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Cowans | Clark | DelVecchio Modern and Contemporary Ceramics Auction May 17, 2013


Cowans | Clark | DelVecchio Modern and Contemporary Ceramics Auction

Auction: Friday, May 17, 2013 10:00 AM Exhibition: Thursday, May 16 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM Friday, May 17 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM Format of Auction: Live floor and phone bidding for all lots. Live internet bidding for all lots through liveauctioneers.com Absentee or “left” bidding for all lots on cowans.com and on liveauctioneers.com  

Cowan’s Auctions 6270 Este Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45232 info@cowans.com 513.871.1670

Clark + DelVecchio 223 N. Guadalupe #274 Santa Fe, NM 87501 ceramics@cowans.com 917.318.0768

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Thoughts About This Auction This auction, our sixth, showcases exceptional work with important provenances and histories. Provenance and documentation have always been important but even more so today as the market grows larger and more complex. Michael Lucero’s PreColumbian figure lot 62 — Young Lady with Ohr Hair (Pre-Columbus) 1991— is from his 1996 retrospective. This series is considered among the best in Lucero’s oeuvre and this particular figure is a masterwork, featured in his 1996 traveling exhibition and book; this piece made appearances in Charlotte (Mint Museum of Art), New York (Museum of Arts and Design), Kansas City (Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art and Design), Washington DC (Renwick Gallery of the National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution), and, lastly, Pittsburgh (Carnegie Museum of Art). Peter Voulkos has had three retrospectives. The most significant of these, due to the refinement and excellence of scholarship, took place in Japan in 1995 at the Seton Museum of Art, Tokyo and the National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto. The works were all key, pivotal examples. Lot 79 — Untitled (Vase) 1957 — is a vessel with figures that show the influence of Miro’s sculpture and Matisse’s cutouts, and lot 80 — Untitled (Sculpture) 1957 — channels the denizens of Cedar Bar, the notorious hangout for the Abstract Expressionist artists which Voulkos visited with the critic Rose Slivka and where he was befriended by some of its most famous players. But provenance and history are not always conventional and museum-bound. In the case of Diego Romero’s lot 57 — Cochiti Feast 2011 — its distinction is being awarded the much-cherished blue ribbon from Santa Fe’s annual Indian Market. This is another form of heightened curatorship, traditional in Native ceramics, adding critical heft to the bowl’s innate beauty and drama. The comments accompanying each lot tell a story about the work’s authenticity, previous ownership, connoisseurship, place in time and weave through the complex history of ceramic art. It does not make any one piece any more exciting to the eye but gives the frisson of scholarship and a record of the object’s journey. Wes Cowan, Garth Clark and Mark Del Vecchio

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Artist Index Arman (Armand Pierre Fernandez)

Karnes, Karen

Saxe, Adrian

Arneson, Robert

Kraus, Anne

Shaner, David

Bean, Bennett

Lawton, James

Shimaoka, Tatsuzo

Buzio, Lidya

Leach, Bernard

Shulpa, Helen

Cabat, Rose

Littlefield, Edgar

Smith, Richard Zane

Conover, Claude

Lucero, Michael

Soldner, Paul

Coper, Hans

Marsh, Tony

Staffel, Rudolph

Corcoran, Annette

Martinez, Maria and Santana Roybal

Staley, Chris

Dillingham, Rick

Mason, John

Takaezu, Toshiko

Dunlap, Carlos

Nagle, Ron

Takamori, Akio

Ferguson, Ken

Ninas, Paul

Turner, Robert

Frimkess, Michael

Ortiz, Virgil

Voulkos, Peter

Gilhooly, David

Picasso, Pablo

Walker, Jason

Gustin, Chris

Pigott, Gwyn Hanssen

Warashina (Bauer), Patti

Hamada, Shoji

Rie, Lucie

Weiser, Kurt

Heino, Otto

Romero, Diego

Wildenhain, Frans

Heino, Vivika and Otto

Sanders, Herbert

Wood, Beatrice

Kaneko, Jun

Sangvanich, Porntip 3


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Bernard Leach (1887-1979; Hong Kong/UK) Square Bottle ca 1945 Stoneware height 7.5, width 5, depth 3 inches artist impressed seal on foot $2,500 - $3,500 This handsome press molded bottle features Leach’s elegant relief drawing. Tenmoku iron glaze “breaks” on the edges producing a rich red-rust wash of color that captures the rhythm and vigor of Japanese calligraphy.

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Bernard Leach (1887-1979; Hong Kong/UK) Faceted Bowl with Carved Flower Interior ca 1970 Porcelain height 3.5, diameter 7.75 inches artist stamp on side of foot $1,500 - $3,000 Purchased from the Leach Studio, St. Ives, England Leach was particularly effective with porcelain. This ceramic body’s tight and less than plastic character when being thrown matched Leach’s desire for control and sharp, clearly drawn edges. The blossom at the bottom of this bowl is brusquely drawn into the porcelain under a lush celadon glaze.

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Shoji Hamada (1894-1978; Japan) Tea Bowl ca 1960 Glazed stoneware height 3.5, diameter 3.25 inches signed box that reads “Yunomi (Drinking Cup)” with “Shoji” seal $2,000 - $3,000

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Tatsuzo Shimaoka (1919-2007; Japan) Sake Bottle ca 1970 Stoneware, with rolled rope surface, enamel decoration and white slip inlay height 7.5, diameter 4 inches $2,000 - $3,000

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Gwyn Hanssen Pigott (1935; Australia) Untitled Still Life #4 1992 Wood-fired porcelain largest height 9, diameter 3 inches $800 - $1,200

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Hans Coper (1920-1981; Germany/UK) Untitled ca 1975 Stoneware, abraded matte slip glaze height 9, diameter 1.5 inches artist seal on foot $25,000 - $35,000 From the Daniel Jacobs and Derek Mason Collection; Acquired from Hadler/Rodriguez Gallery, NY, 1979 This form is amongst the last of Coper’s work alongside the Cycladic-inspired pots that he was making at the same time. Coper was a major influence on studio potters post1950, admired for his innovative vessel forms, flattening his pots to create compressed volumes, scouring surfaces with steel wool to achieve texture and reveal lower layers of slip, and assembling his pots with steel pins to achieve the disappearing point between foot and upper form. This variant is rare with the drama of a black foot and beige vessel. Coper recently set the record for the highest price on auction for a work by a studio potter, fetching £181,250 ($293,588) for the Swinton School Wall Mural, a wall sculpture of thrown disks. Exhibited: Exhibition history includes A Passionate Vision: Contemporary Ceramics from the Daniel Jacobs Collection, DeCordova Museum, 1984, illustrated in catalog. References: Also illustrated in Michael McTwigan, “A Passionate Vision: The Collector Daniel Jacobs”, American Ceramics Vol. 3, No. 2, 1984, p24. For similar work see Margo Coatts, (ed). Lucie Rie and Hans Coper: Potters in Parallel. London: Herbert Press, 1997, p193. Also J. Stewart Johnson. Lucie Rie / Hans Coper, Masterworks by Two British Potters. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1994.

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Lucie Rie (1902-1995; Austria/UK) Pink and Grey Bottle/Vase ca 1979 Stoneware with intense blue and pink pitted glaze height 14, width 6.75 inches artist stamp on base $20,000 - $30,000 Acquired from Garth Clark Gallery, New York Dame Lucie Rie moved to London in 1938 to escape Jewish persecution and by 1950 was on her way to becoming established as one of Britain’s leading ceramists. She is the most celebrated and most widely collected of all 20th century ceramists. Issey Miyaki curated a landmark exhibition for her; Dan Flavin created light sculptures in her honor; and she received both the CBE and DBE (Dame Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire). This is a signature form known as the “stamp vase”. A similar work was chosen by the Royal Mail in 1987 adorning one of four stamps to commemorate the achievement of British potters. References: Birks, Tony. Lucie Rie. London: AC Black, 1994; Issey Miyake Meets Lucie Rie. Tokyo: Miyake Design Studios, 1989; Stewart Johnson. Lucie Rie / Hans Coper, Masterworks by Two British Potters. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1994.

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Paul Ninas (1903-1964; USA) Abstract Plate ca 1955 Glazed whiteware diameter 13 inches signed on reverse $1,000 - $1,500 Known for his paintings and murals in and around New Orleans, Paul Ninas also produced early Modernist style ceramics. He studied at the Royal Academy in Vienna and the Beaux Arts Academy in Paris in the 1920s. Isadora Duncan selected him for his first solo exhibition. In 1932 he became Director of the School of the Arts and Crafts Club, New Orleans. Reference: Laufe, Marilyn. Modernism in the South. Augusta, GA: Morris Museum, 2002.

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Pablo Picasso (1881-1973; Spain) Charger with House 1952 Whiteware diameter 16.5 inches studio stamp on reverse, Edition #32/200 $3,000 - $6,000 Picasso’s ceramic work is always a marvel as his twodimensional painter’s eye always found a way of making vessel forms come alive as a 3-dimensional form. These works are now classic and have grown in value considerably over the years.

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Beatrice Wood (1893-1998; USA) The Three Musicians (6 Panel Tile) ca 1952 Earthenware with wood frame height 30, width 52, depth 2 inches signed on front of panel six $15,000 - $25,000 To give textural drama to this large tile panel, Wood used matte and blistering volcanic glazes. The subject matter was a favorite of Modernist painters that Wood knew from the Dada movement in New York. Reference: For a full survey of her work see Elsa Longhauser(ed), Lisa Melandri with texts Garth Clark, Francis M. Naumann, Marie T. Keller, Kathleen Pyne, Jenni Sorkin, Lida M. Sunderland. Beatrice Wood: Career Woman, Santa Monica Museum of Art, 2012. This exhibition was one of the series funded by the Getty Museum’s Pacific Standard Time project.

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Beatrice Wood (1893-1998; USA) Untitled (Tile) 1952 Glazed earthenware height 15, width 15 inches signed lower right $3,000 - $5,000 Wood was informally tutored in drawing by Marcel Duchamp in 1917. Thereafter she used two styles, one a naive realism, the other abstracted and closer to the Dada sensibility.

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Frans Wildenhain (1905-1980; Germany) Vessel ca 1957 Stoneware, glazed and incised height 12.5, width 5.75, depth 5.5 inches $2,500 - $3,500 Acquired from the widow of the Artist, 1980 Reference: in “Frans Wildenhain� Rochester Art Gallery and Walker Art Center Journal, 1958.

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Claude Conover (1907-1994; USA) Untitled Vessel ca 1966 Stoneware with slip surface and incising height 21.5, diameter 11 inches signed on base $4,000 - $6,000 Cleveland Museum 1967

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Claude Conover (1907-1994; USA) Tulum ca 1966 Stoneware with slip surface and incising height 13 inches signed on base $1,500 - $2,000

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Rose Cabat (1914; USA) Grouping of Three Feelies ca 1980 Glazed porcelain largest height 6, diameter 3.5 inches each with incised signature on foot $2,000 - $3,000 The most highly sought-after of this artist’s work, who is still making pottery at 99 years of age. This particular grouping is in excellent condition and represents three of her most beautiful forms and glazes.

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Edgar Littlefield (1906-1970; USA) Spherical Vessel 1955 Glazed stoneware height 8, diameter 9.5 inches $800 - $1,200 Littlefield, who later moved to glass, studied ceramics at The Ohio State University. He taught there with Arthur Baggs, Carleton Atherton, Margaret Fetzer and Paul Bogotay. Littlefield was considered the “glaze person”. A rare and unusual find, this is an exceptional piece of mid-century pottery. Reference: “Karl Martz” The Studio Potter, June 1991, page 46.

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Herbert Sanders (1909-1988; USA) Crystalline Vessel with Lid ca 1967 Porcelain with complex crystalline glaze height 7.5, diameter 6.5 inches artist signature incised on base $1,000 - $2,000 Acquired directly from the Artist Herbert Sanders was a long-time teacher at San Jose University where he established the ceramics department in the late 1930s. In 1958 Sanders had a Fulbright fellowship to Japan and then wrote The World of Japanese Ceramics (Kodansha, 1967). He also published The Sunset Ceramics Book (1958), a primer, Glazes for Special Effects (1974) and others. Sanders is forever known for perfecting the crystalline glaze beyond any artist of his time.

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Otto Heino (1915-2009; USA) Tall Vase with Handles ca 1999 Stoneware with orange salt glaze and black slip height 14, diameter 6 inches $800 - $1,200 Acquired directly from Artist

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Otto Heino (1915-2009; USA) Tall Vase ca 1999 Stoneware orange salt glaze with black slip height 13.25, diameter 5.75 inches $800 - $1,200 Acquired directly from Artist 20 Vivika and Otto Heino (1910-1995; USA and 19152009; USA) Large Tile with Plant Impressions 1997 Salt glazed stoneware with impressed leaf forms width 22, height 25 inches $1,000 - $2,000 Commissioned from the Artists

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Vivika and Otto Heino (1910-1995; USA and 19152009; USA) Large Tile with Plant Impressions 1997 Salt glazed stoneware width 21.5, height 22.5 inches $1,000 - $2,000 Commissioned from the Artists Otto and Vivika moved to California in 1952 from New Hampshire, where Vivika replaced Glen Lukens, head of ceramics at the University of Southern California, for three years. Otto also taught at the university during this time. In 1952 Vivika became a technical advisor for Twentieth Century Fox Studios. She and Otto made 751 pots for the movie The Egyptian in 1953. In 1955, she was invited to reorganize the ceramics department at the Chouinard Art Institute in Los Angeles and remained there for eight years. They later purchased a house in Ojai, built by Beatrice Wood, a friend since 1952. Their highly successful pottery studio produced functional and decorative vessels, as well as architectural commissions.


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Otto Heino (1915-2009; USA) Dinner Service for Six 2000 Glazed stoneware with celadon and reduced copper red glazes dinner plate: diameter 10 inches cup: height 3.5, diameter 3.25 inches bowl: height 3.5, diameter 5 inches $2,000 - $2,500 Commissioned from the Artist

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Robert Turner (1913-2005; USA) High Square ca 1980 Stoneware height 10, width 8 inches $3,500 - $4,500 Reference: Similar work illustrated Marsha Miro and Tony Hepburn Robert Turner: Shaping Silence: A Life in Clay, Tokyo and New York, Kodansha International, 2003 page 42.


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Karen Karnes (1925; USA) Split Winged Vessel ca 1991 Wood-fired stoneware height 7, width 27, depth 13.5 inches artist stamp on foot, produced in Morgan VT $2,500 - $3,500 Reference: Mark Shapiro (ed) A Chosen Path: The Ceramics of Karen Karnes, Phoenix, UNC Press, 2010. See page 130 for a similar example.

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Karen Karnes (1925; USA) Lidded Vessel ca 1985 Wood-fired, salt-glazed stoneware height 8, diameter 9 inches artist seal near foot $1,000 - $2,000 Acquired from Blue Herron Gallery, Deer Isle, ME

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Karen Karnes (1925; USA) Lidded Vessel ca 1984 Salt glazed stoneware height 6, diameter 7 inches artist stamp near foot $1,000 - $2,000 Acquired from Blue Herron Gallery, Deer Isle, ME

This work, and the following lot, were both made at the Stony Point, NY studio. During this period Karnes produced some of the most exquisitely colored and subtle salt glazes in modern ceramics with the gentle coulee of the glaze flow complementing the undulating and scored vessel shape.

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Toshiko Takaezu (1922-2011; USA) Closed Form ca 2007 Glazed porcelain height 6, diameter 5 inches incised signature on foot $1,500 - $2,000

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Toshiko Takaezu (1922-2011; USA) Hanging Landscape Tile ca 1975 Stoneware height 11, width 10.75 inches alterations by artist; signed on verso $2,000 - $3,000 Acquired directly from the Artist

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Toshiko Takaezu (1922-2011; USA) Closed Form ca 1980 Porcelain height 5, diameter 5.5 inches incised signature on foot $2,000 - $3,000

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Toshiko Takaezu (1922-2011; USA) Mask Form ca 1995 Glazed stoneware height 3.5, diameter 10 inches incised signature on base $3,000 - $4,000 Acquired directly from the Artist

Writing in Takaezu’s obituary in The New York Times Michael Grimes says that with her stoneware and porcelain forms “some small enough to fit in the palm of one hand, others monoliths more than six feet tall, Ms. Takaezu blended the expressive bravura of painters like Jackson Pollock and Franz Kline with the calm, meditative quality of traditional Japanese pottery in forms suggestive of acorns, melons or tree trunks”. Her work was the subject of a traveling retrospective that originated at the National Museum of Modern Art in Kyoto in 1995 followed by “The Poetry of Clay: The Art of Toshiko Takaezu” at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 2004. Reference: Peter Held (ed), The Art of Toshiko Takaezu: In the Language of Silence, Chapell Hill, University of North Carolina Press 2011. 28


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Ken Ferguson (1928-2004; USA) Untitled Triple Udder Mermaid Vessel ca 1997 Stoneware height 19.5, width 16, depth 12 inches $2,500 - $3,500 This is an exceptional example of Ferguson’s work with the wrinkled phallic spout, three breast base and the mermaid with long hair. The color and surface is inspired by Chinese bronzes salvaged from shipwrecks causing the surface to turn verdigris green. One of the great masters of American studio pottery, Ferguson was also an influential teacher. The two following works are both by his students.

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Chris Gustin (1952; USA) Untitled (Large Black Vessel) 1986 Glazed thrown and altered stoneware height 21, width 11 inches $3,000 - $4,000 Acquired directly from the Artist Reference: Ed Lebow et al, Chris Gustin: Masterpieces in Clay, Brockton, MA, Fuller Craft Museum, 2012.

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Chris Staley (1953; USA) Faceted Bottle/Vase 1986 salt-glazed, thrown cut and facetted porcelain height 21, width 8 inches incised signature on base $1,500 - $2,000 Chris Staley is the Professor Laureate at Penn State University for 2012-13.

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Paul Soldner (1921-2011; USA) Sensuous Landscape 1979 Raku fired earthenware slab, altered and cut height 17.5, width 24 inches $2,000 - $3,000 Acquired from Palm Gallery, San Diego, CA 1979 Paul Soldner, artist and educator (he was head of the ceramics department at Scripps College, Claremont, CA for decades) was the father of American raku, a variant of the venerated Japanese low-fire tradition. He was Peter Voulkos’ first student at the Otis Art Institute in Los Angeles. Reference: Elaine Levin et al, Paul Soldner: A Retrospective, Seattle, University of Washington Press, 1991. See page 83 for a similar example.

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David Shaner (1934-2002; USA) Pillow Pot ca 1985 Reduction fired glazed stoneware height 3.5, width 9, depth 6 inches artist stamp on foot $2,000 - $3,500 Acquired from Blue Herron Gallery, Deer Isle, ME

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Kurt Weiser (1950; USA) Lidded Jar with Two Figural Tropical Birds ca 1980 Raku glazed earthenware height 15, diameter 13.5 inches signed on foot $2,000 - $3,000 Reference: Peter Held (ed), Eden Revisited: The Ceramics of Kurt Weiser, Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2008.

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Kurt Weiser (1950; USA) Untitled Lidded Jar ca 1980 Raku glazed earthenware height 17.5, diameter 17 inches signed on foot $1,200 - $1,600

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Kurt Weiser (1950; USA) Untitled Vessel 1984 Glazed molded porcelain height 16, width 11, depth 7 inches $5,000 - $6,000 Reference: Exhibited on the traveling exhibition Eden Revisited: The Ceramic Art of Kurt Weiser (20082010) organized by the Museum of Art, University of Arizona, Phoenix and illustrated in the accompanying book on page 23.

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James Lawton (1954; USA) Squared Bowl; Square Platter with Chair ca 1984 Raku fired glaze 13.5 inches squared, bowl height 9, width 9, depth 9 inches $400 - $600 From the Betty Asher Collection Exhibited: James Lawton, Garth Clark Gallery, LA, 1984.

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Bennett Bean (1941; USA) Dolen 1990 Earthenware with gold and transparent glazes, richly colored acrylic paint, and organic effects from pit firing height 6, diameter 9.25 inches artist stamp on base $1,500 - $2,000 Acquired directly from the Artist

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Porntip Sangvanich (1959; Thailand) Geometric Teapot 2001 Glazed whiteware with overglaze height 10.75, width 5.25, depth 5 inches artist signature on foot $1,000 - $1,500

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Annette Corcoran (1930; USA) Mexican Inspired Bird Teapot 2001 Earthenware height 4.5, width 4.25, depth 2 inches artist signature on base $2,000 - $3,000

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Anne Kraus (1956-2003; USA) Untitled Cup and Saucer 1984 Whiteware height 2.25, diameter 5.25 inches signed on foot of both $500 - $700 From the Betty Asher Collection

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Anne Kraus (1956-2003; USA) The Oasis Motel Plate 2003 Underglaze painting on whiteware height 2, diameter 11.5 inches artist signature on base $1,800 - $3,000 The art of Anne Kraus is included in numerous public collections including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Houston Museum of Fine Art, the Newark Museum, Carnegie Museum, Everson Museum of Art, the International Ceramic Museum in Shigaraki, Japan and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. Kraus extended her love of painting into ceramics, creating narrative scenes on the vessel, exploring stories that depict the tenuous balance between reality and the unknown. Reference: Garth Clark, Anne Kraus: Survey, New York, Garth Clark Gallery, 1998.

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Lidya Buzio (1948; Uruguay) Untitled Roofscape Vessel 1981 Burnished Earthenware height 8.5, diameter 11 inches incised signature on side: L. Buzio 1981 NYC $1,500 - $3,000 Acquired from Garth Clark Gallery, NY, 1983

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Lidya Buzio (1948; Uruguay) Untitled Roofscape Charger 1988 Burnished Earthenware diameter 16 inches $600 - $900 Acquired from Garth Clark Gallery, NY, 1988

Lidya Buzio is family to the leading South American modernist, Joaquin Torres Garcia, and studied at his school, Taller Torres-Garcia. She was inspired by traditional Pre-Columbian vessels as a starting point for an untraditional treatment drawing urban scenes, frequently based on New York cityscapes, on the form, which is then burnished, fired and waxed. She has shifted in an abstract mode over the last decade with brightly colored, angular and planar vessels. Her works are in numerous museum collections including the Museum of Fine Art-Houston, Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Reference: Garth Clark, Lidya Buzio Ceramics, New York, Cecilia de Torres, 2012. 41


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Patti Warashina (Bauer) (1940; USA) “Water Works” Cookie Jar ca 1970 Whiteware height 10, width 10, depth 5.5 inches $2,500 - $3,500 Exhibited: “Seattle USA” 1971, Philadelphia

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Michael Frimkess (1937; USA) Zuni Vessel ca 1973 Stoneware height 5.25, diameter 6 inches $1,000 - $2,000 From the Collection of Betty Asher A very important commissioned piece by the Los Angeles collector, Betty Asher. While only 6 inches in diameter, it comments on the LA Art Scene as it existed in the 1970s.

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Rick Dillingham (1952-1994; USA) Untitled Vessel 1974 Raku with plexiglass stand height 8.5, diameter 8 inches incised signature on base $1,000 - $1,500 Dillingham’s pottery reflected his knowledge of and interest in American prehistoric Indian pottery from when he was restoring pots at the Museum of New Mexico, Laboratory of Anthropology, in Santa Fe. Reference: Jan Adelman, Garth Clark, Tom Collins and Malin Wilson, Rick Dillingham (Santa Fe, New Mexico: Rotary Club, 1993) and Joseph Traugott, Rick Dillingham 1952-1994: A Retrospective Exhibition (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Art Museum, 1994.)

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Helen Shulpa (1928-1985) Santa Clara Melon Bowl 1975-80 Black and Sienna burnished earthenware height 4.75, diameter 6.5 inches $2,500 - $3,500 Helen Shupla learned pottery from her Santa Clara aunt, Ologia Naranjo in the 1940s but did not achieve recognition for her distinctive style until after her death. Her technique involved pushing the melon ribs outward from the inside while she was building the jar with coils of clay and utitlized various firing techniques to create different surfaces, giving the shape and form a very organic appearance. Her work is in the collections of the Heard Museum, Denver Art Museum, MIAC, NMAI and others. Her melon bowls were featured on the cover of Stephen Trimble’s, Talking with the Clay and she was photographed throughout Betty LeFree’s Santa Clara Pottery Today. She won “Best of Show” at Santa Fe Indian Market, Museum of New Mexico Purchase Award and other prestigious awards over the years.

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Richard Zane Smith (1955; USA) Wyandot Corrugated Jar 1991 Earthenware height 13.5, diameter 15 inches artist signature on base $5,000 - $6,500 Richard Zane Smith works from a point of homage to the Wyandot tribes creation myths that say the world was created by putting clay on the back of a tortoise who then spread it until the earth was covered. His decoration, playing with the illusion of depth, is purely contemporary, merging past and present. His technique of micro-coiling is similar to early Indian “corrugated� pots although it comes from basket making. Reference: Charlene Touchette (ed), NDN Art: Contemporary Native American, Albuquerque, Fresco Fine Art Publications, 2003, see page 112 for similar example.

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Carlos Dunlap (1958-1981; USA) San Ildefonso Polychrome Jar 1979 Earthenware height 14, diameter 13.5 inches artist signature incised on bottom $2,000 - $3,000 Carlos was the son of San Ildefonso potter Carmelita Dunlap and a great-nephew of Maria Martinez. While he worked for a few years before his untimely death in a car accident, he was an innovative force in San Ildefonso pottery, excelling at larger forms and polychrome, brown and black colorations. The size of his vessels was unusual but his uniqueness was in his free flowing designs and utilization of open spaces, which gave his work a more modern appearance. His work is scarce, especially polychrome pots. His pottery is in the collections of the Denver Art Museum, The Heard Museum, NMAI and others.

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Virgil Ortiz (1969, USA) Cochiti Animal (Tic) Figure 2003 Earthenware with slip and black wild spinach height 8.5, width 11, depth 8.5 inches $4,500 - $5,500 In ways both sly and obvious, Ortiz adjusts his work to blend stylishly with Cochiti decoration, Art Nouveau, Art Deco and Pop elements. He shows in galleries and museums across the United States and abroad. His pueblo’s tradition of making figures goes back over a century initiated by the arrival of circus performers, opera singers, and Siamese twins from freak shows. He updates this genre, blending tattoo art, piercings and overtones of leather fetish. Reference: Charlene Touchette (ed), NDN Art: Contemporary Native American, Albuquerque, Fresco Fine Art Publications, 2003. 49


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Maria Martinez (1887-1980) and Santana Roybal Martinez (1909-2002) San Ildefonso Plate with Feather Design ca 1943-56 Burnished earthenware diameter 14.5 inches artist signature incised on bottom “Maria + Santana� $2,200 - $6,500

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Diego Romero (1964; USA) Cochiti Golfball Moon 2002 Earthenware height 4, diameter 8.5 inches signed on outside rim $2,500 - $3,500

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Diego Romero (1964; USA) Cochiti Paradox 2009 Earthenware height 4.5, diameter 8.5 inches signed on outside rim $2,000 - $3,000

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Diego Romero (1964; USA) Cochiti Cochiti Feast 2011 Earthenware diameter 11.5 inches signed on outside rim $5,000 - $7,000

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David Gilhooly (1943; USA) Frog Food Group, Seven Works ca 1977 Group of 3 Chocolate Frog Cups, 3 Doughnuts and a Frog Cookie glazed earthenware cups: height 2, diameter 2 inches doughnuts: height 1.5, diameter 3.25 inches frog cookie: diameter 4 inches $500 - $800 From the Betty Asher Collection David Gilhooly is known for his ceramic sculpture of animals, food, planets and his invented culture, Frog World. A graduate of the University of California at Davis under Robert Arneson (BA 1965, MA 1967), he and his fellow students and teachers, working in the schools ceramics facility TB-9, founded the Funk Ceramic Movement in the San Francisco Bay Area with Gilhooly as their eternal enfant terrible. Reference: Kenneth Baker, David Gilhooly, Davis, California, John Natsoulas Press, 1992.

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David Gilhooly (1943; USA) Bread Frog Making a Pig of Himself ca 1976 Glazed and modeled whiteware height 16, width 21.5, depth 17.5 inches signed on base $3,500 - $4,500

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Robert Arneson (1930-1992; USA) Pot Kisser 1978 Stoneware height 8.5, diameter 6.75 inches incised signature on foot $7,000 - $11,000 Acquired from Garth Clark Gallery, NY

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Robert Arneson (1930-1992; USA) Self Portrait Shot Glass ca 1979 Porcelain height 2 3/8, width 2 1/2 inches $2,000 - $3,000 From the Estate of Rudolf Staffel; Acquired directly from the Artist 1979

This work is a portrait of the artist kissing a pot while being a pot. Arneson began his career as a potter but soon shifted to sculpture. He would return to the vessel form from time to time but in an ironic context. Reference: Jonathan Fineberg, A Troublesome Subject: The Art of Robert Arneson, Berkeley, University of California Press, 2013.

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Michael Lucero (1953; USA) Young Lady with Ohr Hair (Pre-Columbus) 1991 Earthenware height 19.25, width12.75, depth 6.5 inches signed on right knee $6,000 - $7,000 The Pre-Columbian figures have a special place in Lucero’s oeuvre, bringing out the full range of his palette and sculptural inventiveness. The figure’s hair is an homage to the ruffled pots of the eccentric 19th-20th century Biloxi potter, George E. Ohr. Reference: Exhibited on the Michael Lucero Sculpture 1976-1995, organized by the Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, NC and traveled to various venues between 1996 and 1998. This work has two full page illustrations in the accompanying book, Barbara J Bloemink and Mark Richard Leach (with essay by Lucy R. Lippard) Michael Lucero Sculpture 1976-1995, New York: Hudson Hills Press, 1996.

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Akio Takamori (1950; Japan/USA) Gate Keepers 2002 Stoneware and porcelain largest height 24, width 15, depth 9 inches $6,000 - $9,000 Acquired from Garth Clark Gallery, NY The heads are self-portraits of the artist, and refer to guardian figures throughout history, from the Chinese lion to European gargoyles. Reference: Exhibited Akio Takamori: New Works, Garth Clark Gallery, NY, 2003. For another work from this series se Peter Held Between Clouds of Memory: Akio Takamori: A Mid-Career Survey, Phoenix: Arizona State University Museum, 2005, page 109.

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Adrian Saxe (1943; USA) Gold Mortar Bowl with Base 1989 Stoneware and porcelain with faceted rim in the manner of a gear wheel height 11, width 9, depth 6.5 inches signed and impressed signatures $5,000 - $6,000 Acquired from Garth Clark Gallery, NY 2004

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Adrian Saxe (1943; USA) Untitled Ewer (A Trolling Drollgasm) 94-267 1994 Glazed porcelain with on-glaze luster, stoneware base and mixed media attachments height 14, width 11 inches signed on base and foot of bowl $4,500 - $6,000 Private Collection This teapot’s form by this pioneer of postmodern hedonism is derived from a ginger root. While not it’s purpose, the form is nonetheless perfectly functional. Exhibited: Adrian Saxe: New Work, Garth Clark Gallery, NY, 1994.

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Adrian Saxe (1943; USA) Dents de la Mer (90-165) 1990 Glazed porcelain with overglaze luster and mixed media height 13, diameter 5 inches signed on base $7,500 - $12,000 This technical tour de force with its bejeweled gourd shape evokes an exotic but dangerous naval mine and could be something conjured by the Russian jeweler, Carl Faberge. Exhibited: One Person Exhibition, Garth Clark Gallery, NY 1990.

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Jun Kaneko (1942; Japan/USA) Oval Charger with Pink and Blue Spirals 1987 Stoneware height 24.25, width 20.25, depth 3 inches artist signed on base $2,800 - $3,500

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Jun Kaneko (1942, Japan/USA) Untitled Black Slab 1998 Stoneware height 22, width 29.25 inches $3,500 - $4,500 From the Sanford Besser Collection; Acquired directly from the Artist. Kaneko studied painting with Satoshi Ogawa during his adolescence in Nagoya, Japan. He came to the United States in 1963 to study at the Chouinard Institute of Art. Los Angeles collector Fred Marer drew him to sculptural ceramics and he studied with Peter Voulkos, Paul Soldner, and Jerry Rothman in Southern California. The following decade, Kaneko taught at some of the nation’s leading art schools, including Scripps College, Rhode Island School of Design and Cranbrook Academy of Art. Since 1990 Kaneko has been working in Omaha, Nebraska on massive ceramic sculptures. 69


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Jun Kaneko (1942, Japan/USA) Dango 1998 Stoneware height 36, width 42, depth 32 inches $18,000 - $25,000 From the Sanford Besser Collection; Acquired directly from the Artist.

Kaneko’s artwork, known for its color, pattern and scale, is included in more than seventy museum collections. He has been based in Omaha since 1986. Recently Kaneko has been production designer for opera including Mozart’s Magic Flute for the San Francisco Opera as well as companies in other cities. This monolith sculpture is a classic within Kaneko’s oeuvre and the title, Dango, is Japanese for dumpling. References: Peterson, Susan. Jun Kaneko, Royersford, PA, Weatherill 2001. Kaneko, Jun and Xavier Toubes. Jun Kaneko Between Light and Shadow, European Ceramic Workshop, s’Hertogenbosch, Netherlands, 1996.

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Jason Walker (1973; USA) “The Trap” Lidded Vessel 2003 Porcelain height 15.5, width 11.5, depth 11.5 inches $5,000 - $7,000 Acquired from Santa Fe Clay, Santa Fe, NM; From the Sandy Besser Collection.

Extensive storytelling is an important part of Walker’s work and on the three elements of this piece (lid, jar, base) are texts. Lid: Warning: In order to complicate a simple act - lid has been designed to be placed on urn so that the cosmic light beams are cinque. So just turn the handle until you can just feel the chi and see the boundary. Urn: Danger: May have blinding affect and permanent damage will occur. to avoid ill effects wander in the dark, ATTENTION: For your safety and protection of urn contents, vessel must be placed properly on strike-any-where base. If base is absent it must have been misplaced or a punk-ass little skater dude must have walked by and thought huge match sticks would be just the thing to light his Marley sized blunt with and you should call the proper authorities. Base: ATTENTION: As the blackness of this side implys darkness or shadow - You got it - it is the bottom.

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Tony Marsh (1954; USA) Perforated Vessel ca 1990 Porcelain diameter 20.25 inches $2,000 - $3,000 Marsh studied at Shimaoka Pottery with Tatsuzo Shimaoka whom Japan named a Living National Treasure in 1996 (see lot 4). From 1978 to 1981 Marsh worked for Shimaoka as a student and apprentice. However when it came to his own vision he did not follow the Japanese style. Rather he made his vessels transparent, opening up their volume with thousands of carefully placed hand drilled holes. Marsh is currently the chair of ceramics, California State University in Long Beach.

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Arman (Armand Pierre Fernandez) (1928-2005; France) La Prima Opera 1994 Earthenware height 9, width 15, depth 6.5 inches Original, cast of 30, signed “Arman” and “Bottega Gatti, Faenza” $6,000 - $8,000

Although this comes from a declared edition of thirty, fewer were made. In 1994 Arman worked at the Bottega d’Arte Ceramica Gatti in the Italian pottery town of Faenza. He had not worked much with ceramics besides some dinnerware designs in the 1980s and two porcelain editions for an Artus Magnus project in New York. Although he had a love of the medium (he collected early African terracotta figures) it posed obstacles in that unlike found metal, wood and other objects, fired ceramics could not easily be cut into slices as Arman often did in his work. At the Gatti workshop he had teapots, cups, figures, and even a full-sized slip-cast Fiat car made for him and while still plastic he could cut and assemble the the works. Exhibited: Le Ceramica di Arman, Pallazzo dell Esposizioni Faenza and the Galleria d’Arte Maggiore, Bologna 1994 in conjunction with the International Museum of Ceramic Art, Faenza, 1994 and Arman Ceramics Garth Clark Gallery, NY. Reference: Illustrated in Henry Martin and Umberto Eco. La Ceramica di Arman. Bologna: Edizioni Maggiore, 1994, unpaginated.

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Beatrice Wood (1893-1998; USA) Gold Luster Vessel with Figures ca 1985 Earthenware height 8, diameter 10 inches signed on base “BEATO” $7,000 - $9,000 Acquired through private sale 1995 Wood was introduced to Marcel Duchamp in 1917 and became an intimate friend of the painter and a member of his rechérche culturelle clique which included Francis Picabia, Man Ray and others. She was present when the most famous ceramic work of art in the 20th century, Duchamp’s “Fountain” (1917), was thrown off the Independents Salon by the jury. Wood’s interest in making ceramics was aroused in 1933 when she wanted to produce a teapot to match a set of six luster plates and joined the adult pottery classes at Hollywood High School. She studied with Glen Lukens at the University of Southern California in 1938, and in 1940 with Gertrud and Otto Natzler. By 1950 Wood emerged as the leading American exponent of luster pottery and had the most remarkable career, actively making and exhibiting until close to her death at 105. Her work is in scores of museum collections including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Pompidou Center in Paris. Reference: Garth Clark, Gilded Vessel: The Lustrous Art and Life of Beatrice Wood, Madison, Guild Publications, 2001.

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John Mason (1927; USA) Black Geometric 1990 Stoneware height 3, width 20 inches $2,500 - $3,500 From the Neuberger Berman Collection; Acquired from Garth Clark Gallery, NY, 1990 Mason career has been revived by the Getty Museum’s multi-million dollar Pacific Standard Time project in 2012. The exhibition Crosscurrents in L.A.: Painting and Sculpture from 1950 to 1970, began with his giant relief sculpture, Blue Wall, 1959. Reference: Peabody, Rebecca, Perchuk, Andrew, Phillips, Glenn, Singh, Rani, and Bradnock, Lucy. Pacific Standard Time: Los Angeles Art, 1945-1980. Los Angeles: Getty Publications, 2011.

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Rudolph Staffel (1911-2002; USA) Light Gatherer ca 1980 Thrown and carved porcelain height 4, diameter 3.5 inches $2,000 - $3,000 Acquired from Helen Drutt Gallery, Philadelphia; Inscribed by artist on side: “To Virginia 1984”; Purchased in the late 1980s

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Ron Nagle (1939; USA) Untitled 1991 Earthenware height 3.25, diameter 2.5 inches $2,500 - $3,500 Created in New Zealand while jurying the Fletcher Challenge Ceramic Awards in 1991, this is a rare terra cotta cup.

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Peter Voulkos (1924-2002; USA) Untitled Vase ca 1950 Stoneware with rare style of wax resist decoration height 9.75, diameter 4.5 inches signature inscribed in base; made at the Archie Bray Foundation, Helena MT $2,200 - $3,000

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Peter Voulkos (1924-2002; USA) Portrait Charger ca 1952 Stoneware, glazed and incised with portrait of a woman height 2.5, diameter 18.25 inches made at the Archie Bray Foundation, Helena MT $3,500 - $6,500

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Peter Voulkos (1924-2002; USA) Untitled (Vase) 1957 Glazed stoneware with stencil figures height 12, diameter 9 inches slip signed on the base $7,000 - $10,000 In 1956 Voulkos began experiments with waxed paper or cardboard stencils, cutting shapes, attaching them to the pot. The pot was then dunked in glaze which did not adhere to the paper. The paper fired away leaving the clay body exposed underneath and left a sharp, slightly raised ridge between clay and glaze. This causes 3-D illusion as background and foreground appear to move apart. The stylized figure is influenced by the assemblages of Jean Arp and Pierre Matisse’s paper cutouts. This vase was selected for Voulkos’s retrospective in Japan in 1995. Reference: Exhibited at Sezon Museum of Art, Tokyo January-February,1995 and The National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto Feb-April 1995 and illustrated in the catalog, Sezon Museum of Art, Peter Voulkos Retrospective, Tokyo, 1995 page 53.

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Peter Voulkos (1924-2002; USA) Untitled (Sculpture) 1957 Stoneware height 28, width 17, depth 11 inches signed near base $40,000 - $60,000 This important, unique, transitional work was shown on the artist’s epic Japanese retrospective. It is a link between his sculptural vessels such as Rocking Pot (1956) and his large-scale non-vessel sculptural work from 1958. The surface has been vigorously incised and painted, an aggressive interpretation of Abstract Expressionist energies. A relatively conventional thrown foot rises into forms that push out from the interior. This both speaks of the plastic character of his medium and points to later developments in Voulkos’ career and his chunky lateperiod wood-fired Stacks. Reference: Exhibited Sezon Museum of Art, Tokyo JanFeb, 1995 and The National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto Feb-April, 1995, and illustrated in the accompanying catalog, Sezon Museum of Art, Peter Voulkos Retrospective, Tokyo, 1995 page 63.

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Peter Voulkos (1924-2002; USA) Untitled (Plate) 1980 Wood-fired stoneware height 3.75, diameter 23 inches signed verso on base $10,000 - $14,000 A particularly fine and beautifully composed wood-fired plate made of stoneware with porcelain pellet inset and deep scoring. The appearance of Voulkos’ plates changed after his 1967 Milan visit with Lucio Fontana, the modern master of holes (buchi) and cuts (tagli). Thereafter his composition of lines and holes on plates was more formal and considered, usually anchored by a horizon line that transversed the plate horizontally. In this plate that line is broken, begins on the left, halts for a rudimentary cut and then continues on the right.

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Peter Voulkos (1924-2002; USA) Untitled Lithograph 1994 Paper height 26.75, width 22 inches Edition 7/45 $800 - $1,200

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Peter Voulkos (1924-2002; USA) Tea Bowl 1990 Wood-fired thrown and altered stoneware height 4, diameter 6 inches incised signature on base $2,500 - $4,500 Acquired from the Braunstein / Quay Gallery, San Francisco, CA 1991 A handsome American response to the Japanese Yunomi or tea bowl. The bowl is energetically altered and textured with an irregularly drawn lip. The form is allowed to slump into its exaggerated foot and the wood-firing has created a tonally rich palette from black to orange.

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Peter Voulkos (1924-2002; USA) Stack/Bottle 1975 Wood-fired stoneware height 26, diameter 17 inches signed both across foot and on the side of vessel $40,000 - $50,000 Handsome, large wood-fired stoneware vessel with vibrant ash flashing (color ranges from powder blue through sienna to chocolate brown), porcelain inserts and a swirling cut leading to the neck and various other markings, either pushed into the surface or pulled through from within. The first of these forms appeared in 1968 in the “Black Show� at the Ruth Braunstein/Quay Gallery, San Francisco. Reference: See Rose Slivka and Karen Tsujimoto The Art of Peter Voulkos, Tokyo and New York, Kodansha International 1995 page 87, for a similar form.

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Cowan’s Staff

President and Principal Auctioneer C. Wesley Cowan - info@cowans.com Business Operations Reid Sikes - reid@cowans.com Specialists American Indian Art Danica M. Farnand - indianart@cowans.com Susan Labry Meyn Books and Manuscripts Patricia Tench - pat@cowans.com Fine and Decorative Art Diane Wachs - decarts@cowans.com Graydon Sikes - art@cowans.com Kirstie Craven - kcraven@cowans.com Sam Cowan - sam@cowans.com Jennifer Howe - jenniferhowe@cowans.com Lea Lane - lea@cowans.com Historic Firearms and Early Militaria Jack Lewis - firearms@cowans.com Joe Moran - joe@cowans.com Joe Higgins - photographer Emery Maury Doug Hamilton Jack Haney Carolyn Luken American History Katie Horstman - historic@cowans.com Matt Chapman - matt@cowans.com Jewelry and Timepieces Brad Wanstrath - jewelry@cowans.com Militaria and Civil War Allen Cebula

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Office Manager / Auction Coordinator Phyllis Terry - phyllis@cowans.com Linda Heineman - payment@cowans.com Marcia Moyer Wendy Simmons Amy Francis - info@cowans.com Spencer Francis - spencer@cowans.com Nora Francis Production Manager Maureen Buri - maureen@cowans.com Advertising, Marketing and Public Relations Evan Sikes - evan@cowans.com Photography Linda Gillings - photo@cowans.com David Jackson Catalogue Design Jennifer Castle - jenny@cowans.com Warehouse Jack Erp - jack@cowans.com Nick Grote - nick@cowans.com Shipping Dan Wolfangel - shipping@cowans.com Dave Shear Michael Schroder


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Terms and Conditions By registering and bidding in an auction conducted by Cowan’s Auctions, Inc. (“Cowan’s”), bidders (whether present in person, by telephone, by agent, by written or telephone absentee bid instruction, or through a live internet connection) agree to be bound by these terms. These are the complete and only terms and conditions on which all property is offered for sale. Cowan’s retains the right to bar any bidder from participating in any auction and to exclude or reject any bid. 1) REGISTRATION. All bidders must register their name, permanent street address (no P.O. Boxes), and telephone number prior to the auction. Unless known to Cowan’s, all registrants are required to present two forms of identification, at least one of which must include a current photograph. Bidders may be required to present a valid Visa or MasterCard. By registering with Cowan’s or submitting an absentee bid form, an individual registrant authorizes Cowan’s to obtain a copy of his or her consumer credit report and authorizes Cowan’s, at its sole discretion, to use the information contained therein to make business decisions regarding the registrant’s participation in the bidding process. 2) ACCEPTANCE OF TERMS. Bidding on any item, whether in person, by phone, by absentee bid or via a live internet auction indicates the bidder’s agreement to be bound by these Terms and Conditions for Bidders. Any right of bidder under this agreement shall not be assignable and shall only be enforceable by the original buyer. The rights and obligations of the parties shall be governed by the laws of the state of Ohio. All bidders submit to the personal jurisdiction of the state and federal courts in Ohio. 3) TERMS OF SALE. Announcements made the day of auction take precedence over any previous communication. The auctioneer reserves the right to withdraw any lot at any time before its final sale and to reject any bid for any reason. The highest bidder for each lot acknowledged by the auctioneer shall be the “buyer”. If any dispute arises as to any bidding, or between two or more bidders, at the sole discretion of the auctioneer, the successful bidder will be determined or the disputed lot shall be put up again at the last undisputed bid and resold. 4) BUYER’S PREMIUM. (a) Buyer’s Premium for “Antique and Modern Firearms” auctions; the Auctioneer will collect and retain from the Buyer, as additional commission, a premium equal to 15% the Sale Price of each Lot up to and including $200,000, plus 10% of the amount by which the Sale Price exceeds $200,000. (b) Buyer’s Premium for “American History” and “the World at War” auctions; the Auctioneer will collect and retain from the Buyer, as additional commission, a premium equal to 17 ½% of the Sale Price of each Lot up to and including $200,000, plus 12 ½% of the amount by which the Sale Price exceeds $200,000. (c) Buyer’s Premium for “Fine and Decorative Art”, “Modern Ceramics”, and “American Indian and Western Art” and any other specialized auctions; the Auctioneer will collect and retain from the Buyer, as additional commission, a premium equal to 20% the Sale Price of each Lot up to and including $200,000, plus 15% of the amount by which the Sale Price exceeds $200,000. (d) Buyer’s Premium for online, timed and other third-party bidding platforms may vary. 5) ESTIMATES AND RESERVES. Presale estimates are intended to be guides and may or may not reflect the ultimate hammer price of a lot. Cowan’s retains the right to change estimates on any lot up to time of sale. A reserve is a confidential minimum price agreed upon by the seller of the lot and Cowan’s. In the case of reserved lots, the seller has authorized Cowan’s to bid on seller’s behalf until the reserve price is reached. In no case will the reserve be higher than the low presale estimate. Cowan’s standard house reserve on all property at auction is one-half of the low estimate. 6) WARRANTIES AND DISCLAIMERS. Cowan’s makes a limited warranty only to the original buyer of record concerning the authenticity of each lot for a period of 14 days after bidder’s receipt of the purchased lot. If a buyer is not satisfied that the lot purchased is genuine, the buyer may, at his or her own expense, obtain the opinion of two mutually agreed upon recognized experts in the field of the disputed lot. If these experts determine that the item is not genuine, the buyer’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the rescission of the sale and refund of the amount paid for the item. It is specifically understood and agreed that the rescission of the sale and refund is exclusive and in lieu of any other remedy which might otherwise be available as a matter of law or in equity, and such remedy is conditioned upon the buyer returning the property in the same condition as at the time of sale. Cowan’s shall not be liable for any incidental or consequential damages. All sales are final, with no returns or refunds except as provided in this limited warranty. Except as provided in the immediately proceeding paragraph, EVERY LOT IS SOLD “AS IS”, without any representations or warranties by Cowan’s or the seller as to merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, condition or value of the property, or the correctness or completeness of the catalogue or other description of the property, and no statement, whether written or oral, shall be deemed such a representation, warranty or assumption of liability. Cowan’s makes no representation or warranty that the buyer of manuscript material, photographs, prints or works of art will acquire any copyright or reproduction rights. Cowan’s does not guarantee the working order of any clock, watch, electronic or mechanical device. Dimensions given in the catalogue descriptions may be approximate. 7) DEFINITIONS OF AUTHORSHIP. “By” or “Maker/Artist” — in our opinion, the work is by the artist or maker stated “Attributed to” — in our opinion, the work is probably, but not definitely, by the artist or maker stated “Signed” or “Marked” — in our opinion, the signature or mark is that of the stated artist or maker “Bearing the signature (or mark) of” — in our opinion, the signature or mark is probably, but not definitely, that of the artist or maker stated “Circle of” — in our opinion, the work is of the period and by an artist or maker closely associated with the stated artist or maker “School of” — in our opinion, the work is by a pupil or follower of the stated artist or maker “Manner of” — in our opinion, the work is of the period and done in the style of the stated artist or maker “After” — in our opinion, the work is a copy of a work by the stated artist or maker 8) INSPECTION. Except for On-Line Only Auctions, all lots are available for inspection prior to the auction. Condition reports for most items can be found online at Cowan’s website, www.cowans.com, and prospective bidders are encouraged to contact Cowan’s directly for additional information regarding the condition of any lot. Cowan’s does not warrant the condition of any item. Buyers interested in the condition of an item are encouraged to contact Cowan’s and, to the best of our ability, we will document for the prospective bidder the condition status on any lot. Condition is always a subjective evaluation and final responsibility rests with the buyer to assess the condition of any item sold by Cowan’s. ABSENTEE, TELEPHONE AND INTERNET BIDDING Absentee and telephone bidding is offered as a free service to our customers and prospective bidders. Cowan’s shall not be responsible for any errors or failures in executing bids, either absentee, telephone or via the internet. 9) ABSENTEE BIDDING. Absentee bids are accepted via mail, fax, email and on Cowan’s website. Such bids will be posted with the time and date of arrival, with ties being awarded to the earliest bidder. Absentee bids that are faxed or emailed to Cowan’s need to be in the office at least 2 hours before the sale begins. An absentee bidder unknown to Cowan’s may be required to submit a bank letter of credit prior to the auction, or, using a credit card, deposit with Cowan’s a fee equaling 30% of the absentee bid. All absentee bids are executed competitively by a member of the auction staff. The auction staff will try to purchase the lot for the lowest price possible and will bid up to the amount designated by the absentee bidder only if necessary. Cowan’s does not accept “buy bids,” or absentee bids which have no limit. In the event of a tie bid between a floor and an absentee bidder, the floor bid will be honored. 96


10) TELEPHONE BIDDING. Bidding live via the telephone is available on a first come, first served basis for those lots with a low estimate of $500 or greater. In order for Cowan’s to efficiently serve the needs of those who wish to bid by phone, please note the following: • To participate in the auction by telephone, potential bidders must complete and sign the absentee bid form and check “I WISH TO BID BY TELEPHONE” for the designated lots. Potential bidders may also reserve a phone line on Cowan’s website. If faxing or emailing requests for phone bidding, they need to be in Cowan’s office 2 hours before the sale begins. Once the auction begins, requests left on Cowan’s website may not be retrieved by the staff. • Telephone bidders are advised to indicate an “insurance bid”, which amount will become an absentee bid, pursuant to the absentee bidding process set forth above, if Cowan’s can not reach the bidder by telephone for a particular indicated lot. • Telephone bidders must disable any caller ID or other call blocking mechanism. • Cowan’s sells about 100 lots per hour, so telephone bidders should plan accordingly. Cowan’s will attempt to reach each telephone bidder, but Cowan’s is in no way responsible for missed calls. 11) INTERNET BIDDING. Internet bidding is available through iCowans on our website; additionally, Cowan’s may post certain auctions on Liveauctioneers.com. There may be terms which apply to internet bids that should be reviewed online at the time of sale. Cowan’s is not responsible for any failure to execute a bid and shall have no liability to any bidder for any technical or other failure associated with an internet auction. 12) BIDDING INCREMENTS. The following increments are used at the auction. Absentee bids must fall within these increments. Cowan’s will automatically reduce any absentee bid to the closest increment if the bid falls outside the published range of increments. For Bids falling Between Bidding Increment $0-500 $25 $501-1,000 $50 $1,001-3,000 $100 $3,001-5,000 $250 $5,001 and up $500 or at the discretion of the auctioneer Cowan’s reserves the right to modify increments at any time during the auction. AFTER THE AUCTION 13) BUYER’S RESPONSIBILITY. Upon the fall of the hammer, title to the offered lot shall pass to the buyer and the buyer immediately (a) assumes full risk and responsibility for the lot, including liability for loss or damage and (b) is liable for payment of the Purchase Price (as defined below) to Cowan’s. It is the buyer’s responsibility to ask specific questions on condition related concerns prior to the auction. Cowan’s will not rescind sales with buyers that have disputes regarding firearm’s bore condition. 14) PURCHASE PRICE AND PAYMENT. The discounted “Purchase Price” for each lot shall equal the hammer price, buyer’s premium, sales tax and, if applicable, all packing, handling, insurance and shipping costs. Payment may be made with cash, personal or traveler’s check or credit card. Cowan’s reserves the right to hold a purchased lot until a check has cleared. A convenience fee of $15.00 will be assessed to all transactions made in the alternate payment channels: Phone payments are made available as a convenience outside Cowan’s Auctions customary payment channels, therefore these payments are qualified as payments made in the alternative payment channel. All forms of payment made using this method will be assessed the convenience fee. Please call Cowan’s Auctions if you have any questions regarding this policy. PLEASE NOTE: A surcharge of 2% will be assessed to all credit card transactions. This surcharge is not greater than our cost of acceptance. Buyers who are present at the auction must pay the full Purchase Price at the time of the sale. Buyers who bid by telephone or who are absentee bidders will be invoiced within 5 days after the close of the auction and must pay the full Purchase Price for each purchased lot within 14 days after the date of the auction. By signing the absentee bid form or placing a bid by telephone, an absentee bidder authorizes Cowan’s to charge the Purchase Price for each lot for which such bidder is the successful bidder to the credit card number provided by telephone or on the absentee bid form, unless payment in full or alternative payment instruction is received within 14 days after the date of the auction. No property will be released by Cowan’s unless the Purchase Price has been paid in full. Institutional billing may be available, and should be arranged prior to the auction. Cowan’s may impose late charges of 1.5% per month (or the highest interest rate allowed) on any amount owed to Cowan’s that remains unpaid after 30 days. Buyer shall be liable for any collection costs or attorney’s fees incurred by Cowan’s to collect payment, to the extent permitted by law. 15) SALES TAX. Buyers are required to pay any applicable state and local sales tax. 16) SHIPPING. At the request of the buyer, Cowan’s will authorize the shipment of purchased items usually within two weeks after payment has been received. Shipment is generally made via UPS or Fed-Ex Ground. Unless buyer gives special instructions, the shipping method shall be at the sole discretion Cowan’s Auctions. Cowan’s is in no way responsible for the acts or omissions of independent handlers, packers or shippers of purchased items or for any loss, damage or delay from the packing or shipping of any property. ADVICE TO INTERNATIONAL BUYERS: Cowan’s will not ship any package containing a firearm to any location other than within the United States. Buyers outside the United States must make their own shipping arrangements taking full risk for the transportation of any firearm. Property made of or containing certain plant or animal materials, such as coral, crocodile, ivory, whalebone, baleen, tortoiseshell, etc., may require a license or certificate before exportation from the United States and importation to another country. If you are purchasing items that contain these materials, you need to check the government wildlife import requirements in the countries from which and to which the item is being shipped prior to bidding. Since the export and import licenses are independently issued by the countries of origin and destination, obtaining one does not guarantee that you can obtain the other. Purchasers are responsible for making timely payments on items won at auction, even if a license is delayed or denied. 17) SHIPPING CHARGES. Buyers are required to pay for all packing, shipping and insurance charges. Overseas duty charges are the responsibility of the successful bidder. Be aware that for larger and/or valuable items, shipping charges can be substantial. 18) REMOVAL AND STORAGE OF PROPERTY. If purchased property has not been removed, or Cowan’s has not received shipping instructions within 21 days after the auction date, a $10 per item per day storage fee may be charged to the buyer. 19) CANCELLATION OF SALE. If purchased property remains in the custody of Cowan’s for a period of 60 days following the auction, Cowan’s may, at its option, cancel the sale, retaining as liquidated damages any payments made by the buyer, or resell the property at auction or by any other commercially reasonable means, for the account and at the risk of the buyer, and in such event, buyer shall be liable for the payment of all deficiencies plus all of Cowan’s costs, including but not limited to storage and costs of both sales. This right of cancellation is in addition to any and all other remedies available to Cowan’s. Copyright © 2013 Cowan’s Auctions

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ABSENTEE BID FORM REGISTRATION NO. ___________________________________________________

6270 Este Avenue Cincinnati, Ohio 45232 513.871.1670 Fax: 513.871.8670 info@cowans.com cowans.com

DATE/TIME RECEIVED _________________________________________________ PH/FAX_________________ MAIL___________ E-MAIL______________________ SALE NO. ___________________________________________________________ (FOR OFFICE USE ONLY)

Name (please print)____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Address______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ City__________________________________________________________ State_________________________________________ Zip______________________ Phone________________________________________Fax____________________________________________ Email____________________________________ I request that Cowan’s Auctions, Inc. (“Cowan’s”) (i) enter bids on the following lots up to the maximum price I have indicated for each lot in the “Absentee Bid” column; or (ii) reserve a telephone line for telephone bidding for the lots indicated. I request that if Cowan’s is unable to reach me for telephone bidding for a lot, that Cowan’s enter bids on such lot up to the maximum price indicated in the “Insurance Bid” column. I understand that Cowan’s will execute the absentee bids competitively on my behalf. I further understand that Cowan’s executes absentee bids and allows telephone bids as a convenience for customers and that Cowan’s is not responsible for failure to execute bids or for errors relating to the execution of my bids. I agree to be bound by the Terms and Conditions for Bidders printed in the auction catalog and listed on Cowan’s web site www.cowanauctions.com and I understand that I am responsible for determining the condition and authenticity of any lot, and that all items are sold AS IS with no returns or refunds. By submitting this Absentee Bid Form, I authorize Cowan’s to obtain a copy of my individual consumer credit report and authorize Cowan’s, at its sole discretion, to use the information contained therein to make business decisions regarding my participation in the bidding process.

Lot No.

Description

Absentee Bid I Wish to Bid by Phone Insurance Bid (phone bidders only)

If my bid is successful, I understand that the purchase price for each lot will be the sum of the hammer price, the buyer’s premium, sales tax and all packing, handling, insurance and shipping costs (the “purchase price”). I understand that I will be invoiced within 5 days after the auction and that I will be responsible for paying Cowan’s the full purchase price immediately upon receipt of the invoice. Cowan’s may impose late charges of 1.5% per month (or the highest interest rate allowed) on any amount owed to Cowan’s that remains unpaid after 30 days. By signing this absentee bid form I authorize Cowan’s to charge the credit card listed below for the full purchase price of each lot for which my bid is successful, unless payment in full or alternative payment instructions are received by Cowan’s within 14 days after the date of the auction.

Visa/Mastercard Number_______________________________________ Exp. Date_________________ Security Code (3 or 4 digit number on credit card)________ Print Name (as it appears on credit card)_________________________________________Signature (must be signed)______________________________________

How did you find out about the auction? (Please check as many as appropriate) q Received printed flier q Received printed catalogue q Received email blast q Saw it on our website

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q Saw an advertisement Which publication: __________________________________________________________ q Referred by a friend q Other: ____________________________________________________________________


Cowans | Clark | DelVecchio 6270 Este Avenue Cincinnati, Ohio 45232 513.871.1670 cowans.com


Modern and Contemporary Ceramics