jewelry classes 9745 Willow Street 250 246-4653 for adults, youth and Billys Delights Icechildren. Heirloom andrange from 1.5 Their bead selection rangesAntique, Course levels Cream Estate JewelryParlor from beautiful Japanese and hour projectStreet based classes where 9739 Willow Czech seed beads for fine you learn how 250 246 4131 to make bracelet handiwork to Vintaj brass and and/or earring sets to full day * Lucite-style flowers. For those Chemainus class instruction Infofor advanced looking for crystal beads, Etc! Centre beading: Peyote, Herringbone 9796 Street stocks 3 sizes of Swarovski andWillow Right Angle Weave and a bicones in a variety of colours full day course in Kumihimo as well as Czech Firepolish braiding. The maximum class beads. Silversmiths and local size is 6 students to ensure jewelery makers appreciate their everyone gets the individual wide range of semi-precious attention they need. Learning stones, fresh-water pearls and to make your own jewelry is natural beads made from wood, perfect for those who can never bone and metals. Always adding find the colours or styles they to their impressive bead stock, are looking for to accessorize. Holly recently brought in a stunning selection of hand made Drop in and say hello durCzech glass button. These beads ing their FIRST anniversary are handcrafted in the same sale June 1-4th. Everything in traditional way they have been the store will be on sale with made for hundreds of years. discounts ranging from 10% to And for kids, fun and affordable 50% off. You can’t bead that. acrylic beads in every colour of the rainbow. They also stocksChristmas a In Chemainus variety of cords – silk, hemp and Willow Street waxed cotton for stringing and9748 250 246ETC! 1759First Year all the findings, tools, threads,Christmas Notions Anniversary Sale bobbins, wire and needles for June 1 - 4 bead weaving, bead boards and C 9747 Willow St, kumihimo disks. Chemainus

shopping IN

CHEMAINUS Willow Street Merchants Antiques & Collectibles 9756 A Willow Street 250 246-4333 English & European Antiques

Saltspring Soapworks 9748 Willow Street 250 324-2226 Handmade Soaps, Natural Body Care

Chemainus Health Food 9738 Willow Street 250 246-9838 Natural Grocery, Vitamins, Hemp Fashions

* Toad Hall Emporium 9738 A Willow Street 250 246-4400 THE fun place to shop for all ages

Eliza Hemingway Art and Design Studio 9752F Willow Street Open Thursdays-Sundays 250-324-2212

* The Wine Den 9779 Willow Street 250 324-2215 Wine Kits, Equipment and Supplies

Etc. 9747 Willow Street 250 324-2227 Beads and Beading Classes

* Utopia Bakery A-9780 Willow Street 250 246-9992 Fresh Bread and European Pastries

* Han Cand 9748 250 2 Assor Willow SweeW 9749 250 24 Homem Pizza,

W 97 25 Fin an

See you soon!

Seasons Tickets on Sale Now!

250 324-2227

*

* 9 * Karens Bistro 2 S 9779 Wil 250 246Local and

We Accept Chemainus Dollars

Come to Chemainus; where the people are friendly and the parking is free! Enjoy shopping, excellent eateries, live music, professional theatre and special events. Come for a day or make it a getaway.

www.visitchemainus.com

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W

hen two beings communicate, it is always a two way reflection. You are both mirrors of each other, and in this way you influence not only each other, but all other beings and the environment also in that moment. When I kneel down to stroke a cat who is enjoying the sunshine, I am adding to her enjoyment and she to mine. But we are also, in that place of simple delight-influencing the robin who sings above us, the west wind which blows through our hair and the trees under which we pause. If you see with the eyes of a psychic as I do, you would understand

that the cat and I are also creating more of these good things in the future. The story is never about the story. When you are in conflict with someone and they are trying to communicate with youremember this little piece of advice-the story they are telling you is not really the true story. By this I mean that few people are aware enough to truly know what their true intentions are as they live day to day. Most likely they are pushed and pulled by unconscious forces which they cannot comprehend. Listen to what

Spiritual Counsellor

Spiritual Counsellor

is really being said by paying attention to other clues in the communication-the environment, their body language and the physical sensations you are having as you mirror them.

Workshops in communication, dream interpretation and Reection Therapy Check website for schedules

Finally, the story is always about you! With great courage as a spiritual warrior, take up the communication as the relationship between

Julia Star BHD.BEd

250-709-9673 www.longboatcounselling.com info@longboatcounselling.com

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The ďŹ rst and only Green Spa in the Cowichan Valley.

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Three Secrets to Communication you and the All-a mirror of something that calls out for attention. Often this is where we need help from a counsellor who has a spiritual view of the situation. Julia Star is a spiriutal counsellor in the Cowichan Valley. For appointments call 250 709 9673.

Try This! Next time you are communicating with another being, pause and reflect on the three aspects of being. 1. First, the earthy aspects of the burdens and gifts of being an individual in the world. 2. Secondly, the compassionate aspects of love, caring, communication and acceptance 3. Thirdly the wisdom aspects of the unfolding mystery which brings more joy as you understand more.

Find out how Medical Qi Gong can be a part of your journey to healing, health and vitality. Contact Rommy at: 250-749-6563 rommy.v@hotmail.com

Medical Qi Gong Exercise Classes Fridays 10:15am-11:45 am Harmony Yoga, 111 Station St., Duncan

Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley


Spirit Drummer, Joanna

Cari Burdett

100 Voices for One World Choir

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00 Voices for One World Community Choir project is in full swing. Last month the choir were gifted the Song of the Cottonwoods by local musicians the Spirit Drummers and in gifted in return was the song We are The People by Sue Kirkpatrick. The harmonious exchange was done following traditional ceremonial protocol of the First Nation Cowichan Tribes. A blanket ceremony was shared amongst the people present in honour and respect for the gifting of the songs. “It was a very moving, healing and powerful moment shared between the choir and drummers present.” says vocalist and choir leader Cari Burdett. “When we sing Mondays: together in harmony; we learn to listen in new ways. SingParent + Child Music ing also brings a great joy 9.30 - 10.30and amspirit to the body, mind 9 classes 150$ per famand heart. It opens the heart and allows for movement to

occur, energy and vibration are healing energies that help us to bring joy into our lives; thus sharing that joy out in the world.” The choir continues to welcome singers of all ages and abilities, there are no auditions, everyone is welcome to join in song. Performance dates are: June 21st – International Aborigional Day with the Spirit Drummers, June 27th – International Multicultural Day with the Cowichan Intercultural Society, June 30th – Noon, Choir Festival - opening the Summer Fest, 100th Year celebration of the city of Duncan and July 1st Canada Day celebrations. For more info 250 701 0978 www.joythroughmusic.com. Cari Burdett breathing life into music and music into life. www.joythroughmusic.com

Fathers Day Ideas

For the Man who has EVERYTHING Body care isn’t just about working out or participating in sports. Not all men have the time or patience for these types of activities for wellbeing. A healthy body can also be achieved by regular spa treatments for relaxation and stress reduction. Recently Richard visited Soul Escape for a mens facial. Reluctant at first, he returned boasting about his facial and how men often need skincare attention more than women due to working and being outside more frequently. Skin damage caused by exposure to the elements can easily be treated by nourishing facials. “I choose the Eminence Stonecrop collection on men because it is not a flower or fruit scent. says Eva Walker, of Soul Escape. “It is plant with owner Massimo Pintus based and very fresh, hydrating, soothing and Werbeck Singing, Uncovering thehealing voicefor skin.” Another treatment idea for men is a massage. “The jade stone massage can actually be deeper than a regular massage. It can be as deep as he likes.” Tina Nordstrand of Cloud 10 Esthetics tells us. Tired, hardworking dads also deserve to be pampered. Why not treat them to something very special this Fathers’ Day, June 17th.

Community Music Programs & Workshops • Sing for Joy Choir •Threshold Singers • Music for Children • Gong Choir Vocal Improvisation Class • Helios Song • Deep Listening Evenings • Parent and Child Music • Intuitive Pedagogy: Movement & Musical Games

Voice Lessons

with Cari Burdett BMUS, MMUS from Royal Academy of Music London, UK Folk, Musical Theatre, Classical, Improvisation

Offering Private and Group Music Classes

Guitar Lessons with Massimo Pintus Folk, Pop, Classical, Jazz, Flamenco, Finger independence

Visit Joythroughmusic.com Call to Register 250 701 0978

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Crop Circle Artist The home/art studio of Doug Marsh is a testimony to his creative nature --embellished inside and out with drift wood, roller painting and all manners of mandalas, crop circles and color. Doug loves circles -- especially crop circles.“Circles represent wholeness and it’s a reminder that we are all connected” says Doug.

Doug likes to transfer crop circles to everything -- even his clothes!

Regardless of their authenticity, crop circles are a fascination for Doug and he feels that anyone making one or looking at one will be affected positively by their energy. “Just looking at one, let alone creating one, is a kind of portal to higher consciousness, an archetypal reminder to wake up.” Doug has a dream to see his crop circle mandalas everywhere. The gables of buildings and homes, street art, table tops, even clothing!

Gordo enjoying the outdoors

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To arrange for a viewing of Doug’s work or for any creative carpentry projects (home, garden or business) call Doug at 250-246-5081 -- or you can catch him at the Chemainus Art Walk starting June 22nd -- every Friday night on Willow Street. (cvcas.com)

Who has Gordo?

he Cairnsmore Lovebird has gone missing and we are so sad! Gordo flies free and always comes home unless someone thinks he is lost and ends up keeping him. He usually stays very close by – he is very fond of his cage and his toys and his organic food -- but on nice days he makes it part of his routine to visit his favorite neighbours and make new friends. He has been missing since Friday, May 4th. If you have him or if you know anything of his whereabouts could you please call Nicolette at 250-709-9683. Thank you. We miss him very much! Nicolette Genier

Author Todd Caldecott

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Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley


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e arrive early in the morning, the sun is shining. I get out of the truck; take Tuari (a Harris’ Hawk) in her box and head up the stairs. We get to the top floor and I open her door, she hops onto my glove. She is excited because she knows what happens next. I open the door to the roof and out she flies, determination in her eyes. Suddenly there is a flurry of white feathers and all the sun-tanning gulls race to get out of the way. Loud screeching and angry squawks accompany their hurried flight. Tuari reaches the top of the building and lightly lands, surveying the site. We spend the next hour patrolling the rooftops. The gulls occasionally do a fly-by to see if she is still on site, but it is clear of the 200 gulls that had been there. I walk, Tuari soars. The scene is magnificent, set against a backdrop of the ocean, with

We work at airports, landfills, and various other sites, to provide bird control. It is really effective because using natural predator-prey relationships means that the prey never quite habituate to the predator. Tuari, and all the other birds that get to do the work, enjoy the job – they get to chase other birds, soar the skies, and get big rewards! It’s environmentally safe and sound – a green way to get rid of problem birds.

etween family, work and play in today’s busy times it is often difficult to strike a balance, so why not combine all three! This time of year especially many of us struggle between keeping up our regular maintenance routines inside the house while the gardening and yard work call us outside.

that we have participated in creating for one another and I also appreciate the important community building skills we’re modeling for the kids while we work.

Consider the value of organizing a work exchange with a group of friends, really drawing on the old adage that “many hands make light work”. The group provides willing labor, shares access to tools, and takes turns supervising children all while tackling that long list of projects too overwhelming to get done on your own. It is a very rewarding and productive day. Set aside a day of the week or one day each month, whatever works for your particular needs, and rotate between each of your homes. Even though you’ll be giving up time working at your friend’s homes, I think you’ll find that you get so much accomplished when it’s your turn to host the group that the trade is well worth it. Added to that an unexpected benefit that I have experienced with the group I exchange with is a deepened sense of connection among my friends. Each of us feel a sense of pride in space

There was a time when everyone worked together out of necessity. Family, friends and neighbours helping and supporting each other to grow food, construct buildings, and raise children, a broad sense of community that made light work out of life’s challenges. I can’t say enough about the benefits I feel come from my work exchanges. I encourage you to ease your workload, strengthen relationships and leave everyone with more time to play in the sun this summer.

Green Living

Birds For Hire

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Many Hands Make Light Work

Tuari, patrolling for gulls.

herons, osprey, eagles, and more to watch as we patrol. We are doing our job, moving out the gulls, to make the site safer for the workers and to reduce the numbers and aggression of the gulls. Birds such as gulls, geese, robins, and starlings, have an important place in our natural ecosystem, but at certain sites and times cause all kids of problems and damage. IN the breeding season, gulls will attack rooftop workers, causing human safety issues. Geese, robins and starlings damage crops, gulls, crows and pigeons damage buildings and materials with excessive droppings.

Tracey Paleczka, local mompreneur and owner/operator Clean Choice Eco-Friendly Cleaning Services

www.cleanchoicecleaners.com

Robyn Radcliffe is a falconer at the PN Raptor Centre, responsible for the care, maintenance and well being of over 75 birds. www.pnwraptors.com

Fashions and accesories for EVERYONE made from Organic Cotton, Hemp, Bamboo, Silk, Linen and and Eco Fabrics. Also carrying the finest in Canadian-made skincare and cosmetics. Including Pure Anada, Kogi Naturals and Rocky Mountain Soaps. 155 Craig Street, Downtown Duncan prudenceorganics@hotmail.com Open Mon - Sat 250-597-1188

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More Than Your Average Bike Stores

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f you asked any of the owners of the three bike stores servicing the Cowichan Valley, they would probably tell you that they really don’t want or expect to sell every bike in the valley. The beauty of having three stores doing basically the same thing in one community

is that, in a manner that is friendly competitive, we help each other out. When we are desperate for a part or a tool… we feel free to call upon each other. When we are all called upon to support a community event…we do it together and it always feels companionable. All three bike stores will be offering mechanical support for cyclists who are participating in the Cowichan Valley’s 5th annual Bike to Work Week from May 28th to June 3rd. Not only that, but each shop has donated a bike to Cycle Cowichan to give away in a draw. Three chances to win!

The Moment of Truth ‘Impact’

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From the ground up impact should be: 1. Weight posted into lead leg (for right handed players left leg) 2. Back heel moving towards target 3. Knees moving together in an isometric fashion 4. Hips open 45 degrees to target 5. Hands in line with lead hip giving club shaft forward lean ensuring descending club head 6. Shoulders square or slightly open to target line 7. Three points of posture maintained from starting position

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Peter Oliphant Director of Instruction GBC Golf Academy at Arbutus Ridge Golf Club

was asked the other day “if there was one thing to work on in golf what would it be?” Man that is such a hard question. Kind of like asking your dentist if there was one tooth to brush which one should it be. Seems silly doesn’t it? If you understand and work on the impact position with your CPGA Coach then not only will your ball striking improve, but your short game will improve also. (please see box)

You can see local bike stores supporting local sporting events such as Take a Kid Mountain Biking Day; various Cyclocross races; Mountain Bike races; Road Bike races; and local triathlons. If not one store…you’ll see another on site with various tools, pumps, bike lube and spare tubes… cheering on participants and sometimes participating themselves. Because the one thing they all have in common is that everyone who owns or works in a local bike shop, probably loves cycling of one sort or other themselves.

join in group rides. It’s there that people have the opportunity to learn more about proper road cycling etiquette, advanced mountain biking skills, and vehicular/cycling safety rules. Group rides are social, fun and great exercise. The time flies by and the calories are burned all while having a great time. If you are thinking about joining in a group ride, check in with the shops and see what group rides leave from their stores and when. See you on the road. Sandra Beggs owns and operates Cycle Therapy in Duncan. wwwcycletherapy.ca

Another thing the bike shops do well is encourage people to Velo Village Event SSI June 21 - 23 The BIKE FERRY Event Saturday, June 23 Swartz Bay to Fulford Harbour , SSI ww.velovillage.ca for registration information. Salt Spring will be bicycle-heavenon-earth, the most welcoming place on the planet to be on a bike, between June 21 and June 23. There will be bicycle related fun for everyone at Velo Village! The BIKE FERRY is the big event that everyone will want to be part of. BC’s first bicycle-only vessel sails for Velo Village on Salt Spring Island. The MV Skeena Queen will carry 400 cyclists from

Swartz Bay to Fulford Harbour where they’ll be joined by local cyclists for a 15km Fun Ride to the Velo Village Hub in Ganges. The cycle route will be decorated with dozens of beautiful hand painted bikes created by local artists. These bikes will guide riders along the winding rural country roads of Salt Spring Island. On Saturday, cyclists can leave their bikes with the Velo Village valet service and walk to bike-themed and powered performances, take in vintage bike and photo exhibits and participate in electric bike, cycle tourism, bike economics and rural safe cycling workshops. An easy destination for the Cowichan Valley a ferry leaves from Crofton to Salt Spring almost every hour. www.bcferries.com

Wow! How can anyone work on all that and be sure they’re getting it?

Use tools such as slow motion video, mirrors, an impact bag that allows you feel proper impact. Take a lesson to ensure none of the information you’re getting is misinterpreted. Golf is a game for life so get out there and experience it!

Register now for the Cowichan Challenge Tri at Fuller Lake Park July 8th. Details at www.ceevacs.com

www.golfbc.com

Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley


Valleyview

South Island Fishing Report

Centre

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Kenzie Cuthbert has 25 years of s the weather professional guiding on southern turns to more Vancouver Island and is the owner spring like, more of operator of the Cowichan River us will be heading Wilderness Lodge. out onto the local www.kenzies.com waters. The following is what we might expect to catch through May and into June. Late run Steelhead will still be available in the Cowichan river in small numbers to approximately the third week of May.

Cowichan River Brown, Rainbow and Cutthroat trout fishing is just starting to pick up. If fly fishing, I would recommend Prince nymphs, hares ears, wooly buggers, and fry patterns. If you are using spinning equipment, small spoons in various colors should do the trick. (remember single barbless hooks) In our local lakes, May can be very good to excellent for both Small mouth bass and trout. If trolling, try some willow leafs with either worms or flatfish trailing behind or troll plugs at a faster speed. Spin casting with a Gibbs croc in brass/orange or illusion blue can be very effective for both trout and bass. For the fly fishers I would suggest an olive or black wooly bugger with rubber legs, a micro leech or even a small fry pattern. (mix up your retrieval speeds) For the Bass gear fishers, work the structure with a variety of soft rubber or plastic baits. Tubes, crayfish and soft rubber worms will all work if placed in the right location. For the fly fishers, leeches, wooly buggers, fry and sculpin patterns will all take fish in May. Local lakes that I would recommend for Bass fishingHome are Shawnigan and Fuller. St Mary’s lake on Salt Spring Island can also be very good for Bass. Ocean anglers have already been doing well in Sampson narrows for winter springs. This should continue to be good and change in late May to both returning local mature fish as well as fish passing through our areaPets headed both north and south. Remember…. it’s just a fish, stay safe. Kenzie Cuthbert and Jo-anne Daw

Spirits, Beer & Wine

So much to offer!

1400 Cowichan Bay Rd Books Bucknuck Books 250-929-2665 Used books and Local authors Fitness Valley Health and Fitness 250-743-0511 Full service gym/classes Spa and Wellness Reiki Wellness 250 743-8122 Relax, Rejuvenate, Detox, Nutrition, Ionized Water Home Prolink Mortgage (BC) Inc Marla Daniels 250-733-2201 Best rates, Friendly Free Service Pets Dunkin Dogs 250 743-3935 Grooming, daycare, food/raw and more

Food Cobblecinos 250 743 8158 Breakfast, Lunch, Brunch Country Grocer 250 743-5639 Bakery, Meat & Produce Dragon Yuan 250 733-2335 Chinese Eat In/ Take Out Healthcare Cobble Hill Dental 250-743-6698 Friendly, Family Practice

We Welcome New Patients!

South Cowichan Physiotherapy & Sports Rehabilitation 250-743-3833 Physiotherapy, Acupuncture, Orthotics Computers Teky.ca 1-888-843-8359 Computer service & sales Websites & print design

Liquor Plus 250-929-1999 Wine, beer and spirits

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Learn To Sail This Summer

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West Coast Men’s Centre

he West Coast Men’s Support Society (formerly The Cowichan Men’s Resource Centre) is pleased to announce it is settling into their new office on the second floor of the Cowichan Merchant’s Building, 80 Station St as of June 1st. The centre offers weekly Men’s Circle, Dads Make a Difference group, Youth Mentoring programs, a Respect & Compassion program and resources around Restorative Justice & Men’s Grief. We are also in the process of starting a Senior Men’s Circle. Our Men’s Circles are held on Wednesday nights between 7:00 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. at the Cowichan Station Hub located at 2375 Koksilah Road in Cowichan Station. This is a general circle for men to gather for support and to support other men.

DADS

Make A Difference Our Dads Make a Difference group will take place on Tuesday nights at our new location. This group tends to support dads in crisis. We are continuing to offer

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our Youth Mentoring programming to schools and the community. These groups offer a supportive circle with the boys and healthy male mentors. The groups have typically supported boys age 13 to 18. We are open to creating girls groups too, if the demand calls for it. We will need healthy female mentors to support those groups. We hope to have groups in at least two local schools starting in the fall. The Respect & Compassion program is an alternative to Anger Management programs focused on a new way of communicating for men. Depending on demand, we hope to be able to offer weekly groups first thing on Saturday mornings from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. on monthly rotations. The Senior Men’s Circles are for men age 60+ to connect around their own unique issues and challenges. The group will form based on the demand. Please go to our website www.westcoastmen.org or call us at 250-597-2801 for more information about any of these programs.

elcome to summer sailing 2012! We are gearing up for another exciting summer of sailing and activities at the Maple Bay Yacht Club. Our summer calendar consists of 5-day sailing programs where participants will learn the basics of sailing in both 420s and Lasers then expand on their knowledge in these same boats. Numerous events for both adults and junior members are in the works; including movie nights, camping trips, barbecues, swimming, weekend and evening sailing, tubing, and boogie boarding. Last year almost every week of sailing was bursting with activities - something we’re planning to see again this summer. New this year is the CANSail module! A brand new sailing program created by local athletes from Victoria! It has expanded on the existing sailing levels with a more comprehensive approach to developing sailing skills, while still having fun on the water! We are also hoping to expand the program for older youth who are interested

in racing and advanced sailing tactics. It is encouraging to watch the dynamics of the Junior program participants as they develop skills, friends, and confidence. Our junior members are enthused about being active, outdoors, and on the water during the warm summer months. It is really a joy to be part of this group, and an amazing way to spend the summer. The MBYC Sailing Program is open to everyone from 8 – 18 for the junior classes, and an adult program is on its way! We welcome you to join us for a fun season of activities and sailing. Check out our website at: www.mbyc.bc.ca, or contact the Maple Bay Yacht Club at 250 746 5421. Be sure to register early to avoid being disappointed!

Maple Bay Yacht Club CANSail SAILING LESSONS Courses run in July and August 0830 - 1530 Daily Our instructors are fully trained and certified by the Canadian Yachting Association. They also hold certification in first aid, National Coaching Certification, power boat operation, boat rescue/life saving, & VHF operator’s license. Beginners and experienced sailors of all ages welcome. To Register: Maple Bay Yacht Club 250 746 4521

Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley


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uman beings learn best how to be human directly from other human beings—not from computer programs, and not from worksheets (both have their place).

To Learn

BIG, Chat a Little!

Too often, educational programs focus too heavily on inputting information. Commonly, a student is filled with information for several weeks. Then, in an attempt to measure the level of absorption, the student is asked to select “a), b), c), d) or none of the above”. In another scenario, the student peers into an “interactive” computer program that, being a machine, cannot read the subtleties of his/her hesitation, nor measure the light of interest or pall of boredom in his/her eye.

Diane, a Cowichan Valley resident studying Spanish says, “Even with the interactive software I have—I was scratching my head and wondering; “what?”. Then I had a live class with a teacher who explained it in a way I could understand and now the interactive language program makes sense.” “As a teacher in conversation with a student, you sense whether they get it or not, and can respond with fine-tuned, customized questioning”, says Lesley Joy, a senior faculty member at Island Oak High School in Duncan. Leaders, according to empirical research cited by the Garrison Institute, have two qualities that non-leaders don’t; heightened listening ability, and heightened empathy. To ensure your child acquires these capacities, provide him or her with a learning situation based on conversation with a real, live teacher. Conversation is rich with opposing tensions that are dynamic, living, constantly balancing and re-balancing. In conversation, participants learn to “hold their own” while respecting the input of others.

The Children’s Space

Books For Dad

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ather’s Day falls on June 17th and the perfect Father’s Day gift for a new dad is Crawling, written by Elisha Cooper. The book begins with the birth of the author’s first child and takes readers on a humorous and beautiful journey through the first year of his child’s life, as he navigates the sometimes murky and often messy waters of parenthood. The New York Times calls Crawling “A bravely honest memoir of parenthood”. While all parents will relate to and enjoy this book, the folks at Matraea Mercantile think it would make a terrific gift for dad… after all, Junior will have many years of picking out funny looking ties and band saws so why not try something a little different this year? Another great suggestion from a new Crawling – store committed to providing A Father’s First Year excellent resources for parWritten by Elisha Cooper ents. Come in and see what $15.95 other products and services Matraea Mercantile they offer! 190 Craig Street, Duncan

In conversation, students make meaning of their experience, they test out the concepts they develop, they seek consensus and then test that. Conversational learning deepens both individuality and relational Vivi de Graff is the Communications Coordinacompetence, and that’s why tor at Island Oak High human-to-human learning School on Banks Road. develops higher-level human capacity than worksheets or screens.

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WEBSITES, EMAILS AND VERBAL LINT A KURT REPLY: Local photography Kurt Knock looks forward to this time of the year in the Cowichan Valley. “Projects I think up during the rain and cold of winter are finally possibilities. Even the days are getting longer, allowing more daylight to take photos. With good weather, energized people and a load of inspiration the possibilities are endless!” You can see samples of Mr. Knock’s photographic artistry on display at Old Firehouse Wine Bar (June 1st-July 31st), Unsworth Vineyards (June 1st – Aug. 31st) and ongoing at Gallowglass Books. For more information log onto www.kurtknock.com. WHATEVER HAPPENED TO ... Brent Hutchinson. Musician, soundman, salesman and Cowichan Folk Guild artistic director ... these are just a few of the hats “Hutch” wore during his longtime residence in the Cowichan Valley. These days he is executive director of Empress Theatre in Fort Macleod, 30 minutes west of Lethbridge in southern Alberta. Originally built as an Opera House for vaudeville and travelling shows, Brent tells me the 327 seat theatre is now a current run movie house when it is not hosting live music and theatre shows, community events, such as music and dance recitals, or political town hall meetings. Over the years the Empress has hosted acts like Randy Bachman, Sarah McLachlan, Bif Naked, Michelle Wright, Blue Rodeo, Colin James, John McDermott and Johnny Winter (to name just a few). SPECIAL THANKS ...The folks at Special Woodstock would like to thank Duncan Lions and Sassy Lion Thrift Store for the generous $5,000 donation to the 13th annual festival Aug. 19th at Providence Farm. (Sassy Lion Thrift Store is a separate fundraising arm of Duncan Lions Club). For all the details log onto specialwoodstock.ca NOW WE ARE SIX: Claudia Tennold celebrates the sixth anniversary of Ten Old Books (downstairs in the Duncan Garage Building) this month. (Check out the mystery section. I found one of Tess Gerritsen’s early Rizzoli & Isles novels, The Apprentice, last time I visited the store.)

Jean Crowder has been the NDP Member of Parliament for Nanaimo-Cowichan since 2004. Crowder.J@parl.gc.ca 1-866-609-9998

Crowder’s Corner

Canada’s national broadcaster is a pillar of our Canadian culture—a voice that connects Canadians from coast to coast to coast.A voice that’s worth protecting. But instead of working to improve the CBC, this year’s Conservative budget slashes the broadcaster’s budget by more than 10 percent. Already, these Conservative budget cuts are leading to substantial cuts in services at CBC. 650 jobs eliminated over three years—including as many as 475 jobs lost this year alone. Less Canadian programming and fewer of the regional voices you’ve grown to count on. Specialty channel Bold will be sold off and a planned children’s channel shelved. In a recent interview the Heritage Minister said he could cut the broadcaster’s budget by 10 per cent without affecting services. Clearly, he was wrong. I’ve already heard from many constituents that you want the national broadcaster protected and the services it provides to Canadians enhanced rather than cut. If you haven’t already done so, I would encourage you to send your comments and concerns directly to the Minister of Canadian Heritage, James Moore (james. moore@parl.gc.ca), and the Minister of Finance, Jim Flaherty (jim.flaherty@parl.gc.ca). CBC can remain the strong, dynamic national institution Canadians overwhelmingly want it to be.

By Rick Dennis

WINGS III Opportunity Store You’ll always find a treasure!

Donations Gratefully Accepted

Bring your quality womens and childrens clothing, natural fibres, household gadgets, jewelry, nick nacks and small furniture.

250 746 9906 Open Mon - Sat 10am - 5pm 193 Station St at Jubilee, Downtown Duncan

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Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley


Moonbeams

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h June, the arrival of the first day of summer is welcomed. Here in the Northern Hemisphere our Solstice begins June 20th marking the longest day and shortest night of the year. Our neighbours from the Southern half of the world however celebrate their longest day of the year in December. The term Solstice originates from Latin words “sun” (sol) and “to stand still” (stice). On the 4th of June we will be under the influence of a partial lunar eclipse. Astrologically speaking lunar eclipses are known indicators of change and bring with them a sense of conclusion and undeniable circumstances. Here at home we will be able to enjoy a view of the partial eclipse prior to the moonset. June’s moon is under the influence of Sagittarius with a catch phrase of ‘I see’. ‘I see’ physically, emotionally and intuitively. Sagittarian

characteristics, along with other fire signs, are considered masculine, positive, assertive, active, outgoing, and motivating. These are the doer’s and enjoy shaking things up. They take action, go after what they want, and make things happen. This influence on the moon and therefore us instills us the ability to move forward with confidence and focus to all our endeavors. A few of the names (but not limited to) for this month’s moon are: Strawberry Moon (Algonquin) the short season of strawberry harvest, Mead Moon (Celtic) time to mow the meads (hay), Dyan Moon (Medieval English) names after the Roman Moon Goddess Diana, Flower Moon (English) abundance of flowers and Planting Moon (Neo-Pagan) ideal time for planting. Wishing you an exquisite Solstice!

Robin Massey is a yoga & junior bellydance instructor in and around Shawnigan Lake. www.theomtree.com

We are planning an Events Calendar page expansion! Interested in promoting your business on the most read and referred to page in the magazine? For more information on this prime placement opportunity please contact Adrienne Richards: adrienne@cowichanvalleyvoice. com or 250 510 6596

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Cowichan Feature Listings Offers individual and couple counselling sessions related to grief, stress management, conflict resolution, communication and personal growth. Specialized in addiction issues. Mes services sont aussi offerts en francais si desire. N’hesitez pas a appeler pour avoir de l’aide! 331 St. Julian Street Duncan, BC 250- 510 - 0182

Sophie Barbant - Hayward, M.A. Registered Professional Counsellor Bilingual French and English

Small World Imports Tibetan Rugs and Carpets www.smallworldimports.ca 250-748-6570

1st Anniversary Sale June 1st through 4th Save from 10% to 50% on EVERYTHING in the store for 4 days.

High quality handwoven traditional rugs and carpets made by Tibetan refugees from Nepal.

Metal Artist Brad Allen

Hand-knotted and made of 100% Tibetan wool in a family run venture that houses workers and educates children to alleviate poverty.

- Metal Wall hangings - Free Standing Sculptures

Our mission is to inspire, motivate and most of all... to have fun! We offer encouraging, experienced tap dance instruction for beginners to advanced of all ages.

With a torch,welder and array of metal finishing tools, Brad creates joyful, nurturing and thought-provoking pieces.

Studio located in Duncan by appointment Brad Allen 250 748 0934 www.meddleart.com

Memory foam yoga mat PVC Free. Ideal for pre/postnatal yoga, pilates and those who need more support.

Decor and Design for all types of yoga at historic Suitable including, Vinyasa Flow, Power, Bikram, Ashtanga, Iyengar, Gentle and Kundalini. Whippletree Junction Lynda Allen 250-748-0934 lyndaallentapstudio@shaw.ca

Furniture,Crafts and Specialty Bears!

WHIPPLETREE

JUNCTION 4705 Trans Canada Hwy

Visit us in our new ‘Cupboard’ in the sun! We are to the right of the courtyard, facing the parking lot (how convenient!)

Bears in the Cupboard

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Leola’s Studio In The Courtyard

Open Friday, Saturday and Sunday,

Summer hours:10am to 5pm bearsinthecupboard@gmail.com.

The hom

Spe beauti Canad Dining R Living Hom Ec Sof

25 www

- Classes - Shared Studio

- Community Loom - Gift Certificates - Locally made textiles

yarns, wools, needles, books and notions. 250 746 5250

BC’s Largest selection of indoor and outdoor rattan furniture! thewickertree.com

www.vvitayoga.ca Richard 250 746 9319 Vancouver Island and Gulf Islands Distributor

- Weaving and Spinning

The Loom

The Wickertree

9747c Willow St, Chemainus 250 324 2227

Open 10 am to 5 pm 7 days a week.

Learn and Experience the joy of textiles. leolasstudio.blogspot.com

Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley


Georgia Nicols M.A. is Canada’s most popular astrologer. A Buddhist, this Vancouver-based astrologer is featured in regional papers across Canada, the United States, and New Zealand. www.georgianicols.com

Aries (March 21-April 19)

This month, you’re running around like you’ve got an outboard motor on your ass. Short trips, busy errands, conversations with everyone plus increased reading, writing and studying are just some reasons your pace will be approaching Warp 9. But you’ll welcome the challenge! Look for ways to make money from talking and writing because you can do this in the next four-to-six weeks. Hey, you’re more than just a pretty face.

Taurus (April 20-May 20)

You’ve got money-making ideas and opportunities to earn money. Naturally, since you’re earning some coin, you’re thinking about major purchases. But at a subtler level, when you think about your assets and what you own, you’ll also think about your life values. What are your values? What guides you? You know you want to be happy, and you know you want financial security. (Mortgage-free land!) So what can you do that’s fun and rewarding and makes lots of money?

Gemini (May 21-June 20)

Life is full of up-and-down cycles and it’s important to recognize when you’re on a roll. You are the big winner! Don’t take this for granted. Not only do you have a great summer ahead, you have a fortunate year ahead of you. Make the most of this. That saying, “Make hay while the Sun shines,” is true! Fortunately, you don’t sit around getting dusty. But why not go one step further? Hatch a plan.

Set some goals. Write down what your perfect world would be about a year from now. Be specific.

Cancer ( June 21-July 22)

Time to plan. For the next fourto-six weeks, it behooves you to think about what you want your “new” year (birthday to birthday) to be. For starters, why not look back over your shoulder and size up your last year. How are you doing at the art of living? If you clearly define the goals you want to achieve in the coming year, they will more likely become a reality. After all, are you steering your life or just responding to whatever happens?

Leo ( July 23-Aug. 22)

A popular month! Invitations will pour in as friends and organizations make demands on your time. Expect to hang out with younger, creative, artistic types. And while this month is the perfect time to enjoy the company of others, it’s also a good time to think about your dreams for the future. You’re a leader. It’s not your style to muddle along relying on management by crisis. Your reputation is getting a lovely boost now so what can you do to best use this advantage?

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

This month the Sun boldly calls attention to you, especially the attention of bosses, parents, teachers, VIPs and the police. You are definitely high viz and this lighting is flattering! Others see you as capable, which is why you’ll be asked to take on increased responsibilities. Say yes because you don’t have to be an action hero to please them. Romance with someone older, richer or in a position of authority might percolate. (When you don’t know what you’re doing – do it neatly.)

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

You want to blow town. You want to see new places, new faces and hear new ideas. In fact, you want to be stimulated by fascinating conversation with intelligent people who transport you to new levels of awareness. You want mind-blowing experiences to make your life exciting. Obviously, if you can travel, do so. If you can’t travel, then explore your own sandbox. Go someplace you’ve never been. Talk to people from different backgrounds. Do things that are out of the ordinary.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

Gifts, goodies, money, as well as favours and perks will come your way in the next six weeks. Kaching! (Would I kid you?) People will give you things directly and many of you will benefit indirectly because your partner or someone close to you gets a windfall. The next six weeks are the perfect time to ask for a loan or a mortgage. They’re also the perfect time to decide how to share jointly-held property or an inheritance or settle insurance disputes. Sex will be very hot as well. Hey – you’re laughing!

Sagittarius(Nov.22-Dec.21)

Life will soon be so dazzling you’ll need to wear shades. Relations with everyone will be smoother, more gracious and diplomatic. A casual relationship could become more committed. It’s a great time to begin new partnerships (personal or professional). This is not the time to go it alone. Form working units with others and let people help you! Good time to consult experts as well. (“Is there a taxidermist in the house?”)

June Horoscopes

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

Your urge to organize is strong this month. You want to alphabetize your CDs and colour-code your closet. Not only will you enjoy getting better organized, you’ll become more active at work in a hands-on way. Partly, this is because your relations with co-workers are so good. (Good enough for a romance to spark!) This drive for self-improvement will expand to your health as well. The high standards you set for yourself could earn you a raise or praise from others. Kudos!

Aquarius ( Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

The next six weeks will be one of the most fun-filled times of the year for you. Grab every opportunity to enjoy a vacation (even a tiny one). Attend musical performances, summer fairs, sports events, the arts, craft fairs and anything to do with theme parks and the hospitality industry. Playful times with children will be rewarding. Romantic relationships will get a wonderful boost. Singles could start a new romance. Existing relationships will heat up in a sweet way.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)

You’re entering a domestic phase this month. Expect to enjoy gardening, redecorating, puttering around your digs and tweaking things. You’ll also enjoy entertaining at home, which is also why you’re doing home repairs. This impulse to improve your living space extends even into your family, which is why family relationships will become a stronger focus and also more rewarding and affectionate. For those of you who are exploring real-estate deals, this will be a busy time. .

www.georgianicols.com

Interested in contributing to the Valley Voice? E-mail us at editor@cowichanvalleyvoice.com

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DIRECTORY

Valley Voice Magazine now offers readers a new directory to discover local services and businesses. 3 sizes of ad space are available to suit every business message and budget. Affordable, stylish and straight to the point. Contact Adrienne Richards for more info 250 510 0596 or adrienne@cowichanvalleyvoice.com Deadline June 16th for July 2012 Issue 44.

Accommodations

Business Services

Shawnigan Lake House

Year round waterfront vacation rental with dock. Great for a family holiday or a getaway with friends. www.shawniganlakevacationrentals.ca kpemberton@shaw.ca or call (250) 743-5941

Child Care

Beauty

Nika’s Natural Hair & Relaxation Salon

Need childcare? Taking care of children? Call the Cowichan Valley Child Care Resource & Referral

haircuts for the whole family color & hi-lites (featuring eco-colors) hair and scalp treatments Matraea Centre all natural products 170 Craig Street Duncan 250 710-7339

250-746-4135 local 231

A program of the Clements Centre Society, funded by the Province of BC.

Clothing and Consignment Accepting Summer Consignments Learn how to turn your closet into cash. The Second Hanger Consignment 15-850 Shawnigan-Mill Bay Rd. Cobble Hill 250 743 -7802 www.thesecondhanger.ca

Celebrate our 4th Birthday with feature Clothing and Accessories SALES all week. Begins Monday June 11th!

Farms and Food More than a Meat Shop

Gluten Free/Organic Pasta’s, Organic Meat, Homemade Sausage, International Foods. The Duncan Butcher 430 Trans Canada Hwy 250 748 -6377

The Valley’s 1st Certified Organic /Biodynamic Community Supported Agriculture Program Year round availability or 24 weeks Come eat at our Organic Farm Cafe - Child, Celiac and Vegan friendly! Alderlea Farm and Cafe Open Tues, Fri, Sat, 11am-5pm 3390 Glenora Road, Duncan, 250 715-0799 Special seating for family meals!

Health and Healing Smoking Cessation Hypnosis Pack regular $499, Special $249 for 4 sessions

Valid til June 30, 2012

Danette Noble, RCH, CCHt 250 709-7380 www.cowichanvalleyhypno.com

Ananda Ayurveda with Asrael Luxurious Hot Oil Massages. Ayurvedic Treatments & Consultations. Jyotish Astrology. Yoga - Mondays & Wednesdays 4- 5:30pm Oceanfront Suites, Cowichan Bay.

Asrael 250-597-3973 www.anandaayurveda.wordpress.com

Vitamin And Herbal Supplements Organic Bulk Foods & Herbs Health & Beauty Aids Herbal Medicine & Food For 4-180 Central Duncan Dogs And Cats (Located Beside Sears in Village Sports Nutrition & Weight Loss Snack Bar Green Mall) 250 748-4421

46

SENIORS!

15% Discount Every Day! on Supplements *Unless Already Reduced Last Tuesday of Every Month Seniors receive 15% off most food items as well as supplements.

Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley


Health and Healing (continued) Reflexology and Chi Wellness by Terri COMPLIMENTS ALL CLEANSES

AWAKEN SUMMER VITALITY * RELEASE DISEASE CAUSING STRESS * STIMULATE IMMUNE FUNCTIONS

Father’s Day Special

Terri 250 709-2388 3-1 hour Foot Reflexology Sessions for $159.00 Gift Certificates Available 1453 Algonkin Rd, Duncan Hours: Mon - Thurs 9am - 8pm balancedbody@shaw.ca • www.terriswellness.com Registered * Licensed * Insured * Certified

IN THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN 141 Craig Street, Duncan 250 748-9632 www.mercias.ca

•A Large Variety Of Supplements, Flower Remedies •Homeopathics, Tinctures •Aura-Soma Colour Therapy, Bath and Body Products •Hair Care Products, Specialty Creams, Bulk Soap and More! •Duncan’s Largest Selection Of Bulk Medicinal Herbs Amazing Lines Of Professional Natural Cosmetics including: Zuii Organics Make Up and ZUZU Luxe: luxury color cosmetics line - spa inspired - VEGAN!

Downtown Ladysmith

DIETS DON’T WORK! CLINICAL HYPNOSIS DOES Lori Austein Clinical Hypnotherapist

Marilyn Swallow RMT RA Gillian Leverkus PhD RHP 50 Years combined experience (250) 245 9269 / 714 5044

250 743 5685 laustein@shaw.ca 15 Min Free Phone Consultations Book Your Appointment Today

www.wildflowernaturalhealth.ca

Home Maintenance

Exquisite Designs Painting

For more information on how to be part of the

NEW 2012 Valley Voice Directory

WCB covered & Fully insured Seniors discounts & affordable rates

Contact Saldana today for your FREE QUOTE (250) 7017197 or exquisite_dezigns@yahoo.com

Pet Health and Care

Holistic Care For Pets and People Specializing in Holistic Nutritional Education, Acid/Alkaline Balance, Food Buddy Shopping Services, Alternative Healing, Home Care SHEILA JONES chp Holistic Practitioner MOBILE SERVICES www.holisticnc.ca 250-597-3212

Professional Framing and Local Art

Call Adrienne Richards 250 510 6596 or e-mail adrienne@cowichanvalleyvoice.com Prenatal, Birthing and Maternity FREE Noon Info Session to Discover the #1 Secret of a Calm, Comfortable Child Birth, June 14th @ Matraea Centre Danette Noble, RCH, CCHt 250 709-7380

www.birthwithhypnosis.vpweb.ca

Websites, Domains & Hosting

Web. Domains & Hosting Services

139 Station St. 250-748-3311 ssgfs@telus.net Professional Framing •Local Art •Unique Gifts

WEB HOST Richard Badman rbadman@gearth.com 250.746.9319 Duncan, BC

Yoga Classes, Studios and Instruction Sadie Bartram - Inspiration Yoga

Chakra Yoga and Sacred Chant Circle at Rivendell Yurt Prenatal Yoga and Mom and Babe Yoga at Matrea Centre, 170 Craig St Duncan sdbartram@gmail.com/250-748-2089

Classroom Space Available Enquire Within The Matrea Centre 170 Craig Street, Duncan Call: 250 597 0085 Email: classes@matmercantile.ca or visit our website: www.matmercantile.ca

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Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley


Emily

Family Trip to The Glenora Woodlot

Meghan works parttime and enjoys being a full-time Mom and adventurer.

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stic s the n her m apy.

Bruce Wood/Moonstruck Cheese continued from page 11 Nettle Gnocchi with Moonstruck White Grace Recipe courtesy Bruce Wood, Salt Spring Island

When most people think of gnocchi they think of heavy, leaden balls of potato. When made with baking potatoes and handled as little as possible so as not to develop the gluten in the flour, these little dumplings can be delicate and lovely.

Amount

3 1 lb., cleaned 1 small ¼ tsp. ¼ Cup 1 ½ Cups ¼ Cup 1 Cup

Ingredients

Baking Potatoes, washed but not peeled Nettles (CAREFUL they do sting) Egg Ground Nutmeg Parmesan Cheese, grated All Purpose flour Melted Butter Moonstruck White Grace, grated

Cook the potatoes until tender, drain and cool. Peel the potatoes and put through a food mill or ricer. Blanch the nettles in boiling water for 2 minutes. Drain and squeeze out as much moisture as possible. Puree in a food processor until smooth. Place the nettles in a bowl with the potatoes and beat in the egg yolk. Add the seasonings and cheese. Add the flour and gently knead to a smooth dough. Working on a well-floured work surface, take one-quarter of the dough and form into a rope, approximately 1 inch in diameter. Cut the dough into one inch lengths and transfer to a baking sheet sprinkled lightly with cornmeal. Repeat with the remaining dough. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Toss the gnocchi into the boiling water and cook until they just float. Drain in a colander and toss lightly with a little olive oil. To finish, heat a saute pan over medium high heat and add the butter. Add the gnocchi and cheese and heat through, season to taste and serve with roast chicken or on their own. Serve hot!

*Gnocchi can be prepared a day ahead of time and kept covered in the refrigerator.

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Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley


Adult & Seniors Literacy Program Launched

I

t takes a community to raise a life-long learner. And thanks to the galvanizing efforts of Literacy Now Cowichan, our valley has – as always – come together to address another challenge: adult and senior literacy. The “Pathways to Learning” program was launched for adults and seniors who face literacy challenges. Rather than insult people with “See Dick run” books, learning is tailored for each individual’s

real life needs. Clients work one-on-one with volunteer tutors to prepare for such hurdles as updating resumes, getting a First Aid or Serve it Right certificate, computer skills, forklift training, professional driver’s licence, and even citizenship. Linking the learning to tasks that are essential to their livelihood results in high client motivation and success. As Outreach Coordinator June Hughes explains, “For people who are struggling, the light bulb comes on. It’s wonderful to see people’s confidence grow – it’s what holds them back.” Like a delicious stone soup, many community chefs threw in key ingredients: · Ministry of Advanced Education gave the grant funding, with the proposal cowritten with FreeRange Consulting.

receiving graduates back once their literacy skills are sufficient. · School District 79 likewise enjoys cross-referrals. · Rotary Club of Duncan donated 2 new computers, screens, and an e-reader for clients with visual problems. · Bellamy Learning Centre, Global Vocational, GT Hiring, and House of Friendship all send referrals. Clients can call 597-1776 or come into 213B-80 Station Street on Monday, Tuesday or Thursday between 10-3 to be linked to a tutor. Evening hours can also be arranged. Community members interested in volunteering 1-2 hours/ week as tutors are also encouraged to contact program coordinator Kathleen Rick Juliusson Erickson.

· VIU is the grant partner, referring learners to the program and then often

Ensemble Laude perform at Providence Farm May 6

supports non-profits with sustainable fundraising and organizational development. FreeRangeConsulting.ca

Summer Nights Open Stage Entertainment, Cowichan Lake - Call for Performers! Summer Nights Open Stage Entertainment, Cowichan Lake are looking for any and all entertainment that would like to perform on one of the 9 Saturday nights in the summer. This will be done on a volunteer basis, gratis, no pay.

Ensemble Laude, Victoria’s award-winning women’s choir, (featuring 2 singers from the Cowichan Valley) will perform their spring concert The Garden at Providence Farm on May 6th. Directed by Elizabeth MacIsaac, the forty singers explore a marvellous cornucopia of music past and present, from aboriginal fishing chants to medieval love songs, to a modern interpretation of Persian poetry. This year, they

debut their first commissioned work, written by Victoria composer Nicholas Fairbank, based on the works of Christine de Pizan, a 14th century feminist writer. Two concerts are offered, beginning at 2 pm and 4 pm. Advance tickets are available at The Community Farm Store in the Duncan Garage: Adults $10; Youth 18 and under $5; Children 5 and under are free.

The first hour of the show will be an Open Stage, just come to the park with your talent and get on the list. (limited to around 15 minutes /performance ) Scheduled groups will have their “set” to perform that will be scheduled from 7:30 – 9:30. These sets can be 30 minutes to 2 hours long. We provide: Stage, sound system, chairs

and an audience! This venue is family oriented; the entertainment must be children friendly. Decisions regarding who will perform and when will be made by the Entertainment Committee for Summer Nights Open Stage Entertainment, Cowichan Lake. For more info please contact: kayakluver60@hotmail.com

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Cowichan Feature Listings Offers individual and couple counselling sessions related to grief, stress management, conflict resolution, communication and personal growth. Specialized in addiction issues. Mes services sont aussi offerts en francais si desire. N’hesitez pas a appeler pour avoir de l’aide! 331 St. Julian Street Duncan, BC 250- 510 - 0182

Sophie Barbant - Hayward, M.A. Registered Professional Counsellor Bilingual French and English

Small World Imports Tibetan Rugs and Carpets www.smallworldimports.ca 250-748-6570

1st Anniversary Sale June 1st through 4th Save from 10% to 50% on EVERYTHING in the store for 4 days.

High quality handwoven traditional rugs and carpets made by Tibetan refugees from Nepal.

Metal Artist Brad Allen

Hand-knotted and made of 100% Tibetan wool in a family run venture that houses workers and educates children to alleviate poverty.

- Metal Wall hangings - Free Standing Sculptures

Our mission is to inspire, motivate and most of all... to have fun! We offer encouraging, experienced tap dance instruction for beginners to advanced of all ages.

With a torch,welder and array of metal finishing tools, Brad creates joyful, nurturing and thought-provoking pieces.

Studio located in Duncan by appointment Brad Allen 250 748 0934 www.meddleart.com

Memory foam yoga mat PVC Free. Ideal for pre/postnatal yoga, pilates and those who need more support.

Decor and Design for all types of yoga at historic Suitable including, Vinyasa Flow, Power, Bikram, Ashtanga, Iyengar, Gentle and Kundalini. Whippletree Junction Lynda Allen 250-748-0934 lyndaallentapstudio@shaw.ca

Furniture,Crafts and Specialty Bears!

WHIPPLETREE

JUNCTION 4705 Trans Canada Hwy

Visit us in our new ‘Cupboard’ in the sun! We are to the right of the courtyard, facing the parking lot (how convenient!)

Bears in the Cupboard

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Leola’s Studio In The Courtyard

Open Friday, Saturday and Sunday,

Summer hours:10am to 5pm bearsinthecupboard@gmail.com.

The hom

Spe beauti Cana Dining R Living Hom Ec Sof

25 www

- Classes - Shared Studio

- Community Loom - Gift Certificates - Locally made textiles

yarns, wools, needles, books and notions. 250 746 5250

BC’s Largest selection of indoor and outdoor rattan furniture! thewickertree.com

www.vvitayoga.ca Richard 250 746 9319 Vancouver Island and Gulf Islands Distributor

- Weaving and Spinning

The Loom

The Wickertree

9747c Willow St, Chemainus 250 324 2227

Open 10 am to 5 pm 7 days a week.

Learn and Experience the joy of textiles. leolasstudio.blogspot.com

Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley


Georgia Nicols M.A. is Canada’s most popular astrologer. A Buddhist, this Vancouver-based astrologer is featured in regional papers across Canada, the United States, and New Zealand. www.georgianicols.com

Aries (March 21-April 19)

This month you want to boost your earnings, get a better job or make money on the side. Plus, you’re considering a major purchase. Specifically, you want to feel what you own helps you in your life, not hinders you. (Do you own your stuff or does it own you?) If you buy something, you’ll want to show it off. All this just prompts you to think more deeply about your value system. In other words --what really matters in life? Hmmm?

Taurus (April 20-May 20)

Now the Sun is back in your sign for the first time in a year. It’s all about you! This is your chance to recharge your batteries for the rest of the year. It’s totally appropriate to put yourself first. This is not selfishness. It simply means it’s time to focus on you. Furthermore, you have a strong need to express yourself to others. It’s the one time of year when your first duty is to yourself. (Yes! Seconds on dessert!)

Gemini (May 21-June 20)

We all send out two signals to the world: one is what we consciously say and do and the other one is what unconsciously propels us. Although we might not be aware of it, others see both. This month, your unconscious self will grab you by the throat. Childhood behaviour patterns that are no longer appropriate might manifest in an embarrassing way. Grab this chance to identify them and let them go! (“Be gone!”) It’s also a good time to look back and see

how well you’re doing at the art of living.

Cancer ( June 21-July 22)

You’re going to be very popular this month! Not only will you enjoy involvement with groups and friends, others will love to see you as well. Get out and schmooze. Team efforts will be productive. (In fact, it’s a good time to form working relationships.) Speak freely about your hopes and dreams for the future because others might be able to help you (almost a certainty). Plus you’re excited about your ideals.

Leo ( July 23-Aug. 22)

The Sun is at the top of your chart acting like a spotlight, and this lighting is flattering! Everyone think you’re hot! Naturally, you can use this to your advantage. Go after what you want. You’ll be surprised how easily doors will open for you. This is also the perfect time to think about your life direction. Where are you headed? Where do you want to go? Meanwhile, back at the ranch, many of you are involved with parents more than usual. (Don’t know about you, but my parents turned out pretty well.)

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

You want to travel, see new places, meet new faces and learn new facts. You want adventure, fresh knowledge and the feeling that life is stimulating! You’re Gene Kelly strutting across the stage singing “Got-ta dance!” This is a fabulous time to take a course or enroll in any kind of study or take up a new hobby. By all means, travel anywhere if you can. You’ll love discussions that are metaphysical, philosophical, spiritual, religious and political because you’re intrigued by big ideas.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

Your love of restaurants, social fun, chic clothes and a beautiful home is tough on your pocketbook. Because you’ve enjoyed recent travels and splurges, now your financial reality is coming home to roost. This is why you’ll be focused on debt, taxes, inheritances, insurance matters and shared property in the next month. You want to reduce your debt so you can have more fun in the future! Along with this desire, you want to improve your life at many levels.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

The Sun is your source of energy, and this is the only time all year when the Sun is opposite your sign. This means you need to get more rest. (The Sun is far away!) Do yourself a favour and acknowledge this. Furthermore, the Sun opposite your sign makes you focus keenly on partnerships and close friendships. Clean up messy situations and examine your relationships with others. Do these relationships benefit you? After all, it’s a two-way street.

Sagittarius(Nov.22-Dec.21)

You’re making To Do lists because you’re keen to get better organized. You want to establish a better sense of order; in part, because you’re also keen to improve your health and you know that cluttered surroundings contribute to a cluttered mind. Vigorous, daily outdoor exercise is probably on your list along with getting rid of whatever you don’t need. You love to lighten your load because it means greater freedom in the future, which of course, means freedom to travel.

May Horoscopes

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

Oh joy! You’re entering one of the most fun-filled months of the year! Because it’s your turn to party, you’re motivated to get out and have a good time. You also want the freedom to be able to express who you are. Everything around you feels lighter, prankish and social. Your involvement in sports, the Arts and children will be increasingly rewarding. Your passion to have a good time encourages love affairs and romance to flourish.

Aquarius ( Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

This month your attention swings to home and family. Some will cocoon; some will tackle special projects. Because you’re doing lots of personal self-evaluation and evaluating your surroundings, you’ll think a lot about your lifestyle. This focus will manifest externally (as you check out where you live and relations with family members) and internally (as you acquire a deeper, psychological self-awareness.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)

Strap on your sneakers because you hit the pavement running! You’ve got places to go, things to do, people to see. You’ll love the pace because you feel excited. You’re stimulated talking to everyone, running around doing errands and taking short trips. You’ll also be increasingly aware of the need for clear communications with others because this month is the perfect time to tell others exactly what you think.

www.georgianicols.com

53


DIRECTORY

Valley Voice Magazine now offers readers a new directory to discover local services and businesses. 3 sizes of ad space are available to suit every business message and budget. Affordable, stylish and straight to the point. Contact Adrienne Richards for more info 250 510 0596 or adrienne@cowichanvalleyvoice.com Deadline June 16th for July 2012 Issue 44.

Accommodations

Business Services

Shawnigan Lake House

Year round waterfront vacation rental with dock. Great for a family holiday or a getaway with friends. www.shawniganlakevacationrentals.ca kpemberton@shaw.ca or call (250) 743-5941

Beauty

Nika’s Natural Hair & Relaxation Salon

haircuts for the whole family color & hi-lites (featuring eco-colors) hair and scalp treatments Matraea Centre all natural products 170 Craig Street Duncan 250 710-7339

Child Care

Clothing and Consignment

Need childcare? Taking care of children? Call the Cowichan Valley Child Care Resource & Referral 250-746-4135 local 231

Accepting Spring and Summer Consignments Learn how to turn your closet into cash. The Second Hanger Consignment 15-850 Shawnigan-Mill Bay Rd. Cobble Hill 250 743 -7802 www.thesecondhanger.ca

Farms and Food More than a Meat Shop

Gluten Free/Organic Pasta’s, Organic Meat, Homemade Sausage, International Foods. The Duncan Butcher 430 Trans Canada Hwy 250 748 -6377

The Valley’s 1st Certified Organic /Biodynamic Community Supported Agriculture Program Year round availability or 24 weeks Come eat at our Organic Farm Cafe - Child, Celiac and Vegan friendly! Alderlea Farm and Cafe Open Tues, Fri, Sat, 11am-5pm 3390 Glenora Road, Duncan, 250 715-0799 Special seating for family meals!

Health and Healing Smoking Cessation Hypnosis Pack regular $499, Special $249 for 4 sessions

Valid til June 30, 2012

Danette Noble, RCH, CCHt 250 709-7380 www.cowichanvalleyhypno.com

Ananda Ayurveda with Asrael Luxurious Hot Oil Massages. Ayurvedic Treatments & Consultations. Jyotish Astrology. Yoga - Mondays & Wednesdays 4- 5:30pm Oceanfront Suites, Cowichan Bay.

Asrael 250-597-3973 www.anandaayurveda.wordpress.com

Vitamin And Herbal Supplements Organic Bulk Foods & Herbs Health & Beauty Aids Herbal Medicine & Food For 4-180 Central Duncan Dogs And Cats (Located Beside Sears in Village Sports Nutrition & Weight Loss Snack Bar Green Mall) 250 748-4421

54

SENIORS!

15% Discount Every Day! on Supplements *Unless Already Reduced Last Tuesday of Every Month Seniors receive 15% off most food items as well as supplements.

Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley


Health and Healing (continued) Reflexology and Chi Wellness by Terri COMPLIMENTS ALL CLEANSES

AWAKEN SUMMER VITALITY * RELEASE DISEASE CAUSING STRESS * STIMULATE IMMUNE FUNCTIONS

Father’s Day Special

Terri 250 709-2388 3-1 hour Foot Reflexology Sessions for $159.00 Gift Certificates Available 1453 Algonkin Rd, Duncan Hours: Mon - Thurs 9am - 8pm balancedbody@shaw.ca • www.terriswellness.com Registered * Licensed * Insured * Certified

IN THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN 141 Craig Street, Duncan 250 748-9632 www.mercias.ca

•A Large Variety Of Supplements, Flower Remedies •Homeopathics, Tinctures •Aura-Soma Colour Therapy, Bath and Body Products •Hair Care Products, Specialty Creams, Bulk Soap and More! •Duncan’s Largest Selection Of Bulk Medicinal Herbs Amazing Lines Of Professional Natural Cosmetics including: Zuii Organics Make Up and ZUZU Luxe: luxury color cosmetics line - spa inspired - VEGAN!

Downtown Ladysmith

DIETS DON’T WORK! CLINICAL HYPNOSIS DOES Lori Austein Clinical Hypnotherapist

Marilyn Swallow RMT RA Gillian Leverkus PhD RHP 50 Years combined experience (250) 245 9269 / 714 5044

250 743 5685 laustein@shaw.ca 15 Min Free Phone Consultations Book Your Appointment Today

www.wildflowernaturalhealth.ca

Home Maintenance

Exquisite Designs Painting

For more information on how to be part of the

NEW 2012 Valley Voice Directory

WCB covered & Fully insured Seniors discounts & affordable rates

Contact Saldana today for your FREE QUOTE (250) 7017197 or exquisite_dezigns@yahoo.com

Call Adrienne Richards 250 510 6596 or e-mail adrienne@cowichanvalleyvoice.com

Pet Health and Care

Spot Available

Prenatal, Birthing and Maternity

Professional Framing and Local Art

Holistic Care For Pets and People Specializing in Holistic Nutritional Education, Acid/Alkaline Balance, Food Buddy Shopping Services, Alternative Healing, Home Care SHEILA JONES chp Holistic Practitioner MOBILE SERVICES www.holisticnc.ca 250-597-3212

FREE Noon Info Session to Discover the #1 Secret of a Calm, Comfortable Child Birth, June 14th @ Matraea Centre Danette Noble, RCH, CCHt 250 709-7380

www.birthwithhypnosis.vpweb.ca

139 Station St. 250-748-3311 ssgfs@telus.net Professional Framing •Local Art •Unique Gifts

Yoga Classes, Studios and Instruction Sadie Bartram - Inspiration Yoga

Chakra Yoga and Sacred Chant Circle at Rivendell Yurt Prenatal Yoga and Mom and Babe Yoga at Matrea Centre, 170 Craig St Duncan sdbartram@gmail.com/250-748-2089

Classroom Space Available Enquire Within The Matrea Centre 170 Craig Street, Duncan Call: 250 597 0085 Email: classes@matmercantile.ca or visit our website: www.matmercantile.ca

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Valley Voice Magazine -Your Monthly Guide to Living in the Cowichan Valley

June Issue Valley Voice Issue 43  

Monthly guide to life in the Cowichan Valley.