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SENIOR

Living

A SPECIAL PUBLICATION OF THE

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Top Notch Care!

Our goal is optimal recovery, which means that we help our residents achieve the highest level of function possible. We strive to duplicate as many real life experiences as possible, allowing you to practice and prepare for the move back home.

Creswell

Coast Fork

735 S. 2nd St. Creswell, Oregon 97426

515 Grant Ave. Cottage Grove, Oregon 97424

Health and Rehabilitation Center

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The Only Emergency Medical Transport Service in South Lane County

Community Public Education: • CPR/AED • Heart Attack Recognition • Fall Prevention • Stroke Prevention • Fire Prevention • Fire Extinguishers • Fire-Med Membership

Nursing Center

(541) 895-3333

Rehabilitation Palliative Care

SOUTH LANE COUNTY FIRE & RESCUE

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(541) 942-5528

Nursing Care Respite Care

Call 541-942-4493 for info. FOR EMERGENCY DIAL 911 Serving South Lane County.

www.southlanefire.org

www.PrestigeCare.com

2 • Senior Resource Guide 2016

• Cottage Grove Sentinel • (541) 942-3325


INSIDE How to Prepare a Home 4 Cottage Grove Senior Center 5 Volunteer Opportunities 5 Preplanning you Funeral 6 Take an Art Class 7 Seniors & Gardening 9 Retirement Saving 10 Making new friends 11 Healthcare Directives 12 Enjoy Travel 13 Paying for Long-Term Care 14 Directory 8-9

$PUUBHF (SPWF 4FOUJOFM 116 N. Sixth Street · P.O. Box 35 · Cottage Grove, OR 97424

A publication of the Cottage Grove Sentinel, P.O. Box 35, 116 N. Sixth St., Cottage Grove, OR 97424, www.cgsentinel.com, (541) 942-3325, Fax 942-3328. Extra copies of this guide are available free of charge for distribution in places of business, offices and anywhere else they might be helpful. Call the Sentinel at (541) 942-3325 to make arrangements. ©Contents copyright 2016 Cottage Grove Sentinel

Senior Resource Guide 2016

• Cottage Grove Sentinel • (541) 942-3325 • 3


HOW TO PREPARE A HOME FOR ELDERLY RESIDENTS Upon reaching retirement age, new retirees may face decisions regarding their living arrangements. Some seniors may opt to stay put, while others may want to downsize their homes to save money and relieve themselves of the burdens of maintaining larger homes. But those are not the only situations seniors find themselves in. Some seniors realize they can no longer care for themselves without assistance. In such instances, seniors may opt for assisted living facilities or choose to move in with a relative, such as a grown son or daughter. While assisted living facilities are designed to meet the needs of the elderly, young men and women welcoming seniors into their homes may need to take on some home improvement projects to ensure their homes are as safe as possible for elderly residents.

seniors are likely to use, choose locations that are accessible to seniors. Avoid storing items on the top shelf of pantries, bookcases or entertainment centers, as seniors with limited mobility may not be able to reach them. Many seniors move in with their adult children to make their golden years safer and more enjoyable and manageable. Such a change in living arrangements may necessitate some changes on the part of homeowners so they can ensure their homes are safe for seniors.

• Convert a room on the first floor into a bedroom. While this may not apply to all seniors, some men and women struggle with stairs as they age, and that can make it difficult for them to fully participate in a household. Homeowners with an extra room to spare can convert a room on the first floor of their homes into a bedroom so seniors won’t have to climb up and down stairs throughout the day. That ease of accessibility to the primary floor of the house encourages seniors to be active participants in a household. If possible, choose an area that is close to a first-floor bathroom. • Take steps to make bathrooms safer. The National Institute on Aging says that more than one in three seniors over age 65 fall each year, and 80 percent of those falls take place in the bathroom. Slippery tile floors can make it difficult for seniors to navigate bathrooms safely, and bathtubs and shower stalls present additional challenges. Install grab bars on bathroom walls and next to toilets to provide support. In addition, consider installing a shower chair or bench and removable shower nozzle in the shower or tub so seniors can sit down while they bathe and rinse without having to stand up on slippery surfaces. Make sure any mats around bathtubs and sinks are nonskid to reduce the risk of falls even further. • Install an extra phone line or two. While kids and adults between the ages of 18 and 50 may never use the landlines in their homes, many seniors still rely on traditional telephones as their primary means of communicating with the outside world. Install extra landlines in your home, including in seniors’ bedrooms, so they can more readily access the phone should they fall and need to call for emergency help. Phones in seniors’ bedrooms may also provide some additional privacy to seniors who don’t want to carry on phone conversations in busy areas of the home, such as the kitchen or living room. Such lines may also reduce feelings of isolation. • Prioritize accessibility when storing items. When storing groceries, books, magazines, or other items

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• Cottage Grove Sentinel • (541) 942-3325


VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES

Today’s retirees recognize that an active retirement tends to be more rewarding than simply sitting around the house, and that attitude is reflected in the vast number of retirees who volunteer with various nonprofit organizations and other programs across the globe. The following are a handful of volunteering opportunities for those retirees who want to give back and make the most of their retirements. These local organizations are looking for volunteers and could use your help. Bohemia Gold Mining Museum................................541-942-5022 Community Sharing......................................................541-942-2176 Cottage Grove Area Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center.................................................................541-942-2411 Cottage Grove Community Hospital Hospice.........541-942-0511 Cottage Grove Genealogical Society Jane Meyers ..................................................541-942-9570 Phyllis Pruitt..................................................541-942-3068 LIBRARY........................................................541-942-9570 COTTAGE GROVE HISTORICAL SOCIETY.........................541-942-2176 COTTAGE GROVE PUBLIC LIBRARY................................541-942-3828 COTTAGE GROVE SENIOR CENTER.................................541-942-8751 HABITAT FOR HUMANITY COTTAGE GROVE AFFILIATE..541-767-0358 HUMANE SOCIETY OF COTTAGE GROVE........................541-942-3130 MEALS ON WHEELS PROGRAM......................................541-942-9261 SOUTH LANE SCHOOL DISTRICT....................................541-942-3381 SOUTH LANE WHEELS..................................................541-942-0456 THIS & THAT CORNER HUMANE SOCIETY THRIFT SHOP ......................................................................................541-942-3130

Ann White Certified Financial Planner Investment Advisor Representative 1807 E. Main Street, Cottage Grove, OR 97424 541-942-5535

COTTAGE GROVE SENIOR CENTER ACTIVITIES SCHEDULE MONDAY BINGO 12:45PM

TUESDAY WOODCARVING & PAINTING 10AM CHARITY QUILTING10AM WEDNESDAY NEEDLE ARTS AND CRAFTS 1-4PM PINOCHLE 12-4PM THURSDAY SING-ALONG 1ST & 3RD THURSDAY BUNKO (4TH THURSDAY OF THE MONTH AT 12PM) FRIDAY PINOCHLE 1-4PM SENIOR LAW (2ND FRIDAY OF THE MONTH 10AM-12PM) CALL US AT THE COTTAGE GROVE SENIOR CENTER IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS OR WOULD LIKE TO START OR HAVE A NEW ACTIVITY AT

541-942-8751.

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Senior Resource Guide 2016

• Cottage Grove Sentinel • (541) 942-3325 • 5


THE BENEFITS OF PREPLANNING YOUR FUNERAL Coping with the death of a loved one is never easy. Dealing with a sudden, unexpected death of a beloved friend or family member can be even more difficult, especially for those people who have to make important financial decisions while grieving. To remove the burden and stress associated with funeral planning, many adults preplan their funerals. Adults can be as specific as they prefer to be when preplanning their funerals, and doing so gives relatives peace of mind knowing that their loved ones’ funeral services were conducted in accordance to their own wishes. Preplanning a funeral may sound morbid, as few people want to think about their deaths or discuss dying with their families. But there are numerous benefits to preplanning funerals. • Preplanning provides time to make the best decisions. Men and women who preplan their funerals have ample time to decide just what they want their memorial services to be like and how they want to fund those services. Men and women trusted to make those decisions upon the death of a loved one will need to make those decisions more quickly and likely won’t be in the correct frame of mind to make decisions that will honor their loved one’s legacy.

• Preplanning ensures your wishes are honored. Men and women who formalize their funeral plans will ensure their wishes are honored. That can give men and women peace of mind and will provide peace of mind to the loved ones they leave behind, who can attend funeral services knowing those services are being conducted in adherence to their loved one’s wishes. Even men and women who discuss their wishes for their funerals with loved ones may not have those wishes honored if they are not put in writing. • Preplanning can help control costs. Preplanning often includes men and women setting aside money for their funerals before they pass away. Knowing that a funeral, which can be expensive, is already paid for can provide additional peace of mind. Instead of worrying that their relatives will be forced to handle the burden of financing their funerals, men and women who preplan can rest easy knowing their insurance money and life’s savings will be going to their surviving loved ones and not toward paying for funeral expenses. • Preplanning protects families faced with sudden death. Few people want to think about their deaths, and fewer still want to think about dying suddenly and/or dying young. Preplanning a funeral and setting money aside early can protect and help families faced with sudden deaths. That can be especially important for young parents, who won’t want to leave their spouses and children financially destitute should they suddenly pass away. Preplanning a funeral may not be something to look forward to, but doing so can protect families and provide men and women with some peace of mind.

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Funeral & Memorial Planning Cremation Options Monuments & Memorials Cemetery Services 123 South 7th Cottage Grove, Oregon 541-942-0185 www.smithlundmills.com

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• Cottage Grove Sentinel • (541) 942-3325


TAKE AN ART CLASS

Maybe you’re looking to flex your creative muscles or simply seeking a fun indoor activity during the warm summer months. No matter the reason, starting a new art class could be the answer for you. Many art associations and community colleges have discount programs available to senior citizens looking to pick up a paint brush or take up a hobby in pottery. Some senior centers and veteran’s service organizations also offer art programs that provide many benefits to aging artists. These can range from improved hand-eye coordination to the all-important socialization with peers. Relationship -building and overall cognitive impact also are major benefits of seniors participating in the arts. With regular senior programs and highly qualified instructors, you may find that your local community is perfect for artists— both professional and aspiring.

ing, Health and Humanities. One of the center’s studies tracked 300 men and women across several arts programs around the country. Research found that arts participants with an average age of 80 scheduled fewer doctor appointments and used fewer medications than members of the control group who were not involved in the arts. They also found fewer incidents of depression, higher morale and more involvement in outside activities.

The Benefits New research supports the idea that the arts offer the perfect mix of creativity and mental health benefits for the senior population. Creative activities such as painting, writing, pottery, drama, singing and storytelling raise self-esteem, increase enthusiasm for life and result in fewer doctor visits, according to studies by the George Washington University’s Center on Ag-

Find a Friend Drawing, painting and creating by yourself can be enjoyable, but having someone to talk to during the creative process makes for a more engaging experience. With a friend, you can bounce ideas off each other and garner opinions on your artistic strategy for various projects. Don’t fret if you can’t find any friends or family members available to learn with you. Art classes are great places to build relationships with new people. Don’t be afraid to ask other classmates about their artistic influences and interests. You may just learn something in the process.

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Assisted Living and Memory Care Apartments

Our beautiful community is designed for those who need assistance or have memory impairments. You can be assured that you or your loved one will receive the best in care along with compassionate personal attention from our well trained staff.

Call or stop by for more information and a personal tour! We are available 7 days a week!

1500 Village Dr., Cottage Grove, OR 97424 T 541-767-0080 swww.MiddlefieldOaks.com

We have an energy assistance program and low income weatherization program with rebates and cash grants.

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Lane Electric, we’re in it for the long haul! 541-484-1151 www.laneelectric.com Public Transportation in South Lane County

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Senior Resource Guide 2016

• Cottage Grove Sentinel • (541) 942-3325 • 7


SENIOR SERVICES PHONE DIRECTORY AUTOMOTIVE DEALER & SERVICE BRAD’S COTTAGE GROVE CHEVROLET .........541-942-4415 BANK UMPQUA BANK 625 E. GIBBS AVE, COTTAGE GROVE, OR 97424 ........................................................………..541-942-9122

OREGON SENIOR HEALTH INSURANCE BENEFIT ASSISTANCE (SHIBA) AT THE WILLAMALANE CENTER FOR SPORTS AND RECREATION 250 S. 32ND ST, SPRINGFIELD, OR 97477 .......................................................... 541-736-4421 LAW ENFORCEMENT COTTAGE GROVE POLICE DEPARTMENT ....... 541-942-9145 CRESWELL POLICE DEPARTMENT ................ 541-682-4150 LEGAL SERVICES LANE COUNTY ............................................ 800-575-9283

COMMUNITY SERVICES COMMUNITY SHARING ................................. 541-942-2176

MEDICAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES GROVE MEDICAL EQUIPMENT ...................... 541-225-5443

FINANCIAL SERVICES CETERA ADVISOR NETWORKS, LLC ........... 541-942-5535

MEALS ON WHEELS COTTAGE GROVE & CRESWELL .................. 541-682-4038

FIRE & AMBULANCE SERVICE SOUTH LANE COUNTY FIRE & RESCUE, FIREMED ..............................OFFICE 541-942-4493 EMERGENCY 911

MEDICAL CASCADE DERMATOLOGY 992 COUNTRY CLUB RD, STE 201, EUGENE, OR 97401 ...................................................................…541-485-7546 PEACEHEALTH COTTAGE GROVE COMMUNITY MEDICAL CENTER, 1515 VILLAGE DRIVE, COTTAGE GROVE, OR 97424............................................................ 541-767-5500

FUNERAL HOME, CREMATORY, CEMETERY SMITH LUND MILLS FUNERAL CHAPEL & FIR GROVE CEMETERY ....................................................541-942-0185 GOLF MIDDLEFIELD GOLF COURSE ........................541-942-8730 91 VILLAGE DRIVE, COTTAGE GROVE, OR 97424 HEARING GRANT’S HEARING CENTER .........................541-942-8444 1498 E. MAIN, STE 108, COTTAGE GROVE, OR 97424 HOME HEALTH & HOSPICE SACRED HEART HOSPICE ...............................541-461-7550 HOSPITAL FOUNDATION PEACEHEALTH COTTAGE GROVE MEDICAL CENTER FOUNDATION........................................................... 541-767-5461 INSURANCE STATE FARM INSURANCE, MATT BJORNN, CHFC RICP 1481 GATE WAY BLVD, COTTAGE GROVE, OR 97424 ...................................……………………..541-942-2623 MEDICARE (GENERAL) ................................ 800-633-4227 OREGON HEALTH PLAN .............................. 800-359-9517

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MENTAL HEALTH SOUTH LANE MENTAL HEALTH .................. 541-942-2850 SENIOR CENTER COTTAGE GROVE SENIOR CENTER ............... 541-942-8751 SENIOR CONNECTIONS COTTAGE GROVE ......................................... 541-682-7800 CRESWELL VILLA ......................................... 541-895-2338 SENIOR & DISABLED SERVICES COTTAGE GROVE OFFICE ............................. 541-682-7800 SENIOR MEALS DINING CENTERS CRESVIEW VILLA ......................................... 541-895-2338 RIVERVIEW TERRACE ................................... 541-942-9261 SENIOR LIVING CONSULTANTS SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION .......... 800-772-1213 TAX AID (AARP) ..................................... 888-687-2277

• Cottage Grove Sentinel • (541) 942-3325


TRANSPORTATION SOUTH LANE WHEELS ................................ 541-942-0456

SENIORS & GARDENING

UTILITY SERVICE LANE ELECTRIC.................................….541-484-1151 787 BAILEY HILL RD, EUGENE, OR 97402

Gardening is one of the greatest hobbies for seniors because it requires concentration, physical work and a demanding initial investment of your time and sweat equity. But it’s the results that make it all worthwhile. The vibrant pops of color. The bounty of fruit and vegetables. Gardens are so loved by many people young and old because of this special gratification that comes with planting something from seed and watching it grow into something so useful and beautiful. Health Benefits Gardens are health-beneficial, not only because of the healthy food they produce but because of the activity level required to maintain them. Seniors can get great exercise from planting and tending to their gardens. While staying safe in the summertime heat can be a challenge, proper hydration and common sense can ensure that gardening gives you the right amount of physical exercise needed to keep your body and mind in great shape. Low-Maintenance Plants The versatility of plants and produce make it easy for gardeners of all levels of expertise get in on the action. If you’re not looking to devote too much of your time to upkeep — some plants require intensive year-round care — there are plenty of options at your disposal in terms of the plants that fit your plans. Low-maintenance plants such as black-eyed-Susans or peonies grow rapidly and healthfully without too much of your time or attention. These can be great options for someone simply looking to brighten up a specific area of the yard. You can also choose planters that won’t require weeding for an even simpler growing process. Using Containers Using planters and other types of movable planting options make it easier for you to do some of your work in the shade or even inside. You can handle chores such as pruning and trimming while out of the heat, helping you conserve your energy for watering your plants. Find ceramic pots with holes in the bottom for low-maintenance plants. This allows the water to soak through the soil and out of the pot. Keeping plants contained to smaller areas such as pots and planters also helps avoid needing too much potting soil or mulch, which are oftentimes required to maintain larger areas.

VETERANS SERVICES EUGENE ....................................................... 541-465-6918 ROSEBURG ..................................800-549-8387 (EXT. 44) PORTLAND .................................... 800-949-1004 (EXT. 5)

SENIOR LIVING & CARE FACILITIES ASSISTED LIVING COMMUNITIES MAGNOLIA GARDENS ................................. 541-942-0054 1425 DAUGHERTY AVE., COTTAGE GROVE, OR 97424 MIDDLEFIELD OAKS SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITY ..................................................................... 541-767-0080 1500 VILLAGE DR., COTTAGE GROVE, OR 97424 MEMORY CARE MAGNOLIA GARDENS ................................. 541-942-0054 1425 DAUGHERTY AVE., COTTAGE GROVE, OR 97424 MIDDLEFIELD OAKS SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITY ..................................................................... 541-767-0080 1500 VILLAGE DR., COTTAGE GROVE, OR 97424 NURSING FACILITIES LONG TERM CARE COAST FORK NURSING CENTER .................. 541-942-5528 515 GRANT AVE., COTTAGE GROVE, OR 97424 REHABILITATION CENTER CRESWELL HEALTH & REHABILITATION CENTER ..................................................................... 541-895-3333 735 S SECOND ST., CRESWELL, OR 97426 RETIREMENT HOUSING JEFFERSON PARK APARTMENTS .................. 541-942-4808 325 SOUTH 5TH STREET, COTTAGE GROVE, OR 97424 RIVERSTONE MOBILE HOME PARK ............. 541-942-4147 7750 SOUTH 6TH ST., COTTAGE GROVE, OR 97424

Senior Resource Guide 2016

• Cottage Grove Sentinel • (541) 942-3325 • 9


RETIREMENT SAVING FOR LATE BLOOMERS

Today’s young professionals hear about the importance of saving for retirement seemingly from the moment they are hired. In addition to discussions with human resources personnel about employer-sponsored retirement plans, young professionals are learning about the importance of saving for retirement thanks to the abundance of financial-planning advertisements on television, the radio and the Internet. Older workers may not have been so lucky, and many may find themselves trying to play catch up as retirement age draws closer. While it’s important to begin saving for retirement as early as possible, late bloomers whose retirement dates are nearing can still take steps to secure their financial futures. • Pay down debts. Eliminating debt is good for men and women of all ages, but especially so for those nearing retirement. Substantial debt may delay your retirement and can greatly reduce your quality of life during retirement. If you still have substantial debt, eliminate that debt before you start saving additional money for retirement. Once your debt slate has been wiped clean, you can then increase your retirement contributions. • Eliminate unnecessary expenses. If your retirement savings are low (many financial advisors now advise men and women that they will need at least 60 percent of their pre-retirement income each year they are retired), start cutting back on unnecessary expenses and reallocate that money toward retirement saving. Cutting out luxury items, such as vacations to exotic locales or country club memberships, is one way to save money. But don’t overlook the simpler ways to save, such as canceling your cable subscription or dining at home more often. • Downsize your home. Many empty nesters downsize their homes as retirement nears, and doing so can help you save a substantial amount of money. If the kids no longer live at home or if you simply have more space than you will need after retirement, downsize to a smaller, less expensive home. Monitor the real estate market before you decide to downsize so you can be sure to get the best deal on your current home. Downsizing saves on monthly utility bills, property taxes and a host of additional expenses. Downsizing also means less

maintenance, which gives you more time to pursue your hobbies upon retiring. • Take on some additional work. While you may have long felt you would slowly wind down in the years immediately preceding retirement, taking on some additional work outside of your current job is a great way to save more for retirement and perhaps even lay the foundation for a post-retirement career. Workers over the age of 50 can be invaluable resources to startups or other businesses looking for executives who have been there, done that. Look for part-time jobs that seek such experience. Even if the initial jobs don’t bowl you over financially, part-time consultant work in retirement can make up for lost retirement savings and may even make your retirement years more fulfilling. Men and women on the verge of retirement can take many steps to grow their retirement savings and make their golden years that much more enjoyable.

Organic, free trade coffee. Community events. Free cookies on Fridays. All at your neighborhood bank.

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Member FDIC Equal Housing Lender

10 • Senior Resource Guide 2016

SBA Preferred Lender

• Cottage Grove Sentinel • (541) 942-3325


MAKING NEW FRIENDS AFTER A MOVE OR OTHER LIFE EVENT Downsizing and other life changes often find seniors leaving their comfort zones to move to new neighborhoods or regions of the country. It can be difficult to leave those comfort zones behind, especially when it means saying goodbye to close friends or family members. Establishing new social circles as a senior can be challenging. But with a little effort and the right attitude, seniors can meet new people and enjoy the excitement that comes with new friendships.

• Join a club. If you have a particular hobby or interest, rekindle it in your new location. Find a local gardening club, churchsponsored organization or fitness center where you can meet like-minded men and women. Ask the real estate agent who helped you relocate to make suggestions on where to find community information and read community notices in the local newspaper. • Get a dog. Dogs make great companions inside of the house and also serve as an ice breaker when you are outdoors. Take plenty of walks and take advantage of opportunities for conversation when people come up to you to inquire about your dog. Explain your situation and you may make some new friends along the way.

• Volunteer your time. Many people make new friends through volunteering. Volunteer and you’re likely to meet people who share the same interests as you. Sign up with a favorite charity or volunteer at nonprofit events and look for familiar faces. Start talking to those people you meet again and again. • Participate in church events. Places of religious worship are often cornerstones of a community, and they frequently host different events to get parishioners or members together. Read the bulletin and get involved in pot lucks, retreats, movie nights, and other church-sponsored events. • Work at a school. Schools also serve as hubs of community activity. Volunteer or work for a local school and you will soon find yourself immersed in your community’s weekday hustle and bustle. This is a great way to meet people and learn more about your new neighborhood in the process.

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• Host your own party. Go out on a limb and plan a “new to the neighborhood” party. Put invitations in neighbors’ mailboxes and invite everyone over for snacks and cocktails. Remember, neighbors may be just as nervous about new faces as you are, and a party is a great way to break the ice. Change can be hard for people seniors starting out in new communities. With some gumption and a few strategies to get started, anyone can expand their circle of friends.

Sara Lester, Licensed Aesthetician 541-485-7546 www.casderm.com

Senior Resource Guide 2016

• Cottage Grove Sentinel • (541) 942-3325 • 11


THE BENEFITS TO ESTABLISHING ADVANCED HEALTHCARE DIRECTIVES Healthy adults may give little thought to injuries or illnesses. When the going is good, it is easy to forget about the less pleasant side effects of aging. However, putting off these conversations and decisions can lead to unnecessary obstacles in the years to come. Advanced healthcare directives can be invaluable resources for family members and friends who will be responsible for managing a person’s plans should they become unable to make their own decisions. Various organizations, including AARP, offer resources on advanced planning and the options available to adults looking to plan their estates. The National Healthcare Decisions Day movement, a group dedicated to providing clear, concise and consistent information on healthcare decision-making, defines advanced directives as establishing: • a “healthcare power of attorney” (or “proxy” or “agent” or “surrogate”), or the person you select to be your voice for your healthcare decisions if you cannot speak for yourself. • a “living will” to document which medical treatments you would or would not want at the end of life. While these are decisions that people often put off, it’s important to make them as early as possible. Not only will they dictate your wishes, they’ll take the pressure off of loved ones who would otherwise be tasked with making difficult decisions on their own. Healthcare proxy Appointing a healthcare proxy ensures that there will be someone there who has the legal authority to make healthcare decisions for you if you are no longer able to speak for yourself. This may be a spouse, child, relative, or close friend. The Mayo Clinic suggests choosing a person who can be trusted to make

12 • Senior Resource Guide 2016

decisions that adhere to your wishes and values and to be your advocate if there are disagreements about your care. Be sure to have a candid discussion with your healthcare proxy in which you go over the types of medical care you wish to receive and any ways you would or would not like your life prolonged. It helps to keep the proxy up-to-date on any medical conditions you may have so that he or she can make the most informed decisions on your behalf. Having a healthcare proxy does not mean you are giving up your right to make medical decisions. It’s a fail-safe in the event you are unconscious or cannot direct medical care. Living will An advanced healthcare directive enables you to create specific written instructions for future health care, known as a living will. The living will should include wishes regarding lifesustaining medical treatments and resuscitation if you are no longer able to speak on your own behalf. It also can spell out whether you want to remain in a hospital or receive palliative care at home for a terminal illness. A living will can be changed if/when your wishes or circumstances change. Legal and medical advice Although legal advice is not required for an advanced directive, it can be helpful to iron out the legalities of your directives. Speak with your doctor about your desires and needs. A physician can help you form a coherent directive that is in line with your wishes. Remember, an advanced directive is not reserved for the elderly. Any consenting adult age 18 or older can benefit from a living will and other documentation.

• Cottage Grove Sentinel • (541) 942-3325


INTERESTING WAYS TO ENJOY TRAVEL Research indicates that traveling is at the top of the list of interests motivating today’s men and women over the age of 50. Seniors are perhaps the most likely demographic to indulge their love of traveling. Retirement leaves lots of time for recreation, and many choose to spend that time on the road. Travel also can be improve adult longevity, says geriatricians at the University of Arkansas. Those in the travel industry understand that men and women over 50 comprise a large percentage of their customers and have catered many travel packages toward this influential demographic. The following is a look at some of the more popular travel opportunities for men and women over 50. • Genealogical tourism: This is one of the fastest-growing markets in vacation travel. Genealogical tourism involves individuals traveling to areas of historical significance for their families, such as churches where past relatives may have married and villages where grandparents or cousins once resided or were employed. This can create a tangible link to one’s past and open up more opportunities to learn the varied genealogical history that has shaped a family, and even one’s personal identity. • Extended vacations: Seniors may have the capacity to devote more time to travel and not be caged in by strict time constraints. That makes them eligible for extended vacations. These can include long-term rentals in tropical locales, several-week sightseeing cruises or guided tours overseas that touch on several different countries or cities during the trip.

• Off the beaten path: Adventurous travelers may not be content to stick to the resort lifestyle or standard vacation options. Active men and women over 50 are charting their own vacation courses with bucket list-style vacations that may be off the beaten path. Travelers who have always aspired to climb a mountain or see a rain forest may be inclined to realize these goals as they get older. Nontraditional tours can include living like indigenous peoples or following the footsteps of early explorers. • All-inclusive tours: All-inclusive packages remain a popular option for travelers of all ages. These vacation packages charge one price for accommodations, entertainment, sightseeing, food, and many other amenities. All-inclusive vacations remove some of the headaches associated with organizing various components of travel so that a person can focus on relaxation and having fun. • Singles meets: Single vacationers over 50 may want to meet other men or women in their age bracket in the hopes of finding romance. These vacations double as relationship mixers and give men and women the opportunity to mingle with others in similar situations without the pressure of traditional dating. Travel is a way to see the world, meet new people and experience various cultures. Seniors increasingly embrace travel because they have both the time and the means to take vacations.

Senior Resource Guide 2016

• Cottage Grove Sentinel • (541) 942-3325 • 13


OPTIONS WHEN PAYING FOR LONG-TERM CARE Aging has its side effects, as it’s inevitable that individuals’ bodies and minds will change as they approach their golden years. Illnesses, disabilities and other conditions may speed up the changes in certain individuals. While many seniors continue to live independently well into their golden years, some require long-term care. The decision to move an elderly relative into a long-term care facility can be difficult. In addition to the emotional effects of such a decision, families must deal with the financial repercussions. Long-term care services can be costly, and many general healthcare insurance plans do not cover long-term care. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services offers that an assisted living facility may cost roughly $3,300 per month for a onebedroom unit, while a nursing home may cost between $6,200 and $6,900. Seniors or families who have enough income and savings may be able to pay for long-term care services without assistance. But those who cannot afford to do so may need to utilize different programs or resources to pay for long-term care. • Long-term care insurance: According to WebMD, commercial insurers offer private policies referred to as long-term care insurance. These policies may cover services such as care at home, adult day care, assisted living facilities, and nursing homes. However, plans vary widely. In addition, the cost for care and eligibility requirements may change as a person ages, so it’s best

to purchase this insurance while young and relatively healthy. • Government assistance: Government health programs may pay for a portion of certain care but not all of the services offered by long-term care facilities. For example, the Canadian Life and Health Insurance Association says government health care programs may cover only a small percentage of the costs for nursing homes or other specialized residential care facilities, or perhaps none at all depending on the circumstances. In the United States, Medicare is the Federal health insurance program for people age 65 and older and for some people younger than 65 who are disabled. Medicare generally does not pay for long-term help with daily activities. Medicare pays for very limited skilled nursing home care after a hospital stay, but not for many assisted living facilities. Medicaid is another option that pays for health services and long-term care for low-income people of any age. First, applicants must determine their eligibility for Medicaid. Medicaid is typically only available after most personal assets have been depleted. Even with Medicaid, a resident of a long-term care facility may need to pay a portion of the care out of pocket. What’s more, as part of the application for Medicaid, a “look back” at assets is required to deter gifting assets in order to qualify. Paying for long-term care requires planning well in advance of when such services may be needed.

Grove Medical Equipment & Supplies “BUILDING A HEALTHY COMMUNITY” Home Oxygen • Aides to Daily Living • CPAP/BiPAP • Home Medical Alarms Hospital Beds • Breast Pumps • Wheelchairs • Compression Stockings Nebulizer • Splints & Bracing • Walkers • Incontinence Supplies Catheters • Ostomy • Canes • Lift Chairs Crutches • Power Mobility • Bathroom Equipment • Wound Care Cold Therapy Units • Blood Glucose Testing Supplies • Blood Pressure Units • Knee Walkers

148 Gateway Blvd (Bi Mart Plaza)

Cottage Grove, OR 97424 Hours of Operation Monday –Friday 9:00 to 5:00 • Saturday by Appointment Sunday Closed 24 Hour On-Call Services (541-731-1441) INSURANCE BILLING AVAILABLE

541-225-5443 grovemedical@outlook.com Join us on Facebook

Matt Bjornn ChFC RICP, Agent 1481 Gateway Blvd Cottage Grove, OR 97424 Bus: 541-942-2623 matt@bjornninsurance.com State Farm, Bloomington, IL 1211999

Keep Medicare Working for you Mistakes? Waste? Abuse of the system? Your 18-hole publicly owned golf course

Special Senior Pricing

Tell Someone! • 541-736-4421 Free assistance through the Senior Medicare Patrol. Report Medicare Fraud

Tournaments • Tee Times • Leagues • Special Rates

91 Village Drive

Phone: (541) 942-8730

www.middlefieldgolf.com

14 • Senior Resource Guide 2016

• Cottage Grove Sentinel • (541) 942-3325


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Cottage Grove Sentinel www.cgsentinel.com

Senior Resource Guide 2016

• Cottage Grove Sentinel • (541) 942-3325 • 15


Cottage Grove, we’re here for you. Your community hospital provides: „ 24-hour emergency care

„ Weekend clinic

„ In-patient medical care

„ Walk-in clinic

„ Primary care clinic

„ Digital radiology

„ Mammography

„ Lab tests

„ Outpatient physical therapy 1515 Village Drive, Cottage Grove, OR 97424 ƒ 541-767-5500

peacehealth.org/ cottage-grove

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