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AUGUST 30, 2012 n SEASIDESIGNAL.COM

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YEAR 108 | WEEK 31

Volunteers help give Clatsop kids a good start for new school year By Jeremy C. Ruark

jruark@countrymedia.net

HOT SCHOOL FASHIONS

W

hat’s popular with back-toschool shoppers on the North Coast Page 3

SEASIDE, OREGON | 75 CENTS

WARRENTON – Volunteers, including several students from the Tongue Point Job Corps Center joined supporters of the Lunch Buddy Mentoring Program Aug. 22 at the

Warrenton Elementary School cafeteria to unpack dozens of boxes of school supplies and repack them in hundreds of children’s backpacks. Costco Wholesale donates 475 backpacks,

See BACKPACKS, page 8

Mentoring Program Fundraiser

• Grilled Cheese and soup dinner • Sept. 8, 5 p.m. – 8 p.m. • Seaside Civic and Convention Center, 415 1st Ave. • $6/adults, $4/senior & children under 12 $15 for families of 3 or more

SIGNAL PHOTO / JEREMY C. RUARK

Sunset Parks and Recreation District Aquatics Manager Genesee Dennis explains the need to retrofit a portion of the Sunset Pool’s heating, ventilation and cooling system.

SPORTS

Sunset Pool gets major improvement projects, to be closed for 9 days

MEDALS FOR WINNERS

By Jeremy C. Ruark

jruark@countrymedia.net

T

he winners of the annual OfficeMax Hood-to-Coast Relay Page 9 INDEX Classifieds.............6-7 Calendar................... 5 Crossword................ 6 Hocus Focus............. 7

SEE VIDEO AT SEASIDESIGNAL.COM

Sudoku..................... 7 Sports..................9-10 Viewpoints................ 4

W E AT H E R Thursday Mostly cloudy Hi 62; Low 53 Friday Sunny Hi 65 Low 52 Saturday Partly sunny Hi 66; Low 53 Sunday Partly sunny Hi 67; Low 53 Monday Party sunny Hi 68; Low 53 Tuesday Party sunny Hi 70; Low 51 Wednesday Sunny Hi 79; Low 54

HERE AND SEE THE REASONS TO BEGIN THE PROJECT IMPROVEMENTS AT SEASIDESIGNAL.COM

SIGNAL PHOTO / JEREMY C. RUARK

Toveri Erfling, 8, from Astoria, helps sorts through a large stack of backpacks on the floor of the Warrenton Elementary School cafeteria. The backpacks will be filled with school supplies for Clatsop County students in kindergarten through second grade.

SEASIDE – Major improvement projects will be conducted during the annual maintenance work at the Sunset Empire Parks and Recreation District’s (SEPRD) pool and fitness room at 1140 Broadway. The pool and fitness room will be closed for the work from Sept. 2 through Sept. 10. The pool’s front office will remain open from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Sept. 4-7. The projects include an additional unit to meet state requirements to sanitize the water used in the buildings two pools.

Sunset Pool

• Closed from Sept. 2-10 for annual maintenance • Front office open Sept. 4-7 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. “We are required to have a minimal amount of chlorine in the pool, but with that as loads change the chlorine has trouble doing its job,” said SEPRD’s aquatics manager Genesee Dennis. “The new ultraviolate light device we are installing helps to kill bugs. It sterilizes

See POOL, page 8

Police alert vehicle owners of unusual car prowling cases SEASIDE – Seaside Police Chief Bob Gross says it’s the first time he has seen this type of crime in the city: A suspect or suspects stealing vehicle registrations, insurance cards and titles from parked vehicles in front of area homes. “We had at least seven vehicles broken into between 3:30 and 6:30 on the morning of Aug. 22,” Gross said. “These were forced entry break-ins. A suspect or suspects broke the auto windows to get in.” The car prowling occurred in north Seaside along 5th and 6th Avenues and Holladay Drive. “In one case, the suspect or suspects stole a vehicle, removed the registration, returned the vehicle to the front of the house and left the car running, then stole a second vehicle from in front of the home,” Gross said. The second stolen car was later found abandoned a few blocks away. “This is a professional theft op-

eration,” said Gross. “They have left behind other valuables like a lap top computer and a purse with cash and credit cards and have targeted only the vehicle information.” He believes the suspect or suspects or from out of the area. Investigators said the suspect or suspects will likely use the stolen registration, vehicle identification numbers, insurance cards and titles to forge registration in a stolen car operation. “They could use the registration to support a vehicle they may have just stolen and it could also be used to sell a stolen vehicle,” Gross said. The information taken from the vehicles could also lead to identity theft. Police are urging residents and visitors to remove valuables from their vehicles, park in a well-lit area at night and call police if you spot anyone suspicious in your neighborhood.

Council OKs sign policy, businesses must now follow regulatory process

SIGNAL PHOTO / JEREMY C. RUARK

Seaside Police are looking for a suspect or suspects breaking into vehicles and stealing auto registrations, insurance cards and vehicle titles.

SHS 2012 Football Season is here

By Jeremy C. Ruark

jruark@countrymedia.net

SEASIDE – Downtown core businesses that are using feather signs in front of their establishments to advertise their business must now go through $40 fee allows a new feather flags in regulatory process the downtown core area and pay a fee to meet new city policy adopted by the Seaside City Council Aug. 27 The adoption follows the council review of the proposed feather and bow sign

New Sign Policy

SIGNAL PHOTO / JEREMY C. RUARK

The Seaside City Council has approved a new policy to regulate feather signs in the core area of the city.

See SIGNS, page 8

SIGNAL PHOTO / JEREMY C. RUARK

Members of the 2012 Seaside High School football program wave as they get team photos taken for the September edition of the Seaside Signal’s Seagull Pride special section. The Gulls open their nine-game season against Warrenton Aug. 31. See page 10 for the story. Read the team profile in the 2012 Fall Seagull Pride September 13.


2 n August 30, 2012 n Seaside Signal n Seaside, Oregon

Traffic safety restraint enforcement blitz in Seaside SEASIDE - Seaside Police officers are joining other Oregon law enforcement agencies on the lookout for unrestrained adults and children as part of a safety belt / child safety seat enforcement blitz, Aug. 27 through Sept. 9. Seaside Police will be putting extra patrols on the road using federal overtime grants from National Highway Transportation Safety Administration focusing on proper safety belt and child restraint use. In addition to the safety belt and child restraint enforcement blitz, officers will also be on the lookout for impaired drivers. The fine for not restraining a child in a safety seat or in a seat belt is $110. Drivers and passengers not wearing a safety belt also face a fine of $110. Carla Levinski, Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) Transportation Safety Division’s Occupant Protection program manager, reports a statewide observation survey in June 2012 found 97 percent of Oregon’s motoring public used safety belts, making Oregon one of the highest belt use states in the country. Unfortunately, booster seat use

Safety Seat – Seat Belt Enforcement • $110 fine for not buckling up among four to eight year olds was observed to be only 54 percent. “Half of children in this age group killed or injured in crashes in 2010 were not using booster seats,” said Levinski. “Child safety seats reduce the likelihood of infants under one-year-old being killed in a crash by 71 percent and the fatal risk for toddlers aged 1 to 4 by 54 percent.” Statistics show 13 child passengers from infant to age 9 were injured in traffic crashes in Clatsop County in 2010. Oregon law requires: • Children less than 40 lbs. are restrained in a child seat. • Children under one year or weighing less than twenty pounds must be restrained in a rear-facing child seat. • A child over 40 lbs. must be restrained in either a child seat or a booster seat appropriate for their size until they reach age eight or

PHOTO COURTESY

Seaside Police have joined an enforcement blitz that began Aug. 27 and continues through Sept. 9. Officers are looking for children not being restrained in safety seats or in seat belts while riding in a motor vehicle. 4’9” tall AND the adult belt system fits them correctly. The Oregon State Police, Oregon State Sheriff’s Association, Oregon Association of Chiefs of Police, and Oregon Department of Transportation offer the

following safety reminders for holiday travel: • Be watchful for emergency vehicles and workers. MOVE OVER if you are approaching any type of emergency vehicle, tow truck or roadside assistance

vehicle which is stopped on the roadside with emergency lights activated. • Get rested before you leave. Fatigued drivers are more frequent during holiday weekends because of increased travel and activity. Allow plenty of time to reach your destination. • Stay up to date on road conditions by visiting TripCheck. com or calling 5-1-1. Outside Oregon, dial (503) 588-2941. In work zones, even when workers are not present, all speed limits still apply and fines double. Inactive work zones still have equipment, detours, and incomplete changes in the broadway so drivers need to slow down and be alert. • Share the road. Watch for bicyclists and pedestrians, especially at night. Bicyclists and pedestrians need to make sure motorists can see them, and motorists needs to make sure they are seen. • Buckle up every trip, every time. Be sure to use child safety seats correctly. • Be alert and avoid distractions. • Drive sober.

Cannon Beach Council formally authorizes bow hunting in Forest Reserve arimel@countrymedia.net

CANNON BEACH The Cannon Beach City Council voted to authorize a plan developed by city staff to allow bow hunting in the Ecola Creek Forest Reserve at a special meeting this week. At the August 22 special meeting, announced just over a day before, the council approved a plan they had asked city staff to develop the previous week at a work session, which will allow bow hunting in portions of the recently expanded Ecola Creek Forest Reserve. Despite the fact that Mayor Mike Morgan opened the meeting by reminding attendees that the public forum on the issue had closed, several attendees took time to object to the plan in the meeting’s public comment period. “We have made our decision this year,” said Morgan, adding that the issue would be reexamined in the future. “It’s a reasonable compromise for this one year,” he said. “We’ll revisit it in the future.” The interim plan will allow bow hunting by special city issued permit only in an area north of the North Fork of Ecola Creek in the city owned reserve. Prospective hunters will need to purchase a $200 permit from the city to hunt in the reserve, in addition to all

“We have made our decision this year. It is a reasonable compromise for one year.” Mike Morgan, Cannon Beach mayor

of the normal permits they are required to obtain from the state. Once purchased, the city permit is good for a year, although it is restricted to deer and elk, which have limited seasons in the fall. Cannon Beach Public Works Director Mark See said the cost of the permits was to cover the city’s expense on administering the permit program, and to buy and hang signs about the hunting restrictions in the reserve. “I hope it’s not a deterrent,” said See of the $200 permit that will be required of all hunters in the reserve. “It was never meant to be a deterrent.” According to See, the permitting process was inspired by the Port of Tillamook Bay, which sells permits to hunt on its property for $35 a day. The permit for Cannon Beach will be for just deer and elk, and will be good for a year. See said that the city may consider changing the cost for permits in the future, based on

the results of the program this year. See said the city will be purchasing four larger signs for $50 each to hang at entries to the reserve, and another 50 signs to hang from trees in the reserve, which will cost another $900. See said installing the signs will likely take a day of labor for a couple of public works employees. This sign expense, and the labor hours to install the signs, will come from a pool already allocated by the city council for projects in the reserve. A letter from City Manager Rich Mays to the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, which has a conservation easement on part of the reserve, said that the area where hunting is to be allowed is approximately 500 acres. In his letter to the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board Mays said “the City is committed to informing hunters of the restricted activities in conjunction with hunting. The City is also committed to implementing a monitoring/enforcement program.” Mays said at the meeting that the city would, as a onetime thing, have one person at city hall on Saturday, August 25 from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. to issue permits to hunters because the day is the beginning of bow season for elk in Oregon. In the future, hunters will need to go to city hall during normal

SIGNAL PHOTO / ANTHONY RIMEL

Cannon Beach will spend $1,100 on new signs relating to hunting in the forest reserve. business hours to buy a permit. Ed Johnson was among those who spoke at the end of the meeting. He objected to the plan, saying that having most of the newly purchased reserve open to hunters was not “equitable.” Bruce Francis, a member of the Ecola Creek Forest Reserve Advisory Committee that initially drafted the new management plan for the reserve, thanked the council for their decision.

“I appreciate the council wading through this…” he said. “Thank you from the Saddle Mountain Archers.” Nadia Gardner, who was also a member of the committee, said she would like the council to follow the rest of the committee’s recommendations more closely. Gardner had made statements in opposition to hunting at multiple public meetings. “I’ve wasted a year and a half of my life on this, and I

the swamps”). Peter Byrne, former big-game hunter and world-renowned Bigfoot pursuer, takes us through the swamps of Southern Florida, giving us a view of the truly primitive and desolate country the creature calls home. A series of photos taken by a British journalist and a photo taken by a former fire chief are examined as well as interviews with witnesses of the creature. We get an interesting look at local wildlife in “Skaawanoki’s” habitat and Byrne puts forth great effort in trying to locate the creature.

can do so by phone, or at the Library circulation desk. Everyone is creative and the Seaside Library wants to give you the opportunity to let your artistic flag fly. Using a variety of glass, clay, and wooden beads, participants will construct colorful necklaces that will be fashionable for any occasion. The instructor will also be showing the technique for making paper beads out of recycled materials. This interesting process is done by many African women who often support their families through this simple yet elegant process. Although we call this workshop “Ladies Day” it is open to men as well.

Seaside Library Events Local author Honey Perkel to speak at Seaside Library Sept. 6

On Thursday, Sept. 6, The Friends of the Seaside Library will host Honey Perkel local author of “A Thousand Summers” and “Secrets at the Cove.” The event will begin at 7 p.m. and take place in the Community Room. Honey will have her books for sale and there will be scrumptious refreshments. In the first part of “A Thousand Summers” Honey Perkel tells the tale of an Idaho girl and her family who spend their summers in a quaint cottage in Seaside during the 1960s. The second half is about a woman whose life falls apart and, in an attempt to save herself, moves with her daughter and a friend to the same cottage in Seaside. With charm and quirky characters, we find out how the two eras connect and

get a glimpse of lives coming full circle. The sequel “Secrets at the Cove” was recently released and the third book in the trilogy, “A Place Called Paradise,” is in the works. Honey Perkel lives in the hills above Seaside with her husband and two Shi Tzu’s, Molly Ann and Emma Mae, where she is a full time writer.

questions will be asked by our trivia host and the winners are the team which, at the end of the night, has correctly answered the most questions. Prizes will be awarded, but the main prize is knowing you have the smartest trivia team in Clatsop County.

Night of All Knowledge Trivia Tournament Sept. 12

On Thursday, Sept. 20, at 7 p.m. the Friends of the Seaside Library will host documentary filmmaker Andreas Wallach. He will be showing “Skaawanoki: The Skunk Ape-Florida’s Bigfoot.” The event will take place in the Community Room and refreshments will be served. “Skaawanoki” is a very interesting and unique documentary in that it focuses on the Florida version of Bigfoot, a creature the local Seminole Indians have named. The literal translation is (“man of

On Wednesday Sept. 12, at 6 p.m. the Seaside Public Library will host its monthly Team Trivia Tournament. Teams can consist of one person or have as many as five people. Trivia nights are informal, fun, competitions where teams battle to see who has the greatest knowledge of all matters trivial. General

Bigfoot Film at Seaside Library Sept. 20

Ladies Day Jewelry Class Sept. 22 On Saturday, Sept. 22, at 1 p.m. the Seaside Public Library will be offering a jewelry class in our popular ladies day series. Due to material requirements you must register for this class, and

Seaside Library is located at 1131 Broadway. For more information call (503)7386742 or visit us at www. seasidelibrary.org and www. facebook.com/seasidepubliclibrary.

feel disgusted,” she said. Morgan said the committee’s draft plan was a “fine effort.” “We appreciate your work,” he said.

This Week at Seaside American Legion Post 99 WED. AUGUST 29TH BINGO AT 6:30PM ★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

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By Anthony Rimel


Seaside, Oregon n Seaside Signal n August 30, 2012 n 3

Back to the classroom means back-to-school shopping By Kelsey Nuttall

knuttal@countrymedia.net

SEASIDE – With just a few days left before the start of the new school year, back to school shopping is at its peak with many kids looking forward to the new fashion trends. “We’ve been selling a lot of sweatshirts,” said Jaclynn Bandy, the assistant manager for Zumiez at the Seaside Factory Outlet Center. “It’s been two sweatshirts per person.” At the Nike Store at the Factory Outlet Center, manager Mike Curk said, “For us, the most poplar thing are gender fleeces.” With cooler weather quickly approaching, the back-to-school shopping has sparked a need for boots, and a lot of them. “We’ve gotten a lot of boots in,” said Grant Hampton, manager of Famous Footwear. “Mainly riding boots and cowgirl boots.” Alyssa Bowley, assistant manager of Maurices, a Warrenton clothing store that caters to younger shoppers agreed that boots are hot this season. “There are a lot of boots being sold. Ankle boots are big,” she said.

Hot Sellers for Back-to-School • Neon Backpacks • Gender Fleeces • Sweatshirts • Neon socks • Shoes, boots At Ter Hars Clothing stores in Cannon Beach and Seaside shoes are one of the popular back-to-school items selected by shoppers. Not only are boots, shoes and clothing flying off the racks, but accessories are the talk of the town, especially the essential: backpacks. “Backpacks are huge,” said Vanessa Underhill, manager of the Seaside Ter Har’s. “Honestly, we too are selling a lot of backpacks,” said Bandy. And the hottest color? “We are selling a lot of highlighter colors,” said Bowley. “Lots of Neon colored backpacks.” “Neon socks are by far the most popular accessory,” said Hampton. “Bright

“Neon socks are by far the most popular accessory.” Grant Hampton, Famous Footwear store manager, Seaside Factory Outlet Mall

colored neon socks.” While the economy may be in a state of shock, most business operators said they are seeing the same, if not more, sales this summer. “I would think shoppers are spending more now,” said Curk.

Jeff Ter Har, of Ter Har’s Clothing store in Seaside and Cannon Beach, stacks shoes that are a popular back-to-school purchase for shoppers this summer. SIGNAL PHOTO / JEREMY C. RUARK

Bard Memorial Golf Tournament Sept. 30

Little entrepreneurs Nevaeh Nathison, 8, and her brother, Kody, 7, set up a lemonade and cookie stand along the side of the roadway at U.S. Highway 101 and 5th Street in Seaside. They were selling the lemonade for $1 a glass and the cookies cost four for $1. Over the past several days the two have collected about $30. Nevaeh plans to donate half of what they earn to children’s cancer research. SIGNAL PHOTO / JEREMY C. RUARK

Elk enjoys the view LINCOLN CITY - You never know just who, or what, you might see along the Oregon Coast. Cathleen Shea caught this young buck on camera as he stopped to admire the sweeping ocean vista from the Taft Pioneer Cemetery on Wednesday, Aug. 15. Send us your Oregon Coast moments in photos and videos and we’ll share them with our readers and web viewers. Email them to jruark@countrymedia.net.

SEASIDE – A memorial golf tournament has been established for former Seaside Fire and Rescue member Glenn Bard who served as a lieutenant and the department’s chaplain. Bard passed away in May of this year. He was 79. The first annual Bard Memorial Golf Tournament is set for Sept. 30 at the Seaside Golf Course. “Glenn is Seaside Fire,” said Joey Daniels, Seaside Fire and Rescue Department chief. “He is near and dear to everybody’s heart. He always kept us in line, so our goal is to give something back to Glenn and keep his name going.” According to Daniels, the memorial tournament will attempt to establish scholarships to help local students pursue a degree in Emergency Medical Services, Fire Science, or Public Safety. “Glenn is the epitome of the man I would like to become just because of his community service. He always put others in front of himself,” said Rich Nofield, the tournament coordinator for the Seaside Fire Volunteers Association. “The scholarships will be in memory of Glenn for the public service that he performed. That is what he was all about. This is to honor Glenn for what he did for pubic service in Seaside.”

SIGNAL PHOTO / JEREMY C. RUARK

Seaside Fire Chief Dale Kamrath (left) awarded Glenn Bard with a plaque in June 2011 to honor Bard’s 50 years of service as a volunteer firefighter.

The tournament will be a four-person shotgun scramble format with a limited number of teams. The cost of the tournament is $200 for a foursome not including cart. Team members will receive a Glenn Bard Memorial sleeve of golf balls and a towel. Trophies and prizes will be provided for the longest drive and closest to the pin. Registration forms need to be returned by Sept. 7. The Seaside Volunteer Fire Association is also seeking sponsors for the tournament. For more details, contact Seaside Fire and Rescue Department at (503) 7385420 or email Rich Nofield at rnofield@q.com.

Waud’s Funeral Home (503) 842-7557 Simple Cremation $ 895.00 Affordable Burials, Cemetery Headstones Veteran Benefit Specialist, Family Owned and Operated. On-site Crematory, Body Donation Programs Available. Able to make all arrangements online. waudsfuneralhome.com H20872

PLACE YOUR GARAGE SALE AD IN THE SEASIDE SIGNAL AND GET YOUR AD

ONLINE FOR FREE! $10 SUMMER SPECIAL We Have Garage Sale Signs for $1 Call the Signal at (503) 738-5561 or stop by 1555 N. Roosevelt Drive in Seaside

S01698


4 n August 30, 2012 n Seaside Signal n Seaside, Oregon

Viewpoints I just hope that I’m away from the screen when that Kit Kat thing comes on

• Someone ruined my quip allow man to survive. Though in last week’s paper. The punch it’s hard to contemplate at line should have been “they times, it’s the natural order of always use the butting green.” things and we should thank Darn! I have a special appreGod for his providence. C’est ciation for puns. la vie. • I suppose commercials • On Saturday, I attended a on TV, besides paying for the memorial picnic at the Legion programs, give a person his Club, hosted by Ruthie Marsh chance to move in memory of her around, make a brother, Ben Dooley. phone call or do Ben died a couple of some other chore. months ago. Even I just hope that though they had a I’m away from small tent against a the screen when short sprinkle of rain, that Kit Kat thing the rather large group comes on. Egad! I went inside for food want to scream. and fellowship. I met • Was it Snoopy many new people, who did the “Summostly girls but the mertime” Dance? only name that sticks It’s so wonderful is Michelle. to have a few days • When I went CLAIRE LOVELL of it, at long last. I by the Chamber on may even get some Roosevelt, a carwash sunburn. was in progress and • Many people have trouble I intended to return to it going with clutter. There are also home since I live on a dusty quite a number of solutions street and can’t wash my car offered to solve the problem. I worth a darn anymore. The rain heard one on the radio which mixed with the dirt made quite sounds like a sensible start that a picture. It was about 2:30 anyone can do. This person when I got there, and doggone suggested that we set our timer it, the crew had already gone for 15 minutes and work like home. What a hard days work! the dickens through that pe• Sunday was the annual riod. You can do it once or five Legion Picnic in the parktimes, but in four 15 minute ing lot on East Broadway. I periods, you’ve worked an stopped by for a short time hour. Challenge yourself every and had some salad for lunch. day to do at least one session It was not as well attended or whatever. Little by little, the as some but there is such a junk will disappear and you’ll thing as attrition. The World feel better about everything. War II generation after all has Especially about yourself. many 90 year olds, though the • I saw the best looking logs ‘many’ is relative. There are trucking down the highway still a few faces from the old last Friday. Two loads of the days. straightest, biggest trees I’ve • Quip: Were you supposing seen in awhile. I’m sure they that very old clove hitch was were older than fifty years still in fine working condition? because of their size, which Frayed knot! makes a person feel kind of sorry. But I also believe that Claire Lovell lives in oil, coal, natural gas, trees, fish Seaside and can be reached at and animals were put here to (503) 738-7215.

SCENE AND HEARD

A new school year for the Seaside School District Seaside School District is ready grade and new high school students. for a great, new school year. Our All returning middle school and high school students will begin number one commitment is to the children of today their first day of school on and the adults that they will Wednesday, Sept. 5. Our become in the future. Kindergarten Multiphasic Our teachers work toClinic will also be held on Wednesday, Sept. 5 at the gether to provide extensive academic programs and Seaside Convention Center practical experiences that and their first day of school prepare our students for a is Thursday, Sept. 6. rapidly changing world. As Our Open House schedour society becomes more ules are as follows: complex, we can best pre• Cannon Beach Elemenpare our students through tary School – Aug. 29 at cultivating their love of 6:30 p.m. – Principal Nicki learning, developing their Thomas Douglas Dougherty skills in finding and using • Gearhart Elementary relevant information, and School – Aug. 29 at 6:30 facilitating critical and flexible p.m. – Principal Sande Brown thinking. • Seaside Heights Elementary School – Sept. 12 at 6 p.m. – PrinciSchool begins on Tuesday, Sept. 4 for all elementary students in pal Dan Gaffney grades 1-5, all 6th grade and new • Broadway Middle School – Aug. middle school students, and 9th 28 at 6 p.m. – Principal Doug Pease

GUEST COLUMN

• Seaside High School – Sept. 4 at 7 p.m. – Principal Sheila Roley Our bus schedules are maintained by Transportation Director Anna Borges (503) 738-7150 and they can be found online http://www. seaside.k12.or.us/transportation. Our athletic and activity schedules are maintained by Athletic Director Jason Boyd (503) 738-5586 and they can be found online at http://www. cowapaleague.org. We invite you to make a difference in a child’s life. Please consider joining our large group of parents and community members, providing valued support in classrooms or mentoring a student. Everyone benefits through these types of partnerships. Douglas C. Dougherty, Ph.D., is the Superintendent of Schools for the Seaside School District. He can be reached at (503) 738-5591.

Signal in Scotland

Popa joins Providence Medical Group-Seaside SEASIDE - Cosmina Popa, M.D., a family practice physician, has joined the staff of Providence Medical GroupSeaside and is accepting new patients. Dr. Popa’s medical specialty is geriatrics, a muchneeded area of expertise for the communities here on the North Coast. “I’m excited to move to the beautiful Oregon coast and I look forward to caring for my new patients and getting involved in the community,” said Dr. Popa. Dr. Popa earned her medical degree at the University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Iuliu Hatieganu”, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. She completed her family medicine residency at Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown, Penn. followed by a geriatric fellowship at the same hospital. A gifted multilinguist, Dr. Popa speaks four languages: English, Spanish,

PHOTO / COURTESY

SCOTLAND – “My family is a long-time reader of the ‘Seaside Signal’ even though we live 200 miles away in Renton/Issaquah Washington. My mom, JoAnne Brown, is your subscriber. We consider Seaside our other hometown. A few weeks ago I made my first trip to Britain; to the Midlands and the Lake District of England and then on to Scotland. I thought you’d enjoy my picture that brings Seaside to Scotland. I’m located next to the statue of the famous ‘Greyfriar’s Bobby’ in Edinburgh: the little dog that faithfully guarded his master’s grave for 14 years in the 1800s,” said Catherine Brown. PHOTO COURTESY

Cosmina Popa

Romanian and French. When not practicing medicine, Dr. Popa enjoys painting, designing clothing, skiing, swimming and dancing. Providence Medical GroupSeaside is located on the campus of Providence Seaside Hospital, 725 S. Wahanna Road, Seaside. To contact the clinic, call (503) 717-7556.

USPS 487-560 Published weekly by Country Media, Inc. at 1555 N. Roosevelts, Seaside, OR 97138; Telephone: (503) 738-5561; email: jruark@countrymedia.net STAFF Director of News: Samantha Swindler Publisher/Editor: Jeremy C. Ruark Reporters: Felicia Struve, Anthony Rimel Intern: Kelsey Nuttall Graphic Designers: Stephania Baumgart, Mitzie Johnson, Rita Reed Director of Sales: Don Patterson Production Manager: Susan Pengelly Sales Associates: Maddy Speer and Lauri Moore Sports Photographer: Jeff Ter Har LETTER TO THE EDITOR POLICY The Seaside Signal welcomes letters to the editor. The deadline to submit letters is noon Monday prior to publication. Letters must be 350 words or less. All letters must be signed by the author and include a telephone number for verification. We also respectfully request that submissions be limited to one letter to the editor per month. Send letters to P.O. Box 848, Seaside, OR 97138, drop them off at 1555 N. Roosevelt Dr. or fax to (503) 738-9285. Letters may also be emailed to jruark@countrymedia.net.

Circulation Manager: Lora Ressler Contributing Writers: Claire Lovell, Jon Rahl, Teresa Brown, Darren Gooch, Reita Fackerell, Dr. Phyllis Ritchie DEADLINES Editorial: Monday by 10 a.m. Advertising: Friday by 5 p.m.. Advertising (Camera Ready): Monday by 10 a.m. Classifieds: Monday by Noon Legals: Friday by 5 p.m. SUBSCRIPTIONS Annually: $26 in county; $38 out of county. Six-month Subscriptions: $16 in county; $22 out of county.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Seaside Signal, P.O. Box 848, Seaside, OR. 97138-0848. Periodicals Postage paid at Seaside, OR 97138 and at additional mailing offices. © Copyright 2012 by the Seaside Signal. No portion of this newspaper may be reproduced without written permission. All rights reserved. The Seaside Signal is printed on recycled newsprint.

Broadway’s assistant principal to also lead Cannon Beach Elementary By Anthony Rimel

arimel@countrymedia.net

SEASIDE – Nicki Thomas is adding a new assignment to her list of education administration duties. Thomas, the assistant principal at Seaside’s Broadway Middle School for the past three years, will become the new principal at Cannon Beach Elementary School when the new school year begins Sept. 4. “I’m very honored and excited to become a part of the community,” said Thomas. Thomas will continue to spend much of her time at Broadway Middle School and she will devote a couple of mornings each week to the administrative duties at Cannon Beach Elementary. She believes her primary goal as principal will be to take care of the administrative challenges, so that the teachers can focus on teaching. “I want to take care of things that take teachers away from teaching,” she said. Thomas said the staff of the school is “very talented.” “They could probably run the school by themselves,” she said. Thomas is in her tenth year of working in public education, the last three of which have been at Broadway Middle School. However, Thomas said that she

“I want to take care of things that take teachers away from teaching.” Nicki Thomas, Cannon Beach Elementary School’s new principal

has worked with elementary aged children in the past. Thomas currently has a master’s degree in school counseling from Lewis and Clark College and is working on her dissertation for a PhD from George Fox University. Thomas praised Cannon Beach Elementary, saying that its small size helps create a sense of family. “The fact that it is small makes it a great place,” she said. Thomas doesn’t want parents to hesitate to come to her with problems or concerns. “I am a very big supporter of small community schools,” she said. Thomas expressed support for local efforts to move the school to a location out of the tsunami inundation zone within the city. She said that student safety is her primary concern, and that she would support moving students to the proposed super campus in Seaside if

a location within the city for the school isn’t realized before the completion of that project. Former Cannon Beach Elementary principal Doug Dougherty will shift his priorities to his duties as Seaside School District Superintendent spending more time on relocating the five District schools to a new campus out of the tsunami inundation zone and with state issues dealing with education. “We often move administrative responsibilities around, depending on the needs of the district,” he said. The Seaside School District is also welcoming new staff and teachers:

BEN CHAMBERS

• Half-Time Language Arts Teacher at Seaside High School • B.A. in German Language from Denison University • M.Ed. in Counseling from Our Lady of the Lake University • Language Arts Teacher at Alamo Heights High School in San Antonio, Texas from 2008 to 2010 • Talent Search Guidance Coordinator at Clatsop Community College in Astoria, Oregon from 2010 to Present

EMILY DOWNES

• Primary Teacher

at Gearhart Elementary School • B.S. in Education from University of Oregon • B.A in Spanish from University of Oregon • M.Ed. from University of Oregon in progress • Third Grade Student Teacher at Laurel Elementary School in Junction City, Oregon from April 2012 to present

JESSICA SMITH

• Head Cook for Seaside School District • Assistant Food Service Manager for WarrentonHammond School District from 2010 to Present • Self-employed child care director from 19812009

SUSAN WILDERMAN

• Language Arts Teacher at Seaside High School • B.A. in English from Linfield College • M.A. in Teaching from Willamette University • English Teacher at Douglas McKay High School in Salem, Oregon from 2007 to Present

MITZI YORK

• Assistant Custodian for Seaside High School • Custodian at Seaside Library from 2008 to Present • Self-employed house cleaner for 17 years


Seaside, Oregon n Seaside Signal n August 30, 2012 n 5

Clatsop County sees rise in percentage of college graduates By Bill Bishop and Robert Gallardo ASTORIA - Clatsop County has experienced a brain gain in the last 40 years, joining the rest of the country in what has been a massive increase in the number of adults who have earned college degrees. In 1970, 8.8 percent of those over 25 years of age had college degrees in Clatsop County. By 2010, 21.6 percent of adults here had completed college. The percentage of adults with college degrees in Clatsop County was less than the national average of 27.9 percent in 2010. The collegeeducated rate here was less than the Oregon average of 28.6 percent. The number of adults in the United States with college degrees has nearly tripled since 1970, when only 10.7 percent of adults had graduated from college. But the percentage of adults with degrees in counties with small cities, such as Clatsop County, while increasing, has generally fallen behind the proportion of college-educated residents in urban counties. The loss of young, welleducated residents has posed a long-standing difficulty for rural communities. “One of the problems that rural areas face is that in order to get a college education, young people often have to leave,” says Judith Stallmann, an economist at the University of Missouri. “Once you leave, that introduces you to other opportunities that you might not have seen had you not left.” The good news for rural America is that it has caught up in every other measure of education. In 1970, 7.8 percent of adults in rural counties had some education after high school, but less than a college degree. By 2010, 27.4 percent of rural adults had attained some post high school educa-

7 DAY

CALENDAR

­­Deadline for Community Calendar is 5 p.m. Friday. Items can be emailed to jruark@country media.net, faxed to (503) 7389285 or mailed to P.O. Box 848, Seaside, OR 97138.

THURSDAY | AUG 30

ROTARY CLUB OF SEASIDE: Noon at Shilo Inn Oceanfront Hotel at 30 N. Prom.

“It’s a big deal in a lot of rural counties because you don’t see a lot of jobs that require a college education. Young people graduating from high school don’t see many jobs that demand a college diploma, so they don’t think about coming home once they leave for the university.” Judith Stallmann, University of Missouri economist

But the problem of keeping college graduates in rural America is a national issue and one that is also enduring. Missouri economist Stallmann said this is a reflection of the kinds of jobs that are generally available in rural communities. If there are fewer jobs demanding college degrees in a community, there are likely to be fewer college graduates. “It’s a big deal in a lot of rural counties because you don’t see a lot of jobs that require a college education,” Stallmann said. Young people graduating from high school don’t see many jobs that demand a college diploma, so they don’t think about coming home once they leave for the university. There can be a “selfreinforcing cycle” in rural communities, Stallmann said — young people leave to gain higher education, they don’t come back after college because there aren’t jobs that demand such education, and their absence diminishes the chances that more of these kinds of jobs will be created. Nationally, rural counties and counties with small cities have caught up with urban counties in the percentage of adults who have some post high school education. Stallmann sees this as a sign that “there are perhaps more jobs in rural areas that require post secondary education but not college.” Both Stallmann and Par-

tridge said the data on college education rates told them that rural communities should consider the kind of jobs being created locally. “Rural communities may need to think about the types of jobs” being created, Stallmann said. “There are some communities that are doing things like getting local businesses to put an emphasis on hiring local kids who got a college education.” “It really suggests that rural communities that aren’t thinking about making themselves attractive to educated people are really going to suffer,” Partridge said. Bill Bishop is co-editor of the Daily Yonder (www. dailyyonder.com), an online news publication covering rural America that is published by the Center for Rural Strategies. The Center for Rural Strategies (www.ruralstrategies.org) is a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization whose mission is to promote healthy civic discourse about rural issues. Roberto Gallardo is an assistant extension professor at the Southern Rural Development Center at Mississippi State University, (srdc.msstate. edu).

LABOR DAY HOLIDAY: Most city, county, state and federal offices closed. NOCHLERS PINOCHLE: 1:30 - 4 p.m. at the Bob Chisholm Community Center at 1225 Ave. A. (503) 738-7393. ALCOHOL ANONYMOUS MEETING: Beginners meeting 5:30 p.m. 715 3rd St. Seaside. (503) 738-5511. TEXAS HOLD ‘EM: 7 p.m. at American Legion Post 99. 1315 Broadway in Seaside.

Community Center, 1225 Ave. A. (503) 738-5511. RED CROSS BLOOD DRIVE: 1 p.m. - 6 p.m. Seaside Elks Lodge at 324 Ave. A. (503) 738-6583 SEASIDE LIBRARY BOARD: 4:30 p.m. at the Seaside Public Library, 1131 Broadway, (503) 738-6742. SEASIDE PLANNING COMMISSION: 7 p.m. at Seaside City Hall, 989 Broadway. (503) 738-7100. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS: 11:30 a.m. The Lodge at 12th and Holladay 6 p.m. at 715 Third Ave. Help-Line (503) 717-3702.

TUESDAY | SEPT. 4

MISC. MEETINGS:

each month at 5:15 p.m. at the Bob Chisholm Community Center, 1225 Avenue A. Seaside. (503) 738-3311. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: Meets monthly on the third Tuesday from 1:30-3 p.m. at the NW Senior and Disability Services at 2002 SE Chokeberry Ave. Warrenton. (503) 738-6412. SEASIDE LIONS: Second Monday each ­­­­month. (503) 738-7693. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT GROUP meets 4 p.m.-6:30 p.m. the third Sunday of each month at the Seaside Library. (503) 7917559. SENIOR LUNCH: Mon-Fri 11:45 a.m. at the Seaside Senior Center at 1225 Ave. A. (503) 738-7393

tion without earning a college diploma. That level of education was close to the national average of 28.1 percent. In Clatsop County, 11.7 percent of adults had some college in 1970, rising to 40.4 percent in 2010. The Oregon average in 2010 was 34.3 percent. Clatsop County had 16,755 adults (those over 25 years of age) in 1970 and 25,647 adults in 2010. Overall, Stallmann says, the trends show that “rural

people have responded to the demand for increased job skills by the increasing their post secondary education.” Only 8.9 percent of the adult population in Clatsop County had failed to graduate from high school in 2010. Nationally 15 percent of adults had not completed high school; in Oregon, the rate was 11.4 percent. Mark Partridge, a rural economist at Ohio State University, says that regional dif-

ferences in college graduation rates have increased in recent years. Partridge said his studies have found that rural counties and counties with small cities in the South and West didn’t fare as well as those in the Midwest and Northeast in attracting college graduates. Even though the Sunbelt has seen tremendous growth over the past few decades, the South’s rural counties haven’t kept up in terms of attracting adults with college degrees.

SEASIDE KIWANIS: Noon at Westlake Chinese Restaurant at 1480 S. Roosevelt Dr. Seaside. ALCOHOL ANONYMOUS MEETING: 5:30 p.m. 715 3rd St., Seaside. AMERICAN LEGION POST 99: Free Jukebox 6-8 p.m. at Seaside American Legion Post 99 at 1315 Broadway.

ics Anonymous Help-Line (503) 717-3702.

Lady of Victory Catholic Church at 120 Oceanway in Seaside. (503) 738-6161.

FRIDAY | AUG. 31

SEASIDE CHAMBER: 8:30 a.m. Twisted Fish, 311 Broadway, (503) 738-6391. SEASIDE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 1-5 p.m., Bob Chisholm Community Center 1225 Ave. A. (503) 738-7817. ­­­­­­AMERICAN LEGION POST 99: Karaoke 9 p.m., Seaside American Legion Post 99, 1315 Broadway. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS: 6 p.m., 715 Third Ave., Narcot-

SATURDAY | SEPT. 1

DUPLICATE BRIDGE: 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Bob Chisholm Community Center, 1225 Avenue A, Seaside, (503) 7387817 LIBRARY EVENTS: Story Time and Puppets at 11 a.m. Seaside Library at 1131 Broadway. (503) 738-6742. BINGO: 5 p.m., Our Lady of Victory Catholic Church Parish Hall at First Avenue and Columbia Street in Seaside.

SUNDAY | SEPT. 2

BREAKFAST: 9-11:30 a.m. American Legion Post 99 at 1315 Broadway, Seaside. Line Dancing 5:30-8 p.m. FREE SUPPERS: 3 p.m. Our

MONDAY | SEPT. 3

SEASIDE COMMUNITY /SENIOR COMMISSION MEETING: 10 a.m. at the Bob Chisholm

SUNSET EMPIRE PARKS & RECREATION DISTRICT MEETING: The third Wednesday of

For the raw information included in this story and charts, graphs and a map, visit this site: http://www. dailyyonder.com/educationand-rural-america-datapage/2012/07/06/4165

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6 ■ August 23, 2012 ■ Seaside Signal ■ Seaside, Oregon To Place A Classified Ad: Call 503-738-5561; stop by our office at | 1555 N. Roosevelt, Mon-Fri. 8am-5pm; or log onto www.seasidesignal.com. Deadline for ads is Friday at 5 p.m. for Thursday’s paper. 999

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We have a couple of openings for energetic people with an interest in selling advertising for our community newspapers and websites ... while enjoying all that a coastal lifestyle has to offer! We’re Country Media, the fastestgrowing information and marketing company on the Oregon coast. Our offices are in Lincoln City, Tillamook, Manzanita, Cannon Beach, Seaside, Astoria and St. Helens. Does living in one of those towns strike your fancy? If so, test the waters by emailing Director of Sales Don Patterson at mailto:dpatterson@cou ntrymedia.net . We’d like to hear from you.

SS12-114 TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by STEVEN R BANGHART, AND BECKY J BANGHART, as grantor(s), to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 08/15/2005, recorded 08/19/2005, in the mortgage records of Clatsop County, Oregon, as Recorder’s fee/file/instrument/micro film/reception Number 200509992, and subsequently assigned to THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDER S OF THE CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-11 by Assignment recorded 04/26/2012 in Book/Reel/Volume No. at Page No. as recorder’s fee/file/instrument/micro film/reception No. 201203414, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 15, BLOCK 1, OLNEYS MOBILE HOMES, IN THE CITYOF WARRENTON, COUNTY OF CLATSOP, STATE OF OREGON. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 296 TYEE STREET HAMMOND, OR 97121-9704 Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations that the Trust Deed secures and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor’s failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $949.33 beginning 03/01/2012; plus late charges of $42.49 each month the beginning with 03/01/2012 payment plus prior accrued late charges of $-212.45; plus advances of $45.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee’s fees and attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. By reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures are immediately due and payable, said sums being the following to wit: $110,424.25 with interest thereon at the rate of 7.70 percent per annum beginning 02/01/2012 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon together with title expense, costs, trustee’s fees and

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HOME RENTAL Gearhart BRAND NEW Home 3 bd, 2.5 ba, 2028 sq. ft. w/detached garage/shop. 704 10th - Steps to beach/downtown/golf.

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999

Public Notices

attorney fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the Beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interests therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., the undersigned Trustee will on Monday, November 05, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Clatsop County Courthouse, 749 Commercial, Astoria, Clatsop County, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of Deed, the Trust together with any interest which the grantor or grantor’s successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by paying the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of notice of default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and actually expenses incurred in enforcing the obligation that the Trust Deed secures, together with the Trustee’s and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation that the Trust Deed secures, and the words “Trustee” and “Beneficiary” include their respective

999

Public Notices

successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 27, 2012 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. For further information, please contact: RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 (800)-281-8219 (TS# 12-0056533) 1006.162573-FEI SS12-113 TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE File No. 7037.91197 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Gloria D. Everson, A Single Woman, as grantor, to Ticor Title ins. Co., as trustee, in favor of JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as beneficiary, dated 10/27/06, recorded 10/30/06, in the mortgage records of Clatsop County, Oregon, as 200612205 and subsequently assigned to by Assignment recorded as , covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Beginning at the Southwest corner of the Northwest quarter of the Southwest quarter of Section 24, Township 8 North, Range 8 West, Willamette Meridian, County of Clatsop, State of Oregon; thence 350 feet North to the point of beginning; thence North 212 feet, more or less, to the Southerly line of Highway No. 30; thence in a Southeasterly direction along said South line of said Highway No. 30, 277 feet to a point; thence South 50 feet; thence Southwest 252 feet to the point of beginning PROPERTY ADDRESS: 92479 Conroy Road Astoria, OR 97103 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor’s failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $908.02 beginning 08/01/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month 08/16/11; beginning plus prior accrued late charges of $114.00; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee’s fees and attorney’s fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above

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999

described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $119,901.12 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5 percent per annum beginning 07/01/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 08/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $114.00; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee’s fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on November 13, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o’clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Clatsop County Courthouse, 749 Commercial, in the City of Astoria, County of

Public Notices

Clatsop, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor’s successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee’s “Urgent Request Desk” either by personal delivery to the trustee’s physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee’s post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts federal law, with persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender’s estimated or actual bid.

999

Public Notices

Lender bid information is also available at the trustee’s website, www.northwesttrustee.c om. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee’s and attorney’s fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee’s sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan

999

Public Notices

documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words “trustee” and “beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.c om and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.c om and www.USAForeclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Heather L. Smith Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Everson, Gloria D. (TS# 7037.91197) 1002.222219-File No SS12-112 TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust by Judith E. Pachal, as Trustee of the Pachal Living Trust dated July 3, 2007, an Oregon Trust, as grantor, to UPF Services, LLC, as the trustee, and Riverview Community Bank as the

SEE ANSWERS IN THE CLASSIFIEDS

NEHALEM VALLEY CARE CENTER 280 ROWE ST, WHEELER, OR (503) 368-5171

CNA CLASS SCHOLARSHIPS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS Class scheduled to begin on 9/17/12. DEADLINE SEPTEMBER 7, 2012 If interested please send resume to: jmiller@nehalemtel.net

H34214

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

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for this week’s puzzle 1908 Second Street, Tillamook, OR 97141

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999

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beneficiary dated December 20, 2007, recorded on December 26, 2007, under Recording No. 200712944 (hereinafter the \’93Deed of Trust\’94). The undersigned was appointed Successor Trustee per document recorded April 25, 2012 under Recording No. 2012-03352. The Deed of Trust covers the following described real property situated in that county and state, to-wit: Tract B, RIVERWOOD PARK; and Lots 4, 5, 10 and 11, Block 18, CARTWRIGHT PARK, in the City of Seaside, County of Clatsop, State of Oregon. TOGETHER WITH that certain tract of land, if any, inquiring to said Lots by virtue of that certain Vacation Ordinance by the City of Seaside, Ordinance No. 60-43, recorded August 30, 1960 in Book 256, page 467, Clatsop County Records. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor’s failure to pay when due the following sums: February through April 2012: $ 9,929.58 Late Fees $ 827.45 Legal Fees $ 1,500.00 Title Report $ 1,310.00 Foreclosure fees and costs $ 50.00 $13,617.03 By reason of the default just described, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, those sums being the following, to-wit: Principal balance: $475,929.33 Interest $ 23,768.47 Late Fees $ 827.45 Legal Fees $ 1,500.00 Title Report $ 1,310.00 Foreclosure fees and costs $ 50.00 $503,385.25 WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will on September 28, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 o’clock, a.m., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, Clatsop County Courthouse, 749 Commercial Street, Astoria, Oregon, front entrance, in Astoria, County of Clatsop, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the real property described above which the grantor

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Public Notices

had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed together with any interest which grantor or grantor’s successor’s in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of the sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein or the Notice of Default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying those sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee and attorney fees not exceeding the amount provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular included the plural, the word \’93grantor\’94 includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other owing an person obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed, and the words \’93trustee\’94 and beneficiary include their respective successors in interest, if any. DATED: May ____, 2012. Mark F. Stoker, Successor Trustee OSB #84356 State of Washington )) ss. County of Clark ) I, the undersigned, certify that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original trustee’s notice of sale. Mark F. Stoker, OSB #84356 211 E. McLoughlin Blvd., Suite 100 Vancouver, WA 98663 NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for August 17, 2012. The date of this sale may be postponed. Unless the

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Public Notices

lender that is foreclosing on this property is paid before the sale date, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. After the sale, the new owner is required to provide you with contact information and notice that the sale took place. The following information applies to you only if you are a bona fide tenant occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a bona fide residential tenant. If the foreclosure sale goes through, the new owner will have the right to require you to move out. Before the new owner can require you to move, the new owner must provide you with written notice that specifies the date by which you must move out. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the new owner can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FROM EVICTION YOU ARE A BONA FIDE TENANT OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING, YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO CONTINUE LIVING IN THIS PROPERTY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE FOR: THE REMAINDER OF YOUR FIXED TERM LEASE, IF YOU HAVE A FIXED TERM LEASE; OR AT LEAST 90 DAYS FROM THE DATE YOU ARE GIVEN A WRITTEN TERMINATION NOTICE. If the new owner wants to move in and use this property as a primary residence, the new

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owner can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even though you have a fixed term lease with more than 90 days left. You must be provided with at least 90 days’ written notice after the foreclosure sale before you can be required to move. A bona fide tenant is a residential tenant who is not the borrower (property owner) or a child, spouse or parent of the borrower, and whose rental agreement: Is the result of an arm’slength transaction; Requires the payment of rent that is not substantially less than fair market rent for the property, unless the rent is reduced or subsidized due to a federal, state or local subsidy; and Was entered into prior to the date of the foreclosure sale. YOUR TENANCY BETWEEN NOW AND THE FORECLOSURE SALE: RENT YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT PURSUANT TO LENDER’S THE INSTRUCTIONS UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD OR UNTIL A COURT TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE. SECURITY DEPOSIT You may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord as provided in ORS 90.367. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or

Public Notices

individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE: The new owner that buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out after 90 days or at the end of your fixed term lease. After the sale, you should receive a written notice informing you that the sale took place and giving you the new owner’s name and contact information. You should contact the new owner if you would like to stay. If the new

Seaside, Oregon ■ Seaside Signal ■ August 23, 2012 ■ 999 999 999 Public Notices

owner accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the new owner becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise: You do not owe rent; The new owner is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf; and You must move out by the date the new owner specifies in a notice to you. The new owner may offer to pay your moving expenses and any other costs or amounts you and the new owner agree on in exchange for your agreement to

Public Notices

leave the premises in less than 90 days or before your fixed term lease expires. You should speak with a lawyer to fully understand your rights before making any decisions regarding your tenancy. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR DWELLING UNIT WITHOUT FIRST GIVING YOU WRITTEN NOTICE AND GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU SHOULD CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar at 1800-452-7636 and ask for the lawyer referral

Public Notices

service. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. LASO Hillsboro Office, 1-888-245-4091.

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8 n August 30, 2012 n Seaside Signal n Seaside, Oregon

n Backpacks From page 1 and the Lunch Buddy Mentoring Program purchases an additional 360 backpacks to provide backpacks to kindergarten through third grade students in Clatsop County. In addition, school supplies such as pencils, crayons, glue, glue sticks, erasers, and folders are purchased to fill the backpacks. “After I totaled up my list, we are about 100 backpacks short of what we need,” said Carna Kupples, executive director of the Lunch Buddy Mentoring Program. “That means the backpacks will not be available to 100 kids and we can only supply kindergarten through second grade students with the backpacks.” Kupples predicted that next year’s backpack project could be even leaner. “With the economy and how things are going with our budget unless we get another grant or something, it will look really different next year,” she said. The cost of this year’s backpack project came to $3,300. “Our cost for the backpacks remains the same each year, but when we went to shop for the school supplies, we were amazed to see how much more they cost compared to last year,” Kupples said. Funding for the project comes from a variety of

n Pool From page 1 and sanitizes and helps the chlorine process.” After reviewing encouraging research about the ultra-violate light system used at pools around the country, SEPRD officials decided it was what was needed for the Sunset Pool. “We believe it will improve the patron experience because it is designed to reduce the chlorine odor, make it be easier on pool user’s eyes, and the water clarity should be

n Signs From page 1 policy presented by Seaside Planning Director Kevin Kupples at the Monday council meeting. “The feather and bow flag signs started out as an enforcement issue,” he told the council. “This policy gives the city more control with what’s going on.” “This is not a new law, or a new ordinance,” said Seaside City Manager Mark Winstanley. “It is a new council policy.” Kupples has been working on the proposed policy over the past few months and has taken the issue to a series of public meetings. Currently, the City of Seaside sign ordinance does not permit private signs in the public right of way like sidewalks along city streets. But because some businesses are prohibited by their property leases from mounting wall signs or attaching other advertising to their building, a number of these business owners have requested authorization from the Seaside City Council that would permit the temporary installation of a feather or bow sign in the public sidewalk adjacent to their business. “The policy would allow the signs to be placed in the public right of way within the commercial core of Seaside,” said Kupples. “It allows the City to authorize businesses to put up the feather signs within the same flag pole holes that are on the public sidewalks when those holes are not being used for the American Flags.” The Seaside Chamber Ambassadors place the American Flags in front of participating businesses during holidays and other events. Under the policy the City will charge a $40 permit fee for the feather flags. Each business would be required to submit a site plan and a colored elevation drawing or photo that indicates the dimensions, graphic design, size and type of pole material proposed. Under the draft policy, the maximum height of the sign shall be 14 feet and the maximum width shall be three feet, but the Planning Director may allow increases of up to 20 percent over the maximum

sources including United Way of Clatsop County, business and community service group contributions and private citizen donations. Volunteers also sent out solicitation letters to the community and Kupples continues to write grant applications to try to raise additional money for the backpack and mentoring programs. “The backpacks are important because not every child has school supplies to use in class,” said Kupples. “These supplies we provide are the bare minimum. They will help get the kids started. Without the supplies, kids will come unprepared to class because they just don’t have the resources.” The program began about 15 years ago after Costo adopted Lewis and Clark Elementary School. When Kupples became the director of the project in 1999 it was expanded to include all of Clatsop County Schools. “This is a fun project that fills a serious need in Clatsop County,” Kupples said. “It’s nice to see all the backpacks hanging on the back of student’s chairs in their classroom and when people call and ask for help, you know that you are filling a need. So, if there is a need we will do everything we can to see that it is filled.” As Tongue Point Job Corps student Colby Dimaggro from Everett, Washington helped fill the backpacks with the school supplies he acknowledged it was a first-time much better,” said Dennis. The ultra-violet light will replace the Sunset Pool’s 15 year old ozone system. “The annual cost of maintaining that system was costing us over $1,000 to rebuild pumps and keep that thing going,” he said. “While it did do a good job sanitizing, it also began to turn the pool water green. When we shut it off the water color would go back to blue.” The new ultra-violet light system and installation will cost approximately $50,000. The second major project includes refitting the pool building’s heating, ventilation and cooling system (HVC). standards to accommodate unique design features that will not fit within the standard limitations. The policy states that the temporary flag signs will not be permitted in locations where the sign will adversely impact pedestrian movement, block traffic signs, or interfere with awnings. Establishing new holes for the signs would be at the discretion of the Seaside Public Works Department. The temporary signs cannot be put up during special events or holidays when the flag holes will be used for their original purpose. The issue surfaced earlier this year after several downtown businesses began displaying the flags as a new form of advertising, triggering a community debate over the safety of the flags and how the flags impacted the look of the downtown. Councilor Tita Montero sparked the debate over the legality of the feather signs in March after expressing concerns about their safety. At the Aug. 27 council meeting Montero said the new policy was very clear well organized. In the next 30 days, the city planning department will be sending letters to core area businesses explaining the new sign policy. Kupples said the policy only regulates the feather signs in the core area of Seaside. “The issue of the feather signs in other parts of the city is an issue the Planning Commission is currently reviewing,” he said. At the Aug. 27 meeting, the city council also: • Decided to interview the 11 applicants who have applied to be on the new Seaside Transportation Advisory Committee. The interviews will be conducted prior to the next council meeting. • Accepted a bid of $226,226 from Pacific Timber to complete phase two of improvements at the Seaside Airport. • Approved a resolution to accept a Federal grant of approximately $494,710 to fund improvements at the Seaside Airport. • Approved using $25,000 from the Seaside Capital Improvement and Maintenance Fund to make building improvements at the Seaside Visitors Information Center at

“It’s nice to see all the backpacks hanging on the back of student’s chairs in their classroom and when people call and ask for help, you know that you are filling a need.” Karna Kupples, Lunch Buddy Mentoring Program executive director

mentors to come into the grade and middle schools during the school year to provide a positive, caring relationship with an adult. Recruitment occurs throughout the school year. “Our numbers right now, stand at about 35 mentors,” Kupples said. “We need at

least 75 mentors to even come close the amount of kids we need to serve.” A mentor visits the school once a week during the lunch hour to meet with their designated child. The students are either self-referred or chosen by school personnel as someone who would benefit from

a mentoring relationship. The mentors go through a screening process which includes training and a criminal history check which is repeated approximately every two years. For questions regarding either the backpacking event or on how to become a mentor, contact Karna Cupples at (503) 739-6042 or by e-mailing lunchbuddies@msn.com. A Grilled Cheese and “Tow-Mater” soup dinner fundraiser is planned Sept. 8 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Seaside Convention Center for the mentoring program. The fundraiser is in conjunction with the annual Wheels and Waves car show in Seaside. The movie “Cars” will be playing in the adjoining room and a life-sized replica of the tow truck “Tow Mater” will be there.

great deal of heat loss with the system because of that breach,” said Dennis. “We are consistently losing between six and eight degrees.” Craig Kennedy, SEPRD head of operations, said the integrity of the ductwork around the HVC system had failed. “We are in the process of getting closed-cell form installation that will be wrapped with waterproof liners to act as a waterproofing for the system,” Kennedy said. He noted that the HVC system, installed two years ago, has proven to be environmentally-friendly, saving thousands of dollars annually. “Both of the boilers that we used to use to heat the pools were on constantly before we installed the HVC system,” Kennedy said. “I have to turn them on once a week to make sure they still run, but we now heat both pools and our domestic water supply

with the HVC system.” The HVC retrofitting will cost about $12,000. Another project includes replacing the women’s locker room heater that had been installed 11 years ago. Other annual maintenance includes painting, cleaning and chalking projects. The improvement projects will be paid from the SEPRD general fund that is supported through user fees. An architect will also take a close look at the building’s lobby. “We want to redesign the lobby to be a little more customer friendly,” Kennedy said. “We want the employees to be able to greet and see the public while they are also doing their work in the lobby.” Dennis is also hopeful the redesign will include more space. “We need more room for vending to provide the equipment the public needs while they are here,” he said. We

also need a point-of-sale area that’s computerized for registering people more efficiently. And we need more space for storage.” Kennedy and Dennis both agreed that Mark Blake, the former SEPRD general manager and Justin Cutler, the current GM, have allowed crews to address critical projects early on in a pro-active approach to maintaining the pools, surrounding systems, and the building. “We’ve also held back part of my budget for any unseen stuff which comes up all the time,” Kennedy said. “Everything has a life span,” said Dennis. “We pretty much plan on that in our budget so that we are able to maintain the great placed that we have to offer our patrons. It boils down to safety, efficiency and patron experience.” The Sunset Pool building was constructed in 1977.

SIGNAL PHOTO / JEREMY C. RUARK

Volunteers help fill backpacks with school supplies during the annual event at Warrenton Grade School. The backpacks will be distributed to students in Clatsop County schools. experience for him. “I think this is a great project,” he said. “When I was in school and I couldn’t afford school supplies, it would have been nice to have a program like this to have helped me out.” The Lunch Buddy Mentoring Program recruits adult

“It boils down to safety, efficiency and patron experience.” Genesee Dennis, SEPRD aquatics manager

Maintenance crews discovered that they HVC systems outer shell was being breached by the rain and coast weather conditions. “The normal installation in the system can soak up water and we are experiencing a Broadway and U.S. Highway 101. -Recognized Reita Fackerell with a standing ovation as she attended her last council session before retiring as Seaside Public Library Director.

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T O P L A C E YO U R A D H E R E , C A L L M A D DY AT 5 0 3 - 7 3 8 - 5 5 6 1


Seaside, Oregon n Seaside Signal n August 30, 2012 n 9

SHS track star Willyard being recruited by University of Oregon By Anthony Rimel

arimel@countrymedia.net

CANNON BEACH - The University of Oregon has a good track program, to say the least. In the 2012 Summer Olympics two former Ducks won gold medals, and another won a silver medal. The school has famously good athletic facilities, and its historic Hayward Field has hosted the track and field trials for the U.S. Olympics team in 1972, 1976, 1980, 2008 and 2012. The University’s reputation as a center for track and field has even helped earn Eugene the nickname “Tracktown U.S.A.” So it’s not every day when a coach from the university makes it to Cannon Beach on a recruiting trip. However, reigning 4A state champion in the 3000-meter and 1500 meter races Brett Willyard of Cannon Beach got such a visit from an assistant head coach from the university on August 22. Neil Branson, Willyard’s coach at Seaside in both track and cross country, put it simply: Oregon wants him. “When the U of O comes knocking it would be hard for a person to not give that a very sincere look,” said Branson. He said the Oregon track program and its Hayward Field have a “mystique.” The University of Oregon is not the only Division One track program to express interest in Willyard, who currently holds the Seaside High School records in the men’s 800 meter, 1500 meter, and 3000 meter races. Willyard, who starts his senior year

SIGNAL PHOTO / ANTHONY RIMEL

Brett Willyard wearing an Oregon shirt and shorts at a cross country workout this August with Seaside High School teammate Cirilo Harold. this fall, has even received a recruiting letter from Harvard University. However, he said he may not be “academically prepared” for Harvard. Willyard said the home visit with Andy Powell, an assistant head coach who works with distance and cross country runners at U of O, lasted a few hours. Powell also met with Branson to talk about Willyard.

“They were really high on him,” said Branson. Branson said in the meeting his role was to be an advocate for Willyard and to ask questions about how the school wants to use Willyard. “He [Willyard] is the real deal as far as being a runner,” said Branson. Branson adds that he thinks Willyard can be competitive as a runner in the Pac 12 Conference.

However, Branson said he tries not to give Willyard advice, and instead just ask him questions. “My constant message to him and his family will be that he should feel comfortable with where he’s going, and that he feels he’s gonna get treated well and be competitive.” Branson’s biggest concern for any student is that the program they choose treats

them as an individual, and that they are respected by their coaches. He said his impression from the Oregon coach is that they would respect Willyard. He also said that Willyard is intelligent enough to make a good decision, and that he and his family will make a smart decision. Willyard, who said he might like to study math or science in college, seems to be keeping a level head about the situation. “I’m not too surprised because I’ve been getting letters and stuff, so I’m sort of mentally prepared for there to be all this excitement,” he said of the visit. Willyard said he knew his parents were excited about the visit because of how much cleaning they did before the visit. “They’re both excited and seeing it as a big possibility,” he said. U of O is the first school to send a coach to visit Willyard. “There are a lot of positives to going to Oregon,” he said. Willyard plans to visit Oregon and a few other schools this fall, but he said he’s been “talking about Oregon a lot.” Although he hasn’t taken his official visit yet, he has done a track camp at U of O, and has competed at Hayward Field, so he said he’s already seen some of Oregon’s famous athletic facilities. He’s only been offered a partial scholarship by Oregon so far, but he said the school has told him they would increase his scholarship level each year if his

performance is good enough. “If I’m going to school for running I want to be at the best running school,” he said, and because of that he is leaning toward Oregon. Willyard said he talked with the Oregon coach about running and traveling with the team in his freshmen year. Willyard said there are three sports he may be running in, indoor track, outdoor track and cross country. The Powell told him he might run right away in one of the sports, and redshirt in the others to give him an extra year of eligibility. For Willyard, winning state in the 1500 meter and the 3000 meter last track season has been inspiring for this season in cross country because those are the events cross country runners compete in. He said he’d like to “work his way to state” in both cross country and track this year. Willyard said Seaside High School teammates help him a lot with training. He said fellow senior Cirilo Harold has been a good training partner for him. “We do really good workouts together,” he said. Willyard said Powell told him one of the advantages of going to University of Oregon is the track community there. “The whole community knows runners,” said Willyard. “One of the big things is if you’re an Oregon native who goes to University of Oregon, that’s something special where the fans enjoy it more and you seem to do better.”

Team Japan wins Hood-to-Coast running relay By Jeremy C. Ruark

jruark@countrymedia.net

SEASIDE - A team from Japan came to Seaside to compete for the first time in the annual OfficeMax Hood-toCoast Relay and took home the title. The relay that began at Timberline Lodge on Mt. Hood Friday, Aug. 24 and finished at the beach in Seaside Saturday, Aug. 25, drew about 17,500 participants. The Japanese team finished with the fastest time of 17 hours, 14 minutes, 24 seconds. The average pace for the team was 5 minutes 10 seconds. “The nighttime was the toughest part of the race for our team,” said Toshiyuki Sakai, the Toyo University team’s coach. But despite the challenges during the relay, he said the team came well prepared. “Our team prepared by training in the mountains and along the coastline of Japan,”

SEE THE JAPANESE TEAM CELEBRATING AS THEY CROSS THE FINISH LINE AT SEASIDESIGNAL.COM

he said. “We hope to return next year.” The next closest team was Bowerman AC from Nike with a time of 17 hours, 55 minutes

and 53 seconds for an average time of 5 minutes 22 seconds. The Olympia Slackers from

See RELAY, page 10

SIGNAL PHOTOS / JEREMY C. RUARK

A Hood-to-Coast runner crosses the temporary foot bridge at U.S. Highway 101 in Seaside.

The coach of the Japanese team holds up the medals his teammates received after placing first in the running portion of the Hood-to-Coast Relay. Serving the North Oregon Coast since 1993

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10 n August 30, 2012 n Seaside Signal n Seaside, Oregon

SHS football season kicks off Aug. 31, Gulls take on Warriors By Kelsey Nuttall

knuttal@countrymedia.net

WARRENTON – The Warrenton Warriors will host the Seaside Seagulls Aug. 31 as the Cowapa League high school football season gets started. “The tough thing about Warrenton is that, like Seaside, they have a new coach, a new scheme,” said Seaside High School head coach Jeff Roberts. “We won’t have the opportunity to see it as a film that shows what they will be like on the field before we play them.” Instead, Roberts said his team will be more focused the each game of the entire season. He hopes to turn around last year’s 0-9 losing season. “We are doing something completely different than last season,” said Roberts. “We have a hardworking, dedicated group of young men who are committed to working as a team.” Ian O’Brian, the new Warrenton High School

n Relay

head football coach, said the Warriors will concentrate on what they know about the Seagulls. “You can’t go back to last year’s games,” said O’Brien. “We can’t get a handle for their tactics. We just know who is returning and who is not.” But like Roberts, O’Brien is focusing on his team’s spirit and eagerness to win. “We are trying to get our kids to work hard and improve each day,” said O’Brien. “Hopefully, we execute offensively and defensively a bit better than last season.”

SIGNAL PHOTO / JEREMY C. RUARK

The Seaside High School football team is using the school field and the Broadway Park Field for drills. The Gulls take on the Warriors in Warrenton Aug. 31 in their first game of the new high school football season. Washington won the High School portion of the relay with a time of 13 hours, 38 minutes and 58 seconds with

From page 9

SEE VIDEO OF THE EVENT AT SEASIDESIGNAL.COM an average time of 6 minutes, 22 seconds. The High School Relay was about 131 miles in length from Portland to

Seaside. Racewalkers NW of Banks captured first place in the walking team competition

with a time of 21 hours, 48 minutes, and 25 seconds. That team posted an average time of 10 minutes, 10 seconds. The walkers also faced about a 131 mile course from Portland, a few miles longer due to a fire along the course at St. Helens. Jude Hubber, Hood-toCoast Relay public relations director said the fire that de-

stroyed the Les Schwab store Aug. 25 in St. Helens did alter the race along U.S. Highway 30 a bit. “The fire puts the Relay into perspective,” Hubber said. “The race may not be as important as we think. Our thoughts are with those employees who have been displaced by the fire.”

The team from Toyo University in Japan crosses the Hoodto-Coast finish line with the fastest time to win the running portion of the relay from Mt. Hood to Seaside.

perfect proof Seeing IS Believing

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SIGNAL PHOTO / JEREMY C. RUARK

Hughes-Ransom Mortuary & Crematory

220 N. Holladay Dr., Seaside 503-738-6622 S01911

Factory-Direct Prices • sPecial events • Free couPon Book • on-line couPons

Use oUr entry sign to find oUt aboUt cUrrent store specials and special events

503-459-1839

Ryan Beazely In Cannon Beach PerfectProofMedia@gmail.com

You choose the best produce. You choose the best phone plan and the best car insurance. Wouldn’t you like to choose the best education for your child, too?

Now you can.

Caring, Professional Service 576 12th St. Astoria 503-325-2535

A digital video archive of your property inside and out... for personal and insurance documentation in case of • natural disaster • vandalism • theft • fire

Open daily for convenient one-stop shopping, Japanese dining, and free daily wine tasting.

open mon.-sat. 9-9 sun. 9-7

seasiDe Factory outlet center • 12th ave. & hwy. 101 seasiDe, or 503.717.1603 • seasiDeoutlets.com

Oregon Choice Academy, featuring the classic Calvert School education for lower grades is a virtual, homeschool alternative for kindergarten through twelfth grade students in Clatsop County and surrounding areas. With easy-to-use, daily lesson plans, and in-person support from Oregon-certified teachers, students can choose a blend of online and on-campus classes. Enroll Now!

SS 8-30-12  

SS 8-30-12 SS 8-30-12

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