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COTSWOLD-HOMES.COM THE PROPERTY & LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE FOR THE NORTH COTSWOLDS

SUMMER 2019 COMPLIMENTARY COPY

Nell Gifford & Briony May Smith Making a Circus of Dreams Clare Mackintosh Bestselling Author Competitions The Big Feastival, Giffords Circus & More Places to Go Top Day-Trip Destinations Events Our Summer Highlights Hot Property Beautiful Homes, Expert Advice


CONTENTS

Hot in the Cotswolds These really are the best months to be putting an issue of Cotswold Homes together. Summer is when things really kick off in the Cotswolds, even as residents start to unwind. Not only have we got the likes of The Big Feastival and Giffords Circus to look forward to, but there’s no better time to go visiting those hundreds of attractions that are sitting pretty (in many cases, practically atop your own doorstep). When was the last time you took in the view from Broadway Tower, strolled along the Cotswold Way or nosed around a historic brewery? Now that the long, warm days are here, there’s no excuse not to live the good life. That’s why, in addition to our usual events section, we’ve rounded up 40 of our favourite places to visit - so if you’re ever short of summer inspiration, you know exactly where to turn. One of the year-round joys of making a Cotswolds-centric magazine is meeting the diversely talented people who live here. Everybody seems to have taken a different road to success - and this issue’s interviewee, author and columnist Clare Mackintosh, is no exception. After spending over a decade serving with the police in Chipping Norton, Clare gave up her career and became a bestselling novelist. (There’s a story you don’t hear every day…) Cotswold legend Nell Gifford is another fine example. Her rise from josser girl to ringmistress of her own internationallybeloved circus is the stuff dreams are made of. Nell’s real-life adventure is at the heart of her new picture book, Nell & The Circus of Dreams. In this issue, we’re taking a close look at the production of that special book and reproducing some of illustrator Briony May Smith’s gorgeous pictures for all to see. Of course, weather isn’t the only thing that’s hot right now; our property section is as full of gorgeous homes and expert advice as ever - and makes for nice material for a spot of summer daydreaming. So why not grab a Pimms, settle down in the garden, and get reading?

Contents 04 Competitions

Win tickets to The Big Feastival, Giffords Circus & more

08 An Interview with

Clare Mackintosh

The bestselling novelist on her career

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Nell Gifford on Nell & The Circus of Dreams

The circus superstar on her first storybook

18 Drawing the Circus

Illustrator Briony May Smith puts the circus on the page

26 Shrink Your Climate

Footprint

Grow a little greener with these tips

44 Forty Great Places to Go Your guide for fun days out

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Cotswold Calendar: Summer Highlights

Fab events for all the family

64 Hot Property Beautiful homes, expert advice

Cover Artist Cover image: Wisteria Wedding Cornwell Manor by artist Lucy Pratt, cropped. (Original 24 x 30 inches, Oil on Canvas). Lucy is represented by Stow-on-the-Wold’s Fosse Gallery. See more of Lucy’s beautiful work at www.lucypratt.com

Cotswold Homes Magazine Our next edition, Autumn 2019, will bring you more upcoming events, competitions and articles showcasing the local area helping you get more out of life in this beautiful part of the world. To speak to a member of the team, please call 01451 822977 or email: Editor’s Desk: matt@cotswold-homes.com Property: karen@harrisonjameshardie.co.uk Marketing & Sales: keelin@cotswold-homes.com Website & Admin: admin@cotswold-homes.com

COTSWOLD-HOMES.COM THE PROPERTY & LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE FOR THE NORTH COTSWOLDS COTSWOLD-HOMES.COM

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COMPETITIONS

SUPER SUMMER COTSWOLD COMPETITION GIVEAWAY SUMMER IS HERE, AND WE’VE ROUNDED UP SOME VERY SPECIAL PRIZES FOR OUR LUCKY READERS TO ENJOY - INCLUDING TICKETS TO THE BIG FEASTIVAL AND GIFFORDS CIRCUS! ENTERING OUR COMPETITION DRAWS COULDN’T BE EASIER - JUST HEAD TO WWW.COTSWOLD-HOMES.COM/COMPETITIONS-AND-OFFERS

WIN! A WEEKEND FAMILY TICKET to THE BIG FEASTIVAL! Great news, everyone - not only is the best party in the Cotswolds back in town, but we’re giving away a Weekend Family Ticket! With music from Rudimental, Jess Glynne, Elbow, Lewis Capaldi, The Zutons, Nina Nesbitt, Craig Charles, The Cuban Brothers, Jonas Blue, Jack Savoretti and Grandmaster Flash, it’s sure to be a Bank Holiday weekend to remember! It just wouldn’t be Feastival without the Michelin Star winning chefs: Raymond Blanc, Daniel Clifford and James Lowe will all be at the table; other foodie guests include Prue Leith, Gennaro Contaldo, Andi Oliver, Candice Brown, Tom Brown, Martin Morales, Mark Hix, Chris Baber, Skye Gyngell and Robin Gill.

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And there’s loads to keep the kids entertained - including appearances from Justin Fletcher, Dick & Dom, Peppa Pig, Paw Patrol and Adam Henson. And we haven’t even mentioned the delicious street food… To enter this competition draw, simply head to the competition section of www.cotswold-homes.com. The competition closes on 2 August 2019.


COMPETITIONS

SUPER SUMMER COTSWOLD COMPETITION GIVEAWAY WIN! A FAMILY TICKET* to GIFFORDS CIRCUS’ AMAZING 2019 SHOW, XANADU!

Two adults and two children can experience all the fun of Xanadu, the psychedelic show of the summer, thanks to the Cotswolds’ very favourite circus! Roll up, roll in to the stately pleasure dome for miracles, song, symphony and enchantment. The Giffords Circus caravan has taken to the road for a 2019 summer of love!

in the kitchen as he thought everyone was talking about ‘Flour Power’…

It is midsummer 1973 in Hyde Park and the Flower Power movement is at its height. Hippies, hipsters, rock stars, musicians, wild women and global nomads with Shamanic horses gather to play, sing, dance, protest and perform. Policemen and a family of out-oftowners get caught up in the celebrations. Will they get in the groove? Nell Gifford builds a pleasure dome and Tweedy has a job

*Dates subject to availability. Giffords Circus is on tour until 29 September 2019.

As evening approaches, the ever more chaotic event careers towards a joyful, transcendental finale. Be there or be square!

To enter this competition draw, simply head to the competition section of www.cotswold-homes.com. The competition closes on 2 August 2019.

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COMPETITIONS

SUPER SUMMER COTSWOLD COMPETITION GIVEAWAY Ian McEwan

Julia Donaldson

WIN! A PAIR OF TICKETS to see KING JOHN at the RSC’s SWAN THEATRE, Stratford-upon-Avon, plus a pre-show meal for two at the ROOFTOP RESTAURANT Shakespeare’s rarely performed tale of a nation in turmoil vibrates with modern resonance in this vivid new production by Director Eleanor Rhode. A mad world of mad kings, teetering on the brink of disaster. Richard the Lionheart is dead and his brother John is King of England. Threatened from all sides by Europe, the English noblemen and even his own family, King John will stop at nothing to keep hold of his crown.

WIN! A PAIR OF TICKETS to STROUD BOOK FESTIVAL’S Launch Event! The Stroud Book Festival are very pleased to offer two complimentary tickets to their Festival Launch Event on the evening of 6th November. The 2019 Stroud Book Festival will be headlined by Bookerwinning author (and Stroud Book Festival patron) Ian McEwan, along with much-loved, best-selling children’s author Julia Donaldson. The full Stroud Book Festival line-up will be revealed this summer and will aim to build on the success of the 2018 Festival, which finished its five-day run with record ticket sales, sell-out events and a line-up widely praised both for its variety and broad appeal. The Festival programme will, once again, include a wide variety of children’s events, including a Schools' Day, poetry and performance, memoir, fiction, food, nature, writing competitions, Stroud Short Stories and much more besides.

King John plays in the Swan Theatre from 19 September 2019 until 21 March 2020 and we’re thrilled to offer you the chance to win a pair of tickets to see Shakespeare’s rarely performed history play. What’s more, your visit to the theatre will be preceded by a delicious pre-theatre meal in the relaxed and stylish Rooftop Restaurant, with stunning views of Stratford-upon-Avon. To enter this competition draw, simply head to the competition section of www.cotswold-homes.com. The competition closes on 1 September 2019.

The Launch Event will be headlined by the culinary talents of Henry Firth and Ian Theasby, winners of the Lifestyle NonFiction Book of the Year award at the British Book Awards 2019, and creators of the world’s biggest and fastest-growing plant-based platform, BOSH! Their online channels have over 2.3 million fans and constantly inspire people to cook ultra-tasty & super simple recipes at home. *Terms and Conditions:

Tickets for Stroud Book Festival events will go on sale later this summer. If you’d like to receive their newsletter, please sign up at www.stroudbookfestival.org.uk To enter this competition draw, simply head to the competition section of www.cotswold-homes.com. The competition closes on 1 September 2019.

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• Terms and conditions apply • Prize offered subject to availability • Two tickets for King John valid for any performance, subject to availability. Tickets will be located at the discretion of the Box Office Manager • Pre-theatre dinner in the Rooftop Restaurant consists of two courses and a drink, any additional courses/drinks to be purchased by the winner • There is no cash alternative and the prize will not be transferable • Cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer


COMPETITIONS

SUPER SUMMER COTSWOLD COMPETITION GIVEAWAY WIN! A PAIR OF TICKETS to The Ashmolean’s Major New Exhibition, LAST SUPPER IN POMPEII This major exhibition tells the story of the ancient Roman city of Pompeii's love affair with food and wine. Located in the sunny paradise of southern Italy, Pompeii was sandwiched between lush vineyards and fertile plains to one side, and the bountiful waters of the Bay of Naples to the other. When the ash from Mount Vesuvius began raining down on Pompeii in AD 79, people were engaged in typical day to day activities: producing, buying and selling food and, most importantly, eating and drinking.

WIN! A Copy of Nell Gifford’s new children’s book, NELL & THE CIRCUS OF DREAMS, illustrated by Briony May Smith When a little girl called Nell makes friends with a tiny chick on her farm, it is the start of a journey that leads her into a dreamy circus realm. Was it something real or did it spring from her imagination? Nell will never be sure… but she leaves the tent uplifted by the wonderland that she found inside.

See over 400 rare objects, including fine masterpieces of Roman art which range from the luxury furnishings of Roman dining rooms to the carbonised food that was on the table when the volcano erupted. Everything from the exquisite mosaics and frescoes in the villas of the wealthy, to the remains found in kitchen drains, show what the Pompeians loved to eat and drink. This remarkable exhibition provides an extraordinary insight into their everyday lives. To enter this competition draw, simply head to the competition section of www.cotswold-homes.com. The competition closes on 18 August 2019.

Beautifully written by Nell Gifford, founder of Giffords Circus, and with stunning illustrations from Briony May Smith, this story brings the heart-stopping magic of the circus to the pages of a book. Read more about the making of the book in this very magazine! To enter this competition draw, simply head to the competition section of www.cotswold-homes.com. The competition closes on 1 September 2019.

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INTERVIEW

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CLARE MACKINTOSH

AN INTERVIEW WITH AUTHOR

CLARE MACKINTOSH Clare Mackintosh left behind a twelve year long police career to try her hand at writing for a living. She’s now the award-winning author of four bestselling novels - her latest book, the moving After the End, was released in June 2019. Earlier this year, Clare released a collection of her columns from Cotswold Life entitled A Cotswold Life. She is also the founding member of the fantastic Chipping Norton Literature Festival. So exactly how did Clare go from copper to columnist to bestseller? Does she get attached to her characters as her loyal readers clearly do? And how does she craft such odious villains? Matt Dicks investigates.

Hi Clare. One of your most recent books, A Cotswold Life, is a collection of your columns from Cotswold Life - but to readers outside the Cotswolds, you’re perhaps best known as a writer of psychological thrillers… I know — there’s not a single murder in it! So what’s the response been like? It’s been pretty lovely, actually. I think nowadays readers want a slightly more three-dimensional experience from books. They’re not just reading books, they’re going to events and meeting authors, chatting to them on Facebook and Twitter; authors are sharing more about their lives behind the scenes. So it’s been nice to extend that dialogue and put it in a book. I’ve had lots of messages from readers saying how nice it’s been to ‘peek behind the curtain’.

not quite the same. I miss the countryside. Notably, you worked as a police officer in Chipping Norton for over a decade. Can you tell us about the transition you made away from the police, and into the world of writing for a living? It wasn’t deliberate, insomuch as I didn’t think ‘well I’ve had my police career, now I’m going to become a bestselling novelist’. I’d always wanted to write, but I didn’t consider it to be a possible career path.

You’re now living in Wales, of course. What do you miss most about the Cotswolds?

After I joined the police, I started blogging, and I began to get feedback from people I’d not met before. As we grow up, the only feedback we get is from the people close to us - teachers, parents, friends - and it’s very difficult to get a sense of whether or not you’ve got something. The blog was really instrumental in giving me confidence, as suddenly I would be getting feedback from people who didn’t have to say nice things. So I learned from them what people liked and didn’t like.

The stone. I miss that gorgeous honeybuttery colour, along with the rolling hills. It’s a very different environment here in North Wales. We have amazing mountains, but it’s

I got my column with Cotswold Life while I was still a police officer and, again, it was a real confidence boost. It was the first time I’d been paid to write something.

I slowly started thinking that perhaps if one magazine would pay me to write, then another one would. At the same time, I was finding it very difficult to manage my police career along with my family. I was very ambitious, driven and worked very long hours - I was very focused on doing good things with the police. As something of an all-or-nothing person, I didn’t feel as though I could go part-time, and so I decided on a career break - that I would go two years trying to make a living from writing. I pitched to newspapers and magazines, slowly picking up journalism work. I did a lot of copywriting and social media writing for small businesses - all sorts of things to do with words and communications. It worked, and I was able to pay the bills. At the same time, I wrote my first novel, I Let You Go. Since then I’ve been very fortunate in that I’ve been able to write novels full-time. It’s very rare now that I do any other type of writing - apart from my column with Cotswold Life. I feel very loyal to them; I don’t know if I’d have had this career without the encouragement I received from the editor all those years ago.

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INTERVIEW

Clare’s debut novel, I Let You Go

Your first book, I Let You Go, was inspired by a real-life hit-and-run case that affected you deeply. Have other cases from your police career stayed with you in the same way? It’s a funny thing… I think that when people know that I’m an ex-police officer, they assume that I must write about a lot of true cases; in fact, I Let You Go is the only book where I’ve drawn on something that I’ve had first-hand experience with at work. The other books tend to be inspired by headlines or news stories, or some other source of inspiration. What I really got from my police career was exposure to people from all walks of life. When you work in an industry where you’re exposed to the public - whether police officer, nurse, social worker, teacher - you’re forced out of the bubble in which you live, and you soon realise how different people’s lives are; how thin the line between good choices and bad choices really is. In reality, any one of us could have ended up taking a very different path; that’s the bit I’m always fascinated by, as a writer. How thin is that line, and what would it take for us to cross it? It’s a very rich territory to mine as an author. Is there anything about the way that police life is often represented in crime fiction that strikes you as inauthentic? British police procedurals used to make me

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really cross; in fact, when I was working in the police, I couldn’t read them at all, because the errors were just infuriating. So I only read American procedurals, which could have been equally wrong - but I wouldn’t have known, so it didn’t matter as much! I’m not sure if I’ve got more tolerant over the years, or if writing has got better - maybe both - but the fiction I read nowadays is very, very accurate…mostly. Perhaps where I have the edge [as an author] is that when you’ve lived something, you’re able to create a layer of authenticity in terms of atmosphere and dialogue and characters. It’s very, very hard to do if you’ve not been there. You can look up how fingerprint technology works, and you can look up what the procedure is around murder investigations, and you can ask police officers all manner of things about how crime is investigated, but you don’t know what it’s like to be inside a custody block, what those cell doors sound like what they slam, how awful the food is, or how

police officers talk to each other when the public isn’t around… you don’t know what it’s like until you’ve seen it. It’s given me a bit of a headstart in adding authenticity to my novels. You’ve said before that it takes roughly a year to write a book; that’s a long time to live with the characters that you’ve created. Are you still attached to any of them? Are there any narrative strands that you’d like to pick up? That’s such a good question - and yes, absolutely! Perhaps because I’m growing as an author and getting more invested in my characters, the characters are getting more real. My last psychological thriller featured a retired detective called Murray Mackenzie. I never really intended for the book to be his story, but I think by the time you get to the end of the book, he’s probably the character you’re most invested in. I would love to go back and do something more with him. Actually, right now, I’m finding it very, very


CLARE MACKINTOSH

Clare’s latest book, After the End

I love the psychology behind criminal acts. Very few of us are born evil; there’s always something that’s triggered our behaviour, that’s shaped us as people. That’s why I find it fascinating to get inside a criminal’s head and look at those vulnerabilities, those trigger points. In fact, my first novel probably has my most evil character - but there is this vulnerability to the way he thinks, and this twisted logic behind some of the actions he takes, that made me feel quite sorry for him, at the same time as absolutely hating him and being quite frightened of him. As a thriller writer, how preoccupied are you with the idea of believability? We’re living in outlandish times; these days, the truth is frequently stranger than fiction. When you’re creating your narratives, do you ever ask yourself if something is too much for a reader to accept?

difficult to write my fifth book, because I’m finding it very difficult to get out of the heads of the characters of my fourth book, After the End. I’m really struggling with it, to the point where I almost feel like taking a break for a couple of weeks - I can’t stop thinking about them, wondering what they’re doing… Before I wrote novels, I used to listen to authors say that they couldn’t stop thinking about the characters; that the characters kept doing unexpected things while they were writing the book. And I used to think that was slightly pretentious, but actually, it’s very, very true, when you live with a character for that long. And really, I spend more time with my characters than I do with my family, because they’re with me all the time. Even when I’m not writing, they’re somewhere in my head, shaping up. So really, it’s very hard to let go of them. You’ve written some truly despicable characters. What’s it like, getting under the skin of a villain? What is the process for you? That is again an area where I draw on my police experience, where I draw on the hours I’ve spent in the interview room with suspects. I find them really easy to write, if I’m honest - though I don’t know what that says about me. I listen to their voice and write down what they have to say.

I do think about that a lot, actually. I do think that in a world where Trump and three years of Brexit are possible, that fiction is much less terrifying. In general, my benchmark is not ‘is it probable’, but ‘is it possible’ - that’s the question I ask myself all the time. [Crime] fiction is undoubtably more outlandish - generally, the crimes I dealt with in the police were really quite dull, the criminals generally quite stupid. I very rarely met any sort of super-intelligent master criminal, yet if you went by fiction you would assume that the baddies are all masters of criminology. At the end of the day, we’re not writing manuals. There’s a reason why people want to escape into a book. What they’re looking for is something that keeps them turning the pages. But I do have a slight bit of twist fatigue, both as a writer and as a reader. I’ve loved writing three twisty-turny books, but I’ve found it’s been a joy to write something that’s suspensely in a rather different way. My latest book, After the End, has a different propulsion.. It’s much more grounded in reality, and in the emotion and tension that surrounds a traumatic and yet perfectly believable situation, so it’s been a great palate-cleanser. I do wonder sometimes if we’ve created a certain thirst for twists in fiction, and it’s led to some books being completely unbelievable.

Speaking of twists, it’s impressive how tight-lipped your readers have been about yours - there are remarkably few spoilers circulating online. They’re very good, aren’t they? I was really worried about I Let You Go, which has a real belter of a twist, and actually people have just been brilliant about it. I get an awful lot of emails about the twist, and about the ending… the general impression I get about fiction, and not just mine, is that if you’ve read something that is really good, you don’t want to spoil it. You want other people to read it and then you can talk about it - you want them to have the same shock and delight and surprise that you did. I’ve just set up a private Facebook group to make a place where people can talk specifically about my books with spoilers. It’s an outlet where they can come and be completely spoilerful - it’s like an online book club, really. Could you tell us about the creation of the fantastic Chipping Norton Literature Festival? It was driven a little bit by boredom and a little bit by seeing a need. I left the police in July 2011, and, although I was writing, I really struggled with the transition from being an Inspector in a busy police station with lots of responsibility and lots of people to work with and mentor, to suddenly being at home without any of that. At the same time, I was looking at literature festivals in lots of other places, and kind of wondering why nobody had set one up in Chipping Norton before, when we had this incredible independent bookshop, a theatre renowned all over the country - some wonderful venues, a bustling high street… we seemed to have all the right ingredients. When I looked at other literary festivals, the thing that I thought was a shame about them was that so often they were centred in big marquees just outside the town centre, or in a venue that didn’t bring people to the high street. What I envisioned was a big festival in terms of names and the quality of authors who came, but absolutely rooted in the town - we would be using small venues, and working with all the restaurant owners and all the shop managers to make sure that we saw some benefit from the people that came to town.

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INTERVIEW

I love the psychology behind criminal acts. Very few of us are born evil; there’s always something that’s triggered our behaviour, that’s shaped us as people That was the vision and, at the same time, it would fulfil the need that I had to work with people and to manage a budget – something that would give me a bit of a headache, which is what I’m used to. So, I pitched this idea to a group of likeminded people and we just threw ourselves into it with no idea how to run a festival - none of us had ever talked to anybody who had set up a festival, or organized one. In retrospect, that was maybe a bit mad… except it meant that we organized it with completely fresh eyes. It went brilliantly. We had hundreds of people that first year and it has grown every year since. It’s actually far easier to start something than to sustain it - so I take my hat off to Jenny Dee, who has been the Festival director for several years. Once the novelty of something wears off, you’ve got to keep that momentum, you have to keep volunteers engaged, and authors and publishers supportive. But it has been amazing. I remember, in that first year, seeing Jasper Fforde, in the back room of The Chequers - twenty-five people was the most we could cram into there. But what it did was give was such an intimate experience to the audience. At some of the other festivals you might be at the back of a marquee with two hundred other people and, if you’re lucky, you get your book signed - but Jasper was just hanging out, having a beer with everyone. It was great. I’m really proud of it. Did you have any expectations of what it would be like being an author? No. [Laughs]. Actually Chip Lit Fest was amazing for that. I used to go and speak to publishers about which authors they had coming up, and you could really tell which books they were really passionate about, and which authors might be a bit difficult… I remember making a silent vow

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when I was writing I Let You Go that if I ever got published, I was not going to be a difficult author. Most authors are absolutely wonderful, but occasionally we would have an author who was slightly more labour intensive. So I always wanted not to be difficult. There’s a popular idea that being an author is quite a relaxed sort of job - that if you’re a writer you can spend a day sitting in a café making notes. But your reality sounds rather more hectic… My day-to-day reality has changed over the years. Writing in the early days often entailed writing in the evening after the children went to bed. When my husband was off work, he’d take them and I might have a day writing. There was no routine, it was all over the place. Now it’s become much more of a job. I tend to keep office hours; I start work somewhere between 9am - 10am, and tend to finish around 6.30pm. I rarely nowadays work evenings unless I’m really up against it. I certainly spend more time at my desk - not necessarily writing, but doing all the other things. Today, for example, I’ve been doing lots of post - sending off copies of my book to people who have helped me with research. I’ve got to write 2,000 words today, write something in my newsletter, answer a stack of emails, do two interviews by phone, write a talk I’ll be doing later in the week, do my social media, speak with my graphic designer… so there’s all sorts of things I have to do that have nothing to do with the writing. Or rather, they’re all part of the business of writing, but they’re not the actual writing. You’re very good with social media. Do you think authors have to be tech-savvy these days? Do you know authors who don’t engage?

Absolutely - Kate Atkinson isn’t on social media and she’s obviously very successful. I don’t think aspiring published writers should feel under pressure to do it if they don’t like it. I think this is the key; if you like social media and you are good at it then the chances are that it will work for you. I find it a very intuitive, fun thing to do; I have to stop myself from spending too much time on it when I should be writing. For me, it doesn’t take up a lot of mental space - it’s quite relaxing, it’s fun, I get to talk to readers, it builds up loyalty in my readership. But if you are the sort of person who doesn’t find it easy - if what you’re doing comes across as stilted, or the only thing you feel comfortable doing is sharing details of your book, and not the details of your life behind the book – then it’s not going to work well. And if that’s the case, I just say don’t do it. Find something you do like doing, like chatty newsletters, or concentrate on writing the best book you can and leave the marketing to the publisher, as and when you find one. I think it’s best not to do things for the sake of it, or otherwise it becomes forced. Finally, do you have any book recommendations for our readers? I’m terrible when I’m asked this question - I keep a reading journal for this very purpose so I’m not flailing around. I’ve been holding back on thrillers recently for various reasons, but two that I’ve read recently and loved are Fallen Angel by Christopher Brookmeyer and The Life of Death by Lucy Booth. The Life of Death is a really incredible one as it was published posthumously - Lucy was being treated for cancer for several years while she wrote this book. After she died, the Oxfordshire company, Unbound, published it, and it’s actually really moving and very funny and I loved it.


CLARE MACKINTOSH

Find out more about Clare and her books at www.claremackintosh.com COTSWOLD-HOMES.COM

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FEATURE TYPE

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FEATURE TITLED

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INTERVIEW

NellGifford on writing Nell & the Circus of Dreams

There are elements of your own life story in the journey of the main character, Nell. Was writing her tale at all nostalgic or emotional for you? Writing the main character Nell had some autobiographical elements and it was a very nostalgic and emotional process. The Rosebud chicken was actually me and my younger sister Clover’s chicken when we were children, so I guess it is emotional for her too. What does the word ‘circus’ mean to you today? It means a place of safety and family; it’s a kind of retreat as well as an adventure. It’s a leaving home and going home at the same time.

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Which parts of the story do children really react to during your readings? And what sort of questions have they asked? Children like to hear about the circus… and always want to know where Tweedy is. Hopefully the next book will have Tweedy in it. What do you like most about Briony’s illustrations? They are wonderful because it is a continuous made-up world, and it’s accurate to show what circus life is like, it has a cosiness and lusciousness. What message do you hope readers will take away from the book?

Have you learned anything unexpected about the process of writing children’s books?

The circus is a real place of fantasy and dreams - and a place where you can make up your own reality.

It has shown me how much of an oral traditional children’s books are and how much I have read the book aloud in the past few months.

Find out more about Nell and Giffords Circus at www.giffordscircus.com

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NELL GIFFORD

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INTERVIEW

BRIONY MAY SMITH Drawing the Circus

The award-winning illustrator tells us about her work on Nell Gifford’s first children’s book, Nell & the Circus of Dreams

How did you develop the look of the main character, Nell? Nell Gifford and Oxford University Press had a fair idea going into the project of what Nell and the circus family might look like. I think she embodies the spirit of a little Nell Gifford, so she was always going to be blonde and, since she lives on a farm, she had her wellies from the earliest character sketches. Horses play a significant role at Giffords and, from Nell’s autobiography and seeing the show myself, I put a horse pattern onto the character’s dressing gown to reinforce this. What are some of the unique challenges involved in drawing a circus? There are always multiple characters –

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performers, circus crew, families, animals – in every scene, from the set up of the circus, the performance, to packing up and going home; this makes every page very detailed, which is lots of fun because you can hide lots of scenes for children to spot! But it also means it takes a long time to get right, with the perspective, and making sure all the characters and their clothing don’t overpower or ruin the aesthetic of the overall spread. Do you have a favourite spread or illustration from the finished book? I really enjoyed drawing the scene where Nell was just about to enter the circus world, running up the meadow towards the wagons. I had lots of fun trying to make it look like the sunrise was just starting to light up the hill, and colouring each individual flower!

I think, like Nell, I’ve been very lucky in that I have always known what I wanted to be, and this was indeed to be a children’s book illustrator!


BRIONY MAY SMITH

When was your first visit to Giffords, and what were your impressions? It was over the Summer in 2017. First was to the Circus headquarters, when rehearsals for the show were underway, and then again a few months later to see the show itself. I loved the care and attention that went into the appearance of the circus, from the tent itself, to the wagons and caravans the circus sold merchandise in, and the crew stayed in. There was always a buzz of activity surrounding and leading up to the show. The show itself was fantastic, it was thrilling to watch the acrobatics, and the horses were amazing. The glittering costumes and set were really inspiring and really helped me to imagine the sort of circus that the picture book would contain.

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INTERVIEW

Did you ever want to run away and join the circus, as the real-life Nell did? Or did you always dream of being an illustrator? I think, like Nell, I’ve been very lucky in that I have always known what I wanted to be, and this was indeed to be a children’s book illustrator! I did enjoy being up on stage at school (apparently I stormed off a stage as a toddler at ballet - I don’t remember this) but I knew that I would have to do something in art. But the great thing about all my favourite subjects at school is that they all fed into each other. And so I think there’s a little of the circus world in there, I just didn’t pack my trunk.

“The show itself was fantastic, it was thrilling to watch the acrobatics, and the horses were amazing. The glittering costumes and set were really inspiring”

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BRIONY MAY SMITH

What words of advice would you give to children who’d like to become illustrators or artists? My own experience has been, keeping a sketchbook and drawing all the time (which is easy when you want to draw all the time) will help you develop as an artist. You will constantly be improving, and that’s the great thing about drawing. Practical advice would be, you should look at what you’re drawing more than the piece of paper - I personally believe observing is a major part of development. It helps to have varied interests, consume culture and read, too, to build up the scope of your imagination.

Horses play a significant role at Giffords and, from Nell’s autobiography and seeing the show myself, I put a horse pattern onto the character’s dressing gown to reinforce this.

Find out more about Briony at www.brionymaysmith.com

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SAFARI STAYCATION!

SAFARI STAYCATION!

Situated high up in the Cotswold hills between Bourton on the Water and Northleach is a peaceful ancient settlement first mentioned in the Doomsday Book. I have always been a massive fan of the staycation, the nearer the better, so when I am offered a two-night stay at one of the Notgrove’s new safari tents I jump at the chance. Ah, the British weather, though. Late June, a howling wind, scudding grey skies and a predicted night-time high of six degrees. My husband, not a fan of camping “ever, under any circumstances” gets in the car with a look of forbearance. The children are slumped in the backseat, end-of-school-week weary. “It’s going to be freezing,” says the youngest morosely. But as we turn off towards Notgrove the mood shifts. Instant alchemy. “Oh my god it’s so beautiful. Seriously, I could live here forever,” exclaims the eldest as we meander into the village and the clock goes back half a century. “Did you hire bikes?” demands middle-child. I did. She’s off with her sisters in the slipstream, speeding away before we have even unpacked. My husband has already got the kettle on and he’s happy, too. After all, this is not camping. This is glamping par extraordinaire. Plumbed-in loo, heating, proper beds, downy duvets, extra blankets, sofa and cushions, retro enamel kitchenware. No TV. Bliss.

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This is glamping par extraordinaire. Plumbed-in loo, heating, proper beds, downy duvets, extra blankets, sofa and cushions, retro enamel kitchenware. No TV. Bliss. Night falls. We snuggle up, eat crisps and play cards, go to bed in our dressing gowns and sleep like babies until nine in the morning, lulled by the rush of beech trees blown about by the wind. Overnight, the weather has done a complete 360. We throw

open the canvas to let in the rising heat, sit on the veranda in the sunshine. The estate gardener is mowing, filling our tent with the scent of newly-cut-grass. He apologises for breaking the peace and offers me a quick tour of the grounds.


SAFARI STAYCATION!

He’s been working here for four years now; the results are beautiful. Stone-walled immaculate terraced lawns, long wide informal borders filled to bursting with traditional flowers and shrubs, open vistas of parkland, ancient spreading trees. We stop to admire a pretty cottage garden. I nearly die of envy when he tells me that’s his home. He gives me an everlasting sweet-pea, tells me to plant it somewhere sunny and to pick the flowers often. A consolation prize. Later, we invite a friend for supper who also once lived in the village. Nostalgia hangs in the air. She brings our two dogs to join us who are suitably overjoyed. My husband cooks sausages over an open fire, logs supplied by the farm. I boil new potatoes with mint, wash some lettuce for a salad. As the sun sets, the tent is bathed in hot pink light. We quaff chilled Mateus Rosе`, eat strawberries and cream. The children run around the field in slow circles throwing sticks for the dogs and then collapse. We are only twenty minutes from real life, but we have time-travelled, suspended in a hazy summer’s day from the 1970s. Safari, so good.

The beautiful Notgrove estate occupies around fifteen hundred acres of dry steep-sided valleys, grasslands and mixed woodland copses, with a quaint archetypal Cotswold village at its centre - thirty ancient stone cottages nestling beside cart-wide lanes, a grand manor house, parish church and newly restored village hall at the centre. It really doesn’t seem possible that such a place can still exist today - peaceful and utterly unspoilt, seemingly blessed with an unchanging rural life enjoyed for centuries. However, since taking over from his father some years ago, current owners Harry Acland and his wife Diana have poured heart and soul into making significant changes to that way of life which they hope will preserve the estate for future generations. “I don’t own anything here, it’s all in trust and I am just the custodian passing everything onto the next generation in good shape, so it was very important to get the estate paying its way. We once had hundreds of sheep and a large milk herd too, but it really wasn’t sustainable any longer with TB and so on, not enough at least to support a whole village, and we simply had to come up with a different way of living.

Today, with the addition of a holiday let business, we have created a sustainable income that complements the farm and the way we manage the countryside. It provides for maintenance and restoration of the whole estate ... “Today, with the addition of a holiday let business, we have created a sustainable income that complements the farm and the way we manage the countryside. It provides for maintenance and restoration of the whole estate - you won’t see any dry-stone walls falling down here – and offers far more secure employment than small-scale farming.

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SAFARI STAYCATION!

“It feels good to support the local economy. Most of the villagers are now engaged in various aspects of the holiday let business, from small construction projects to website administration, maintenance and cleaning. Best of all, it’s an enterprise that offers very family-friendly hours for those with young children.”

tents designed for families have been erected on the former cricket field.

In addition to the few holiday cottages, there is a choice of rustic yet luxurious accommodation dotted sparsely around the estate. Four light-filled modern barns sleep up to thirty-two people at a time, whilst a quiet cluster of glamping pods - furnished with bed sofas and kitchenettes - are just the ticket for couples. Now five brand-new safari

“We all need to escape from the stresses and rigours of a busy modern life,” says Diana. “Harry and I stayed in a safari when we first put them up in March – it was freezing outside but we were perfectly cosy and had the best night’s sleep for a very long time.”

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Enclosed by mature spreading beech trees, situated in the centre of the village and surrounded on all sides by estate land, this is a truly wonderful spot for a few nights under canvas.

“Most of our guests absolutely crave down-

We have very deliberately kept the imprint of our new business light upon the land.


SAFARI STAYCATION!

paths, setting aside some two hundred acres of special plots which we have planted with wild bird mixes, corn pollen and nectar mixes for bees and beetle banks to provide a wonderful environment for wild birds.”

time and are at their happiest simply sitting with a glass of wine, cooking a barbecue under a star-filled sky - but we have provided an on-site games room and a mini football pitch to occupy the children, just in case they are feeling particularly energetic!”

“Living in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The scenery changes with each season as does the pattern of farming; we have an abundance of lambs and calves in spring, a golden harvest in summer, autumnal woods and dramatic winters, often with snow,” says Harry.

“There are also a host of friendly animals to visit, including our gorgeous pigs, alpacas and donkeys, and the opportunity to walk or cycle through the estate to the local pub at Cold Aston about a mile away, arriving just in time for a spot of Sunday lunch.”

“We have very deliberately kept the imprint of our new business light upon the land. We are passionate about looking after this exceptional landscape and protecting all its natural inhabitants too, so we have joined a wildlife conservation scheme as part of our drive towards eco-friendly living.”

“The results of our endeavours have been so rewarding. Skylarks, corn bunting, grey partridge and lapwing thrive here and we have also seen a great improvement in hare and hedgehog populations. It is, thankfully, a complete vindication of our original vision. Suffice it to say we are tremendously contented with this new way of life in our ancient corner of paradise.”

“We have added in new foot and bridle

Words by Karen von Speyr

What are the greatest joys of living in Notgrove?

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SHRINK YOUR CLIMATE FOOTPRINT

HOW TO SHRINK YOUR CLIMATE FOOTPRINT IN

SEVEN EASY STEPS

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SHRINK YOUR CLIMATE FOOTPRINT

With global emissions still rising, urgent action must be taken to preserve our biosphere. Only political will and global co-operation will fix the problem, but there are many ways you can reduce your personal impact on the environment. Read on to discover how your family can contribute.

1. MODIFY YOUR DIET Cut back on meat and dairy and you can reduce your carbon impact by up to a whopping 73% Cutting back on the meat we consume is the ‘single biggest way’ of minimising the harm we cause to our environment, according to researchers from the University of Oxford. Published in the journal Science, their landmark 2018 study examined over 40,000 farms in 119 countries and assessed the impact of over 40 food products (together representing over 90% of all that we eat) and reached a number of fascinating conclusions - not least that if everybody stopped eating meat and dairy, global farmland use could be reduced by an enormous 75%. Research leader Joseph Poore said: “A vegan diet is probably the single biggest way to reduce your impact on planet Earth, not just greenhouse gases, but global acidification, eutrophication, land use and water use.” “It is far bigger than cutting down on your flights or buying an electric car… Avoiding consumption of animal products delivers far better environmental benefits than trying to purchase sustainable meat and dairy.” Poore also said: “The reason I started this project was to understand if there were sustainable animal producers out there. But I have stopped consuming animal products over the last four years of this project. These impacts are not necessary to sustain our current way of life. The question is how much can we reduce them, and the answer is ‘a lot’. So, should we all immediately go vegan? It’s a proposition that some might find unappealing, but we can all certainly buy less and consume less meat - an act which comes with added health benefits as a nice sweetener. For starters, why not introduce three or four meatless days a week? You can find quality vegetarian recipes all over the Internet, but BBC Good Food’s Best Vegetarian Recipes (www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/best-vegetarian-recipes) is a great place to start.

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SHRINK YOUR CLIMATE FOOTPRINT

3. SHOP SUSTAINABLY Use your purchase power to support those making a difference

BACK ON 2.CUT TRAVEL

(ESPECIALLY FLYING) Taking fewer breaks abroad will greatly reduce your personal impact Air travel is a real climate killer, partly because airplanes ditch their emissions into our upper atmosphere. Unfortunately, more planes are in the sky than ever before. (According to the BBC, the number of planes in British skies reached new highs on 24 May 2019, with over 9,000 flights using the UK’s airspace). When a return flight to New York from London can blow through one person’s yearly emissions allowance, it really puts all of your other efforts to reduce your carbon footprint into perspective. Put simply, we need to fly less. Much less. The Swedes have a word for the feelings of guilt experienced when you realise how much damage your flying is causing - flygskam (‘flight shame’). If you’re feeling brave, you can tally up the emissions your recent flight released at www.travelandclimate.org - it’ll also tell you how much Arctic ice your planned trip will melt. Yikes! So, what does this mean for your holidaymaking? It’s an excellent excuse to take more breaks in the UK, for starters - or for venturing to Europe by rail which, relative to flying, is a more eco-friendly proposition. If you have to fly, you can offset your emissions by contributing to reforesting and renewable energy schemes. A growing number of airlines are introducing offsetting schemes, but do your research to ensure that your money is being invested in worthy projects. When you are booking flights, make sure you fly directly - not stopover - and please do fly economy. Even in our day to day lives, there are many ways we can minimise our impact - from liftsharing to working from home. And, if you must buy a new car, buy electric!

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From the food we eat to the clothes we wear, we’re still living in an age of waste. Government statistics show that ‘approximately 8 million tonnes of food is wasted post-manufacture.’ Meanwhile, in 2017 alone, UK households banished 300,000 tonnes of clothing to UK landfill sites. It’s no surprise that the fashion industry is a major source of emissions. In 2018, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change reported that up to 10% of global emissions were attributable to the fashion industry, thanks to its ‘carbon intensive supply chain and production processes.’ The fashion industry also squanders precious resources - the same UNFCCC article states: ‘To make just one pair of denim jeans, 10,000 liters of water is required to just grow the one kilo of cotton needed for the pair of jeans. In comparison, one person would take 10 years to drink 10,000 liters of water.’ ‘Cumulatively, the fashion industry produces about 20% of global waste water. Furthermore, 85% of textiles end up in landfills or are incinerated when most of these materials could be reused.’ So, what can you do as a consumer? For starters, make sure that any new clothes you buy are sustainably made and plastic free - without polyester and other synthetic fibres. Better yet, purchase most of your new clothes second-hand at vintage stores or charity shops. As for the weekly shopping list, think organic - even for beauty products and toiletries - locally grown food cuts back on air miles and packaging. Speaking of packaging, a 2018 Guardian investigation found that ‘Britain’s leading supermarkets create more than 800,000 tonnes of plastic packaging waste every year.’ Luckily, the public is growing more aware of the impact of single-use plastic - from the emissions resulting in its production, to the terrible effect that microplastics can have on the environment. (Store policies are changing, thanks in part to campaigners like Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall; Waitrose Oxford has introduced a package-free shopping trial). Perhaps if we can support more of our local producers, we can cut back on the waste and excess of the current supermarket system, and the emissions that come from importing our food. So, use those butchers and greengrocers, those farmers’ markets and farm shops it won’t just benefit the local economy, but the planet. (Find out much more about sustainable food at www.sustainablefoodtrust.org) Finally, make sure any investments you make are not placed in fossil fuels, and join the chorus of voices pressuring big organisations to divest from fossil fuels. The transition to renewables will come about faster, the less financial interest there is in keeping fossil energy alive.


SHRINK YOUR CLIMATE FOOTPRINT

4.GET POLITICAL Don’t let our politicians ignore their responsibilities - demand that they take action For decades, politicians around the world have been getting away with ignoring the emergency of climate change. We must continue to let them know, as loudly as possible, that we need firm action on green issues. So put your vote in a party that actually believes in doing something about the crisis we all face - parties with policies, not empty pledges and promises. Research that candidate to find out what their personal beliefs are. If your MP isn’t giving the issue the attention it deserves, let them know! The emergence of young activists like 16-year-old Greta Thunberg currently leading a global school strike movement - and movements like Extinction Rebellion – should shame those leaders who haven’t yet spared a thought for humanity’s future. It’s our ongoing responsibility to educate ourselves and our children, so that our politicians are forced to think further ahead than the next election.

Extinction Rebellion protest, London, 19th April 2019

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CONTROL OF 6.TAKE YOUR DEVICES Manage your energy spend with these simple tips

5. CHANGE YOUR HOUSEHOLD HABITS Changing bulbs and turning off lights is far from the limit of what can be done at home Needless to say, it takes a lot of power to keep Britain’s households running. The good news is that a transition from dirty coal-powered energy to renewables is underway (at the time of writing, we’ve gone without coal for 10 days and 21 hours). But there’s plenty to be done at home while our national infrastructure adapts. There are economies to be made when it comes to big labour-saving devices such as washing machines, tumble driers and dishwashers. Unless there’s some sort of nasty stain you’re trying to blitz, general clothes washes can be done at colder temperatures of around 30oC or lower. Air dry your clothes whenever possible, and swap out the dishwasher for a plastic tub in the sink every other day. Your wallet will thank you. And there are plenty of other easy little changes you can make to how you run your household. Drink a lot of tea? Of course you do! In the UK alone, 165 million cups of tea are consumed everyday, so consider switching to bags that are actually compostable. You can even find organically produced alcohol these days, so shop around until your every essential is sustainably sourced. Cut back on paper waste by receiving your statements online, instead of having them delivered through the post. Bring cups and bottles from home to avoid buying bottled water and grabbing disposable cups from cafе`s. Plan your meals ahead to minimise food waste, and start a compost heap in the garden to put food waste to use. See if you can get your appliances second-hand before buying them from new, and donate any unwanted functioning appliances. Of course, none of these little actions are, by themselves, going to ‘save the planet’ - but if we all live a little more responsibly, it’ll help lift the burden. And let’s not forget, one of the biggest changes you can make is switching energy suppliers to the growing number of green energy providers.

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In a wireless world, it’s all too easy to believe that our use of the Internet leaves little-to-no carbon footprint. But the reality is that much of this marvellous ‘invisible’ infrastructure is powered by massive, energy-hungry data centres far away from home. Studies show that the world’s information technology networks are accountable for a sizeable (and rapidly increasing) proportion of global energy usage. Last year, they accounted for 6-10% of global energy consumption - coming to around 4% of greenhouse gas emissions. Every time you send or receive an email, make a search, or post on social media, you are increasing CO2 emissions. According to the energy usage website Energuide: ‘When browsing the web, an average Internet user yearly needs about 365 kWh electricity and 2,900 litres of water, which corresponds to the CO2 that is emitted when you travel a good 1,400 km by car.’ It’s not hard to reduce the effect of your Internet usage. By deleting old emails, sending smaller attachments (or compressing them) and unsubscribing from unread newsletters, you can make your online communications more energy-efficient. By entering the website address of the website you intend to visit - rather than entering it into a search engine - you’ll save the energy required to process a search request. When you do need to make a search, try using Ecosia - a search engine that uses ad revenue to plant trees, which in turn scrub CO2 from the atmosphere. (Not only that, but their servers run on 100% renewables!) When it comes to televisions, the rule of thumb is that larger screens eat up more energy. LCD TVs also soak up considerably more power than LEDs - but plasma screens are the thirstiest of all. (Check the energy certificate when buying a new set - A-A* ratings are what you’re looking for). As with all other devices, remember to turn them off rather than put them in standby when not in use. As for computers, generally speaking, laptops are more efficient than desktops, usually consuming up to 80% less electricity (and operating on much less power). Again, leaving a laptop or a desktop in standby still uses up energy (consumption falls to about a third for both). So, if there’s a desktop computer constantly running in the home office, do make sure to switch it off when not in use. (Remember to switch off all of those accessories we connect to our computers, too - printers, speakers, chargers etc.)


SHRINK YOUR CLIMATE FOOTPRINT

7. SPREAD THE WORD With all citizens lobbying for change, we will start to see results Humans are social creatures. Our ability to co-operate and pass on knowledge is the secret to our success. We solve our problems by working together, and that’s made a good deal easier when we’re all on the same page. The good news is, public awareness of climate change is at an all-time high (even as misinformation spreads in our interconnected age). But, as with big, uncomfortable topics such as death and money worries, climate change can be difficult to discuss with friends, neighbours and relatives. Why? It’s easy to feel ineffectual, even hopeless, in the face of such adversity. But, by having those difficult conversations, we can channel those feelings of anxiety into positive action. Take a look at the Citizens’ Climate Lobby UK, who are campaigning for a Carbon Fee and Dividend (see www.citizensclimatelobby.uk for more details).

IN BRIEF: INDIVIDUAL ACTIONS AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE • • • • • • • • •

Talk about climate change Eat less meat and dairy Fly less (just one long trip can wipe our your yearly carbon budget); offset any flights you must take Use public transport instead of driving when possible; get a hybrid/electric car Don’t vote for politicians lacking real green policies Support peaceful climate campaigning Switch to a green energy provider Use sustainable business and local producers Buy clothes that last (second-hand when possible)

POSSIBLE GOVERNMENT ACTIONS TO ACHIEVE ‘NET ZERO’ CARBON EMISSIONS* • • • • • • • •

Support renewable energy Cut fossil fuel subsidies Reforest and rewild the UK Promote low emission farming and diet Tax fossil fuel use (including aviation fuel) Support electric cars and public transport Enforce Building Regulations and support retrofitting Support the EU Emissions Trading Scheme

*Sourced from Cheltenham Festival of Science 2019 event ‘Bang Goes the Climate’, featuring speakers Dr Tamsin Edwards (King’s College London), Prof. Ed Hawkins (University of Reading), Prof. Mark Maslin (University College London) and Prof. Andrea Sella (University College London) COTSWOLD-HOMES.COM

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ASK THE EXPERTS

Going Green I want to make my Listed house more green, but think it probably isn’t possible. What can I do? t is very good news that the Government is, at last, really making an effort to make our housing stock more sustainable and that carbon neutral forms of energy are being increased. Some people think that Listed buildings are difficult and costly to heat, but in fact solid stone or masonry builds lend themselves admirably to working like big storage heaters; so they are ideal for the continual ambient heat from underfloor heating, which can be provided by ground source heat pumps. In fact, this is arguably better for the building than the ‘boom and bust’ form of heating provided by a boiler and timer, where the house is allowed to grow cold and then is rapidly heated by a boiler and radiators.

Central Surveying has offices in the Cotswolds and Knightsbridge, specialising in independent professional surveying and property consultancy services for commercial and residential clients in the Cotswolds, South West and London. Robert Hamilton works from Naunton in the heart of the North Cotswolds. To contact Robert, telephone 01285 640 840 or visit www.centralsurveying.co.uk

Not letting heat escape is the first task, so ensure really effective insulation is in place in the roof space. Sheep’s wool is highly effective; it provides good thermal performance in a high-density format. It also has very good soundinsulation capability, so can be an effective insulator for partition walls. For those who are totally vegan, there are hemp-based fibre insulations available too but remember to allow for ventilation in the roof space, or condensation can be a problem. Walls and windows can allow heat to escape. Secondary glazing is very effective and is permitted in Listed houses, or those whose windows are too ‘individual’ to allow for replacement with standard units. Thick interlined curtains are a good solution, or some houses use internal shutters; it is always a joy to come across a period house where the shutters are still functioning, and it is relatively inexpensive to get a good carpenter to renovate or replicate shutters. Shutters make an effective light-andnoise excluding barrier and keep the heat in. Walls were traditionally insulated by using thick tapestries, so why not make a design

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statement by doing the same thing our ancestors did? Beautiful carpets from the Middle East and India or Pakistan can be used to the same effect; their beautiful jewel colours also serve to warm any room. Or be more prosaic and line masonry walls with drylining on ‘dabs’ - air provides an effective insulator. Remember that doors are often major sources of heat loss, so creating an enclosed porch to form an airlock (and useful coat and boot room!) will retain heat in the house; or if this is not an option, a lined portière curtain (see curtains above). Let’s return to heat sources. Under current legislation, ground source heat pumps are currently considered ‘permitted development’ for Listed buildings in most planning areas. This makes a huge difference in considering their use. Basically, they source warmth from under the ground; this can be as little as two metres or so if you have a large enough expanse of garden to allow for ‘slinky coils’ (horizontal collectors) or for boreholes. These require drilling down to some 80m or more. Although the heat pumps work on electricity, for every unit of electricity used to run the pump, three or four units of heat are captured and transferred. At this efficiency level, 70% lower CO2 emissions are recorded. If the electricity is provided by renewable sources, this can be zero carbon. The way the heat pumps work provides a constant low level heat source, ideal for use in liquid underfloor heating systems. Provided the ground works are carried out effectively and good insulation is put under the liquid filled pipes, even old flagstones can be replaced and act effectively. I recently stayed in a relative’s house in Poland where, even in the depth of Winter with deep snow on the ground, we could open the windows because the ground source heating was so efficient. Air source heating is another option, but may require some planning input. Again, the efficiency conversion is impressive. Limited grants are available, but on a repayment basis so you have to be brave enough to pay up front! It must be remembered that Listed and period houses were built at a time when there would be coal or wood fires in most of the rooms for as many hours as possible. They are therefore designed to be heated at a constant low level, rather than being allowed to get cold then being reheated quickly by a boiler being called into action. If you can heat your period house sustainably, you are doing it, yourself and the planet a favour.


DIARY OF A FARMER’S WIFE

When the cows escape, Anna MacCurrach finds herself filling the role of ‘cattle dog’ teacher that I would be selling my hockey stick and, thereafter, would either be at a music lesson or having an asthma attack for the rest of the season, only reappearing in the summer for rounders and tennis. I was, therefore, as surprised as my family was when I decided that I would like to start cross country running – I can run around the farm, I can take the dogs with me, and I can get in shape for dealing with these cows. Win, win, win.

At Tagmoor, some of our grass fields are permanent pasture and others are grass, as part of the arable crop rotation. One or two of our neighbours often ask when particular fields will be back in grass, as they like seeing the cattle out there during the summer. We like it when the cattle are out too; there is nothing better than seeing the cows and their calves contentedly chewing the cud and relaxing in the sunshine. It is not always relaxing though. The cattle have to be moved around different fields as they eat the grass, and sometimes they escape - a wayward walker might have left a gate open, or the cattle might decide that the grass looks greener on the other side of the fence, and they just barge their way through three strands of barbed wire to get to it. It is during these moments, when we are moving the cattle for whatever reason, that I wonder why cattle farmers don’t have dogs in the same way that sheep farmers do. I wonder this because it appears that the farmer’s wife has to fulfil this role, at least in our house. It is not remotely enjoyable

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for someone who has spent years avoiding running (and generally prefers to be the person doing the shouting rather than being shouted at) to be treated like a dog. Just to be clear, I have literally spent my entire life trying to avoid running. At around the age of 14, I announced to the school PE

As I write this, I am in my seventh week of running five times a week and all seemed to be going well, until winter arrived in June and scuppered my new routine. I have googled ‘waterproof running leggings’ and they don’t seem to exist. I’m starting to panic and am contemplating swimming as a back up plan, but how will this help with farm duties? There’s only one thing for it; I’ll take the quad bike and train Jimmy to the whistle!

Find out more about Tagmoor Farm at www.lovemycow.com


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REVIEW

Volkswagen e-Golf Miss Dashboard drives guilt-free to the green gastro café at Thistledown in a gleaming new e-Golf. We’ve seen David Attenborough’s Blue Planet, we’re seeing social media and news images of our oceans full of plastic and pitiful pictures of polar bears standing on melting ice. Instances of asthma are on the increase. Our air is polluted by diesel fumes. We’ve taken our world for granted and it has to change. Now! But we don’t have to stop living our lives, we can all make small changes to make a big difference. One family who have been doing this for nearly twenty-five years are the Kellys, who own Thistledown – an organic farm, campsite and now outstanding café (though the word café undersells its incredible food) set in a wildflower meadow on the outskirts of the beautiful village of Nympsfield near Nailsworth in Gloucestershire. The views out across Woodchester Park alone are worth the visit. All the food here is cooked on a charcoal barbeque and wood-fired clay oven using local, organic, foraged and free-range ingredients, including their own meat and vegetables. Thistledown Café is not a ‘knit your own

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muesli’ type alternative place, it’s a modern space with a sophisticated edge, serving the most delicious food, influenced by Mediterranean and Middle Eastern cuisine. We ate chicken shawarma – marinated in yogurt, with homemade pickles – and a flatbread, cooked in the clay oven (in front of our very eyes). The Indian mezze was sublime, with turmeric roast cauliflower, a Gujarati lentil dhal and rhubarb & ginger chutney. The Dukha and dips sharing platter was a rainbow of colours and flavours. The cakes are all made on-site – orange & cardamom, cherry & almond, nankatai (a delicately flavoured pistachio, orange zest and date shortbread style biscuit); the list goes on! And to complement the food, you can choose from a fine selection of locally produced wine, beer, cider, cordials, teas and coffees. It’s foodie heaven! So I didn’t feel guilty rocking up in a brand new car, as the e-Golf has no exhaust pipe and produces zero emissions. We just glided quietly along the beautifully named Tinkley Lane and into the field. An understated car; it’s a Golf, but green. It’s the now and it’s the

future. Cars like this will make a difference to how we save our world. It’s not about a gas-guzzling, loud, grand gesture. It’s a silent revolution. The Golf was the best selling car in the UK last year – so it’s likely that this electric version will continue the tradition of one of our all-time favourites. As an electric vehicle, it’s subtle – as it doesn’t look like some high tech car from an era way into the future. It has a small e-Golf badge and blue line along the front grille, slightly different curved headlights and aerodynamic alloy wheels (flatter than usual). I can’t say enough times that there’s nothing gimmicky or ostentatious about the e-Golf. It’s a classic VW Golf – only electric. Even the charging plug is exactly where you’d traditionally fill it up with petrol or diesel. It feels as solid and as ‘normal’ as you’d expect from a Golf, but without the worry of any more emissions. The drive is as solid as any traditional Golf, with more or less the same generous legroom for four adults (five at a squeeze) and a good-sized boot. It’s ultimately just a Golf, but


DRIVING MISS DASHBOARD

Fast facts Fuel consumption – electric charging costs about 4p per mile, as opposed to 14p for petrol. A full charge will give you up to 144 miles. Charging time – on the e-Golf’s commercial high speed charging system you can get about 80% charge in 45 minutes, but realistically you’re more likely to plug in at home – using a wall charger will take about 5 hours and, on a standard three pin plug, about 17 hours (so overnight is the best option). Road tax – £0 – it’s a zero emissions car. Safety – it’s the latest Golf, so has as many, and more, safety features as you’d expect, including several driver alert systems to prevent crashes and protect pedestrians, including pre-crash preventative braking and city emergency braking. Media – a really simple touch screen which accesses radio, satnav and Bluetooth connection. An app allows you to switch on the heating or air-con remotely, so the car is the right temperature when you get in it. the new fun bit is using it in the various modes that regenerate electricity as you brake (with a simple switch of the automatic gearstick), or by driving in eco or eco plus mode, where you can restrict the amount of air-con that you use in order to maximise your mileage. When driving back down the hill near Uley Long Barrow, I clawed back seven miles worth of electricity – it’s such a positive way to travel. My hints for getting the most out of the e-Golf are always plug in when you get home – charging overnight means you can fill up for about a fiver! It’s a classic VW Golf – only electric. Even the charging plug is exactly where you’d traditionally fill it up with petrol or diesel.

Muted colours – eight colours, which is great if you’re happy with whites and greys, plus black and a dark blue. The drive – normal, eco and eco plus. Optional extras – the most useful is the heat pump, which reduces the electric power use by up to 36% in cold weather, by recycling heat as the car drives. Warranty – 3 year (60,000 mileage) and 8 year (99,360 mileage) battery warranty. Price – from £30,340 (including £3,500 government electric vehicle grant).

Of course I’d like a longer electric range (Tesla and Hyundai have already achieved this) and that will come in time, but it’s still perfectly possible to use the e-Golf as your every day car. Frankly I’d rather be flying the flag for a sustainable future – and this makes it possible. Thistledown Café is open 9 – 4.30 Wednesday to Sunday (7 days a week during school holidays), with sourdough pizza on Friday and Saturday evenings from Easter to October. Booking highly advisable! For more information visit www.thistledown.org.uk/cafe

Follow Alexandra on Twitter @MissDashboardUK for a refreshing take on cars.

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DENTAL HEALTH MATTERS

Dental Health Matters

Tooth Wear

Due to advances in medical science, the population of the UK is living longer than ever before. Living longer means that our teeth are retained for longer as well. Although this is a good thing, it brings its own set of problems - namely tooth wear. Dr. Trevor Bigg What is tooth wear? Tooth wear is divided into three types:

and even through to the nerve of the tooth leading to an abscess.

Attrition This is best described as ‘tooth-on-tooth’ wear. In past centuries, coarse food caused much wear to the teeth. In modern times our food is nowhere near as coarse as it used to be, but we’ve replaced the wear from food with habits such as bruxism, the repeated clenching or grinding of teeth. Bruxism wears down the biting surfaces and can cause fractures of teeth and fillings.

Erosion Erosion comes from acid attacking the tooth surface. The acid can come from within the body or from the diet. Erosion from within the body is caused by gastric reflux, or heartburn. Many people suffer from this complaint, which becomes more common as the years pass by, but many more have reflux to a lesser degree and are not aware of it. Erosion from the diet is caused by the consumption of acid foods and drinks.

Abrasion Abrasion is caused by the action of an external force on the tooth surface. The classic example of this is toothbrush abrasion. A conventional hand toothbrush is sometimes used with too much pressure, particular if we want to remove staining on the teeth; this can form a groove at the gum margin, where hard enamel gives way to the softer material covering the root. With the toothbrush alone, it’s possible to cut deep within the root surface

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How do we prevent tooth wear? We can reduce its effects by taking the following steps: Attrition – regular visits to the dentist will ensure that any tooth wear is monitored closely and sometimes a night guard needs to be worn to reduce further wear. Damaged areas can be repaired using tooth-coloured fillings. (To see examples of this, go to our

website at www.drbigg.com/gallery) Abrasion – change to a modern electric toothbrush with a pressure sensor, which lights up if it is pushed too hard and prevents further wear. Erosion – medication can be helpful in reducing gastric reflux. Diet discussion with the dentist or hygienist will help reduce acid from food and drink. If you want more information about the contents of the article, go to the British Dental Health Foundation website at Tell Me About/Topics, or contact Penny at Milton Dental Practice: 01993 831 396 or email penny@drbigg.com and come to see us for a consultation. To accompany this article, we are offering a New Patient Examination at the fee of £99.00, including bitewing X-rays if required, and a free Denplan Examination.


THE YOGA TREE

Living Seasonally Emma Lawrence of The Yoga Tree explores the ways you can draw strength from the summer

The season of summer is known for its long and light days, allowing us to soak up nature’s energy which is at its peak at this time of year. Absorbing this energy allows us to live life to the full, stay up later and get up earlier whilst everything, including us, is in full bloom. If summer were a person, their nature would be someone who loves to enjoy rather than strive. Their strength makes them open, warm, strong and joyful. They move and operate from the heart and perform with passion. They can draw out the positive and hope in others and be extremely persuasive. However, they have a tendency to burn out, over commit and set up expectations they cannot meet.

inhalation and exhalation. Summer tastes – choose colour! Eat light foods, little and often. Incorporate cooling water-based ingredients, like salads and fruit. Start adding seeds and nuts to give you more omega oils. Summer heart habits Give from the heart to others. Find out this summer what really makes you happy. Communicate with everyone around you. Summer priorities Take control of your life.

Summer exercise – keep it fun! Take a brisk walk in the morning and evening. Summer is a time to socialise, so do this with a friend. Cycle whenever you can.

Learn to let go, move on, forgive.

Meditation – with all the energy of the summer, it is important to balance with some calm and still have time for yourself. If you struggle with meditation, just start by sitting still for five minutes and focus on every

Summer avoidances Burning out.

Try to balance the intensity of living in the moment with an awareness of what follows.

Extremes of any kind. Getting stuck in the same routine.

If summer were a person, their nature would be someone who loves to enjoy rather than strive. Their strength makes them open, warm, strong and joyful. They move and operate from the heart and perform with passion. Summer lifestyle Read inspiring books. Make life simple and harmonious. Take indoors out and bring outdoors in. Summer yoga Yoga – cardiovascular flows. Heart opening postures including Gomukasana, Sucirandhrasana, Ustrasana, Utthita Hasta Padangustasana, Supta Padangustasana, Marichyasana A & C.

For more information on seasonal yoga and where to find classes in the Cotswolds, visit www.the-yoga-tree.com

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FEATURE TITLED

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REV’D CANON KATRINA SCOTT

A significant anniversary leads Rev’d Canon Katrina Scott to think on the progress made by women in the Church

Over the last few months, the Church of England has been marking the 25th anniversary of the first ordinations of women as priests. I was a teenager while the Church was debating the issue, and I remember thinking about it and chatting with friends. I had been lucky enough to grow up seeing some amazing women in Church leadership, and having some inspiring role models in women living their lives at home and in a variety of work places. I was also struck by the compassionate inclusion in Jesus’ character in the Bible – the way he always sought to challenge societal norms, to include the poor, the outcast and those on the edges. Jesus cared for all. I was delighted when the Church began to ordain women and when I saw that Church leadership was being shared by men and women together. Now, after 25 years, the Church, like much of our society, is celebrating how far we have come, whilst also recognising that

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there is still work to be done for gender equality at home and across the world. At a recent service in Gloucester Cathedral, I was pleased to stand in worship alongside some of those first women ordained priest in this Diocese in 1994, and also younger women with exciting futures ahead of them. Wherever I am – at school with my children and their friends, at a big Diocesan service, or simply living in our communities, I delight that all people are equally made in God’s image and loved by God. Katrina Scott Rev’d Canon Katrina Scott is a Rector of 7 churches at the heart of the Cotswolds (including Cutsdean, Farmcote, Temple Guiting, Guiting Power, Naunton, Upper Slaughter and Lower Slaughter) and is also the Area Dean of the North Cotswold Deanery. She has lived in the Cotswolds since 2015, having previously served in Coventry for 15 years. Katrina loves being a vicar, and being a wife and a mother too.

Key statistics provided by The Church of England: There are 5,950 women in ordained ministry in the Church of England. (2017) 30% of clergy are women. (2017) 319 women began training for ordination in 2018, a 38% increase over two years. 54% of those starting training for ordination are women. (2018) Nearly a quarter of clergy in senior posts (bishops, deans and archdeacons) in 2017 were women, which is almost double what it was five years previously.


EVENTS

Want to make some special Summer memories? Here’s a selection of our favourite destinations

1

Gloucester Cathedral

There’s plenty to admire about this magnificent work of architecture - from its breathtaking vaulted ceiling and stainedglass windows to its 225ft tall tower; not forgetting, of course, the cloisters that served as the backdrop to Harry Potter’s cinematic adventures. Over one thousand years of history, art and worship is concentrated at Gloucester Cathedral. Visit the website for an impressive digital tour, which offers a taste of the real experience. www.gloucestercathedral.org.uk

2

Hailes Abbey

Once a site of pilgrimage that claimed to host a phial of Christ’s own blood (later suspected by Henry VIII’s investigators to be the blood of a duck), Hailes Abbey was destroyed during the Dissolution of the Monasteries. Its remains make a pleasant destination for an afternoon trip, however. You can even get there by steam train with the recent opening of the Hailes platform. www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/ hailes-abbey/

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The Wilson, Cheltenham

Gloucester Cathedral

The Rollright Stones

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The Rollright Stones

Those who haven’t visited Cheltenham’s own museum/art gallery in a few years might be surprised by the stunning rehaul it received in 2013. Named after the Cheltenhamborn explorer Edward Adrian Wilson (who perished with Scott during the doomed 1911 expedition to the Antarctic) the Museum remains a treasure trove of curiosities. Its Arts and Crafts Movement collection is very good.

This Neolithic stone circle is the Cotswolds’ own answer to Stonehenge - and the source of just as much superstitious folklore. Do the stones really come alive at night and roll down to the river to drink? Or are they in fact the tragic remains of a cursed king and his loyal knights, all turned to stone by a mischievous witch? It’s no wonder these mythical monuments have inspired such wonder - they’ve stood through 5,000 years of history, after all.

www.cheltenhammuseum.org.uk

www.rollrightstones.co.uk

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FORTY PLACES TO GO

5

The Butterfly Farm, Stratford-upon-Avon

If you’ve never experienced Stratford-uponAvon’s Butterfly Farm before, you’re in for a unique and exotic experience. Proceed through sealed greenhouses, admiring the gorgeous free-flying butterflies and birds. Insect-lovers will also doubtless get a big kick out of the Minibeast Metropolis. www.butterflyfarm.co.uk

6

Shakespeare’s Birthplace

Of all the historic places in the UK, this surely must be considered one of the most significant - the home where William Shakespeare, arguably the world’s greatest literary figure, was born. Find out more about the Bard’s family life from costumed guides and discover more about his inspirations from the Famous Beyond Words exhibition. Of course, Shakespeare wasn’t just born in Stratford, he was buried there too - in the beautiful Holy Trinity Church (only a short walk from the centre of town). www.shakespeare.org.uk/

Anne Hathaway’s Cottage

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Anne Hathaway’s Cottage

Since we’re on the subject of Shakespeare, there are a few other places we should mention. This 500 year old cottage was the site of Shakespeare’s courtship of his wife Anne, and you can see plenty of period furniture (including the Hathaway Bed) right here. The sumptuous gardens are not to be missed. www.shakespeare.org.uk/visit/anne-hathaways-cottage/

The Royal Shakespeare Company

8

The Royal Shakespeare Company

In no place do the Bard’s immortal words feel so vital as in The Royal Shakespeare Company in Stratford-upon-Avon. Dedicated to bringing the world fresh imaginings of Shakespeare’s plays, the RSC also celebrates the work of other notable playwrights, with a variety of new and interesting productions every year. Check the website for performance times.

9

The Fashion Museum, Bath

This fascinating collection focuses on fashionable wear from the 18th Century onward. Marvel at the bold, beautiful (and sometimes implausible) garments and the artistry of those who produced them. There’s even a dressing up area, where kids and adults can try their hands at modelling corsets and bonnets. www.fashionmuseum.co.uk

10

Batsford Arboretum

Batsford Arboretum is a historic assemblage of beautiful plants from around the world, and a great destination no matter the season. In Summer you’ll find clouds of forget-me-knots, buttercups, foxgloves and orchids in the wild flower areas, while rare trees - such as the Maidenhead Tree and Dawn Redwood - really come to life. www.batsarb.co.uk

www.rsc.org.uk

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EVENTS

Kiftsgate Court Gardens

11

Cotswold Falconry Centre

The Cotswold Falconry Centre is situated right next to the Arboretum, but the Falconry Centre shouldn’t be scheduled in as an afterthought - it’s full of charismatic birds that are truly fascinating to meet - from vultures and owls to eagles, kites, buzzards and harriers. Don’t miss the flying demonstrations - check the times online before you visit. www.cotswold-falconry.co.uk

12

Adam Henson’s Cotswold Farm Park

As one of the Cotswolds’ more ‘venerable’ attractions, the Cotswold Farm Park has been both delighting and educating visitors for generations now. It’s grown a lot since it was opened by Joe Henson in 1971, and Joe’s son - Countryfile presenter Adam Henson continues to add new attractions and works tirelessly to preserve and promote rare breeds. www.cotswoldfarmpark.co.uk

13

Cotswold Wildlife Park and Gardens

Visit the Cotswold Wildlife Park and you’ll see the most exotic animals imaginable tigers, rhinos, giraffes, lions, lemurs, penguins, tapirs and more. Children and adults can also get hands-on with a variety of Keeper Experiences (visit the website for more details). www.cotswoldwildlifepark.co.uk

14

Snowshill Manor

Snowshill was the home/personal treasure trove of a true British eccentric - the wildly imaginative Charles Wade. Wade’s jawdropping collection of curios is sorted into a sequence of themed rooms. Visitors will discover samurai suits, boats, bicycles, obscure instruments, toys and countless more marvels. Nothing is labelled (it would detract from the charm), but dedicated guides are on hand to answer any question you could possibly have. www.nationaltrust.org.uk/snowshill-manorand-garden

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Kiftsgate Court Gardens

Kiftsgate is a vision of loveliness resulting from the visionary creativity of three generations of women gardeners. Full of special architectural flourishes (such as a half-moon pool and wooden summer house) and beautiful plant life, Kiftsgate is a living testament to the singular ability of exceptional gardens to delight and amaze. This year it was even the subject of a special commemorative exhibition at London’s Garden Museum. www.kiftsgate.co.uk

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Sudeley Castle

Royal history merges with the gorgeous Cotswold landscape in the magnificent Sudeley Castle, which, as visitors and historians alike know, is the resting place of Henry VIII’s final queen, Katherine Parr. Sudeley’s sprawling, picturesque estate incorporating a church, ten gardens, ruined banquet hall, an adventure playground, special exhibitions and more - is worth a day’s visit. Don’t overlook Sudeley’s lively programme of events, which has been known to include jousting tournaments, classic car rallies, festivals and plays. sudeleycastle.co.uk

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FORTY PLACES TO GO

17

Blenheim Palace

Like Sudeley, Blenheim is simply a mustvisit for history lovers, for it was at this monumental (in all senses of the word) home that Sir Winston Churchill was born. And it must be said that the eventful saga of Blenheim’s dukes (and indeed the tales of its troubled creation) are no less fascinating than the childhood of Britain’s wartime hero. But for sheer architectural clout, few places impress like Blenheim, which truly deserves the designation of ‘palace’. We promise that Blenheim’s vast lawns, waterfall, interesting exhibitions and treasure-stuffed interiors will leave a lasting mark on the memory. www.blenheimpalace.com

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The Cotswold Way

A famous trail measuring just over 100 miles long, the Cotswold Way meanders all the way from Chipping Campden to Bath, weaving through iconic villages (such as Stanway and Broadway), splendid countryside and sites of historical interest as it goes (Sudeley Castle, the Tyndle Monument and Broadway Tower, for example).

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Only seasoned walkers will want to try the full length, but there’s no reason why shorter segments can’t be attempted over the course of a sunny afternoon. Awesome views of the Black Mountains, the Forest of Dean and even Gloucester Cathedral are available from various points in the walk. (Try gazing out from the top of Broadway Tower - it’s a spectacle to remember).

www.nationaltrust.org.uk/chastleton-house

www.nationaltrail.co.uk/cotswold-way

Blenheim Palace

Chastleton House

Chastleton House is a Jacobean manor that’s been left largely untouched for 400 years - thanks, in no small part, to the declining fortunes of its former inhabitants. Their loss was our gain, as Chastleton House is as close to the definition of ‘time capsule’ as stately homes can get. It’s really no exaggeration to say that to wander around Chastleton’s rooms is to lose oneself in a vanished era.

20

Hook Norton Brewery

The family-owned Hook Norton Brewery is as fantastically whimsical to the eye as buildings can get, outside of fantasy movies. Technically speaking, it’s a Victorian Tower Brewery - and probably the best surviving example of one, to boot, but it’s still very much a functional operation, supplying over 36 pubs with plenty of delectable drink. The on-site museum and brewery tours will make your visit one to remember… even if you partake of a little too much Hooky! www.hooky.co.uk

The Cotswold Way

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EVENTS

Painswick Gardens

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There’s lots to do in the Gloucester Docks area, from marvelling at the ships to visiting the National Waterways Museum and the Soldiers of Gloucestershire Museum. A relaxed day of wandering around the water’s edge can be a pleasant antidote to a few days of bustle.

Stanway House and Fountain

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Stanway House and Fountain

Stanway House is another striking example of a Jacobean manor house - it’s only open to visitors during specific months, days and times, so do check the website - but the real marvel is in the garden: a single jet fountain that can launch its plume of water up to an astonishing 300 feet (which actually makes it the tallest fountain in Britain, and the second-tallest gravity fountain in the world). www.stanwayfountain.co.uk/the-fountain/

22

The Cotswold Motoring Museum, Bourton-onthe-Water

The Cotswold Motoring Museum promises a ‘fascinating journey through 20th Century motoring’ and, as we’re now teetering on the cusp of a world filled with self-driven electric cars, what better time to visit? View a range of classic vehicles and related paraphernalia at this lovingly-presented collection. Children, young and old, will also enjoy visiting the home of Brum, that cheeky star of classic British children’s telly. www.cotswoldmotoringmuseum.co.uk

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Gloucester Docks

23

Birdland & Jurassic Journey, Bourton-on-theWater

www.gloucesterquays.co.uk

25

Cleeve Hill

Bourton’s Birdland is a time-honoured destination for a family day out and, like the Farm Park and the Cotswold Wildlife Park and Gardens, it’s continued to grow and develop. Not only does it host a stunning variety of bird life - including penguins, owls and flamingos - but its Jurassic Journey (filled with life-sized dino replicas) is sure to thrill dino-mad youngsters.

Take a stroll up Cleeve Hill and you’ll be treated to sweeping views of the Pittville area, including the world-famous Cheltenham Racecourse. The Cotswold Way can be joined here and a few historic sites can be found in the area, including the site of an old fort. Cleeve Hill can be a very nice spot for flying kites, walking the dogs and just admiring the local landscape. (It is, after all, the highest point in Gloucestershire.)

www.birdland.co.uk/meet-birds

www.visitcheltenham.com

The Cotswold Motoring Museum, Bourton-on-the-Water


FORTY PLACES TO GO

26

Broadway Tower

Talking of high places, Broadway Tower is a must-visit for appreciating the beauty of the Cotswolds (and beyond). This striking folly almost looks like something from a fairytale; it certainly inspired the famed English designer William Morris, who used to vacation inside it. Recently re-opened is a nuclear monitoring bunker once manned by the Royal Observer Corps - inside, you’ll get a peek at what might have happened ‘had the Cold War turned hot.’ www.broadwaytower.co.uk

Broadway Tower

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One of Cheltenham’s little gems, the Holst Birthplace Museum celebrates the life of the famous composer (best known for The Planets) and maintains all sort of charming period fixtures, offering both a glimpse at the childhood of a genius and a look at a bygone age. This volunteer-run museum is not always open, so do check the website ahead of your visit.

There’s plenty of fantastic historical stuff to see in the Cotswolds, but this particular destination - a Neolithic long barrow - is positively prehistoric. Walk up the hill to this burial mound (which once housed 38 skeletons) and soak in the scenery - no wonder our ancestors chose such an aweinspiring place to lay their dead to rest. A visit to Belas Knap won’t last long, so do work it in as part of a day of other activities (ideally in nearby Winchcombe)

The Holst Birthplace Museum

Hidcote Manor Garden

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Hidcote Manor Garden

Hidcote has a justifiable reputation as one of the country’s best gardens. Designed as a series of interlinking ‘outdoor rooms’, it boasts wildflower areas and pools, alongside the curated delights that bear the influence of the Arts and Crafts Movement style. A must-see for anyone even faintly interested in garden design.

www.holstmuseum.org.uk

Belas Knap Burial Mound

www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/ belas-knap-long-barrow/

www.nationaltrust.org.uk/hidcote

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The Gloucestershire Warwickshire Steam Railway

You won’t regret riding on this volunteeroperated heritage railway, which fully preserves and celebrates the magic of steam travel. With a day travel card you can hop on and off at a number of Cotswold destinations, including Cheltenham, Broadway, Winchcombe and Hailes. For timetables and special events, please refer to the website.

The Gloucestershire Warwickshire Steam Railway

www.gwsr.com

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EVENTS

Chedworth Roman Villa

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Chedworth Roman Villa

Take a trip to the past at Chedworth Roman Villa, where you can learn how the Roman Britons lived. Here you’ll find the remains of ‘one of the grandest Roman villas in Britain’ - and the historic curiosities to see include splendid mosaic artworks, a natural spring nymphaeum and what’s left of a flushing toilet. www.nationaltrust.org.uk

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Corinium Museum

More treasures are to be discovered at the Corinium Museum, where you’ll be guided through the bustling Roman town of Corinium - known today as Cirencester. There are more mosaics here than anywhere else in the country, bar London; but with Anglo-Saxon and Medieval artefacts also on display, it’s the perfect destination for the budding archaeologist in the family. With events and guided tours also on offer, you won’t soon forget this timeless local museum. www.coriniummuseum.org

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33

The Pitt Rivers Museum

This atmospheric collection of anthropological and archaeological artefacts must be seen to be believed. Containing ‘over 600,000 objects, photographs and manuscripts from almost every country in the world and from all periods of human existence, the displays – showing over 55,000 artefacts – are organised by type, rather than geographical region or time period.’ To visit the Pitt Rivers Museum is to be submerged in hundreds of different cultures all at once. www.prm.ox.ac.uk

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The Gordon Russell Design Museum

This small museum won’t take long to explore, but it contains an inspiring collection of crafts and homeware. Gordon Russell believed that good design was beneficial to the spirit and, looking at the works on display here, it’s hard to disagree. The gift shop is stocked with things to make your own home beautiful. www.gordonrusselldesignmuseum.org

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Court Barn Museum

A charming museum dedicated to the creative pioneers of the Arts and Crafts Movement - and those who came after them. C.R. Ashbee’s colony of craftsmen inhabited Chipping Campden for only a short while, but they manufactured many delightful things in that time. Inside this museum you’ll find fascinating works from remarkably skillful makers. Some are better remembered than others, but all are equally deserving of your attention. www.courtbarn.org.uk


FORTY PLACES TO GO

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Cotswold Lavender

Come and see the fields of purple lavender from mid-June - it’s an iconic Cotswold spectacle. There’s a shop and tearoom to peruse too. Cotswold Lavender manufacture a wide range of products, from oils and skincare to gifts and chocolates. Do check the website for visiting times and for more information. www.cotswoldlavender.co.uk

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The Regal Cinema, Evesham

Summer holidays can be exhausting, and sometimes there’s nothing you want to do more than relax in front of a film for a couple of hours - even if it’s just to keep the kids busy for a while. But if you’ve only ever had the multiplex experience, you’ll be charmed by Evesham’s Grade II Listed Art Deco independent cinema, which was lovingly restored several years ago by the Wiper family. www.theregal.ac

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The Ashmolean Museum

One of the UK’s very best museums, the Ashmolean is the University of Oxford’s own museum of art and archaeology. While full of treasures and timeless collections, it regularly showcases fascinating special exhibitions - catch the latest, ‘Last Supper in Pompeii’, from 25 July 2019 to 12 January 2020. From the website: ‘Everything from the exquisite mosaics in the villas of the wealthy to the remains found in kitchen drains reveals what the people of Pompeii loved to eat and drink. The Ashmolean’s 2019 summer exhibition will tell the story of this ancient Roman town’s love affair with food.’ www.ashmolean.org

The Model Village

Cotswold Lavender

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Longborough Opera Festival

What started as the barn-based passionproject of Martin and Lizzie Graham swiftly blossomed into a world-class festival of opera, attracting premier performers and opera fans from around the globe to the Cotswold village of Longborough every summer. Head to the website for bookings and to find out more about this year’s productions. www.lfo.org.uk

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Giffords Circus

Giffords Circus needs very little introduction - every summer its touring red wagons bring awe-inspiring fun around the Cotswolds. In the years since its inception, Giffords has become internationally regarded as one of the most visionary, ambitious (and yet intimate) circuses around. This year’s show, Xanadu, is bringing peace and love to a field or village green near you. For more information on this year’s production, and to book tickets, visit the website. www.giffordscircus.com

Giffords Circus

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EVENTS

Your Guide to T HE BI G FE ASTIVA L 2019 Famous chefs, chart-topping acts, vintage funfair antics and unforgettable family entertainment – not forgetting the oodles of delicious award-winning street food! These are the essential ingredients of Alex James’ annual three-day extravaganza, The Big Feastival (23rd - 25th August). So what’s on the line-up for 2019?

The Music As the old saying goes, variety is the spice of life - and 2019’s line-up is certainly full of flavour. Set to be the best yet, why not take a look for yourself? Britpop sensation Sleeper and New York eccentrics the Fun Lovin’ Criminals will bring the nineties back in force on Friday, while headliners Rudimental follow up their massive recent success with a barnstorming DJ set - all to take place on The Main Stage. Don’t even think about missing out on the stirring voice of this year’s breakout star Lewis Capaldi - or the MOBO-winning DJ Luck and MC Neat. If you are still thirsty for more, then take a wander to The Udder Stage to discover new gems, such as Oxford’s own homegrown star Joely. Saturday’s party will be kick-started by Grandmaster Flash and The Zutons, whose immortal hit Valerie (memorably covered by Amy Winehouse) never fails to get people moving. If anybody can rival their energy, returning favourites The Cuban Brothers and Cheltenham beatbox prodigies Duke can and that’s to say nothing of Nina Nesbitt’s raw pop power. However, the headline spot has rightly been secured by the vocal excellence of Jess Glynne, who’ll be closing the Saturday night. Who could ever forget her work on Clean Bandit’s ‘Rather Be’?

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The unique voices of Jade Bird, Barns Courtney and Jonas Blue are sure to get the blood pumping on the final day. Plus there’s plenty more in store, courtesy of Propaganda’s thumping club night and indie folksters Saint Alto at The Udder Stage. However, Jack Savoretti followed by the legendary Elbow will be the ones to round off the weekend’s jam-packed schedule on The Main Stage.

Don’t Miss: The Alex James Orchestra;

BBC Music introducing: Little Brother Eli; folk-pop brothers Eloquent Youth; singersongwriter Lucy May Walker; and twoman band Stone Bear. Keep your eyes on The Bandstand for top acoustic acts!


THE BIG FEASTIVAL

The Food Needless to say, The Big Feastival is a mecca for all foodies. Not only will you see kitchen stars of the small screen preparing mouth-watering dishes live on-stage at The NEFF Big Kitchen, you’ll also find street food to savour wherever you wander. Kitchen icons don’t get much bigger than national treasures Raymond Blanc, Prue Leith, Mark Hix, Chantelle Nicholson and Robin Gill; these and many more will be serving up some unforgettable culinary masterpieces. Special demonstrations will also help to connect audiences with the craft of cooking, with the Fabulous Baker Brothers and Helen Gogh amongst those sharing their wisdom in Q&A sessions. Not forgetting the ever-saucy Gennaro Contaldo and Bake-Off Queen, Candice Brown, who will be there to send your taste buds into overdrive.

Delicious new street food additions include Indian cuisine Naania; chicken haven Wingmans; Filipino inspired winners of Million Pound menu BBQ Dreamz; wood fired pizza from Crust Bros; and Vietnamese BBQ from MAM. Legendary street food favourites abound: Oli Baba’s, Farang, Burger & Beyond, Smokestak, Made of Dough, Le Bab, Cheese Bar, Claw, The Piadina Project, Other Side Fried, Sub Cult, Rainbo, Anna Maes - and many more.

Don’t Miss: The Food and Drink

Market, which has something to suit all tastes; and the glorious return of The Friday Night Supper Club - a sunset food-fest for all.

“Needless to say, The Big Feastival is a mecca for all foodies.”

The Fun It just wouldn’t be The Big Feastival without all the family entertainment it’s famous for. The Udder Stage invites families to battle it out on Saturday and Sunday in The Big Feastival’s Got Talent open mic competition, as well as the chance to get your groove on with a silent disco each night! Samba drumming, gospel and ukulele workshops will give families a chance to get musical; meanwhile The Royal Albert Hall’s Albert’s Band will invite festival goers along to daily masterclasses.

And T here’s So Much More…

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COTSWOLD SUMMER HIGHLIGHTS

LONGBOROUGH FESTIVAL OPERA

Your Cotswold Calendar: Summer Highlights There’s loads to see and do this Summer in the Cotswolds. Here’s our pick of upcoming events Longborough Festival Opera

International Garden Photographer of the Year

Nestled on a hillside and with splendid views over the tranquil Gloucestershire countryside, Longborough Festival Opera is a hidden gem of the Cotswolds. Monteverdi’s L’Incoronazione di Poppea runs 28 July to 2 August. Performances on Saturday 28, Monday 30, Tuesday 31 July and Thursday 2 August.

The world’s premier competition and exhibition specialising in garden, plant, flower and botanical photography. Tickets required: Palace, Park and Gardens or Park and Gardens or an Annual Pass.

Until 3 Aug 2019 www.lfo.org.uk

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Blenheim Palace Until 20 Aug 2019 www.blenheimpalace.com


COTSWOLD SUMMER HIGHLIGHTS

GIFFORDS CIRCUS: XANADU

Venice Preserved The Royal Shakespeare Company, Stratford-upon-Avon Until 7 Sep 2019 www.rsc.org.uk Venice is sinking. Under the shadow of darkness, an impoverished nobleman and senator’s daughter marry in secret, and are disinherited by her oppressive father. Discontented and vulnerable, Jaffeir is enlisted by his dear friend Pierre – a decorated and famous Venetian soldier – to join an international revolution against the leaders of their failed city state. But when a soldier from within the revolution threatens his wife Belvidera, they go on the run, and make a decision that tears their lives apart. Prasanna Puwanarajah directs this new production of Thomas Otway’s rarely-performed Restoration political thriller: a dark masterpiece, and a breathtaking love story.

The Provoked Wife The Royal Shakespeare Company, Stratford-upon-Avon Until 7 Sep 2019 www.rsc.org.uk Lady Brute is tired of her tedious, loveless marriage and her tedious, drunk husband. When she decides to spice up her love life with a younger man, scandal threatens to ruin her. Phillip Breen (The Hypocrite, The Shoemaker’s Holiday, The Merry Wives of Windsor, 2012) directs Caroline Quentin (The Hypocrite, 2017), Alexandra Gilbreath (The Rover, 2016) and Jonathan Slinger (Hamlet, 2013) in this outspoken Restoration romp that shocked 17th Century society.

Giffords Circus: Xanadu Until 29 Sep 2019 www.giffordscircus.com

It is midsummer 1973 in Hyde Park, and the Flower Power movement is at its height. Hippies, hipsters, rock stars, musicians, wild women and global nomads with Shamanic horses gather to play, sing, dance, protest and perform. Policemen and a family of out-of-towners get caught up in the celebrations. Will they get in the groove? Nell Gifford builds a pleasure dome and Tweedy has a job in the kitchen as he thought everyone was talking about ‘Flour Power’. As evening approaches, the ever more chaotic event careers towards a joyful, transcendental finale. Be there or be square!

Ghosts of Berkeley Castle Sculpture Exhibition Until 30 Oct 2019 www.berkeley-castle.com

Wire sculpture exhibition by local ‘Slimbridge Soldiers’ sculptor, Jackie Lantelli. See Edward II, doomed in his cell; Elizabeth I, ready with her crossbow to kill the Earl of Berkeley’s prize stags; and Dicky Pearce, the jester who fell from the Minstrel’s Gallery. With many other sculptures to spot as you wander around Berkeley Castle’s grand rooms and grounds, this exhibition will bring the Castle’s intriguing history to life.

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COTSWOLD SUMMER HIGHLIGHTS

The Taming of the Shrew

Mr Stink

In a reimagined 1590, society is a matriarchy. Baptista Minola is seeking to sell off her son Katherine to the highest bidder. Cue an explosive battle of the sexes in this electrically-charged love story.

Based on the book by David Walliams. The very kind, but lonely, twelve year old Chloe invites ‘Mr Stink’ and his slightly wiffy dog to leave behind the wooden bench they call home and secretly move into her family’s shed.

The Royal Shakespeare Company, Stratford-upon-Avon Until 4 April 2020 www.rsc.org.uk

Justin Audibert (Snow in Midsummer, The Jew of Malta) turns Shakespeare’s fierce, energetic comedy of gender and materialism on its head to offer a fresh perspective on its portrayal of hierarchy and power.

Everyman Theatre, Cheltenham 23-27 Jul 2019 www.everymantheatre.org.uk

Matters become more complicated when Chloe’s mother, a woman with unfulfilled political ambitions, tries to take credit for Chloe’s generosity. But exactly who is Mr Stink anyway?

Last Supper in Pompeii Ashmolean Museum, Oxford 25 Jul 2019 - 12 Jan 2020 www.ashmolean.org

Everything, from the exquisite mosaics in the villas of the wealthy, to the remains found in kitchen drains, reveals what the people of Pompeii loved to eat and drink. The Ashmolean’s 2019 summer exhibition will tell the story of this ancient Roman city’s love affair with food.

The 49th Guiting Music Festival Guiting Power 19-28 Jul 2019 www.guitingfestival.org

For nearly half a century, the Guiting Music Festival has been a delightful niche festival to enliven the Cotswolds’ summer calendar, bringing an exciting variety of highly talented performances of Classical, Jazz and Blues music by artists from around the world.

When the ash from Mount Vesuvius began raining down on Pompeii in AD 79, people were engaged in typical day to day activities, including eating, drinking and producing food. Located in the sunny paradise of southern Italy, Pompeii was sandwiched between lush vineyards and fertile plains to one side and the bountiful waters of the Bay of Naples to the other. The city produced more wine, olive oil and fish-sauce than it could consume and exported its gourmet products across the Mediterranean. Many of the objects, on loan from Naples and Pompeii, have never before left the country; they range from the luxury furnishings of the Roman dining room, to the carbonised food that was on the table when the volcano erupted.

The festival is held in the beautiful and unspoilt Cotswold setting of Guiting Power, near Stow-on-the-Wold in Gloucestershire’s Cotswold Hills. This year’s talented guests include harpist Catrin Finch, the Elias String Quartet, the Aquarelle Guitar Quartet, pianist Saskia Giorgini and many, many more. See the website for booking and full event information.

Fantasy Forest Festival Sudeley Castle 20-21 Jul 2019 www.sudeleycastle.co.uk

Immerse yourself for a day or a whole weekend in another world, surrounded by characters from cosplay, steampunk, fantasy, sci-fi, medieval, gothic, pirates and more. Be who you want to be. Dress up in your favourite costume and join us for an experience you don’t want to miss. On the festival terrain you’ll find fantasy-related shows, entertainment, stages, competitions, lectures, workshops, traders and more.

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LAST SUPPER IN POMPEII, ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM


COTSWOLD SUMMER HIGHLIGHTS

THE FESTIVAL OF BRITISH EVENTING

A Tudor Day Out with the Boleyns

BBC Countryfile Live

Encounter Tudor royalty as King Henry VIII arrives at Berkeley Castle on his royal progress. Meet his Queen, along with her ladies in waiting and noble gentlemen and enjoy the spectacle of Tudor dancing in the Great Hall.

This huge and exciting event combines the tradition of the UK’s best county fairs with the quality editorial and presentation of one of the BBC’s flagship programmes.

Berkeley Castle 21 Jul 2019 www.berkeley-castle.com

A Midsummer Night’s Dream Outdoor Theatre, Sudeley Castle 25 Jul 2019 www.sudeleycastle.co.uk

Blenheim Palace 1-4 Aug 2019 www.blenheimpalace.com

Enjoy exciting live arena shows, talks, hands-on activities, Adam Henson’s farm, animal displays, farming in action, Q&A with the Countryfile presenters, off-road experiences, shopping from more than 700 exhibitors including food, craft and luxury producers and even a great British pub garden.

The Lord Chamberlain’s Men, the UK’s premier all-male theatre company, invite you to join them this summer at Sudeley Castle to celebrate their 15th year with Shakespeare’s enchanting comedy, A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

The Festival of British Eventing

This supernatural comedy of mischievous fairies, confused lovers and rude mechanicals is an intoxicating tale of clarity found from chaos, as tangled love gives way to happily ever afters.

Eventing (sometimes referred to as Horse Trials) originally evolved from the training and selection of cavalry horses. Today it is three equestrian disciplines combined (dressage, show jumping and cross country) and competed by horse and rider as a combination. (See britisheventing.com for more).

Gatcombe Park 2-4 Aug 2019 www.festivalofbritisheventing.com

As well as a weekend of top class eventing, a whole host of other entertainment will be taking place at Gatcombe Park for all to enjoy this August (with lots of shopping to indulge in too).

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THE BIG FEASTIVAL

The Magnificent Seven – Meet the Loves of Henry VIII Berkeley Castle 11 Aug 2019 www.berkeley-castle.com

Thomas Cromwell welcomes court visitors to the Castle’s Great Hall. Embark on a journey through Henry VIII’s long and eventful life and meet each of his six wives; introduced by Bessie Blount, King Henry VIII’s favourite mistress. Hear how each queen fell out of favour with the King and feel free to quiz them at the end of their presentation, they’ll be waiting to hear from any budding historians.

The Mullah of Downing Street Chipping Norton Theatre 21-24 Aug 2019 www.chippingnortontheatre.com

A new comedy by Imran Yusuf. Frazzled Prime Minister, Clare Scarsdale, is back home for what might be the last time. She is happily embracing multiculturalism one Bombay Dry Gin at a time, when her chances of a relaxing election eve are shattered by unexpected guests. Her ‘domestic’ policy choices soon take centre-stage as the news-cycle and spin-cycle compete to manage a fast-evolving laundry basket of issues. With enemies like hers, who needs family?

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The Big Feastival

23-25 Aug 2019 www.thebigfeastival.com The Big Feastival will take place on Alex James’ farm in the Cotswolds this August Bank Holiday. See Rudimental, Jess Glynne, Elbow, Lewis Capaldi & many more at this unforgettable familyfriendly festival. Full weekend camping - as well as pre-pitched tents and glamping - is available.

The Moreton-in-Marsh Show 7 Sep 2019 www.moretonshow.co.uk

An exciting and action-packed day of all that’s best in British farming and the countryside. You can take a look at hundreds of beautiful farm animals and watch some of the best horses and riders in competition. Moreton Show has lots of family fun, from terrier racing and stunt motorbikes to Tractor Ted and circus skills, as well as scores of trade stands selling fantastic country clothing and fabulous gifts. Moreton also celebrates farm-to-fork with delicious British food. Come and join in to experience the countryside in a day.


COTSWOLD SUMMER HIGHLIGHTS

SSANGYONG BLENHEIM PALACE HORSE TRIALS

Skylight

Chipping Norton Theatre 11-21 Sep www.chippingnortontheatre.com Schoolteacher Kyra receives an unexpected visit from her former lover, Tom, a charismatic self-made restaurant tycoon. As supper bubbles on the stove and a cheap electric heater tries to dispel the cold of a London winter’s night, flickers of their former passion rekindle. As they fall into a battle of opposing politics and mutual desire, is the gap between them too great to be bridged? Written by David Hare and directed by John Terry.

SsangYong Blenheim Palace Horse Trials 19-22 Sep 2019 www.blenheimhorse.co.uk

Returning for its 29th year, the SsangYong Blenheim Palace Horse Trials attracts the world’s best riders and thousands of spectators over the four-day event. Experience dressage competitions, crosscountry and show jumping. In addition to this, there will be a variety of classes, displays, demonstrations, a fun ride and over 200 shops. The unique shopping experience is one of the many highlights of the event - the layout resembles a bustling high street, with items ranging from luxury picnic hampers to country tailors and much more.

Peter Pan Goes Wrong

Everyman Theatre, Cheltenham 19 Oct - 2 Nov 2019 www.everymantheatre.org.uk Following their multi-award-winning success with The Play That Goes Wrong and The Comedy About A Bank Robbery, Mischief Theatre return with their riotous spin on a timeless classic, the West End smash hit Peter Pan Goes Wrong. The members of the Cornley Polytechnic Drama Society are back on stage, battling technical hitches, flying mishaps and cast disputes as they attempt to present J.M Barrie’s much-loved tale. But will they ever make it to Neverland?

The Showcase

4-13 Oct 2019 www.cheltenhamfestivals.com

Cheltenham Racecourse 25-26 Oct 2019 www.thejockeyclub.co.uk/cheltenham/events-tickets/theshowcase/

The Times and The Sunday Times Cheltenham Literature Festival is thrilled to announce plans for its unmissable ‘Seven at Seventy’ celebrations. This year marks 70 years since Cheltenham Town Hall hosted the world’s first literature festival and started a global, cultural phenomenon.

The wait is over and the home of jump racing kicks off the season in style with The Showcase! This exciting two-day meeting sees a host of new racing recruits join the ranks - from trainers and jockeys to future equine stars - and sets the tone for what’s to come, leading all the way to The Festival in March 2020.

For book lovers everywhere, The Times and The Sunday Times Cheltenham Literature Festival is the only place to be each autumn. The Festival returns from 4 – 13 October 2019, welcoming the world’s greatest writers and thinkers to Cheltenham.

Spectators can expect to enjoy hair-raising action, returning friends and riveting rivalries on the track. With the Cheltenham team working hard to ensure the best horses grace the track, 2019 looks set to give last year’s sensational Showcase a run for its money.

The Cheltenham Literature Festival

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INTERIOR DESIGN

Burford in Bloom Fabulous Florals Summer is here and the countryside is in full bloom; what better time to bring the joy of the outdoors in and fill your home with flowers? Using beautiful faux botanicals and floral patterns in the home creates a positive atmosphere and a feeling of freshness and vitality that is both uplifting and calming; they soften our interiors, mimicking a natural environment, giving us pleasure. Pretty never goes out of style

There are few decorative styles that can compete with the beauty of Mother Nature, so it is no surprise that the most enduring subject of all time in interior design is the natural world, providing us with an endless source of inspiring forms that feel comfortable to live with. In printed fabrics and wallpapers, we see a cornucopia of interpretations, from detailed and accurate representations of flowers, through to more abstract forms. Botanical prints are pleasing to the eye and compatible with a wide range of interiors; from the bright, bold, colour-clashing contemporary, to the subtle and sophisticated pastels, typical of a more classical look.

Flirting with florals

With blooms appearing in all of the latest collections, there are many ways to try out florals in your home; from beautiful fabrics and elegant wallpapers, to accessorising with stunningly realistic faux flowers that are now available, thanks to the latest manufacturing techniques.

Cole & Son, Botanical Botanica

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ď‚ Manuel Canovas

ď‚ Colefax & Fowler


AMANDA HANLEY

Complementary styles

During the course of 2018 and now into 2019, we have seen interior styles shifting away from pale neutrals, to much more dramatic, deep and dark colours, as well as natural textured walls, such as wood and stone. These looks are set off perfectly by the contrast of floral pops of colour and copious amounts of greenery. When it comes to combining patterns, don’t be afraid of mixing modern graphics with florals; if the colours and pattern scales work, the contrast will modernise the look and help to create definition.

Linwood

Bringing the outdoors in and the indoors out

Connecting our interiors to our gardens and the outside world creates a synergy between them. Looking at our immediate surroundings can be a great way to instil our homes with a sense of place and belonging. Think about how the colours, proportions and textures work together; often green can act as a good base and neutral colour to start with when planning a floral scheme. This concept can also be reversed, in starting with our interiors and then mirroring those colours with planting in our garden for an ultra-stylish home that flows inside and out.

Amanda’s top five tips for styling your faux blooms:

1. When looking for faux botanicals and blooms, look for something that isn’t too uniform and perfect, with colour variation and pattern. It’s the detail that’s crucial to how realistic they look. 2. Spend time thinking about the right shaped vase for your arrangement – it makes the world of difference to the end result. 3. Evolve your display over time, to stop it becoming stale, by adding in new stems and taking away too – editing according to your décor, mood and the season. 4. For the most effective display, incorporate lots of textures. Mix generouslysized, loose blooms, such as hydrangeas and roses, with greenery or berries for added structure. 5. Don’t get hung-up on perfection when making your arrangement – a casual approach is often more effective, and the ‘just picked’ look is so much more modern.

Hot on trend

Silk flowers and faux botanicals have taken off enormously over the last year, and this trend is set to thrive further over 2019 and beyond. Cropping up constantly on social media, interiors magazines and in the most chic homes, hotels and social hubs, this is a trend that is really worth embracing. As well as being fashionable, they provide instant decoration to a room, making it feel finished and loved. Most of us adore having fresh flowers and plants in the home, but they can be hard work, have a limited life span, and be difficult to find in interesting varieties that don’t cost the earth. However, with silk blooms, which are now barely

distinguishable from the real thing, we can all indulge in having stunning flowers and plants around the home all year round. In winter, you still have the varieties you enjoy, and, in summer, you don’t have to worry about them being in direct sunlight - and they won’t wilt in the heat. For a more formal look, flowers are available as ready-made arrangements, some with a gel at the bottom of the vase to create the effect of water. Or, more contemporary, you can choose to group together a selection of individual stems for a more natural and ‘gathered’ effect, creating your own unique style that’s adaptable over time too. Faux flower photography by Brad Payne.

Find out more about Amanda at www.amandahanley.co.uk enquiries@amandahanley.co.uk | T 01993 822 385 | M 07976 353 996 Amanda Hanley by Design, The Gallery, 69 High Street, Burford, OX18 4QA COTSWOLD-HOMES.COM

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KEROLEE, STOW ON THE WOLD

£750,000 – SSTC

Kerolee is an immaculately presented four bedroom detached family home with ancillary accommodation, generous gardens, garaging and parking, situated within walking distance of town centre facilities. Entrance Hall | Sitting Room | Dining Room | Kitchen | Utility Room | Ground Floor Bedroom / Study | Shower Room | Master Bedroom with Dressing Room and En Suite Bathroom | Two Further Bedrooms | Family Bathroom | Detached Double Garage with Accommodation over : Open Plan Sitting Room / Bedroom / Kitchen Area | Cloakroom | Off Road Parking | Generous Mature Gardens | EPC Rating: D

Fine and Country, Bourton on the Water 01451 824977

2 GREYSTONES, COLD ASTON

£485,000 – SOLD

2 Greystones is a charming period property part of which originally was a barn, centrally situated within the village and retaining many period features, ideal for use as a second home or holiday let property but substantial enough to be a lovely and eminently desirable family home. Entrance | Living Room | Kitchen/Breakfast Room | Dining Room | Cloakroom | Master Bedroom with En-Suite | Two Further Bedrooms | Bathroom | Courtyard Garden | Parking | EPC Rating: F

Fine and Country, Bourton on the Water 01451 824977

Moreton in Marsh | Bourton on the Water | Stow on the Wold | Mayfair | Lettings


THE BELL HOUSE, STOURTON

£650,000 – SOLD

The Bell House is a charming detached Victorian character cottage situated in the heart of the popular village of Stourton. The front of the property has a handsome red brick double fronted façade with sash windows, whilst the rear of the property is constructed of stone. Two Principal Reception Rooms Both With Log-Burners | Family Room | An Extended Kitchen/Breakfast Room Utility Room And Cloakroom | Three Bedrooms | Bathroom | Gravelled Driveway Providing Off Road Parking | Enclosed Garden | Brick built garden store at the end of the garden | EPC Rating: E

Fine and Country, Harrison James & Hardie, Moreton in Marsh 01608 653893

EAST LEAZE, CHIPPING CAMPDEN

£580,000 – SOLD IN EXCESS OF ASKING PRICE

A beautifully presented and recently refurbished period cottage situated just a short walk from Chipping Campden High Street. The property has been extended to create generously proportioned accommodation whilst retaining much of its original character and charm. Entrance | Sitting Room/Living Room with Atrium style roof | Dining Room | Kitchen | Three Double Bedrooms One With An En-Suite Bathroom | Large Garden | EPC Rating: D

Fine and Country, Harrison James & Hardie, Moreton in Marsh 01608 653893

Country Homes from harrison james & hardie


PLOT 6, 4 SUFFOLK PLACE, BOURTON ON THE WATER

£750,000

The Windrush is a truly exceptional, newly built, five bedroom detached house by Sherborne Homes, in an exclusive development of just six houses. Entrance Hall | Living/Family Room | Kitchen/Diner | Utility Room | Snug/Study | Master Bedroom with En-Suite and Dressing Room | Three Further Bedrooms | Guest Bedroom with En-Suite | Family Bathroom | Garage | Garden | Parking | EPC Rating: TBC

Fine and Country, Harrison James & Hardie, Bourton on the Water 01451 824 977

14 GORSE CLOSE, BOURTON ON THE WATER

£820,000

A well presented one-off detached four bedroom property with separate one bedroom guest house annex, set in a desirable location backing on to fishing lakes with a beautiful lake view. Entrance Hall | Sitting Room | Garden Room | Dining Room | Kitchen | Laundry Room | WC | Office | First Floor Master Bedroom | En-Suite Shower Room | Three Further Bedrooms | Bathroom | Garage/Annex - Kitchen | Bedroom | Shower Room | Driveway Parking | Garden to Rear | EPC Rating: D

Fine and Country, Harrison James & Hardie, Bourton on the Water 01451 824 977

Bourton on the Water | Moreton in Marsh | Stow on the Wold | Mayfair | Lettings


RYELANDS, BOURTON ON THE WATER ÂŁ725,000 A recently refurbished and extended five bedroom detached house with versatile accommodation and a large garden, tucked away within reach of the village centre. Entrance Hall | Sitting Room | Large Open Plan Kitchen and Dining Room | Utility Room | Two Ground Floor Bedrooms | Ground Floor Bathroom | First Floor Landing | Master Bedroom with En-Suite Wet Room | Two Further Bedrooms | Office / Nursery | Large Garden to Rear | Summer House | Ample Off Road Parking | Scope for Garage (subject to planning permission) | EPC Rating: C Fine and Country, Harrison James & Hardie, Bourton on the Water 01451 824 977

3 LUTYENS COURT, UPPER RISSINGTON ÂŁ425,000 A recently converted, beautifully presented three storey town house benefiting from flexible accommodation, landscaped garden to the rear and allocated parking. Entrance Hall | Kitchen/Dining Room/Family Room | Study/Bedroom Four | Cloakroom | First Floor Sitting Room | Bedroom Three / Dining Room | Bathroom | Second Floor Master Bedroom | En-Suite | Bedroom Two | En-Suite | EPC Rating: B

Fine and Country, Harrison James & Hardie, Bourton on the Water 01451 824 977

Country Homes from harrison james & hardie


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ASK THE EXPERTS

Letting Larger Holiday Homes: Maximising profits and getting the best benefits We are a family of five living in London, looking to buy a sizeable second home in the Cotswolds, with the intent to holiday let when we are not visiting, to cover our costs and subsidize our income. Do larger properties let well - and what can we do to increase its popularity? family holiday market during summer months, but they draw regular event-lead bookings too, which fill in off-peak dates and result in steady year-round occupancy - a big family birthday or a milestone wedding anniversary doesn’t always fall in the summer months.

Tom Burdett is Managing Director of Character Cottages, an independent company specialising in the holiday letting of luxury properties in the Cotswolds. To find out more about their services, visit www.character-cottages.co.uk, email letmycottage@charactercottages.co.uk or telephone 01451 600 844.

ot only is this a common aim for many of our property owners, it is also totally achievable. Moreover, there are financial advantages to choosing a large property in particular. The Cotswolds AONB is centrally positioned and extremely accessible; if you live in London, you can be enjoying the scenic countryside of the Cotswolds in only 2½ hours. This is, in part, why large holiday properties in the Cotswolds let very well and enjoy year-round occupancy. Not only do these family-size properties attract the

It sounds as though you’re deciding to enjoy more holidays in the UK. Many other families are doing the same, and a large cottage a stone’s-throw from towns and cities such as London, Bristol, Bath and Oxford will see the benefits of this captive audience. Event-lead bookings, such as weddings, are an important sector of the larger holiday lets’ bookings. They are generally booked well in advance, which is great for budgeting and financial planning. There’s plenty you can do to make your large property attractive for the events market. Many wedding parties choose to rent a large holiday home for the bridal party or groom’s accommodation, and so choosing a large property that is close to a wedding ceremony or reception venue is beneficial. Large holiday lets benefit from proximity to festivals and national events too, such as the racing at Cheltenham, and can take advantage of this out of season market. Quirky, attractive and stand-out large properties, with plenty of privacy and large gardens, attract event bookings for private parties and gatherings of friends and family. Children can run free and kick a ball, whilst adults can enjoy a social gathering on the patio or terrace. Groups of friends or large families looking for a stylish space to get together will look at both rural and more central locations. A village pub

within walking distance can be an attraction, but is less important than with smaller properties catering for a handful of occupants. Being dogfriendly can be extremely beneficial too! To appeal to the family holiday market, style and furnish your property in a contemporary manner, with a nod to traditional features and original character. Include family-friendly extras, like a travel cot, highchair and games consoles. Entertaining is important to this market, where large properties are often used for family gatherings and reunions, so consider spacious dining areas, a second break away area for children and attractive gardens for the whole group to enjoy. Special occasion and largegroup holiday guests tend to spend less time exploring the local area and more in the holiday home, often choosing to dine-in as a group and spend quality time playing games and preparing food together, so these spaces are extremely important. The Cotswolds is enjoying a huge demand for large holiday properties, due to its central location and easy accessibility from hubs like London. The area of outstanding scenic beauty is known for sociable activities like walking, golf and horse riding, which are ideal for groups and complement a year-round holiday offering. The fact that there are fewer competing properties in the large holiday let market is also appealing to many. As well as year-round occupancy opportunities, booking lag for large holiday properties tends to be longer, making it easier to plan financially - and with the uncertainty of Brexit, this is very appealing. Buying a large property in the Cotswolds as a family holiday home will not only pay for itself, it will be a nice little earner too.

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HALFORD HOUSE

H AH LO FOR D U S E BOURTON ON THE WATER

An elegant Grade II listed family house of just under 6,000 square feet, with planning consent to use as a boutique hotel. Halford House is centrally situated in the popular village of Bourton on the Water and is within walking distance of all the local amenities, including both the Primary School and the Outstanding Cotswold School.

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HALFORD HOUSE

Historically, the house has been used both as a family home and a very successful holiday let, and, if one goes back further still, as an antique shop with owners’ accommodation. The present owners have used the house as a family home and have enjoyed the extensive space on offer. The house is approached through electric double gates that open onto a large, gravelled parking area and the lawned rear garden. The front door opens into the entrance hall with doors off to the principal reception rooms and through to the feature staircase. The ground floor accommodation comprises of a drawing room, dining room, sitting room, kitchen/breakfast room, WC, and shower room. From the kitchen, a door leads through into a study and on into the

single storey annexe accommodation that provides a family room and a kitchen/ breakfast room. If the house were to become a business, then it is in this area that a manager’s flat could be created. On the first floor of the main house, there are four bedrooms, two bath/shower rooms, with the master bedroom having a dressing room and en-suite bathroom. On the second floor, there are four further bedrooms, three with en-suite bathrooms and one with an en-suite shower room.

The present owners have used the house as a family home and have enjoyed the extensive space on offer.

Outside the gardens are level and laid to lawn, with both vehicular access and a pedestrian gate out on to Station Road. Gas fired central heating.

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Cheltenham 15 miles Kingham Station 8 miles Oxford 30 miles Daylesford 8 miles Soho Farmhouse 21 miles M5 junction 11a 20 miles Central London 82 miles

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Entrance Hall | Drawing Room | Sitting Room | Dining Room | Kitchen | Study | Family Room | Kitchen | Shower Room | Boiler Room | Cellar | Ground Floor | Single Storey Annexe : Family Room | Kitchen / Breakfast Room | Shower Room | Master Bedroom Suite with Dressing Room & En Suite | Five Double Bedrooms with En Suite | Two Further Double Bedrooms | Bathroom | Walled Gardens | Off Road Parking


HALFORD HOUSE

Historically, the house has been used both as a family home and a very successful holiday let, and, if one goes back further still, as an antique shop with owners’ accommodation.

Tom says: There is very little competition for this size of property, especially one in such a fantastic location, given Bourton on the Water is one of the top performing locations in the Cotswolds. Indeed the previous owner let this property through Character Cottages - based on our previous experience I am very comfortable that it would generate between £110,000 to £120,000 gross revenue per annum, possibly even more if done to an exceptionally high standard."

To find out more about Halford House, marketed by Fine & Country North Cotswolds, Bourton on the Water, visit www.cotswold-homes.com/property or contact James von Speyr on 01451 824977

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Mill Barn Great Rissington A Grade II listed former cart barn of great character, with separate annexe/cinema room being within walking distance of the village pub and primary school.

Mill Barn was sympathetically converted in the 1980’s with the principal house offering accommodation over two floors. The house takes advantage of its surroundings by having the main living space on the first floor, with all four bedrooms being at ground level. Outside there is a detached double garage with the annexe/cinema room above. In brief, the accommodation comprises of: Entrance hall, master bedroom with en-suite shower room, three further bedrooms and a family bathroom, utility room and cloakroom with WC. The stairs rise to the first floor where the main living space of the sitting room, with woodburning stove and exposed

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beams, extensively fitted kitchen/dining room and study will be found. The annexe/cinema room is above the double garage and has its own shower room and WC. To the front of the garage there is parking for two vehicles, along with a single parking space to the front of the house. The gardens are well maintained, being laid predominantly to lawn with small borders and boundary hedging, along with an extensive patio area with ample space for tables and chairs. The property is warmed by oil fired central heating. “We had lived in the village for 3 years


MILL BARN

We have enjoyed 13 wonderful years at Mill Barn, and we will miss the stunning Cotswolds countryside right on our doorstep, as well as our friends and the great experiences that we have enjoyed without having to travel far.

and really wanted to stay but we needed more space. When Mill Barn came up for sale, we immediately knew that it was the perfect fit. We loved its peaceful location on a private road and the flexible and spacious accommodation it offered,” recall the current owners. “Dating back to the 1850s, Mill Barn is a fabulous mix of old and new. The original oak beams are a beautiful feature and the open plan kitchen/dining room is a great family space that we tend to use throughout the day before retiring to the large and impressive lounge to relax in front of the log burner.”

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Village life in Great Rissington has lived up to everything we expected and more with numerous walks from our own front door, a great local pub, sports and social club and numerous village societies and events to keep us busy.

“We’ve made a number of enhancements to Mill Barn, but perhaps the most significant change was the addition of the "Bat Cave". We rebuilt and extended the garage, providing versatile additional accommodation, whilst retaining a double garage with a 21ft room above, which is currently used as a cinema room and guest suite, complete with a 1970's jukebox.” “We love the village and surrounding area and have many happy memories of our children growing up here. The school run was always a pleasure thanks to the free bus service and being within walking distance of the Outstanding primary school. Village life in Great Rissington has lived up to everything we expected and more with numerous walks from our own front door, a great local pub, sports and social club and numerous village societies and events to keep us busy. We’ve enjoyed the wide variety of local

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independent shopping and great facilities catering for everyday needs in the local area, as well as easy access to larger cities and cultural experiences in Cheltenham, Oxford, Gloucester and London.” “The garden is a peaceful, private haven where we can relax in the sun all day long. The large patio area is great for BBQs and entertaining, whilst the flexible rooms in The Barn (plus the "Bat Cave") makes it ideal for visitors. We have hosted many Christmas and New Year celebrations with family and friends and have happy memories of sledging in the snow on one Christmas Day.” “We have enjoyed 13 wonderful years at Mill Barn, and we will miss the stunning Cotswolds countryside right on our doorstep, as well as our friends and the great experiences that we have enjoyed without having to travel far.”


MILL BARN

Tom says: Great Rissington is a wonderful village so there are many positives about this property - not least that it's within walking distance to a good pub, and that detached characterful properties, especially barn conversions, are always in demand. To maximise income I would convert the cinema room to a bedroom - the trick is getting an 8-adult occupancy, in which case I estimate a gross revenue of ÂŁ60,000 to ÂŁ65,000 per annum."

To find out more about Mill Barn, marketed by Fine & County North Cotswolds, Bourton on the Water, visit www.cotswold-homes.com/property or contact James von Speyr on 01451 824977

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Investing in Property – The North Cotswold Holiday Let Marketplace The holiday let marketplace in the North Cotswolds is one of the most sustainable and tax-efficient forms of property income. Tom Burdett, Managing Director of Character Cottages, explains: In this investment-focused Cotswold Homes Summer Edition, our Hot Property editor has selected several properties currently on the market with Harrison James & Hardie Fine & Country North Cotswolds, inviting Tom to give his professional opinion on how well these might perform as Furnished Holiday Lets. All Tom’s assessments are accordingly provided on the basis that properties are presented to a high standard in a contemporary style, have no restrictions, are made available to let all year round and are marketed by Character Cottages. Naturally, before going ahead with a holiday let purchase, you should always take taxation guidance from a suitably experienced independent accountant.

during the period it is classed and used as such - an FHL will qualify for Entrepreneur's Relief, potentially reducing CGT to 10%.

In general, holiday letting comes with certain tax advantages not available to landlords with standard residential portfolios. Furnished holiday lets (FHL) have, as a rule, escaped the government's recent tax measures compared with residential let properties. Landlords will only enjoy basic rate income tax relief from 2020/ 2021 for example, but this change does not apply to FHLs.

When letting as an FHL, your property must be presented and furnished to the highest possible standard to generate best revenues. It should be considered on the value of its long-term value and maintained in peak condition so that it keeps pace with expected growth - it’s not just about a quick profit.

To qualify as an FHL, certain conditions must be satisfied year on year. Of course, it must be furnished, available for letting to the public for at least 210 days in the year, let out for 105 days or more each year but not for a continuous period of more than thirty-one days. Unlike residential let property, profits made from FHLs are treated as earned income for pension purposes. Gains accruing on residential investment property ordinarily attract Capital Gains Tax at 28% but –

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Interests in FHL businesses are also currently exempt from inheritance tax on the death of the owner, providing the property qualifies for Business Property Relief. This is stringently judged but can be demonstrated by providing ongoing assistance with the holiday experience such as booking restaurants, arranging sporting or recreational activities, providing advice on things to do in the area, etc. And as such a holiday let property is a good investment for your children, enabling you to pass your wealth down to the next generation without triggering a disposal for capital gains tax purposes.

Having previously worked with Harrison James & Hardie for fourteen years during a period of boom, bust and recovery, I know that demand for prime period village properties is always high – it’s the most resilient sector, with prices falling less far and more slowly in a recession and improving then accelerating more quickly than the main residential sector as the market recovers. Not only can you generate a year-round sustainable income from a North Cotswold holiday let, but you can have peace of mind that you are investing in reliable underlying capital growth.”

... a holiday let property is a good investment for your children, enabling you to pass your wealth down to the next generation without triggering a disposal for capital gains tax purposes.


INVESTING IN PROPERTY

Maple Cottage, Bledington

Originally built as a barn to a neighbouring farm in the early nineteenth century and converted to a residential dwelling in 1972 by Thomas Williams builders of Longborough, Maple Cottage has also been much improved by the current owners and is now a well-presented substantial stone cottage in the heart of the popular village of Bledington. The kitchen/dining room is complete with

obligatory Aga, whilst the sitting room has an impressive stone fireplace and inset log-burning stove, leading to a conservatory overlooking a beautiful English cottage garden, with a master bedroom and en-suite shower room, two further bedrooms and family bathroom. With far-reaching views over open farmland and plenty of potential, internal viewing is highly recommended.

For further information please contact Martin Frost MNAEA on 01608 651000

Tom says: "Set in such attractive grounds with a pleasant countryside outlook, furnished and decorated to enhance the property's inherent period features, generously proportioned for six adult occupancy, I estimate this delightful house could generate approximately ÂŁ40,000 per annum."

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Belle View, Stow on the Wold

This delightful mid terraced cottage in the centre of Stow on the Wold benefits from a really pretty garden with plenty of space for children. Built in the early 1800’s, it offers surprisingly generous living space set over four floors and is full of period features including flagstone floors and wooden beams, a beamed open fireplace and cellar. There’s a sitting room, separate book-lined dining room and

kitchen/breakfast room on the ground floor, whilst the first-floor landing is particularly spacious and could be used as a study area. Leading to a double bedroom and stairs rising to the second floor, the second bedroom has a door through to a third bedroom which could be used as a dressing room or nursery.

For further information please contact Steve Buchanan MNAEA on 01451 822977

Tom says: “Stow on the Wold habitually performs really well as a holiday let location - it’s on the American tourist trail, so the greatest demand is for properties presented to a very high spec. Sleeping four, equipped with two beautiful bathrooms, I estimate the cottage would generate around £30,000 - £35,000 per annum.”

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INVESTING IN PROPERTY

White Roses Cottage, Moreton in Marsh

A pretty Grade II Listed end of terrace cottage situated close to the centre of town, including the rarest of combinations in the town, a garage and garden. Formerly a two-bedroom cottage, purchased in 2013 by the Dormer House School, the ground floor is being used currently as a classroom with a library on the first floor. Whilst adapted, it has retained a wealth of period features including

a large inglenook fireplace, beams and exposed stone walls. An application has been made to return to residential use. Subject to the necessary approval, this offers real potential to create a fabulous holiday let property.

Editor’s note: A sale was agreed on the launch date of above asking price following competing bids generated on the first day of viewings. For further information please contact Martin Frost MNAEA on 01608 651000.0

Tom says: “This is a great property for refurbishment and would definitely perform well as a holiday let. Funnily enough we have very few properties in Moreton in Marsh, so it falls into a somewhat untapped market. Pretty, within walking distance of the train station and in a nice quiet spot just off the High Street, sleeping four adults this quaint cottage could achieve £30,000 to £35,000.”

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Chapel Cottage, Blockley

A stunning Grade II Listed nineteenth-century stone cottage that was extensively refurbished in 2008 to provide contemporary comfort whilst retaining period character. An open-plan living/dining kitchen complete with Everhot range cooker and underfloor heating is the centrepiece of the home, served by a separate utility area and cloakroom. A separate snug leads up to a galleried en-suite

bedroom/study, with another en-suite master bedroom plus second bedroom and landing/dressing room on the first floor. A charming courtyard garden is enclosed by stone walling, offering a high degree of privacy and views towards open countryside. No onward chain.

For further information please contact Martin Frost MNAEA on 01608 651000

Tom says: “A truly beautiful property, of sufficient size to comfortably accommodate six by changing the snug to a permanent double bedroom and the study above to a small TV room. Quality and finish always go hand-in-hand with potential success so, providing it is furnished to the highest standard, I estimate Chapel Cottage would generate between £35,000 and £40,000 gross income per annum.”

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Sunavon, Little Rissington ÂŁ425,000 A three bedroom semi-detached house with excellent living space and a lovely garden. Entrance Hall | Sitting Room | Kitchen / Dining Room leading through to Family Room | Cloakroom | Three Bedrooms | Bathroom | Garden | Parking EPC Rating : D

Harrison James & Hardie, Bourton on the Water 01451 822 977

Barn Cottage, Longborough ÂŁ525,000 A charming stone barn conversion situated in the heart of this popular Cotswold village. The versatile and flexible accommodation which retains many period features briefly comprises: Entrance Hall | Sitting Room with open fireplace | Kitchen/Diner | Utility Room | Conservatory | Ground Floor Bedroom | Ground Floor Shower Room | Master Bedroom with En-Suite Bathroom | Three Further Bedrooms | Gravelled Driveway to the front providing Off Road Parking for Several Vehicles | Delighful Enclosed Rear Garden | En-Bloc open fronted Garage | Internal Inspection of this deceptively spacious home is highly recommended | EPC Rating: D

Harrison James & Hardie, Moreton in Marsh 01608 651 000

view all our properties at harrisonjameshardie.co.uk


HOT PROPERTY

THE

SKIRRET NETHER WESTCOTE OXFORDSHIRE

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Sold as a going concern, to include all furniture and fittings as well as holiday let bookings. Quaintly named after a traditional Tudor vegetable, The Skirret is a charming two bedroom barn conversion nestled in the beautiful Cotswold village of Nether Westcote with stunning views of the Oxfordshire countryside. Having recently undergone a complete renovation, this property boasts the perfect balance between character charm and contemporary finish. The Skirret is the perfect investment for any buyer seeking their very own slice of the Cotswolds. Entrance Hall | Living Room | Kitchen / Breakfast Room | Two Double Bedrooms | Bathroom | Garden | Parking | EPC Rating: G


THE SKIRRET

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THE SKIRRET

TOM SAYS: "A beautifully presented property, styled perfectly to a boutique hotel finish. With a fabulous pub on the doorstep and in a gorgeous village it is quite simply a wonderful proposition. Being single storey could also open doors to specific markets, so I would estimate ÂŁ30,000 gross revenue per annum, possibly even more in time."

Editor’s note: At the time of going to press, a sale was agreed above asking price following competing bids generated on the first day of viewings. For further information please contact Sophie Williams MNAEA on 01451 824 977

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HOT PROPERTY

Station House Kingham

This lovely home, which dates back to c1850, enjoys a unique and very picturesque setting within The Cotswolds Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. “We moved to Station House twenty-nine years ago, and we were only the third family to privately own the property, which is testament to the fact that it’s always been a much-loved home,” says Margaret. “It sits in this fantastic location, just minutes from the beautiful Cotswold villages of Bledington and Kingham, and we’re surrounded by some of the most spectacular countryside. But one of the biggest draws for us was the fact that my husband could go out of the front door

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in the morning and hop straight onto the train into London, so his daily commute was completely stress free; there was even a time when the station master would ring across to let him know if the train was delayed so that he could sit and have another cup of tea.” “The house was originally built in c1850, and back then it would have been a rather modest two-up-two-down, but over time each of its owners has added to it, so it’s now a very comfortable size. We have a lovely big sitting room with a very nice feature fireplace; the large kitchen-and-breakfast room opens

into a very flexible space that could be a dining area, but we currently use it as a study; the kitchen also flows into the conservatory, which creates a lovely connection with the garden, and we have another room downstairs that could be a guest bedroom. During our time here we too have made improvements, the most significant of which was the addition of the conservatory, but there’s still huge scope for the property to be further enhanced, which could be an exciting project for its new owners.” “Something else that drew us to the house


STATION HOUSE

The utter peace and tranquillity of our beautiful garden, the convenience of the station, these gorgeous surroundings… I really could go on and on.

when we first came across it was its lovely big garden, which has been an absolute haven of peace and tranquillity,” continues Margaret. “It’s mainly laid to lawn and edged with a very mature border of shrubs and trees, so we enjoy total privacy, and the property sides on to open farmland, so we can sit out there and enjoy the most beautiful views – on a clear day we can see all the way across to Stow-on-the-Wold. The garden is definitely a standout feature of the property and friends and family are always saying that the minute you step through the gate you feel as if you’re miles from anywhere.”

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“I would probably say that the conservatory is my favourite room,” says Margaret. “It’s light and bright and we can sit in there – no matter what the weather – and enjoy a splendid view of the garden and the glorious countryside beyond.” “For us the location of the house has been absolutely wonderful,” says Margaret. “We have all the convenience of having the station just a hop, skip and a jump from the front door; beautiful villages such as Kingham and Bledington are just moments away and travel a little further afield and you can be in Chipping Norton, Cheltenham, Banbury… We’re spoilt for choice in terms of towns and villages. And, to top it all, we’re completely surrounded by some of the most beautiful countryside.” “The sitting room is another very nice part of the house,” says Margaret. “It’s double aspect, so wonderfully light and bright, and because it’s such a big room is a really nice place to entertain friends and family.” “We really did think we’d be in this house forever, but we’ve both decided that this is

a sensible time to downsize,” says Margaret. “We’ll be so sad to leave because we’ve loved every minute of our time here and there’s so much that we’ll miss. The utter peace and tranquillity of our beautiful garden, the convenience of the station, these gorgeous surroundings… I really could go on and on.” Entrance Hall | Sitting Room | Dining Room | Study | Kitchen / Breakfast Room | Conservatory | Cloakroom | Three Bedrooms | Bathroom | Gardens | Off Road Parking | EPC Rating: F

Tom says: "The location of this property will certainly appeal to the London market and, if presented beautifully, I don't doubt that it would let really well. When considering refurbishment it's important to create enough sleeping and living space for eight adults - if so, the property should generate in the region of £55,000 to £60,000 gross revenue per annum."

To find out more about Station Cottage, Kingham, marketed by Fine & County North Cotswolds, Moreton in Marsh, visit www.cotswold-homes.com/property or contact Martin Frost 01608 653893

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ASK THE EXPERTS

Moving out to move on? The pros and cons of a chain-free proposition I am keen to sell as quickly as possible. Should I vacate and/or market my property as chain-free to attract buyers?

ccording to Wikipedia, only ten per cent of property transactions in England and Wales are chain-free so, dependent on your circumstances, an offer to move out to accommodate your buyer is something I would recommend in a sluggish marketplace. Anything that gives your property an inbuilt advantage over naturally competing properties is a plus. The Internet is often where buyers start their search - marketing as chain-free will encourage a buyer with a deadline to pick up the phone and book a viewing.

Steven Buchanan MNAEA is Branch Manager of the Bourton on the Water offices of Harrison James & Hardie, Fine & Country North Cotswolds. Having worked with the company for over fourteen years he has overseen many hundreds of successful local property transactions. Telephone 01451 822977 or e-mail steve@harrisonjameshardie.co.uk

First time buyers and investment buyers always like to move quickly too, so it’s an added attraction that could generate an offer closer to your asking price. And by the same token, moving into temporary accommodation also puts you in a stronger position when you offer on your next home. However, are you really prepared to rent or move in with friends or family until you find your next property? Be careful to agree a decent gap between exchange and completion if you need to secure a rental. If you commit to a sale on that basis, you have to stick to it - changing your mind will almost certainly lose your buyer. Vacating a property before you agree a sale is problematic. Buyers often do not have a sense of how space translates in an empty room to work out where their furniture will fit, for example. When viewing, we do supply ideas and imagination, but an empty property is always an unforgiving property. Every mark, every bit of wear and tear is on show. If you must move out, prepare your house

carefully for market and continue to care for it throughout the process. Pay attention specifically to the approach. Paint the front door. Clean all the windows. Weed the gravel. Tidy away any unsightly bins. Mow the lawn regularly. Then take a walk around your empty home through the eyes of a potential buyer. What might deter someone from making a good offer or just buying elsewhere? Wash, make good, renew. Clean or, better, replace the carpets. Take down faded curtains. Paint the house throughout, avoiding extreme colours. Remove detritus. Make sure every light switch works. Attend to leaky taps. Mend broken doors. Replace failed doubleglazing units. Pop to the property regularly, air it to keep it fresh, keep on mowing the grass and weeding the beds. As the summer ends, turn on the central heating early - there’s nothing like seeing their breath in the air to make your buyer think about the cost of winter fuel. Get your boiler serviced and your electrical wiring certified before it goes on the market. Remember, buyers are always looking for an excuse to renegotiate. Surveyors are equally risk-averse on the behalf of lenders. So, don’t provide the ammunition for a down-valuation. You might as well think of a number and double it, let alone the prospect in itself might make a buyer walk away. Instead, spend a few hundred pounds now - it will repay several thousand pounds in the end.

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5 Dikler Close, Bourton on the Water

£575,000

A true three bedroom detached bungalow with a lovely garden, double garage and a glorious lake view. Situated in a pleasant cul-de-sac, within a level walk of the High Street. Outside, the lawned rear garden is well maintained with stocked borders and patio areas. A pedestrian gate leads to the lake and to the front, there is plenty of off road parking and a double garage with power, light and a pedestrian side door. The property is double glazed and has gas fired central heating. Entrance Hall | Sitting Room | Dining Room | Conservatory | Kitchen / Breakfast Room | Utility | Cloakroom | Three Bedrooms | Family Bathroom | Gardens to Front & Rear | Off Road Parking | Double Garage | EPC Rating: C

Harrison James & Hardie, Bourton on the Water 01451 822 977

14 Avro Road, Upper Rissington

72 The Furrows, Bourton on the Water

£450,000

A substantial detached double-fronted family house with separate garage, constructed by Linden Homes in 2016 and situated in the sought-after village of Bourton on the Water. Entrance Hall | Kitchen/Diner | Utility Room | Cloakroom | Sitting Room | Study/Snug | Master Bedroom With Built-In Wardrobes And En-Suite Shower Room | Three Further Good-Sized Bedrooms | Family Bathroom | Lawned Front Garden With A Driveway Providing Off Road Parking For Several Vehicles | Access To The Garage | To The Rear Is A Walled South West Facing Garden | No Onward Chain | EPC Rating: B

Harrison James & Hardie, Bourton on the Water 01451 822 977

£485,000

Rose Cottage, Fifield

£450,000

A spacious four bedroom detached property, offering substantial accommodation over three floors to include a conversion of the attic to provide large master bedroom suite enjoying far reaching views, the whole situated in a generous plot offering the potential to extend, bordered by fields at the edge of the village. No Onward Chain

An opportunity to purchase a three bedroom cottage hosting character from exposed stone, wooden floors,Victorian bread oven. The cottage apart from its charm and character offers a courtyard garden with also a further detached garden, garage/home office and a two parking spaces situated in the picturesque village of Fifield.

Entrance Hall | Sitting Room | Dining Room | Kitchen | Utility | Downstairs Cloakroom | Master Bedroom en suite with Shower Room | Three Further Double Bedrooms | Family Bathroom Gardens to Front & Rear | Garage | Off Road Parking | EPC Rating: F

Entrance Hall | Sitting Room | Kitchen/Breakfast Room | Utility | Cloakroom | Three Bedrooms | Bathroom | Garden | Garage/Home Office | Parking | EPC Rating: G

Harrison James & Hardie, Bourton on the Water 01451 822 977

Harrison James & Hardie, Bourton on the Water 01451 822 977

harrisonjameshardie.co.uk

Bourton on the Water | Moreton in Marsh | Mayfair | Lettings


Orpingtons, Stow on the Wold

£480,000

|

25 Mitchell Way, Upper Rissington

£410,000

A three/four bedroom detached property offering flexible accommodation, tucked away, within walking distance of The Square.

A four bedroom detached house with a pleasant southerly aspect, situated within a short walk of The Rissington School and the local amenities.

Entrance Hall | Sitting Room | Dining Room | Kitchen | Utility Room | Conservatory | Two Principle Bedrooms (both with En Suite Shower Rooms) | Further Bedroom | Family Bathroom | Bedroom Four / Study | Garden | Integral Garage | Parking | EPC Rating: E

Entrance Hall | Sitting Room | Kitchen / Dining Room / Family Room | Cloakroom | Master Bedroom with en suite Shower Room | Three Further Bedrooms | Bathroom | Gardens | Garage | Off Road Parking | EPC Rating : B

Harrison James & Hardie, Bourton on the Water 01451 822 977

Harrison James & Hardie, Bourton on the Water 01451 822 977

3 The Furrows, Bourton on the Water

£406,500

A well presented, detached family home with garden, garage and off road parking occupying a convenient position close to the village amenities and schools. Available with No Chain. Entrance Hall | Cloakroom | Sitting Room | Kitchen / Dining Room | Master Bedroom with en suite Shower Room,Three Further Bedrooms | Family Bathroom | Garden | Garage | Off Road Parking | EPC Rating : B

Harrison James & Hardie, Bourton on the Water 01451 822 977

42 Park Farm, Bourton on the Water

£365,000

A well presented detached four bedroom house with generous garden and off road parking within walking distance of the village centre and schools. Entrance Hall | Sitting Room | Dining Room | Study / Snug | Kitchen | Cloakroom | Four Bedrooms | Bathroom | Garden | Parking | Garage | EPC Rating : D

Harrison James & Hardie, Bourton on the Water 01451 822 977

view all our properties at harrisonjameshardie.co.uk


6 London Road Terrace, Moreton in Marsh

£349,950

A Victorian three double bedroom characterful home with wellproportioned accommodation, generous south facing gardens and scope for further extension. Internal porch leading to Entrance Hall with quarry tile flooring | Kitchen | Dining Room | Sitting Room | Two Double Bedrooms on the First Floor | Family Bathroom | Second Floor Master Bedroom with Dressing Area | Outside there are two stone Outbuildings | Courtyard leading to a Mature Garden | EPC Rating: E

Harrison James & Hardie, Moreton in Marsh 01608 651 000

11 Sankey Grove, Moreton in Marsh

£375,000

Entrance Hall | Spacious and Light Kitchen/Dining/Family Room with Bi Fold Doors Out to Garden | Sitting Room | Cloakroom | Master Bedroom with En-Suite | Three Further Bedrooms and Family Bathroom | Good Size Rear Garden | Garage with Store Room | Parking to The Front | EPC Rating: C

harrisonjameshardie.co.uk

£550,000

A detached chalet style family house situated on the edge of the village with countryside views. Entrance Hall | Sitting Room with Feature Fireplace And Log-Burner | Dining Room | Kitchen/Breakfast Room | Utility Room | Ground Floor Bedroom/Study | Ground Floor Shower Room | Three First Floor Bedrooms Family bathroom | Outside There Are Gardens Front and Rear | Off Road Parking | Garage | EPC Rating: E

Harrison James & Hardie, Moreton in Marsh 01608 651 000

A well presented and extended four bedroom semi detached family home situated in a small cul de sac within easy reach of the town’s amenities

Harrison James & Hardie, Moreton in Marsh 01608 651 000

Vallis, Condicote

Badgers Den, Blockley

£379,950

This three bedroom barn conversion forms part of the picturesque and sought after Lower Farm Cottages complex in the popular village of Blockley. The characterful and charming property benefits from its own private garden and off road parking as well as having the use of the communal grounds bordered by Blockley brook.The accommodation briefly comprises: Entrance Hall | Sitting/Dining Room | Kitchen | Ground Floor Bathroom | Three Bedrooms | First Floor Bathroom | Garden | Parking | EPC Rating: E

Harrison James & Hardie, Moreton in Marsh 01608 651 000

Moreton in Marsh | Bourton on the Water | Mayfair | Lettings


8 Swan Close, Moreton in Marsh

O.I.E.O £300,000

A semi-detached two bedroom bungalow situated just a short walk from the town centre, the property benefits from a garage, car-port and off road parking. The accommodation briefly comprises:

Dream Cottage, Willersey

£395,000

A well-presented link-detached cottage style Cotswold stone property situated in a cul-de-sac location a short walk from the village centre.

Internal inspection is highly recommended.

Entrance Hall | Sitting Room with log-burning stove | Dining Area | Kitchen | Three Bedrooms (one with en-suite) | Family Bathroom | Gardens | En-Bloc Single Garage | Parking Area | Agent’s Note:The area of garden to the east of the property is not included in the registered title however the current and former owners have used and enjoyed this garden during their tenure | EPC Rating: D

Harrison James & Hardie, Moreton in Marsh 01608 651 000

Harrison James & Hardie, Moreton in Marsh 01608 651 000

Entrance Hall | Open-Plan Kitchen/Sitting Room | Garden Room | Two Bedrooms (one with En-Suite Wet Room) and Bathroom | Gardens to the front and rear with the rear garden being of particular interest being SouthFacing | Garage | Car Port | Off Road Parking | EPC Rating: D

46 Park Road, Blockley

£329,950

142 Fosseway Avenue, Moreton in Marsh

£220,000

A well-presented Victorian stone cottage occupying an elevated position on the edge of the sought after North Cotswold village of Blockley and enjoying stunning views across open countryside to the rear.

A modern three bedroom Georgian style terraced house with garage, situated within walking distance of town centre amenities. The accommodation briefly comprises:

Sitting Room | Kitchen with a range of integrated appliances and granite worktops | Bathroom | Two Bedrooms | A Delightful Rear Garden | Views To The Rear | Ideal as a second home or Holiday Cottage for investment purposes | No onward chain | EPC Rating: E

Entrance Hall | Sitting Room | Dining Room | Kitchen | Three Bedrooms | Bathroom | Rear Garden with Workshop/Shed | En-Bloc Single Garage | EPC Rating: C

Harrison James & Hardie, Moreton in Marsh 01608 651 000

Harrison James & Hardie, Moreton in Marsh 01608 651 000

view all our properties at harrisonjameshardie.co.uk


ASK THE EXPERTS

A day in the life of a Lettings Agent I am currently considering a career in lettings. What are the best and worst things about the job?

ales or lettings, our day is completely full-on from the moment we step in through the door, but I always leave with a smile on my face, looking forward to the next. There’s never a dull moment - viewings to arrange, hand-overs to book in, a constant backto-back of calls and emails into the office, maintenance issues that require contractors, essential improvements to be talked through with clients. We might even be asked how to remove Lego bricks from a washing machine filter - you name it, the list of skills we acquire is pretty endless!

Jude Farrell ARLA is Senior Lettings Manager at the Moreton in Marsh offices of Harrison James & Hardie, Fine & Country North Cotswolds. Responsible with Katy Hackling ARLA for over a hundred managed lets, Jude has more than a decade’s experience in the local lettings marketplace. Telephone 01608 651000 or e-mail jude@harrisonjameshardie.co.uk

Both tenants and landlords are familiar faces. We enjoy ongoing relationships based upon trust and respect. This means occasionally being thick-skinned to criticism, a good listener at all times, endlessly patient, having an innately sunny temper and an ability to remain calm and polite no matter how agitating the circumstances. Not for everyone, then, but it’s always rewarding, varied and interesting! My fellow manager Katy and I are perpetually bombarded for advice. An investment buyer introduced by the sales team might want insight on potential properties he is considering as to which would give the highest annual yield or the best underlying capital growth. Five minutes later we could be giving step-by-step instructions to a new tenant on setting a central heating timer. And it really could be anything when it comes to a crisis – a flood, a power cut, a leaking roof, a blocked drain. Our little black book is full of reliable tradespeople who prioritise us when we call them. It’s very satisfying to wave our magic wand. Landlords and tenants are

always profoundly grateful that we are more efficient than they have come to expect from experience elsewhere. We are often shown gratitude in the form of cakes and flowers, which we love, and even a quick wave through the office window makes everyone’s day that bit happier. Above all we are responsible for the security and peace of mind of all our tenants and landlords. Everyone in the company is ARLA qualified (or MNAEA for sales) which isn’t a matter of course in most agencies. It takes about two years to pass all the exams, so it’s hard academic work, but we utilise this industry training every day, keeping up-todate by attending seminars and reading up on news, because there are always frequent changes to current legislation. With the new fee ban and fears about Brexit there’s no doubt that the rental cycle has changed again. Tenants seem far more settled in their homes, not moving from place to place as much, making decisions with considered thought rather than on a whim or light-heartedly. They are increasingly practical about their choices. Many are actively saving to buy a property within the next couple of years – not upsizing, sticking to smaller, cheaper properties so they can save more money each month. So, finding the right property for every tenant and giving best advice to our landlords is crucial. The most satisfying part of the job is when I come back to the office from a viewing having found the right property for a tenant, a place that they can call home. I love that they’re happy, and of course a happy tenant means a happy landlord, too!

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HOT PROPERTY

Smith Barry Circus, Upper Rissington Smith Barry Circus enjoys the most rural and tranquil position within Upper Rissington, a small cluster of prestigious detached properties arranged serenely in the round with a gated approach, each home afforded a generous plot overlooking neighbouring fields and panoramic views towards Oxfordshire.

8 Smith Barry Circus has undergone a programme of refurbishment over the last twelve months, now significantly remodelled and upgraded to create a stunning modern family home. The accommodation, arranged over three floors, provides entirely open-plan ground floor living space with three large double bedrooms and a family bathroom

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on the first floor, plus a luxurious master bedroom suite above, complete with dressing room and separate shower room. “The previous couple had lived here since the original RAF base was sold off in the late 1990s. It was a home entirely suited to their lifestyle, sitting in a wonderful spot

overlooking fields with a stocked mature garden and workshop/garage, still with its original arrangement of smallish separate ground floor rooms. We fell in love with the position and potential, seeing immediately how we might transform the whole ground floor to make the most of its fantastic aspect,� says the present owner.


8 SMITH BARRY CIRCUS

Even in this short time we have made such good friends of the neighbours, who are so kind, welcoming and friendly. We shall certainly miss the Cotswold lifestyle, this little quiet corner of paradise.

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Notwithstanding the amount of work that has already been done, the property still offers significant potential, being situated within a broad plot that particularly lends itself to extension.

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“We began by knocking out the walls separating the kitchen, dining room, sitting room and garden room, re-positioning the back door to a more practical position. We rewired the whole property, replaced the picture windows and door to the front, stripped out an old shower on the ground floor, installing a fabulous new kitchen, before re-decorating the whole house. Fortunately, the top floor had only been recently re-configured, and done so beautifully - at least we were spared that last bit!” It has clearly been a labour of love, and the end result is spectacular. Why then, so soon after finishing their endeavour, are they moving?

“Unfortunately, life sometimes throws a curve ball. My wife’s family is in the South of England and we are needed back there. It’s such a great shame. We have been absolutely delighted in living here Even in this short time we have made such good friends of the neighbours, who are so kind, welcoming and friendly. We shall certainly miss the Cotswold lifestyle, this little quiet corner of paradise.” Notwithstanding the amount of work that has already been done, the property still offers significant potential, being situated within a broad plot that particularly lends itself to extension. As such, early viewing is unhesitatingly recommended. For further information visit www.cotswold-homes.com/ property and to book an appointment to view, strictly by prior appointment, contact the Bourton on the Water offices of Fine & Country North Cotswolds on 01451 824972.


8 SMITH BARRY CIRCUS

Katy Hackling ARLA, Lettings, Bourton on the Water, says: Family homes with good gardens to let in Upper Rissington are always hugely in demand. As an investment property for a professional landlord seeking reliable longterm underlying capital growth, this property would be a perfect choice. Being in the most favoured location within the village, based on the amount of previous competitive interest in a neighbouring property offered to let, it will undoubtedly generate in excess of ÂŁ20,000 gross income per annum.

To find out more about 8 Smith Barry Crescent, marketed by Fine & County North Cotswolds, Bourton on the Water, visit www.cotswold-homes.com/property or contact Karen Harrison on 01451 824977

COTSWOLD-HOMES.COM

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HOT PROPERTY

Church View

Ascott Under Wychwood A delightful five-bedroom cottage in a favoured setting, offered To Let Church View has perfect ground-floor accommodation for family life – a formal sitting room, study, kitchen/dining / openplan sun room, boot room / utility and ground floor loo, complete with three double bedrooms, bathroom and shower room on the first floor and a master bedroom, bathroom and fifth double bedroom above. Provided with off-road parking and enjoying a well-kept garden, there is also a separate stone outbuilding currently used as an art studio. The owner, who is moving abroad, will certainly miss life in Church View:

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“The location of the house was the one of the things that I loved about the cottage from the first time we saw it. It’s so wonderful, looking down onto the Windrush Valley and the Cotswold Hills. That sense of welcome continues when you step inside – it was a friendly place the moment we walked in and it’s always been so good to come home. “There was a lot of work to do but it offered great potential for a family, having a sizeable garden with a lovely aspect overlooking the ancient churchyard, being in a proper village, especially now with the re-opened Swan pub, plus a shop and an

active village hall, with good schools nearby. And Crown Farm Livery yard just around the corner was perfect for our pony. “The property was basically two old cottages that had been knocked through with a linking corridor. It had two of everything, including two front doors, so it required complete modernisation. We immediately gutted the entire property, installing new windows throughout, putting in insulation, new plumbing and electrics. “We uncovered the inglenook which was a great find. We installed a new front door in


CHURCH VIEW

the centre of the house so that it felt like one whole, creating a sense of flow and balance. We also extended to provide a kitchen / dining room complete with a high ceiling, and a new bedroom on the first floor above. Outside, we renovated an old stone building into a studio and garden store, plus a shed and cycle store. “The sitting room, with its inglenook and thick walls, is a great place to be on a grey cold day whilst in summer we gravitate towards the kitchen which looks over the garden, because it’s so light and airy. The garden is my pride and joy – it is enclosed

and private, not enormous but large enough for a lawn to play badminton, where I have installed raised beds and a fruit cage. There are lovely corners that catch the evening sun so it’s a fantastic place to sit and enjoy an evening drink, warmed by the stone walls. “Sitting by the fire in the evening, relaxing in the garden in summer and just watching all the birds flying in and out of the garden are my favourite things. The tranquillity of the location has been a joy but above all it’s that feeling we experienced when we first viewed that we shall miss – a warm welcoming home, full of happy memories.”

Katy Hackling ARLA, says: “This stunning cottage was offered to let at £2750 per calendar month, agreeing at the full price on the first viewing day with competing offers generated by ‘under the radar’ marketing. We always have far more demand than supply of suitable properties, so should you be considering letting your home please call me on 01451 822977 / e-mail katyh@harrisonjameshardie.co.uk”

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ASK THE EXPERTS

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ASK THE EXPERTS

Restrictive Covenants My London solicitor is having a hard time getting his head round my intended purchase of a North Cotswold property. I am worried how various covenants and restrictions he’s highlighted will affect things when I sell. Is this common in the Cotswolds?

Stacey Ballinger is an Associate at Thomas Legal Group, where she runs one of the residential property teams. She has over 20 years’ experience in property work, specialising in all aspects of conveyancing. Stacey has been working in this area since she qualified and has dealt with many thousands of property transactions. Stacey qualified as a Chartered Legal Executive in 2011, having worked in property law since 1997, working with two major law firms in the local area, before joining Thomas Legal in 2010. Stacey regularly undertakes professional development courses in residential property and other related areas of law. To contact Stacey, email stacey.ballinger@thomas.legal or call 01452 657973 Visit Thomas Legal Group at www. thomaslegalgroup.co.uk

have worked and specialised in residential property in the North Cotswolds for twenty years, and yes, it is a unique area of the UK! Basically, covenants are legal promises to do, or not to do, something during your ownership, usually restrictive and running with the land. Restrictions tend to be something that you need to comply with before you can proceed with your purchase or sale; it’s rare to see deeds without them these days and, generally, they are nothing to worry about - just to be aware of. They’re intended for the benefit of the property and/or to maintain the natural beauty of the North Cotswolds. Here are examples of the most common issues in the local area: Section 157 Housing Act 1988 – Often found in Bourton, Moreton, Northleach etc. and usually properties that formerly belonged to Cotswold District Council or Fosseway Housing Association. Requires you to have either lived or worked in the local area for more than three years, in order to keep some housing stock for local people, enabling them to stay in their local area. Buyers need to apply to either the District Council or the Housing Association for consent to proceed. If you can prove you have lived and worked in the local area for the last three years, this process is quite straightforward; I believe you can download the application forms from their website. Restriction on new developments – On completion of a purchase, a formal notice, called a Deed of Covenant, will be served to confirm change of ownership and the buyer’s compliance with covenants and restrictions. This restriction is an additional comfort in

ensuring that outstanding Estate Charges have been settled and, therefore, when you move in you won’t be surprised by an invoice! Usually found on larger new developments, this will include an Estate Charge, a commitment to contribute to the upkeep and repair of communal areas of land – lighting, roads (if to remain private), recreational spaces, etc. A management pack will be provided, containing details of costs and the structure of the management company. As a resident, you become a member and can attend AGMs to have your say on how things are run. Upper Rissington – This is a very unique ex-RAF site with its own private water supply, drainage etc. which, for a long time, was a real issue. Bradford Property Trust sold all the existing residential properties with a restriction in the deeds that, before a property could be sold again, the buyer must enter into a Deed of Covenant with the management company to comply with the covenants contained in the deeds; this included a small annual contribution to maintenance, supposedly collected by BPT’s agents (who failed to do so much of the time). Many existing property owners therefore simply did not realise that charges were due until they came to sell. After Linden and Bovis Homes repaired and renewed the drainage and water systems, Albion Water finally took over adoption of the network in 2014. I do come across the odd outstanding charge these days, which I ensure is paid up to date on completion, when the buyer will also be required to enter into a separate Deed of Covenant to confirm compliance with the covenants contained in the deeds, of course.

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Lettings

Gable End, Bourton on the Water

£2,350 pcm

2 Varsity Close, Upper Rissington

£1,745 pcm

A charming and substantial four bedroom family home with generous gardens located within a peaceful and private setting within easy reach of the centre of Bourton on the Water.

A well presented and spacious five bedroom property located in a small dul-de-sac on the much sought after Victory Fields development in Upper Rissington.

Dining Hall | Sitting Room | Study | Kitchen/Breakfast Room | Utility | Cloakroom | Two Double Bedrooms with En Suites | Further Double Bedroom Large Single Bedroom | Family Bathroom | Extensive Gardens including Orchard | Off Road Parking | Double Garage | EPC Rating: D

Entrance Hall | Open Plan Kitchen/Breakfast Room | Family Room | Sitting Room with wood burner | Study | Cloakroom | Master Bedroom with En Suite | Guest Bedroom with En Suite | Three Further Bedrooms | Family Bathroom | Off Road Parking | Double Garage | Enclosed Garden | EPC Rating: B

Harrison James & Hardie, Bourton on the Water 01451 822 977

Harrison James & Hardie, Bourton on the Water 01451 822 977

11 Bibury Corner, Bourton on the Water

£975 pcm

6 East Street, Moreton in Marsh

£950 pcm

A well presented three bedroom semi-detached house within the popular village of Bourton on the Water.

A beautifully presented three bedroom character cottage located in a tucked away location just off the High Street of Moreton in Marsh.

Entrance Hall | Sitting/Dining Room | Kitchen | Cloakroom | Master Bedroom with En Suite | Two Further Bedrooms | Family Bathroom | Enclosed Courtyard Garden | Garage | Off Road Parking | EPC Rating : B

Entrance | Sitting Room | Kitchen/Breakfast Room | First Floor Double Bedroom | Bathroom | Second Floor Double Bedroom | Single Bedroom Southerly Facing Courtyard Garden | Stone Outbuilding | EPC Rating : D

Harrison James & Hardie, Bourton on the Water 01451 822 977

Harrison James & Hardie, Moreton in Marsh 01608 651 000

harrisonjameshardie.co.uk

Bourton on the Water | Moreton in Marsh | Mayfair | Lettings


Lettings

Hill Farm, Nether Westcote

£2,250 pcm 4 Blenheim Way, Moreton in Marsh

£1,195 pcm

LET AGREED ON FIRST DAY OF VIEWINGS AFTER MULTIPLE APPLICATIONS

LET AGREED ON FIRST VIEWING

Hill Farm with its beautiful mellow Cotswold stone is a charming home situated in the prime village location of Nether Westcote.The property offers a wealth of beautiful period features including exposed Cotswold stone walls, original beams and inglenook fireplaces.

A very well presented three bedroom mid terrace house located on the popular Blenheim Park development in Moreton in Marsh.

Bespoke Kitchen / Breakfast Room | Snug Area | Dining Room | Living Room Cloakroom / Utility room | Store Room | Two First Floor Double Bedrooms Family Bathroom | Two Second Floor Rooms as Bedrooms or Study/Playrooms | Garden | Off Road Parking | EPC Rating : E

Harrison James & Hardie, Bourton on the Water 01451 822 977

10 Corders Lane, Moreton in Marsh

Entrance Hall | Sitting/Dining Room | Kitchen | Cloakroom | Three Bedrooms, Three Bath/Shower Rooms | Single Garage | Off Road Parking | Rear Garden EPC Rating: D

Harrison James & Hardie, Moreton in Marsh 01608 651 000

£900 pcm 2 The Pound, Little Rissington

£895 pcm

LET AGREED ON FIRST VIEWING

LET AGREED ON FIRST VIEWING

A well presented two double bedroom property conveniently located in a central position within the market town of Moreton in Marsh.

A recently improved and beautifully appointed home occupying a tucked away position within this pretty North Cotswold village.

Entrance Hall | Sitting Room | Conservatory / Dining Room | Kitchen | Cloakroom | Two Double Bedrooms | Bathroom | Garden | Garage | Parking Space | EPC Rating: C

Entrance Hall | Cloakroom | Sitting Room | Kitchen/Breakfast Room Three Bedrooms | Bathroom | Enclosed Garden | Off Road Parking | EPC Rating: D

Harrison James & Hardie, Moreton in Marsh 01608 651 000

Harrison James & Hardie, Bourton on the Water 01451 822 977

view all our properties at harrisonjameshardie.co.uk


Profile for Cotswold Homes

Cotswold Homes Summer 2019 Edition  

Welcome to our Summer 2019 Edition of Cotswold Homes Magazine. In this issue, we interview bestselling author Clare Mackintosh, ringmistress...

Cotswold Homes Summer 2019 Edition  

Welcome to our Summer 2019 Edition of Cotswold Homes Magazine. In this issue, we interview bestselling author Clare Mackintosh, ringmistress...