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South Delta Business Sustainability Strategy June 30, 2015

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Prepared by:

Prepared for:

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Source: http://jimleggitt.typepad.com/


South Delta Edmonton – Business Sustainability Strategy Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis Table of Contents 1.

Introduction…………………………………………………………………………………....8

2.

The Town Centre Vision……...………………………………………………………………10

3.

2.1

Vision & Principles

11

2.2

Principles of a Strong Town Centre

12

Existing & Emerging Conditions……………………………………………………………19 3.1

Regional Context

21

3.2

Local Context

31

3.3

Ladner Precinct Delineation & Overview

32

3.4

Ladner Precinct A: Village Core

34

3.5

Ladner Precinct B: Elliott Street

41

3.6

Ladner Precinct C: Waterfront Precinct

47

3.7

Ladner Precinct D: Gateway Precinct

52

3.8

Tsawwassen Precinct Delineation & Overview

58

3.9

Tsawwassen Precinct A: Tsawwassen Town Centre

60

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South Delta Edmonton – Business Sustainability Strategy Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis Table of Contents

4.

5.

3.10

Tsawwassen Precinct B: 12th Avenue & 56th Street

67

3.11

Tsawwassen Precinct C: Tsawwassen Gateway

76

3.12

Conclusion & Synopsis

81

Demand & Impact Assessment…………………………………………………………...82 4.1

Introduction

83

4.2

Population Growth & Real Expenditure Growth

84

4.3

Expenditure Potential & Gross Space Supportable – Baseline

88

4.4

TFN Malls: Outflow Recapture, New Spending & Impact

91

4.5

Synopsis & Conclusions

106

Stakeholder Engagement…………………………………………………………………..107 5.1

Stakeholder Engagement Overview

108

5.2

Ladner Stakeholder Engagement

109

5.3

Tsawwassen Stakeholder Engagement

113

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South Delta Edmonton – Business Sustainability Strategy Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis Table of Contents 6.

7.

Business Sustainability Case Studies……………………………………………………..117 6.1

Introduction

118

6.2

Downtown Napanee, Ontario

119

6.3

Downtown Canmore, Alberta

121

6.4

Downtown Revitalization Task Force, Sidney, British Columbia

123

6.5

Bernard Avenue Revitalization, Kelowna, British Columbia

125

6.6

Business Revitalization, Revelstoke, British Columbia

128

6.7

Danforth East Community Association, Toronto, Ontario

129

South Delta Business Sustainability Action Plan………………………………………...131

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South Delta Edmonton – Business Sustainability Strategy Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis Table of Contents 8.

9.

Community Group Actions…………………………………………………………………136 8.1

Formalize a Ladner Business Improvement Area

137

8.2

Review BIA Administrative Capacity

139

8.3

Collaboration & Consensus Building

140

8.4

Festivals & Events

142

8.5

Tenant Retention & Improvement

144

8.6

Tenant Recruitment

146

8.7

Marketing & Branding

149

8.8

Local Area Research & Monitoring

150

Business Owner Actions……………………………………………………………………..152 9.1

Research & Coordination

153

9.2

Business Self-Assessment

154

9.3

Identify Groups and Resources that can Help

156

9.4

Operational Adjustments

157

9.5

Physical Store Improvements & Merchandising

158

9.6

Research & Monitoring

159 5


South Delta Edmonton – Business Sustainability Strategy Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis Table of Contents 10.

11.

Property Owner & Representative Actions………………………………………………160 10.1

Assess & Improve Property Marketability

161

10.2

Coordinate Recruitment & Leasing Efforts

164

10.3

Monitoring Impacts & Coordinating with BIAs

165

Corporation of Delta Actions……………………………………………………………….166 11.1

Coordination & Oversight

167

11.2

Revisit Planning & Other Municipal Policy

168

11.3

Strategic Investments

173

11.4

Monitoring Plan Implementation & Progress

176

Appendix A……………………………………………………………………………………………177 Appendix B…………………………………………………………………………………………….188

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South Delta Edmonton – Business Sustainability Strategy Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

1

Introduction

7


Introduction

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

The 1.8 million square feet of retail space under construction at Tsawwassen Mills and Tsawwassen Commons is approximately equivalent to adding 42 square feet of new space for every resident in Tsawwassen and Ladner. In the context of a Metro region that, as a whole, contains approximately 40-45 square feet of total retail and service space per capita (of which 35% is classified as malls or power centres), this new supply is significant by any measure. Effectively, upon opening of the malls in spring 2016, South Delta will experience an increase in retail floor space supply far in excess of natural market growth.

It is this seismic shift in the retail landscape that has prompted the Corporation of Delta to retain a consulting team, led by G.P. Rollo & Associates Ltd. (GPRA), to develop a South Delta Business Sustainability Strategy. Drawing on input received through a variety of stakeholder consultations, an in-depth assessment of existing conditions in Ladner and Tsawwassen, and the combination of experience working in communities facing comparable challenges, the consulting team has developed this strategy document with action-oriented advise for local businesses, landowners, other community groups, and the Corporation of Delta. Some actions can and should be implemented immediately, while others will require longer term collaboration and engagement, both locally and beyond. Fundamentally, this Sustainability Strategy comes down to a strategic tenant retention and recruitment exercise. For local businesses, short and long-term success will be predicated on successfully assessing their customer base, the competitive landscape, and making adjustments to succeed in an evolving market. For landowners, properly assessing their properties and engaging in coordinated and collaborative efforts with local community organizations and business owners will be fundamental to ensuring that their properties are productive and that their tenants are financially successful. For community organizations and entities like BIAs, Chamber of Commerce and Tourism Delta, there will be a need for expanded scopes of work and diligence in coordination and communication. And finally, for the Corporation of Delta, this strategy will require a variety of efforts, ranging from consistent oversight and planning policy revisions, to a range of strategic investments. Efforts from all groups will be required to ensure that Tsawwassen and Ladner are well positioned to be clean, safe, attractive and sustainably vibrant town centres for years to come.

8


Introduction There are 11 sections in this report, including these introductory pages:

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Section 2: Town Centre Vision – in this section, the fundamentals of ‘retail ready’ town centres are laid out by way of seven core Principles of a Strong Town Centre. This section sets the stage for subsequent assessments of existing conditions in Ladner & Tsawwassen town centres.

Section 3: Existing & Emerging Conditions – this section provides an overview of the emerging retail competition at the Tsawwassen First Nation (TFN) lands, as well as a detailed quantitative and qualitative assessment of Ladner and Tsawwassen’s commercial inventory and other conditions. Each town centre is divided into component precincts to enable a detailed discussion of the current and targeted tenant mix and market positioning.

Section 4: Demand & Impact Assessment – this section projects South Delta’s market growth, by commercial category, and assesses the potential for TFN mall-related sales impacts on South Delta businesses. Impacts are calculated on a category-by-category basis.

Section 5: Stakeholder Engagement – having established existing and emerging conditions and precinct-specific merchandise mix adjustments in Section 2 through 4, in Section 5 we report on the first step in building the actionoriented Sustainability Strategy: engaging with local stakeholders. This section documents the feedback received during two nights of engagement with Tsawwassen and Ladner land and business owners.

Section 6: Business Sustainability Case Studies – Six case studies are analysed as part of the research for best practices in town centre business sustainability. Three case studies are from BC, two are from Ontario, and one is from Alberta.

Section 7: South Delta Business Sustainability Action Plan – in Section 7, we introduce the structuring elements for the action plan to follow.

Section 8: Community Group Actions – this section lays out recommended action items for the local business (improvement) associations, Tourism Delta, Chamber of Commerce, and other community groups.

  

Section 9: Business Owner Actions – this section provides action items for local business owners. Section 10: Property Owner & Representative Actions – this sections provides action items for landowners. Section 11: Corporation of Delta Actions – finally, action items for the Corporation of Delta are discussed.

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South Delta Edmonton – Business Sustainability Strategy Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

2

The Town Centre Vision

2.1 Vision & Principles 2.2 Principles of a Strong Town Centre 10


Edmonton – Evolving Infill “To establish vibrant, sustainable and Residential resilient downtown environments in Ladner Market Analysis

2.1 Vision & Principles

Vision Statement:

Before beginning a discussion of the detailed actions that will need to be undertaken to implement the South Delta Business Sustainability Strategy, we first draw attention to a fundamental question that all stakeholders (government, businesses, business district managers etc.) should be considering: is the stage sufficiently set in Ladner & Tsawwassen for successful business attraction and retention?

& Tsawwassen through improvements to the quality and viability of existing businesses and the attraction of new viable businesses.”

Fundamentally this strategy will come down to tenant retention and tenant recruitment. In order to ensure that existing businesses survive and thrive, and that complementary new businesses are attracted, both Ladner and Tsawwassen must offer those businesses the fundamentals that they need to succeed. At a minimum, these include a strong customer base, and a clean, safe, attractive commercial environment. Understanding and diagnosing the types of improvements needed to move the business districts (and their component precincts) towards being ‘ready’ for success is a significant part of the overall strategy as it sets the stage to ensure that recruitment and retention efforts have the most impact. This section of the report provides a preliminary vision statement for South Delta (at right), and outlines the principles of a strong town centre. This sets the stage for the analysis of existing conditions found in Section 3, which also provides a simple ranking of existing conditions (strength, neutral, weakness) against the principles discussed in this section.

Principles of a Strong Town Centre Principle #1: Retail & Pedestrian Oriented Built Form Principle #2: Compelling Storefront Design Principle #3: Public Realm that Attracts & Retains People Principle #4: Convenient & Accessible Environments Principle #5: Market Dynamics Principle #6: The Businesses Principle #7: Consistent & Engaged Leadership

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2.2 Principles of a Strong Town Centre Principle #1: Retail & Pedestrian Oriented Built Form As a principle, commercial uses should be laid out in a compact, contiguous, and uninterrupted shopping environment. At all times, shoppers should be able to see new storefronts in multiple directions from their viewpoint, and should be able to access these stores without hindrance or delay. Shopping environments work best when designed for maximum pedestrian ease and comfort, both through minimizing walking distances, but also through the removal of both physical and psychological barriers. In practice, this means creating street retail environments that embody the following characteristics:

Avoidance of gaps in active land uses within shopping environments that deter shoppers from travelling further, including surface parking lots, large set-backs, gas stations, vacant commercial space and empty land.

Similarly, land uses with low ground-floor activity (offices, banks, residential, large format stores) should be designed to minimize the width of entrances fronting on to a main street, and lined where possible with smaller retail units.

Retail environments should be concentrated on core blocks with clear edges / boundaries to prevent unnecessary over-extension (which can lead to gaps in active uses and long walking distances).

Streets should be lined with active uses on both sides and dead-ends should be avoided to maximize retailer sightlines and enable shoppers to flow in a circular pattern.

Street crossings should be frequent and enable pedestrians to easily and safely cross to the alternate side with minimal delay.

Buildings should be built immediately adjacent to the public realm and surface parking should be placed at the rear.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

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2.2 Principles of a Strong Town Centre Principle #2: Compelling Storefront Design The retail structure and layout is primarily a means to feature the true attractor of a downtown, the individual stores themselves. Storefronts provide retailers with the ability to showcase their individuality and branding, lending to a downtown’s overall uniqueness. At the same time, poorly designed and unmaintained storefronts can negatively detract from not only individual business, but can also impact the success of adjacent properties. A downtown should aim to achieve storefronts that provide:

A range of signage diversity that allows retailers to achieve a degree of authenticity, but still maintains a high design quality and respects heritage attributes.

 

Awnings that provide shade and shelter for pedestrians.

An avoidance of blank walls, window wall advertising, and gaps between operable doors.

Regularly cleaned, painted storefronts that see periodic reinvestment to ensure businesses stay relevant to changing consumer preferences.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Inviting / transparent window displays and easy to circulate store layouts that welcome customers.

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Principle #3: Public Realm that Attracts & Retains People Residential The public realm of a downtown is akin to the common areas (hallways) of a shopping mall. Over the long term, public areas Market Analysis

2.2 Principles of a Strong Town Centre

can actually prove to be more important than the stores around them as they are the one constant in a continually changing environment. The public realm plays an important role in both the actual and perceived safety of a town centre, critical factors for encouraging consumers to visit and linger. Increasingly, successful town centres are turning their focus to creating a high quality and shopper-friendly public realm through strategies such as:

Ensuring sidewalks are of a sufficient width to comfortably accommodate a higher pedestrian volume, as well as providing the flexibility to add patio seating.

Ensuring the street is not too wide providing a visual connection between both sides of the street. Many great streets have extended space that allows for programming and overflow areas for businesses.

Providing vegetation and properly planted street trees to give shoppers shading and enhanced visual aesthetics. At the same time, it is important to ensure foliage and planters do not obstruct sightlines and pedestrian movement.

 

Bright and frequent lighting that creates a safer-feeling environment and helps support extended shopping hours.

 

The use of other street enhancements features such as seating, public art, historical plaques, and bicycle racks.

Improving the interface between the built environment and the public realm to allow customers to easily access stores (i.e. low barrier entrances).

The flexible use of streets and on-street parking on a temporary basis to accommodate events, summer patios, food trucks, and other mobile retailers.

Excellent wayfinding

The creation of gathering places such as plazas and parkettes that accommodate small events, public space programming, and temporary pop-up retailers. A strong emphasis on pedestrian networks and protection, including well marked street crossings, wayfinding, and periodic weather protection.

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Principle #4: Convenient & Accessible Environments Residential Today’s shoppers are highly mobile and also under increasing time constraints. A key deciding factor in a shopper’s Marketpreference Analysis of

2.2 Principles of a Strong Town Centre

where to visit regularly relates to the overall convenience of the destination. If a shopping destination is not easy to access, the likelihood of a return visit declines as customers simply choose elsewhere to shop. The continuing evolution of the shopping centre industry and online shopping has elevated consumer expectations regarding convenience. To compete in terms of access and convenience, successful downtowns are seeking to create environments that:

Are accessible by all forms of transportation, including vehicles, transit, cyclists, and pedestrians, in a balanced and planned manner.

Have a parking strategy in place that keeps spaces in front of retailers clear of long-term parkers to maximize convenience for grab-n-go shoppers (such as parking meters), but provides abundant and clearly sign-posted off-street parking for free or at low cost.

Offer a broad merchandising mix that facilitates one-stop shopping, but groups complementary tenancies to maximize convenience.

Implement effective wayfinding strategies, both for external traffic at a regional level, and for pedestrians and vehicles at the local scale.

 

Shift opening hours to include evenings and Sundays to better correspond with the realities of dual-working adult households. Better integrate online technologies (website, apps) to provide shoppers with improved awareness of the diversity and precise locations of available businesses, and explore potential new channels for retailers such as online shopping (deliver, in-store pickup).

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2.2 Principles of a Strong Town Centre Principle #5: Market Dynamics Successful downtowns are typically supported by a combination of a captive local market and inflow from regional day visitors and tourists. To achieve local market support, downtowns must first have access to a sufficiently sized population or employment base - preferably within close walking distance of businesses. At the same time, minimizing the outflow of consumer expenditures made by adjacent residents and employees requires local businesses to possess a deep understanding of the profile of their customer, as well as the nuances of their consumer preferences (such as matching opening hours with shopping hours).

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Drawing visitors from further afield necessitates the downtown to offer compelling reasons for customers to travel past closer, competing retail destinations. One-of-a-kind of businesses, authentic urban experiences, or festivals and events are among the range of drawing factors that successful downtowns leverage to attract non-local visitors. The final element in the market dynamics of a successful downtown is the level of local and regional awareness of the range of goods and services available. Effective branding and marketing can help better position a downtown as a competitive shopping destination. By leveraging market dynamics and capturing sufficient consumer spending to support local businesses, over the long-term successful downtowns are able to thrive and adapt to changing needs.

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2.2 Principles of a Strong Town Centre Principle #6: The Businesses Tenant Mix & Retail Hierarchy – The most important ingredients for commercial success in downtown main street environments are the variety and quality of merchandising offered. To be successful, the downtown must offer a sufficient selection of quality stores and services that can attract residents to shop downtown on a regular basis. Importantly, anchor retail tenants (such as grocery stores) play a critical role in drawing visitors and allowing them to disperse to smaller, adjacent retailers. In downtown environments, this anchoring role of attracting visitors can also be played by non-retail uses such as community centres, public libraries, public spaces, and other institutions.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Market Positioning & Precincts – A downtown must focus on creating a merchandising mix that provides either a unique or complementary shopping experience compared to major shopping centre competition. There are a number of fundamental merchandising strategies to ensure success in the downtown area. In virtually all consumer surveys, shoppers identify the variety and selection of merchandise as one of the most important reasons for patronizing a particular retail destination. The downtown must provide a sufficient variety and selection of goods and services (“critical mass”) to attract shoppers. The variety of goods and services offered should facilitate one-stop shopping in the downtown for essential items. In addition to this strategy (or in lieu of), success may also be achieved in the downtown by becoming dominant in one or more merchandising niches compared to other competitive shopping destinations. It should be noted that the positioning of a downtown may vary significantly across its sub-precincts. This variation is what makes cities interesting and provides a special character not present in shopping centres. Competitive Businesses – Today’s consumer is both sophisticated and demanding as they have all enjoyed high quality shopping experiences outside of their local community. As such, businesses must provide contemporary merchandising, store layout, and store design. Downtown businesses must deliver high quality goods and services, exceptional customer service, and competitive prices. While a degree of transition in tenants enables a downtown to shift to meet changing consumer needs, high turnover indicates unviable economic conditions. Healthy downtowns are grounded in stable market conditions and a merchandising offering that competitively responds to consumer demand. 17


2.2 Principles of a Strong Town Centre Principle #7: Consistent & Engaged Leadership In a highly competitive retail environment, success can be difficult to achieve. Downtown areas often face the greatest challenges due to the many separate interest groups active in the downtown including landlords, tenants, business associations, politicians, and planners. The goals and objectives of these separate interest groups often do not match. In particular, divided land ownership and absentee landlords are frequently a key obstacle to initiating the changes needed to transform a struggling downtown into a successful and vibrant destination.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

The cornerstone for commercial success depends upon the ability for all vested interest groups to find the means to cooperate and coordinate their activities in such a way as to benefit the downtown overall. If positive changes are first made for the benefit of downtown, then all stakeholders and the community at large will benefit as well. The successful revitalization of downtowns requires a strong level of partnership and commitment among the various stakeholders, led by the committed leadership of individuals and organizations that can take coordinated action in responding to competition.

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South Delta Edmonton – Business Sustainability Strategy Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

3

Existing & Emerging Conditions 3.1 Regional Context 3.2 Local Context

3.3 Ladner Precinct Delineation & Overview 3.4 Ladner Precinct A: Village Core 3.5 Ladner Precinct B: Elliott Street 3.6 Ladner Precinct C: Waterfront Precinct 3.7 Ladner Precinct D: Gateway District 3.8 Tsawwassen Precinct Delineation & Overview 3.9 Tsawwassen Precinct A: Tsawwassen Town Centre 3.10 Tsawwassen Precinct B: 12th Avenue & 56th Street 3.11 Tsawwassen Precinct C: Tsawwassen Gateway 3.12 Synopsis 19


Introduction 

Having established the principles of strong town centres in Section 2, in this section we provide an evaluation of both the emerging regional retail context in South Delta as well as an assessment of the current condition of Ladner and Tsawwassen town centres.

Current conditions are discussed in some detail, with examinations of public realm, tenant mix, market positioning, anchors and amenities, and overall form and function. Throughout the section, assessments of existing conditions are tied back to the Principles of a Strong Town Centre by applying a simple ranking system:

Strength

A discussion of relevant retail trends; and An overview of the two malls – Tsawwassen Mills and Tsawwassen Commons – currently under construction on the Tsawwassen First Nation (TFN) lands, with an examination of layouts, merchandising and trade areas.

The Local Context sub-sections (3.2 to 3.10) contain the qualitative and quantitative evaluations of existing conditions in Ladner and Tsawwassen town centres, again with reference to their ranking against ideal town centre principles as noted above. This analysis sub-divides each town centre into a series of precincts as follows: Ladner: 1. Village Core Precinct 2. Elliott Street Precinct 3. Waterfront Precinct 4. Gateway Precinct

Weakness

The regional Retail Context sub-section (3.1) is divided into two components:

  

Neutral

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Tsawwassen 1. Tsawwassen Town Centre Precinct 2. 12th Ave & 56th St. Precinct 3. Gateway Precinct

The evaluation of each precinct concludes with recommendations for strategic repositioning.

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

3.1 Regional Context Overview of Retail Trends The Metro Vancouver Region

Upon completion and opening in 2016, Tsawwassen Mills will be the first new superregional enclosed shopping centre to enter the Metro Vancouver market since Metropolis at Metrotown opened in 1983. Metro Vancouver’s lack of new enclosed shopping centres in the last 30+ years is consistent with a Canada-wide (and indeed North America-wide) trend away from enclosed malls. Indeed, aside from Tsawwassen Mills, the only other super-regional enclosed shopping centres to be constructed in Canada in the last 25 years were Vaughan Mills north of Toronto (2004) and Crossiron Mills north of Calgary (2009).

The Metro Vancouver market appears to be ripe for major new retail entrants and retail centre expansion, ranking well behind the Canadian national figure for square feet of mall and power-centre retail space per capita (14 sq.ft. vs. 19 sq.ft.). Aside from the nearly 1.8 million square feet coming online at TFN in 2016, there is significant new square footage planned and under construction (mostly around rapid transit stations) across the region including: • McArthurGlen outlet mall at YVR (400,00 square feet)1 • Park Royal (additional 300,000+ square feet)2 • Brentwood Town Centre expansion (additional 700,000 square feet)3 • Lougheed Town Centre redevelopment (additional 600,000 square feet)4 • Oakridge redevelopment (additional 900,000 square feet)5 • Coquitlam Centre (additional 100,000 square feet)6

Metro Vancouver is also home to two of North America’s 10 most productive malls (2013), measured in sales per square foot: Pacific Centre is ranked #4 at $1,335 per sq.ft., and Oakridge Centre is ranked #8 at $1,132 per sq.ft. In 2014, Pacific Centre and Oakridge Centre were ranked the most productive and third-most productive malls in Canada respectively. All of these conditions are making it attractive for developers to bring additional space online. In a region constrained by high land values, increasing congestion and the ALR, a large unimpeded site like that on offer at TFN is a rare opportunity.

0 14 ft2

super-regional enclosed malls built in 30 years

low retail centre space per capita mall sales performance

1 Opening

July 9th 2015 Largely complete 3 Construction underway, Phase 1 opening Q3 2018. 4 No known construction/opening schedule. 5 Retail expansion targeted for 2019/2020 opening 6 Likely 2017 or 2018. 2

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

3.1 Regional Context Overview of Retail Trends Outlet Malls

The ‘Factory Outlet Centre’ concept is a purpose-built centre consisting of manufacturers’ and retailers’ outlet stores selling brand-name goods at discounted prices. It is typically a venue for sale of surplus stock, prior-season, or slow-selling merchandise, but also offers merchandise specifically designed (and priced) to be sold at the outlet store. Typically these centres are unanchored, although certain brand-name stores tend to serve as ‘magnet’ tenants. These can be open-air or enclosed, but typically do not exceed 400,000 or 500,000 square feet. Tsawwassen Mills, a 1.2 million square foot super-regional centre, is a hybrid shopping centre as it will offer a collection of outlet and off-price stores alongside categorydominant and first-to-market retailers. This development follows on a wave of new outlet mall and hybrid outlet centre developments across Canada in recent years.

From the time of writing through to 2017, the following new outlet centres will be opening in Canada: • McArthur Glen Designer Outlets, YVR (400,000 sq.ft., 150 outlet stores) • RioCan/Tanger Outlets, Calgary (350,000 sq.ft., 80 outlet stores) • The Outlet Collection, Edmonton (350,000 sq.ft., 85 outlet stores) • The Outlet Collection, Winnipeg (385,000 sq.ft., 90 outlet stores)

These new centres will join several malls which have opened recently in Canada: • Premium Outlets Montreal, 2014 (365,000 sq.ft., 85 outlet stores) • Ottawa Tanger Outlets, 2014 (350,000 sq.ft., 75 outlet stores) • Outlet Collection at Niagara, 2014 (520,000 sq.ft., 102 outlet stores) • Toronto Premium Outlets, 2013 (375,000 sq.ft., 90 outlet stores) • Tanger Outlet Cookstown, 2014 (300,000 sq.ft., 70 stores)

In addition, the Mills-type malls in Calgary and Vaughan have offered a collection of factory outlet stores since 2004 and 2009 respectively.

2

“Mills” hybrid-outlet malls built in Canada in last decade

5

Class A outlet malls opened in Canada in 2014

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

3.1 Regional Context Overview of Retail Trends Online Retail

The Center for the Study of Commercial Activity at Ryerson University predicted in 2013 that online shopping in Canada would double as a percentage of overall retail sales by 2018. However, it noted that the average annual per capita online sales in Canada in 2012 ($170) significantly lagged the $600 per capita spent online in the United States. It was projected that by 2018, Canadian per-capita online sales would reach $340.

The Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC) has projected that online sales in Canada will increase from $5.4 billion in 2012 to over $10 billion by 2020.

While online sales lag those of the U.S., BDC has found that the internet plays a very significant role in the vast majority of Canadian retail transactions. • At least half of consumers conduct an online search prior to purchasing a product; • 75% indicate that online ratings and reviews influence their buying decisions; • Even a 10% price discount is often enough to make a consumer buy a product online vs. in store; • More than 10% of consumers use stores to test products before buying online; The internet is playing an ever-increasing role in consumer research, with online research often directing customers to stores. However, if the stores do not have online presence, even customers who want to support local business may struggle to find those retailers and will go elsewhere. A survey conducted for Google Canada in fall 2014 found that 61% of Canadian independent retailers had no online presence. In the coming years, the most competitive small independent businesses will have a combination of strong customer service and client relationships, combined with a strong online presence (website & social media) that will include online transactions.

$170

2012 online retail sales per capita in Canada

$340

2018 projected online sales in Canada

$600

US current online sales per capita

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3.1 Regional Context Overview of Retail Trends Large Format Retail & the Reemergence of Town Centres

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

With changing demographics and the introduction of omni-channel retailing, large format (or ‘big box’) retailers have recently seen a seismic shift in the shopping behaviours of their customers. As generational shifts occur, the fundamental needs of households evolve. Families with fewer children, small families, empty nesters, and young adults require fewer bulk purchases and more targeted needs-fulfilment. This change in the retail business is driving an overall shift in big box retailing to smaller, more urban store formats. Big box chains such as Best Buy and Staples have notably started a “right-sizing” strategy, closing 15 stores in 2014.

“We’re not seeing customers say the physical store is dead,” said Clint Mahlman, chief operating officer of London Drugs, which is beginning to plan for stores that are about a third the size of their current mega-outlets. “What they are saying is that what they expect from a physical store is very different.”1

As more business flows through online retailing, many traditionally big box brands and retailers are changing the way they interact with their retail real estate. Growing competition from online-only outlets (e.g. Amazon) is forcing developers and retail operators to adapt and revisit their “brick-and-mortar” strategy.

In many ways, the retail industry is beginning a return to main street. More and more, consumers want to shop in an environment that, at the very least, replicates an idealized concept of the traditional, pre-mall-era main street retail district. Many mall developers and major retailers are listening, and the result has been a renaissance of the main street. This includes traditional existing main street environments, as well as new main streets, which are emerging as the centerpiece of new large-scale retail and mixed-use projects. On the decline are many of the automobile-era retail formats, including power centres and strip malls. Many are changing to include experiential elements traditionally found in organically grown and developed town centres. As the expectations and habits of customers change, retailers are recognizing the need to re-evaluate their store formats. Retail is becoming more of an experience, with unique cultural and local flavours taking on more prominence in the overall shopping experience.

1: Retail reboot: How e-commerce is forcing an industry transformation: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-onbusiness/retail-reboot-how-e-commerce-isforcing-an-industrytransformation/article21602870/?page=all

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

3.1 Regional Context TFN Mall Development Overview

The TFN shopping complex, slated to open in the spring of 2016, is being developed 5 minutes by car to the northwest of Tsawwassen Town Centre and 10 - 12 minutes south of Ladner village.

The development consists of two projects: (1) Tsawwassen Mills by Ivanhoe Cambridge, a 1.2 million square foot enclosed shopping centre which will include a number of first-to-market retailers such as BC’s first Bass Pro Shops; and (2) Tsawwassen Commons by Property Development Group, a 550,000 square foot outdoor power centre anchored by Wal-Mart, Canadian Tire and Rona.

LADNER 10+ minutes

TSAWWASSEN 5 minutes

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3.1 Regional Context Tsawwassen Mills Overview Mills Concept

The Tsawwassen Mills shopping centre will combine retail, entertainment, dining, and Service commercial. It will consist of at least 200 specialty stores, up to a half-dozen themed restaurants, an 1,100 seat food court, and a variety of entertainment venues. Upon completion it will be the second largest mall in Metro Vancouver, only slightly smaller than Metropolis at Metrotown in Burnaby. It will also be the first super-regional indoor mall constructed in Metro Vancouver since Metrotown was built in 1983.

The Mills format of retailing was pioneered in the mid-1980s in the Washington D.C. area at Potomac Mills. The first Mills mall in Canada was Vaughan Mills, which opened in 2004 just north of Toronto. The second Canadian Mills mall, CrossIron Mills in Calgary, opened in late summer of 2009. Both centres have been successful, and both entered regional markets where no enclosed malls had been constructed in nearly 20 years.

The Mills retailing format is a blend of several forms of retail and other offerings typically found in regional and super-regional malls, factory outlets, power centres, and entertainment clusters. The Mills concept’s success is partially attributable to this blend. The mix of other Mills centres comprise off-price retailers, factory outlets, department store outlets, catalogue outlets, category dominant stores, entertainment venues/retailers, and restaurants.

This concept is often referred to as a Shopping Centre Hybrid, borrowing elements from many other concepts:

 

From outlet centres: it borrows the idea of grouping manufacturers together

From regional malls: extra large food courts, entertainment venues, community gathering spaces

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

From power centres: it adopts the combination of large scale dominant and off-price stores

Drawing from a very large, super-regional trade area is key to the Mills success. The draw at other Mills malls is characterized as ‘shallow but broad’, meaning that there is a wide super regional draw, but relatively shallow local draw. 26


Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

3.1 Regional Context Tsawwassen Mills Overview Tenant Mix (Crossiron Mills)

While we do not yet know the tenant mix or specific retailers that will locate in Tsawwassen Mills (aside from Bass Pro Shops), an examination of the tenant mix at other existing Ivanhoe Cambridge-developed Mills malls in Canada, particularly Crossiron Mills, provides a good indication of what we are likely to see. The majority of tenants at Crossiron Mills are fashionrelated, with over 55% of floor area and 61% of storefronts (111 in all) categorized as Apparel, Accessories & Jewelry. This figure excludes stores that are more sporting goods-driven which also carry apparel, such as Sportcheck.

Sporting Goods, Hobbies, Music & Books accounts for 30% of floor area, but is clustered primarily in larger stores (6 in all) the most notable being Bass Pro Shops.

The remaining 9% of floor area (and 33% of storefronts) consist of:

Home furnishings & electronics (3% floor area, 3% of units)

 

General merchandise (3% floor area, 1% of units)

   

Pharmacy & Personal Care (1% of floor area, 4% of units) Restaurants & Fast Food (4% of floor area, 16% of units) Services (1% of floor area, 5% of units)

10 Largest Apparel & Access. Tenants: • Winners 31,000 sf • H&M 20,700 sf • The Children’s Place 20,500 sf • Joe Fresh 20,100 sf • Tommy Hilfiger 20,100 sf • La Senza 20,000 sf • Laura 20,000 sf • Forever 21 20,000 sf • Calvin Klein Outlet 10,600 sf • Urban Planet 10,100 sf

4 Largest Sporting, Hobbies, M &B Tenants: • Bass Pro Shops 149,000 sf • Toys R Us 51,000 sf • Sportcheck 39,000 sf • Hockey Life 20,600 sf Notable Home Furnishings/Electronics Tenants • HomeSense 24,000 sf • The Source 2,500 sf • Saneal Cameras 1,600 sf 3 Largest Personal Care Stores • Bath & Bodyworks 3,400 sf • Glamour Secrets 1,600 sf • Fruits Passion 1,300 sf

Notable Restaurant & Leisure Tenants • Boston Pizza 6,700 sf • Tim Hortons 2,720 sf • SML Entertainment 6,200 sf

Restaurants / Fast Food Pharmacy/Personal 4% Care 1% General Merchandise 3%

Services 1%

Leisure 1%

Convenience & Specialty Food 0%

Home Furnishings, Electronics 4%

Sporting Goods, Hobbies, Music, Books 30%

Clothing, Shoes, Jewellery, Accs. 56%

Specialty foods (<1% of floor area, 2% of units) Leisure (1% of floor area, 1% of units)

27


3.1 Regional Context Tsawwassen Mills Overview Trade Area

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Tsawwassen Mills is expected to have a super-regional influence, attracting the majority of its customers from within a 30-40 minute drive of the site, but supplemented by a significant inflow of sales from beyond that zone.

Experience of Vaughan Mills

Ivanhoe Cambridge indicates that, not only is the geographic extent of the Vaughan Mills’ trade area quite large, but the distribution of sales across the trade area is remarkably even. Unlike many regional malls that draw a large majority of sales from a <15- minute primary trade area, it has been reported that Vaughan Mills consistently draws more than 50% of its customers from beyond the 15minute drive zone.

A commercial land use review prepared by Urban Metrics for the City of Vaughan in 2010 found that nearly 70% of the shoppers at Vaughan Mills were drawn from beyond the City limits, and 35% were drawn from beyond the regional trade area altogether. This compared to the much more ‘typical’ drawing patterns of other regional malls in the area, with deeper local market penetration and less geographically extensive influence.

If the Vaughan Mills sales pattern is replicated at Tsawwassen Mills, it will mean a significant influx of new customers from outside the region, some of whom may be enticed to explore shopping and recreational opportunities in the Ladner and Tsawwassen town centres.

28


Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

3.1 Regional Context Tsawwassen Commons Overview Concept & Merchandising Mix

Tsawwassen Commons, located immediately to the north of the Mills shopping centre, is an open-air power centre measuring approximately 540,000 square feet.

Over 37% of that space is accounted for by the three confirmed large anchor tenants: Wal-Mart (107,000 sf), Canadian Tire (61,000 sf) and Rona (33,000 sf). There will be seven additional stores with at least 10,000 sf of leasable area.

The balance of space is to be demised into spaces as large 8,000 sf and as small as 600 sf, with an average of 2,500 sf. There are 49 planned units measuring 2,000 sf or less, and 36 planned units measuring 1,500 sf or less.

The merchandising mix for the Commons (as of January 2015) is presented in the pie chart at right. 54% of floor area is to be comprised of General Merchandise (i.e. Walmart, Canadian Tire) and Home Furnishings. The merchandising plan showed17% of floor area as “opportunity” sites.

As of February 2015 it was indicated that 70% of the shopping centre was leased, however it is not known if this includes anchor tenants.

In addition to the large tenants noted above, other confirmed tenants are:

• • • • • •

PetSmart Dollarama Mark’s Work Wearhouse MetroLiquor Menchie’s Shell

• • • • • •

Tim Hortons Sally Beauty Supply Subway Kami Sushi Quiznos Starbucks

TSAWWASSEN COMMONS MERCHANDISING MIX Service, 7%

Specialty Food Apparel, 6%Food - Grocery, & Drink, 2% 2%

Restaurant, 4% Quick Service Restaurant, 4%

“Opportunity”, 17%

Leisure, 4%

General Merchandise, 43%

Home, 11%

Based on PDG merchandising plan (Jan. 2015).

29


3.1 Regional Context Tsawwassen Commons Overview Trade Areas

â&#x20AC;˘

Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

The map at right, taken from Tsawwassen Commons leasing material, outlines the areas that can be reached within 7, 15 and 21 minutes (driving) from the mall. The 7 minute drive time zone represents the mallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s primary trade area, from which it is anticipated that at least 70% of sales volumes will be drawn. The balance of sales are expected from the other drive time zones, plus a small amount of inflow spending which would likely be spillover from regional shoppers coming to Tsawwassen Mills.

30


3.2 Local Context 

With an understanding of the retail environments that are now emerging on the TFN lands, we turn now in the following sub-sections to an analysis of the existing and emerging conditions in Ladner and Tsawwassen. Through both a qualitative and quantitative understanding of Ladner and Tsawwassen’s commercial inventory and other conditions, stronger and more targeted actions can be recommended. In addition, a detailed review of tenant mix composition assists in the creation of strategic merchandise districting recommendations .

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Retail & Commercial Space Comparison (sf) – Ladner vs Tsawwassen Residential Market Analysis S U P E R M AR K E T S CO N V E N I E N CE & S P E CI AL T Y FO O D S T O R E S BEER, WI NE & LI QUOR STORES P H AR M ACI E S & P E R S O N AL CAR E S T O R E S CLOTHING STORES S H O E S , ACCE S S O R I E S & J E WE L L E R Y S T O R E S

HOME FURNISHINGS STORES

17,096

20,966 7,843

20,183 1,403

780 0

3,946

15,053 0

11,553 10,907

1,660 2,596

6,926 26,507

H O M E CE N T R E S & H AR D WAR E / GAR D E N S T O R E S O T H E R GE N E R AL M E R CH AN D I S E S T O R E S

15,360

6,517

M I S CE L L AN E O U S S T O R E R E T AI L E R S

23,772

35,929

AU T O P AR T S , R E P AI R & M AI N T E N AN CE AD M I N I S TR AT I VE S E R V I CE S

FI N AN CI AL S E R V I CE S

P E R SO N AL & L AU N D R Y S E R V I CE S P E R S O N AL GO O D S R E P AI R & M AI N T . S E R V I CE S P R O FE SSI O N AL S E R V I CE S

Automotive Goods & Services Comparison Goods Convenience Goods & Services Food & Beverage Services Vacant

15,171

FURNITURE STORES

H O M E E L E CT R O N I CS & AP P L I AN CE S T O R E S

26,073

13,254 12,737

D E P AR T M E N T ST O R E S

H E AL T H CAR E S E R V I CE S

Tsawwassen

84,265

SPORTING GOODS, HOBBY, MUSIC, BOOK STORES

E D U CAT I O N AL S E R V I CE S

Ladner

101,361

E N T E R T AI NM E NT & L E I SU R E S O CI AL S E R V I CE S FU L L S E R V I CE R E S T AU R AN T S L I M I T ED S E R V I CE R E S T AU R AN T S PUBS/LOUNGES V ACAN T

21,911

30,410

9,018 4,019 15,605

18,411 4,080 41,124

31,353 44,095 36,638 4,504 30,875 5,246 9,778

60,162 3,243 63,935 29,775 31,276

28,630

63,714

23,82932,283 9,696

12,265

28,178 32,575

31


Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

3.3 Ladner Precinct Delineation & Overview ď&#x201A;§

The map below shows a visualization of the commercial composition of Ladner. For the purposes of this study, Ladner has been sub-divided into the following precincts which together encompass the majority of commercial space.

A.

Village Core Precinct Main street retail and commercial tenants that are mostly located on 48th Avenue and Delta Street.

B.

Elliott Street Precinct Retail and services along Elliott Street, bordered by Ladner Trunk Road to the southeast and River Road to the northwest.

.5km

.25km

C.

Waterfront Precinct Shops and services located on both sides of Chisholm Street adjacent to the waterfront.

D.

Ladner Gateway Precinct Shops and services that are located along Ladner Trunk Road in between Central Avenue to the west and 53rd Street to the east.

.75km

1km

Commercial Typology by Size

D

A

Retail Categories

This map is intended for illustration purposes. The location and size of data points may not align precisely with existing commercial space.

Automotive Goods & Services Comparison Goods Convenience Goods & Services Entertainment & Leisure Food & Beverage Services

Size of Retail Tenant (sf) Small: 1 - 1,500

Junior Anchor: 10,001 - 25,000

Medium: 1501 - 10,000

Large Anchor: 25,000 +

32


On average, Ladner’s four precincts have an occupancy rate of 94%, with 6% of the total 471,279 sf of space being vacant (28,000 sf). Of the town’s vacant floor space, the largest amount can be found in the Ladner Gateway Precinct (15,000 sf), followed by Elliott Street (11,000 sf) and the Village Core (2,000 sf). Elliott Street has the highest vacancy rate at 12%, following by the Gateway District (7%) and the Village Core (2%)

Vacant vs Occupied Commercial Space (sf) by District Commercial Typology

by Size 100%

Vacant Commercial Space%

14,000

80%

12,000

60%

88%

98%

100%

8,000 6,000 4,000

20%

2,000

2%

12%

0%

7%

Village Core

Elliott Street

Waterfront

Gateway

Vacant (%)

.25km

10,000 93%

40%

0%

.5km

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market 16,000 Analysis

.75km

1km

Occupied (%)

Vacant Commercial Space (sf)

3.3 Ladner Precinct Delineation & Overview

0

Vacant (sf)

Commercial Vacancies by Size

D

A

Size of Retail Tenant (sf)

This map is intended for illustration purposes. The location and size of data points may not align precisely with existing commercial space.

Small: 1 - 1,500

Junior Anchor: 10,001 - 25,000

Medium: 1501 - 10,000

Large Anchor: 25,000 +

33


Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

3.4 Ladner Precinct A: Village Core ď&#x201A;§ @@@ Commercial Floor Space Distribution (figures in square feet) Precinct

2,048 2,048

5,153 5,153 4,439 4,439 5,509 5,509

22,685 22,685 11,940 11,940

11,899 11,899

7,262 7,262

2,854 2,854

15,384 15,384

21,186 21,186

10,522 10,522

Commercial Categories Automotive Comparison Goods & Services Convenience Goods & Services Entertainment & Leisure Foods & Beverage Services Vacant Total

Area (sf) 5,153 37,524 2,854 23,293 48,359 2,048 119,231

Retail Inventory

100 m

50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

41% 31% 20% 4%

Automotive

2%

Comparison Goods Convenience Goods

2%

0%

Entertainment & Leisure

Food & Beverage

Services

Vacant

34

34


3.4 Ladner Precinct A: Village Core Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities

Strength

Overall Description  The core retail village for Ladner is characterized by a pedestrian-friendly, walkable environment with street-oriented businesses. The Village Core Precinct is oriented around the main streets of Delta Street, Bridge Street, and 48th Avenue. Public Activity  The precinct’s main concentrations of public activity are found along Delta Street and 48th Avenue, particularly at intersections and activity generators such as Stir Coffee House. During the Ladner Village Market, the precinct transforms into a major hub of public activity. The strip mall at the intersection of Delta Street and 48th Avenue is not an ideal urban form for a prominent intersection, but nonetheless the parking area is well activated in summer months (i.e temporary patio at Vagellis Grill). Pedestrians and cyclists are common through this area, but are less visible on the outer periphery such as past Trenant Street.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Neutral Weakness Residential Market Analysis

Principle #1 Built Form

Sidewalks  For the most part, Delta Street and 48th Avenue’s sidewalks are in good condition with few obstructions or barriers for retailers. They are wide enough (2 to 4 metres) to allow pedestrian foot traffic to flow from shop to shop. 35


3.4 Ladner Precinct A: Village Core Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities

Strength

Landscaping, Street Furniture, Street Art  Delta Street and 48th Avenue are lined with street trees that provide shading for pedestrians and other green elements like planters. Together, these fixtures create a physical and psychological barrier that helps to protect pedestrians against vehicular traffic. Tree foliage should be planned so as not to obscure sight lines to retailer signage.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Neutral Weakness Residential Market Analysis

Streets  Street width in this precinct is sufficient to accommodate one car traveling in each direction. Traffic speed is reduced by travel friction caused by frequent intersections and parallel parking, improving safety for pedestrians and allowing drivers to observe retail signage.

Small bike racks are found throughout the precinct, each capable of accommodating a few bicycles. At the time of observation, all bike racks had at least one bike parked.

There are three major intersections that have well designed crosswalks located at intervals of approximately 100 metres. Crosswalks are demarked with distinct interlocking pavers in order to differentiate it from the street.

Principle #3 Public Realm

36


3.4 Ladner Precinct A: Village Core Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities

Strength

Parking  Delta Street: Street parking is angled or parallel and not metered. Signage indicates that parking is free up to 3 hours from 9am to 6pm, Monday through Saturday. At time of review (mid-day on weekday), parking occupancy was in the range of 90% to 95% on Delta Street between Trenant Street and 48th Street, declining to approximately 70% between Tenant Street and Chisholm Street. There are two off street parking lots near Chisholm Street, one at the corner of Delta and Trenant, and one in the shopping centre at 48th Avenue and Delta Street. There is also a large surface parking lot off of Delta Street at 5000 Bridge Street.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Neutral Weakness Residential Market Analysis

48th Avenue: On-street parallel parking along 48th Avenue is available from Delta Street to Haviland Street. At time of review, on-street parallel parking spots in this area were 90% occupied (mid-day weekday). In addition, there is one large surface parking lot that is located at 4939 Bridge Street.

Bridge Street: There is legal on-street parallel parking along Bridge Street.

Principle #4 Accessible

37


3.4 Ladner Precinct A: Village Core Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Building Appearance  Buildings generally appear to be in a state of good repair and have been regularly maintained. Several buildings along Delta Street have undergone recent renovations. Storefront Design  Building setbacks along Delta Street are well-aligned in respect to creating a walkable, pedestrian-friendly atmosphere with the only exception being the strip mall on the corner of Delta Street and 48th Avenue. Improvements are recommended for individual storefronts to better communicate to customers their unique character and offering. Vinyl awnings and other Principle #2 Storefronts

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Strength Neutral Weakness Residential low-cost signage options are inconsistent with the high Market Analysis quality of urban design found in this area.

Land Use Context  Buildings on Delta Street from Trenant Street to Bridge Street are typically two floors with retail uses on the ground floor and commercial or residential uses on the second floor. Buildings from Bridge Street to 48th Avenue are only one floor. The Village Core is home to Harbourside Plaza, a medium density residential development that has 70 units. Adjacent land uses include a combination of semi-detached and detached homes southwest of Harbour Stroll. Principle #5 Market

38


3.4 Ladner Precinct A: Village Core Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Key Civic Anchors / Amenities  Ladner’s two major civic anchors, the Ladner Leisure Centre and Community Centre are located about 2.9 km and 450 metres from the intersection of Bridge Street and Delta Street, respectively. The Ladner Community Centre is adjacent to All Saints Ladner Anglican Church. In addition the Village Core is home to the Ladner United Church and The Delta Museum and Archives Society.

Despite being walkable, there are limited opportunities for pedestrians to rest, aside from limited private seating at Stir Coffee House and Vagellis Grill.

Strength

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Neutral Weakness Residential Market Analysis

Tenant Mix  Service oriented tenants such as financial, administrative, personal, or other professional services compose the majority of the district’s floor space (41%), while comparison goods tenants such as home furnishings, clothing, sporting goods & hobbies compose 31% of the precinct’s floor space (31%). Food & beverage tenants account for a fifth (20%) of the precinct’s overall floor space. The remaining allocation of the district’s retail and commercial space is divided amongst automotive (4%) and convenience (2%).

Only 2% of the district’s total space is vacant. Principle #6 Businesses

39


3.4 Ladner Precinct A: Village Core Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Retail Form  Two-thirds of the Village Core’s retail floor space is composed of medium sized buildings while the other third is composed of smaller shops. In effect, the Village Core is considered an ‘unanchored’ retail environment that relies on its urban form and tenant mix diversity to attract visitors. Retail Function  The Village Core is home to diverse mix of retail goods and services that are less reliant on destination businesses and single-purpose trips than would be typically seen in a suburban shopping centre. Visitors to the Village Core are likely to walk to several businesses on foot due to the walkability and diversity of the precinct’s tenants.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Strength Neutral Weakness Residential Strategic Tenant Mix RecommendationsMarket Analysis The Village Core Precinct should prioritize active ground floor uses that align with the main street-type environment. Clusters of comparison retail and food & beverage tenants that enable multi-destination shopping trips should be encouraged to locate along 48th Avenue and Delta Street, with services being more appropriate in areas of lower foot traffic (side streets or closer to the Waterfront Precinct). This tenant mix is already present, to a degree, along 48th Avenue east of Delta Street. At such time as the Waterfront Precinct redevelops, more active uses will be appropriate further north on Delta Street.

40


Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

3.5 Ladner Precinct B: Elliott Street ď&#x201A;§ @@@ Commercial Floor Space Distribution (figures in square feet) Precinct

4,710 4,710 1,496 1,496 4,131 4,131 9,367 9,367

7,589 7,589

6,351 6,351 1,552 1,552

2,100 2,100

10,490 10,490 6,351 6,351

50,288 50,288

12,247 12,247 2,092 2,092 1,113 1,113

93,233 93,233 2,574 2,574

Commercial Categories Automotive Comparison Goods & Services Convenience Goods & Services Entertainment & Leisure Foods & Beverage Services Vacant Total

Area (sf) 16,758 9,881 21,712 4,131 1,346 24,733 11,061 89,621

Retail Inventory

50 m

50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

18%

Automotive

29%

24% 11%

Comparison Goods Convenience Goods

12%

5%

1%

Entertainment & Leisure

Food & Beverage

Services

Vacant

41

41


3.5 Ladner Precinct B: Elliott Street Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities

Strength

Overall Description  This precinct is composed of low density strip centres, automotive uses, and destinationtype retailers. The area lacks a unifying theme or concept, but is strategically located adjacent to the Village Core Precinct and the Waterfront Precinct. Public Activity  Pedestrian activity along Elliott Street is lower than in the Village Core, likely as a result of the lower density of retail uses and a public realm that is less conducive for walking and cycling.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Neutral Weakness Residential Market Analysis

Principle #1 Built Form

Sidewalks  Sidewalks are in good condition, but are narrower than those in the Village Core. Sidewalks can accommodate two people walking side-by-side. Landscaping, Street Furniture, Street Art  Unlike the Village Core, there is little to no landscaping on the sidewalks that separates pedestrians from oncoming vehicular traffic. Few buildings within the Elliott Street District feature street art, but one notable exception is located at 4826 Elliott St. The building displays a large mural that helps to lessen the otherwise negative impact of a blank wall.

Principle #3 Public Realm

42


3.5 Ladner Precinct B: Elliott Street Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities

Strength

Streets  Elliott Street is a relatively large boulevard with four vehicular lanes of traffic (two lanes running in each direction) from 47a Avenue to 48th Avenue. Elliott Street from 48th Avenue to the Waterfront District reduces from four lanes of traffic to only two. While the number of lanes decreases, the boulevard itself is still large enough for four vehicles (one lane of vehicular traffic in each direction, with on-street parallel parking on both sides).

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Neutral Weakness Residential Market Analysis

Parking  Like the Village Core, on-street parallel parking is free but restricted to 3 hours from 9am to 6pm on both sides of the road. The densest clusters of parallel parked cars were observed at the intersection of Elliott Street and Westminster Avenue. Lower densities of parked cars were observed adjacent to the intersection of River Road and Elliott Street.

In addition, there are several off-street parking lots (occupancy rates observed during weekday mid-day):

NAPA Auto Parts: smaller lot with a 70% occupancy rate;

Principle #4 Accessible

43


3.5 Ladner Precinct B: Elliott Street Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Parking (continued) • Ladner Harbour Centre: Largest parking lot in the district with an 85-90% occupancy rate;

4846 Elliott Street: smaller lot with a 70% to 80% occupancy rate;

Building Appearance  Buildings appear to be in a state of good repair, but are generally older than those in other precincts.

Strength

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Neutral Weakness Residential Market Analysis

Storefront Design  Store facades are in need of reinvestment, and a number are lacking the necessary design features / amenities required to draw customers inside. When coupled with large building setbacks and blank walls, it is evident that this district has challenges from a pedestrian retail standpoint. However, notable exceptions do exist such as the West Coast Seeds Store.

Principle #2 Storefronts

44


3.5 Ladner Precinct B: Elliott Street Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Land Use Context  Land uses along Elliott Street are limited to mostly one storey commercial uses. Adjacent land uses include retail and other employment uses that are within the Village Core District, immediately to the southwest of Elliott Street. Key Civic Anchors / Amenities  Elliott Street District is adjacent to Lions Park, a green space that includes several picnic tables with chairs, a children’s playground, parking for about 20 cars, and public restrooms.

Strength

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Neutral Weakness Residential Market Analysis

Tenant Mix  Unlike other areas in Ladner, the Elliott Street Precinct has a relatively high vacancy rate at 12%. Other unique differences that sets Elliott Street apart from its counterparts include low allocations of floor space dedicated to food & beverage and comparison goods as each category only represents 5% and 1% of the precinct’s total floor space, respectively. In addition, the Elliott Street Precinct has the highest percentage of its total floor space dedicated to automotive goods and services (18%).

Principle #6 Businesses

45


3.5 Ladner Precinct B: Elliott Street Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Tenant Mix (continued)  Almost 30% of the precinct’s floor space is dedicated to convenience related goods like supermarkets, pharmacies, and personal care, while another 29% is divided amongst professional commercial services such as healthcare, social, financial, and administrative. Retail Form  Unlike the Village Core and Waterfront District, 15% of Elliott Street Precinct's floor space is composed of junior anchor tenants (tenants that are 10,000 sf to 25,000 sf) and only 22% is divided amongst smaller tenants that have floor plates of less than 1,500 sf. The remaining two-thirds of floor space is split up amongst medium sized tenants.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Strength Neutral Weakness Residential Strategic Tenant Mix RecommendationsMarket Analysis

The Elliott Street Precinct benefits from its close walking distance to the Village Core, but has the ability to incubate businesses in more affordable spaces. Destination retailers would be well suited in this area as customers will have the ability to easily visit the Village Core during their trip. In the short term, Elliott Street can accommodate businesses currently located on Delta Street that wish to remain near the commercial core in affordable space (such as thrift stores & services). Over the long term, the Budget Foods plaza would be a prime site for redevelopment into a mixeduse complex with apartments, office and ground floor retail.

Retail Function  Like the Waterfront District, the Elliott Street Precinct is also home to destination businesses that rely on parking availability and single-purpose trips.

46


Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

3.6 Ladner Precinct C: Waterfront Precinct ď&#x201A;§ @@@ Commercial Floor Space Distribution (figures in square feet) Precinct

2,325

2,325 4,864

7,907

4,864

7,907

1,115

1,115

Commercial Categories Automotive Comparison Goods & Services Convenience Goods & Services Entertainment & Leisure Foods & Beverage Services Vacant Total

Area (sf) 4,864 1,115 7,907 2,325 16,211

Retail Inventory

50 m

49%

50% 40%

30%

30% 20% 10% 0%

0% Automotive

0% Comparison Goods Convenience Goods

14%

7% Entertainment & Leisure

0% Food & Beverage

Services

Vacant

47


3.6 Ladner Precinct C: Waterfront Precinct Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities

Strength

Overall Description  The Waterfront Precinct is a geographically compact area adjacent to the Fraser River and Ladner Village. The overall feel of the area is that it is ‘back of house’ with a few notable exceptions, namely Heritage House Interiors, Dragonfly Gallery, Sharkey’s Bar & Grille and Speed’s Neighbourhood Pub.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Neutral Weakness Residential Market Analysis

Public Activity  Public activity is present near key destinations, but the precinct contains large dead zones - particularly at the western edge of Chisholm Street. Sidewalks  Sidewalks are located only on the south side of Chisholm Street and are punctuated by frequent road crossings and driveways. Sidewalks are narrow and have inconsistent widths. Walking routes on the north side of Chisholm Street are challenged by perpendicular parking and are potentially unsafe for pedestrians. Landscaping, Street Furniture, Street Art  Other than a few sporadic trees at the east end of Chisholm street, and in front of some businesses, this area has limited landscaping. No street furniture or street art is present.

Principle #3 Public Realm

48


3.6 Ladner Precinct C: Waterfront Precinct Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Streets  Chisholm Street is approximately 15-16 metres wide (including travel lanes and parking lanes). No pedestrian crossings and limited traffic calming measures (curb bump outs). Parking  Perpendicular spots are located on the north side of Chisholm Street, with parallel parking on the south. Perpendicular / angled parking is more efficient in terms of capacity, but can negatively impact pedestrian safety. Three buildings also have rear surface parking with servicing areas. Principle #4 Accessible

Strength

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Neutral Weakness Residential Market Analysis

Building Appearance  Quality and appearance vary widely from wellmaintained properties to those that require significant reinvestment or demolition. A lack of consistency in terms of setbacks for most properties creates an irregular streetwall. Storefront Design  Inconsistent storefront design and character. Notable exceptions are Heritage House and Dragonfly Gallery with good lighting, signage, street interaction and accessibility. Principle #2 Storefronts

49


3.6 Ladner Precinct C: Waterfront Precinct Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Land Use Context  The precinct includes a limited amount of medium-density residential uses located nearby with a few non-retail type businesses. Marine uses are immediately adjacent. Key Civic Anchors / Amenities  A wharf on eastern edge of precinct and a municipal park on the western edge. Tenant Mix  Almost half of the precinct's floor space is dedicated to food and beverage (drinking establishments and full service restaurants), while comparison goods such as home furnishing and hardware stores compose one third.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Strength Neutral Weakness Residential The district’s remaining floor space is occupied Market by Analysis professional services (14%) and a fitness centre (7%).

Retail Form  Primarily individual stand-alone buildings, some of which are converted from other uses. 63% of the district’s buildings are medium sized (1,500 sf to 10,000 sf), while the remaining 37% are smaller than 1,500 sf. Retail Function  Destination businesses that rely on parking availability and single-purpose trips.

Principle #6 Businesses

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3.6 Ladner Precinct C: Waterfront Precinct Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Strategic Tenant Mix Recommendations

Precinct should strengthen its role as a food & beverage destination, including the addition of sit down restaurants, micro breweries / brew pub and cafes.

In addition, specialty retailers that provide home furnishings / arts and similar projects would build on the existing cluster created by Heritage House Interiors and Dragonfly Gallery. Where feasible, the addition of multi-storey mixed use buildings would help trigger redevelopment and strengthen the precinct as a commercial hub.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

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Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

3.7 Ladner Precinct D: Gateway Precinct ď&#x201A;§ @@@ Commercial Floor Space Distribution (figures in square feet) Precinct 7,260 16,853 39,206

10,677

62,221

7,809

2,574

23,195

50,288 9,367

Commercial Categories Automotive Comparison Goods & Services Convenience Goods & Services Entertainment & Leisure Foods & Beverage Services Vacant Total

Area (sf) 41,780 112,509 20,044 40,048 15,069 229,450

Retail Inventory

100 m

50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

49%

18%

17% 9%

0%

Automotive

7%

0%

Comparison Goods Convenience Goods

Entertainment & Leisure

Food & Beverage

Services

Vacant

52

52


3.7 Ladner Precinct D: Gateway Precinct Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities

Strength

Overall Description  A large retail cluster to the east of central Ladner, oriented around two open-air community shopping centres. This precinct is auto-oriented with limited walkability, although some public realm improvements have been made.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Neutral Weakness Residential Market Analysis

Public Activity  Pedestrian activity is generally less visible than elsewhere in Ladner. Despite this, pedestrian movement does exist near to bus stops and at the intersection of Ladner Trunk Road and 52a Street. Sidewalks  Wide sidewalks line both sides of Ladner Trunk Road and some limited pathways can be found within the shopping centres. Landscaping, Street Furniture, Street Art  The district lacks the lush landscaping, street furniture, and art that the Village Core Precinct has since Ladner Trunk Road features wide streets for cars with few pedestrian amenities. The precinct’s amenities include a protected bus shelter, trash receptacles and benches where the bus stations are located. Street trees are present east of 52a Street.

Principle #3 Public Realm

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3.7 Ladner Precinct D: Gateway Precinct Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Streets  Ladner Trunk Road is a large arterial that can accommodate up to five lanes of vehicular traffic. There are designated left turn lanes that guide vehicles into Trenant Park Square and Ladner Centre.  Pedestrian crossings are about 150 to 170 metres apart. Crossings on Ladner Trunk Road are painted lines (unlike those in the Village Core Precinct).

Strength

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Neutral Weakness Residential Market Analysis

Parking  Parking is located primarily in the off-street parking fields in the two retail centres. On observation, Ladner Centre’s parking field appeared to have an occupancy rate of approximately 40%, while Trenant Park Square had a 70% to 80% occupancy rate. Building Appearance  Like other districts, the buildings in the Gateway District appear to be in a state of good repair. However, retail pads along Ladner Trunk Road would benefit from a physical retrofit. Grocery stores (Safeway, Save-On-Foods) are more recent construction.

Principle #4 Accessible

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3.7 Ladner Precinct D: Gateway Precinct Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Storefront Design  Trenant Park Square’s retail pad units on Ladner Trunk Road are facing inwards toward the centre’s parking lot, placing the back of each retail pad on to Ladner Trunk Road. The backs of these retail pads provide limited interaction with the street, as seen at Ricky’s All Day Grill and FatBurger. The two buildings housing Starbucks, Subway, Spencer Gallery & Framing, and Marlin Travel had entrances that opened up onto Ladner Trunk Road.

Strength

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Neutral Weakness Residential Market Analysis

Land Use Context  While the majority of land-uses within the Gateway District are retail and commercial, there are also two to three storey residential condos on Ladner Truck Road.  Several single family subdivisions are located to the southeast. Key Civic Anchors / Amenities  Delta Hospital is 2km to the east.

Principle #2 Storefronts

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3.7 Ladner Precinct D: Gateway Precinct Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Tenant Mix  The Gateway District has the largest percentage of commercial floor space that is dedicated to convenience oriented tenants out of the four precincts. Almost half of the precinct's 229,450 sf of retail and commercial space is divided amongst supermarkets, pharmacies, and other convenience/specialty food stores.  Comparison goods such as clothing shops, home electronics & appliance stores, and sporting/hobby/music/book stores account for 18% of the precinct’s total space, while personal and professional services account for 17%.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Strength Neutral Weakness Residential  Full service restaurants and limited service restaurants Market Analysis

account for the remaining 4% and 5% retail and commercial space that is occupied. The precinct's remaining 7% of retail & commercial space is vacant.

Principle #6 Businesses

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3.7 Ladner Precinct D: Gateway Precinct Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Retail Form  Similar to the Elliott Street Precinct, 13% of the Gateway Precinct's total retail and commercial space belongs to tenants whose retail area is between 10,000 and 25,000 sf.  Unlike the other districts, one-third of the Gateway District’s space is dedicated to large format anchors whose retail area is over 25,000 sf, while only 16% of its total space is in the form of small format tenants. The remaining 38% of the precinct's commercial space is divided amongst medium sized tenants.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Strength Neutral Weakness Residential Strategic Tenant Mix RecommendationsMarket Analysis The Gateway Precinct is owned by institutional investors who exercise control over the intended tenant mix & function. However, from an overall Ladner Village perspective, the Gateway Precinct would ideally continue to focus on convenience retail categories (groceries, pharmacies, liquor stores, services), fast food operators, and retailers requiring larger floorplates or pad sites to minimize direct competition with the Village Core.

Retail Function  The Gateway District is home to destination, anchor businesses that rely on parking availability and singlepurpose trips. Convenience and accessibility are paramount to the success of these businesses.

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

3.8 Tsawwassen Precinct Delineation & Overview 

Tsawwassen has been delineated into three distinct precincts that each has their own differentiating characteristics:

A.

Commercial Typology by Size C

Tsawwassen Town Centre

The retail core for Tsawwassen, site of the Tsawwassen town centre mall (enclosed mall), and prime opportunity for redevelopment. Adjacent lands (labeled ‘wings’) are also included in this precinct.

B.

C.

12th Avenue & 56th Street A collection of strip malls and plazas oriented around the intersection of 12th Avenue and 56th Street. Tsawwassen Gateway The entrance way to the heart of Tsawwassen and the closest concentration of commercial uses near the TFN developments.

1 km

.75km

A

.5km

.25km

Retail Categories Automotive Goods & Services Comparison Goods Convenience Goods & Services Entertainment & Leisure Food & Beverage Services

Size of Retail Tenant (sf)

This map is intended for illustration purposes. The location and size of data points may not align precisely with existing commercial space.

Small: 1 - 1,500

Junior Anchor: 10,001 - 25,000

Medium: 1501 - 10,000

Large Anchor: 25,000 +

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

3.8 Tsawwassen Precinct Delineation & Overview 

Tsawwassen’s average occupancy rate is 95% with only 5% of the district’s total 710,709 sf of space being vacant (32,500 sf).

The majority of the town’s vacant floor space can be found within the Town Centre & Wings Precinct since there are eight tenants that compose over 28,500 sf of vacant space. One junior anchor store that is vacant, but not currently listed as available space composes over half of the district’s vacant space (16,000 sf), while the remaining space is divided among 7 other units.

The remaining 4,000 sf of vacant space is located within the 12th Avenue & 56th Street Precinct (3,500 sf; 1 unit) and Gateway Precinct (500 sf; 1 unit).

Commercial Typology Vacant vs Occupied Commercial Space (sf) by District by Size 35,000 30,000

80%

25,000 60%

84%

99%

100%

40%

20,000 15,000 10,000

20% 0%

5,000

16%

1%

0%

Town Centre & Wings

12th Ave & 56th Street

Gateway

Vacant (%) Vacant (sf)

Occupied (%)

Vacant Commercial Space (sf)

Vacant Commercial Space%

100%

Commercial Vacancies by Size C

1 km

.75km

A

.5km

.25km

Size of Retail Tenant (sf)

0 This map is intended for illustration purposes. The location and size of data points may not align precisely with existing commercial space.

Small: 1 - 1,500

Junior Anchor: 10,001 - 25,000

Medium: 1501 - 10,000

Large Anchor: 25,000 +

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Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

3.9 Tsawwassen Precinct A: Tsawwassen Town Centre ď&#x201A;§ @@@ Commercial Floor Space Distribution (figures in square feet) Precinct

5,828 5,637

20,231 20,231

19,782 19,782 6,336 10,814 6,336 10,814

1,634 1,634

30,876 30,876 1,092 2,460 1,092 2,460

61,263 61,263

2,235 2,235

9,437 9,437 2,184 2,184

Commercial Categories Automotive Comparison Goods & Services Convenience Goods & Services Entertainment & Leisure Foods & Beverage Services Vacant Total

Area (sf) 26,118 62,355 2,184 11,897 51,768 28,627 182,949

Retail Inventory

50 m

50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

34%

28% 16%

14%

1%

0% Automotive

Comparison Goods Convenience Goods

Entertainment & Leisure

7% Food & Beverage

Services

Vacant

60

60


3.9 Tsawwassen Precinct A: Tsawwassen Town Centre Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities

Strength

Overall Description  This precinct is located at Tsawwassen’s commercial hub at the intersection of 12th Avenue and 56th Street. The precinct is predominantly composed of the Tsawwassen Town Centre mall which is held by a single land owner (Century Group). The commercial areas immediately adjacent to this mall are also included in this precinct as its ‘wings’ due to the potential to integrate them into future redevelopment plans. Public Activity  Pedestrian activity in the public realm concentrates at the intersection of 12th Avenue and 56th Street as people wait to cross the street or at bus stops. Internally to the precinct, pedestrians are active within circulation areas (enclosed corridors and outdoor areas), particularly near anchors such as Thrifty Foods, the government Liquor Store, and Tsawwassen Library. Rotary Square is located internally within the precinct and is currently one of the few existing open spaces.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Neutral Weakness Residential Market Analysis

Principle #1 Built Form

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Strength Neutral Weakness Residential  A barrier has been installed to preventMarket pedestrians from Analysis

3.9 Tsawwassen Precinct A: Tsawwassen Town Centre Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Sidewalks  Sidewalks on 56th Street and 12th Avenue are approximately 1.5 to 2 metres in width. At certain locations, pedestrians are able to enter the precinct along dedicated sidewalks that run perpendicular to the adjacent streets, but in other areas they must mix with vehicular traffic.  The narrow sidewalk along 56th Street (in relation to the width of the street), combined with extensive vegetation, means that pedestrians may have trouble at certain points safetly passing one another.

crossing mid-block on 12th Avenue from the Tsawwassen Town Centre to the Save-On-Foods plaza.

Landscaping, Street Furniture, Street Art  The northern part of the precinct along 56th Street has no landscaping, street furniture, or street art. Pedestrians are required to walk directly next to fast-moving vehicular traffic with no buffer in between. At certain times of the year, overgrown plants and shrubbery on 56th Street along the Town Centre Mall’s sidewalks may actually push pedestrians closer to incoming vehicular traffic.

Principle #3 Public Realm

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3.9 Tsawwassen Precinct A: Tsawwassen Town Centre Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Landscaping, Street Furniture, Street Art (continued)  Portions of 56th Street provide pedestrians with some buffer from vehicle traffic through street trees and setbacks. Similarly, 12th Avenue uses trees and landscaping to separate pedestrians from vehicular traffic between the intersection of 55th Street to 56th Street.

Three bus stops are located on the edge of the precinct, one on 56th Street, and two along 12th Avenue.

A pedestrian barrier prevents shoppers from crossing midblock on 12th Avenue from the Tsawwassen Town Centre to the Save-On-Foods plaza.

Strength

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Neutral Weakness Residential Market Analysis

Streets  56th Street is a large arterial that can accommodate up to 5 lanes of vehicular traffic. Crossings along this street are at intervals ranging from 120 metres and 180 metres.

Like 56th Street, 12th Avenue is also a large arterial that can accommodate 4 lanes of vehicular traffic. Pedestrian crossings are spaced about 100 to 150 metres apart on 12th Avenue from 55th to 56th Street.

Principle #4 Accessible

63


3.9 Tsawwassen Precinct A: Tsawwassen Town Centre Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Parking  There is no on-street parking and almost all spots are located within Tsawwassen Town Centre Mall’s large offstreet parking lot. On observation approximately 80% of the centre’s total parking spots were occupied. Building Appearance  Externally, most buildings appear to be well maintained. Internal concourses within the Tsawwassen Town Centre Mall are in need of modernization. The newest structures are located at the northern edge of the precinct.

Principle #2 Storefronts

Strength

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Neutral Weakness Residential Market Analysis

Storefront Design  Store facades are primarily internal facing in this district and do not interact with the adjacent public streets. Storefront designs are varied in quality and style, largely dependent on the age of construction or last major renovation. Newer buildings are found to the north of the mall with relatively modern storefront designs.

Land Use Context  The retail centre is the main retail/commercial destination, while other land uses include a mix of single family homes (west) and condo developments (north; Windsor Woods). Principle #5 Market

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Strength Neutral Weakness Residential supermarkets, beer, wine, and liquor stores, andAnalysis other Market

3.9 Tsawwassen Precinct A: Tsawwassen Town Centre Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Key Civic Anchors / Amenities  Tsawwassen Library and Rotary Square are two major civic anchors / amenities within the precinct. Tenant Mix  Compared to Ladner’s Village Core, Tsawwassen’s Town Centre & Wings District was observed to have a much higher vacancy rate at about 16%, compared to Ladner’s 2%.

convenience/specialty food stores, while services composed 29%. Only 11% of the precinct’s total floor area is dedicated to comparison goods with the majority being miscellaneous retailers and individual tenants composing the clothing, shoes, accessories, and jewellery, and home furnishings categories.

The majority of the retail and commercial space within this precinct is dedicated to convenience goods. 38% of the precinct’s total floor area was spread out amongst

The other remaining categories within this precinct include food and beverage (4%) and entertainment & leisure (1%). This space is divided amongst limited service restaurants, full service restaurants, and a fitness centre.

Principle #6 Businesses

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Strength Neutral Weakness Residential Strategic Tenant Mix RecommendationsMarket Analysis

3.9 Tsawwassen Precinct A: Tsawwassen Town Centre Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Retail Form  Over half of the precinct’s floor space is composed of tenants whose total floor area is between 1,500 sf and 10,000 sf, while a quarter of the precinct’s total floor space is spread out among tenants that have less than 1,500 sf of floor space.

Like the 12th Avenue and 56th Street Precinct, the Tsawwassen Town Centre & Wings district is also home to large format retail anchors. About 15% of the area’s total floor space is dedicated to these large tenants that have floorplates over 25,000 sf.

This precinct should remain as the local commercial hub for Tsawwassen, but will need to change its positioning to complement the nearby TFN developments. A focus on mixed-use environments, niche and boutique retailers, cafes, restaurants, and ‘experiential’ type shopping should be emphasized. To achieve this transformation, a full redevelopment of the precinct is likely required.

Retail Function  This precinct is the location of a diverse mix of tenants and uses making it a multi-purpose trip destination. Tsawwassen Town Centre mall is currently the predominant commercial centre, but this balance will likely shift as the TFN developments are opened.

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Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

3.10 Tsawwassen Precinct B: 12th Avenue & 56th Street ď&#x201A;§ @@@ Commercial Floor Space Distribution (figures in square feet) Precinct 4,913 4,913

8,484 8,484

2,340 2,340 4,070 4,070

60,464 60,464

32,367 32,367

32,918 32,918

11,804

13,762 13,762

5,170 5,170

11,955 11,955 3,000 3,000 3,462 3,462 13,762 13,762

40,956 40,956

5,170 5,170

30,239 30,239 5,656 5,656 13,679 13,679 1,755 1,755 17,884 1,755 17,884 1,755 2,902 2,902

11,955 11,955

Commercial Categories Automotive Comparison Goods & Services Convenience Goods & Services Entertainment & Leisure Foods & Beverage Services Vacant Total

Area (sf) 10,569 63,002 73,064 8,729 61,264 135,629 3,462 355,719

Retail Inventory

3,000 3,000

50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

40,956 40,956

100 m

38% 18%

21%

3%

Automotive

17% 2%

Comparison Goods Convenience Goods

Entertainment & Leisure

1%

Food & Beverage

Services

Vacant

67

67


3.10 Tsawwassen Precinct B: 12th Avenue & 56th Street Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities

Strength

Overall Description  Largely characterized by a mixture of autooriented strip centre and plazas, the 12th Avenue / 56th Street Precinct includes anchors (Save-On-Foods), personal services, and home related products. The precinct includes all commercial uses near the 12th Avenue and 56th Street intersection, with the exception of the Tsawwassen Town Centre mall. Public Activity  Within the public realm, pedestrian activity tends to concentrate near intersections, street crossings, and at bus stops. Areas of open air seating and plazas also attract pedestrian activity, such as adjacent to Petra’s on 12th Avenue. The public plaza fronting on to 12th Avenue, located adjacent to the Safe-on-Foods, could be a more significant concentration of public activity with improved seating and activation.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Neutral Weakness Residential Market Analysis

Principle #1 Built Form

Cyclists are also present in this precinct, particularly during summer months. On observation, the bicycle rack adjacent to Petra’s was fully occupied.

68


Edmonton – Evolving Infill Strength Neutral Weakness Residential feature any landscaping that separates pedestrians on Market Analysis

3.10 Tsawwassen Precinct B: 12th Avenue & 56th Street Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Sidewalks  Sidewalks on 56th Street and 12th Avenue are approximately 1.5 to 2 metres in width.

the sidewalk from traffic.

Crosswalks at the 56th Street and 12th Avenue intersection appeared to be in good condition and are defined by painted white strips. Crosswalks along 12th Avenue are approximately 100 to 150 metres apart.

Landscaping, Street Furniture, Street Art  Landscaping along 12th Avenue is different on both sides. The northern side of the street is characterized by bushes and street trees that separate pedestrians from vehicular traffic, while the southern side of the street does not

Landscaping in the form of bushes and street trees can be found on the southern side of 12th Avenue from Sticky’s Candy Shop continuing west until the bus shelter. The next block (location of Panago and Tsawwassen Wellness Centre) features a row of low-cut bushes that separates pedestrians from vehicular traffic.

Principle #3 Public Realm

69


3.10 Tsawwassen Precinct B: 12th Avenue & 56th Street Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Streets  Looking east from the intersection of 12th Avenue and 56th Street, the street is approximately 15 metres wide (accommodates four lanes of vehicular traffic). To the west from the same intersection, the street is about 17 metres wide (accommodates four lanes of vehicular traffic plus a 2 metre wide planted median). The planted median extends from the 12th Avenue / 56th Street intersection to the Century Group’s office building. Parking  There are two main off-street parking lots and several smaller lots that belong to individual building owners.

Strength

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Neutral Weakness Residential Market Analysis

The first large off-street parking lot belongs to the SaveOn-Foods retail complex located directly southwest of the 56th Street and 12th Avenue intersection. The parking lot appeared to have a vacancy rate of about 50%.

The second large off-street parking lot is to the northeast of the 56th Street and 12th Avenue intersection and belongs to the Tsawwassen Shopping Centre complex. Like the other large off-street parking lot, this lot was also observed to have a vacancy rate of approximately 50%.

Principle #4 Accessible

70


Edmonton – Evolving Infill Strength Neutral Weakness Residential  Coast Capital Savings - 30 to 40%. Market Analysis

3.10 Tsawwassen Precinct B: 12th Avenue & 56th Street Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Parking (continued)  There are five other smaller parking lots along 12th Avenue that each have a total capacity of 5 to 20 parking spaces. Four of these parking lots are located to the east of the 56th Street and 12th Avenue intersection. At time of review, occupancy rates were as follows:

   

Return-it - 50% South Delta Motors - 80% 12th Avenue Plaza - 30% Petro Canada - 20 to 30%

In addition to these five core smaller parking lots, there are four additional parking lots within this district to the west of Coast Capital Savings. These small parking lots also range in maximum capacity from 5 to 20+/- spots and each were observed to have low occupancy rates of 20 to 30%.

Building Appearance  The range in quality of the buildings in this precinct varies widely depending on age of construction. Tsawwassen Shopping Centre has some of the better quality buildings. Principle #3 Public Realm

71


Edmonton – Evolving Infill Strength Neutral Weakness Residential setback about 8 metres from the sidewalk. These Market Analysis

3.10 Tsawwassen Precinct B: 12th Avenue & 56th Street Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Storefront Design  Storefronts to the east of the 12th Avenue and 56th Street intersection are setback at large distance from the public realm. However, storefronts to the east of the two gas stations (Petro Canada and Chevron) have smaller setbacks and are positioned closer to the street. These retail spaces have decorated storefronts that are inviting and engaging, with the exception of South Delta Motors and Bottle Depot.

storefronts generally feature transparent window displays that pedestrians may view while passing by.

Storefronts to the west of 12th Avenue and 56th Street intersection have smaller setbacks and are located closer to the street, with the exception of White Spot that is

Storefronts to the west of 12th Avenue and 55th Street are setback anywhere from 13 to 24 metres from the sidewalk to allow for surface parking. Canada Post appears to be secluded and separated from the public realm as it is surrounded by several street trees that hinder pedestrian’s line of sight to the building.

Principle #2 Storefronts

72


3.10 Tsawwassen Precinct B: 12th Avenue & 56th Street Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Land Use Context  There are a mix of land uses within this precinct that include single floor retail, commercial, and residential. Residential land uses within and adjacent to this district are diverse and incorporate a mix of mid-rise condos (2 to 5 storeys) with 1 to 3 bedroom units, in addition to nearby single family homes.

New construction includes the 58 unit BRIO Condo development that is located about 250 metres west from the intersection of 56th Street and 12th Avenue.

Strength

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Neutral Weakness Residential Market Analysis

Key Civic Anchors / Amenities  There are several civic anchors and amenities that are located in proximity of this precinct, including; Winskill Park (home to Winskill Aquatic and Fitness Centre), KinVillage Community Centre, and Beach Grove Golf Course. They are about a 5 to 10 minute walk away from the intersection of 12th Avenue and 56th Street. In addition, this precinct is 1km from Boundary Bay Regional Park with its beaches and bird watching.

Principle #5 Market

73


Edmonton – Evolving Infill Strength Neutral Weakness Residential pharmacies & personal care stores and Market Analysis

3.10 Tsawwassen Precinct B: 12th Avenue & 56th Street Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Tenant Mix  Like the Tsawwassen Town Centre & Wings Precinct, the 12th Avenue and 56th Street precinct’s tenant mix is also composed of a high percentage of service oriented tenants as 39% of the area’s total floor space is dedicated to personal & laundry services (11%), professional services (10%), health care services (8%), financial services (5%), administrative services (3%) and social services (2%). In addition to having a high percentage of service tenants, the 12th Avenue and 56th Street Precinct is composed of a high percentage of convenience related goods (20%); supermarkets comprise 12% of the precinct’s total floor space, while

convenience/specialty food stores compose 6% and 2% of the precinct’s total floor space, respectively.

However, unlike the Tsawwassen Town Centre & Wings district, this district has a higher percentage of its total retail and commercial floor space dedicated to food & beverage and automotive uses as both categories compose 16% and 3% of the precinct’s floor space, respectively.

Principle #6 Businesses

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Strength Neutral Weakness Residential Strategic Tenant Mix RecommendationsMarket Analysis

3.10 Tsawwassen Precinct B: 12th Avenue & 56th Street Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities

The 12th Avenue and 56th Street Precincts dedicates the largest amount of its floor space to comparison goods when compared to the others. The precinct has over 63,000 sf (18% of the district’s total floor space) dedicated to comparison goods, while the Tsawwassen Town Centre Precinct has 19,600 sf, and the Tsawwassen Gateway district has less than 8,000 sf.

Retail Form  Like other precincts within Tsawwassen, the 12th Avenue and 56th Street Precinct has a large percentage of medium format tenants (61% of its total floor space). It also has a similar percentage (12%) of its floor space in the form of large format anchors as the Tsawwassen Town Centre district (15%). Small format tenants only comprise 11% of the precinct’s total floor space.

From a commercial standpoint, this precinct should serve an ancillary role to the Tsawwassen Town Centre & Wings Precinct in the near term, focusing on convenience products and services. In the long term, this area could redevelop as mixed use corridors which will allow it to integrate into a new town centre for Tsawwassen. Consideration should be given to contracting the corridor’s overall size, allowing some peripheral locations east of 56 St and west of 54A St to redevelop without ground floor commercial.

Retail Function  This precinct is providing a variety of retail functions, including meeting the everyday needs of nearby residents through convenience retail and services. In addition, this precinct helps accommodate uses that prefer a central location in Tsawwassen but do not desire to be located within the Tsawwassen Town Centre.

Mixed-use redevelopment on Marine Drive in North Vancouver, a major arterial with similarities to 56th Street. 75


Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

3.11 Tsawwassen Precinct C: Tsawwassen Gateway ď&#x201A;§ @@@ Commercial Floor Space Distribution (figures in square feet) Precinct 10,146 10,146

5,570 5,570 24,882 24,882

9,126 9,126

486 486

962 962

10,732 10,732 14,282 14,282

18,862 18,862

44,921 44,921

9,695 9,695

1,234 1,234

11,686 11,686

325 325

6,213 6,213

Commercial Categories Automotive Comparison Goods & Services Convenience Goods & Services Entertainment & Leisure Foods & Beverage Services Vacant Total

Area (sf) 19,841 7,766 11,057 18,862 32,181 78,928 486 169,122

Retail Inventory

100 m

50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

47%

12%

Automotive

5%

7%

Comparison Goods Convenience Goods

11%

19% 0%

Entertainment & Leisure

Food & Beverage

Services

Vacant

76

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3.11 Tsawwassen Precinct C: Tsawwassen Gateway Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities

Strength

Overall Description  This precinct is the closest commercial area to the TFN developments, located just south of Highway 17. Currently, the precinct is composed of commercial plazas, the Coast Tsawwassen Inn, the South Delta Recreation Centre, and the South Delta Artists Guild. Public Activity  Pedestrian activity was observed at various locations along 56th Street, mostly nearby bus shelters or intersections.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Neutral Weakness Residential Market Analysis

Principle #1 Built Form

Sidewalks  Sidewalks are generally narrower than 2 metres in width and are placed directly next to vehicular traffic with no landscaping buffer.

Crosswalks are spaced out 170 to 500 metres along 56th Street and are demarcated with white painted lines. In some cases crosswalk paint is worn and not easily visible.

Landscaping, Street Furniture, Street Art  Landscaping is limited along this portion of 56th Street. Several bus shelters along 56th Street are stocked with a newspaper rack and trash receptacles.

Principle #3 Public Realm

Tree-lined medians can be found in different locations along the 56th Street arterial.

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Strength Neutral Weakness Residential observation, these lots had occupancyMarket rates of Analysis 30% and

3.11 Tsawwassen Precinct C: Tsawwassen Gateway Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities Streets  The main commercial corridor within this precinct can accommodate five lanes of vehicular traffic with two lanes going in each direction. Depending on the location, they street space for the fifth lane is either dedicated as a left hand turn lane, or is used as a tree-lined landscaped median.

In total, 56th Street is about 18 metres wide and allows for maximum legal travel speeds of up to 50 km per hour.

Parking  There are two major off-street parking lots at Century Square and South Delta Recreation Centre. At time of

20% respectively.

In addition, there are several smaller off-street parking lots that belong to the retail tenants located in the retail strip malls along 56th Street between 14th Avenue and 16th Avenue. Together these smaller lots appeared to have an occupancy rate of around 70% at the time of observation.

Building Appearance  Buildings appeared to be in good condition with new or recently completed condo developments located on 56th Street.

Principle #4 Accessible

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3.11 Tsawwassen Precinct C: Tsawwassen Gateway Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities

Strength

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Neutral Weakness Residential Market Analysis

Storefront Design  Building setbacks are consistent with what is typically seen at strip mall sites along major arterials. On average, the strip malls that line 56th Street were setback anywhere from 15 to 20 metres.

Land Use Context  In addition to retail uses, the Gateway Precinct is home to residential (single family homes and mid-rise condo developments), and a hotel (Coast Tsawwassen Inn), as well as leisure and recreational uses.

Key Civic Anchors / Amenities  South Delta Recreation Centre and the Southpointe Academy are two major institutions within the precinct.

Retail storefronts have little variation and are generally consistent with the other units within the same building (e.g: 7-11 and Ossie’s), reducing the ability of tenants to express their unique characteristics.

Principle #2 Storefronts

Principle #5 Market

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Strength Neutral Weakness Residential Strategic Tenant Mix RecommendationsMarket Analysis

3.11 Tsawwassen Precinct C: Tsawwassen Gateway Precinct Strengths, Weaknesses & Opportunities

Retail Form  Almost two-thirds of the precinct is composed of medium format units, while small shops (18% of total; 30,813 sf) and junior anchor tenants (17% of total; 28,581 sf) compose the precinct’s remaining floor space.

Principle #6 Businesses

Tenant Mix  Services compose the majority of the Gateway Precinct’s tenant mix as 47% of the area’s total 170,000 sf is spread out among professional, personal & laundry, and other service related tenants. Following services, food & beverage tenants compose 19%, of the precinct’s total floor space, followed by automotive (12%), convenience goods (7%), and comparison goods (5%).

Being the closest site to the TFN development, the area has an opportunity to act as a stronger gateway to draw visitors into central Tsawwassen. Food & beverage (fast food primarily), service commercial, as well as stronger pedestrian connections, could help tie the various cultural / recreational assets in this precinct into a more cohesive destination.

Retail Function  In part, this precinct’s retail function is to provide convenient access to services for drivers passing into Tsawwassen. Some retail exists in a supporting role to other major uses, such as Browns Social House within the Coast Tsawwassen Inn. In addition, tenants seeking lower cost land availability, such as automotive uses, have been able to find suitable locations in this area.

80


3.12 Conclusion & Synopsis Strategic Repositioning

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

The South Delta retail environment is undergoing a seismic shift in terms of competitiveness and variety for the consumer. In order to survive and thrive, Ladner and Tsawwassen town centres will need to begin a process of shifting their offerings to position themselves as complementary to the TFN malls, with a primary focus on maintaining and increasing their local market penetration. At the business level, proprietors will be required to gain a nuanced understanding of their current customer base, how it is evolving, and how to build upon it. Many will need to revisit both the physical and operational side of their business, examining everything from merchandise mix, pricing and supply chains, to store layout, customer service and marketing strategies. Partnerships and cooperation will be required amongst all stakeholders including landowners, and strong vision, input and leadership from local business (improvement) associations will be essential. Detailed sustainability-oriented actions are discussed in the final sections of this report.

In Section 3 we have inventoried each town centre’s tenant mix, divided town centres into precincts, reviewed each precinct against a variety of criteria, and have made strategic tenant mix repositioning recommendations for each precinct going forward. By way of summary, the following mix adjustments are recommended: 1. Ladner Village Core: More food & beverage, service commercial (personal & professional) and niche comparison retail (e.g. galleries, home furnishings);

2.

Ladner Elliot Street :

Incubation space for startup businesses; service commercial with lower foot traffic requirements; automotive uses. Prime redevelopment sites includes Ladner Harbour Centre.

3.

Ladner Waterfront :

Destination food & beverage, including brew pub, cafes, sit-down restaurants. Build on nascent arts/home furnishings offerings.

4. 5.

Ladner Gateway:

Continue focus as major convenience, fast food hub, and site for larger floor plate retailers.

Tsawwassen Town Centre:

Major redevelopment site. Should be focus of large-scale mixed-use, niche and boutique retailers, cafes, restaurants, and experiential shopping.

6.

Tsawwassen 12th Ave & 56th St:

Ancillary to Town Centre. Near term, focus on convenience, primarily service. Long term, redevelop as mixed-use corridors. Consider contraction of commercial E. of 56, W. of 54A.

7.

Tsawwassen Gateway:

Build on cultural/recreational amenities with more food & beverage, service commercial, and better pedestrian connections.

In Section 4 to follow, we examine the potential impacts that the TFN malls may have on each business category. 81


South Delta Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Business Sustainability Strategy Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

4

Demand & Impact Assessment 4.1 Introduction 4.2 Population Growth & Real Expenditure Growth 4.3 Expenditure Potential & Gross Space Supportable â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Baseline 4.4 TFN Malls: Outflow Recapture, New Spending & Impact 4.5 Synopsis & Conclusions 82


4.1 Introduction

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

This report section provides an evaluation of the potential impacts that the TFN shopping centres may have on the Tsawwassen and Ladner retail precincts.

Definition of Impact:

As noted previously, the two TFN malls will together add approximately 1.8 million square feet of retail, service and food & beverage space to the South Delta market. This will effectively increase the South Delta commercial floor area by 150%, from an estimated 1.2 million square feet today to 3 million square feet upon mall opening in spring 2016.

The introduction of new retail space in a market will usually cause a portion of the sales that would otherwise have gone to existing stores to be captured by new facilities. This process is termed sales transference and is typical in a competitive market economy.

Depending on the overall market growth and access, sales transfer may only cause existing stores to experience lower increases in their sales than would have otherwise occurred. When sales transfer causes existing stores to experience net declines in sales, below base year levels (in this case 2015), then a sales impact is deemed to have occurred.

Whether a sales impact is excessive in terms of the economic welfare of existing stores (and thus representing a critical impact) depends on the duration of the impact and the base year sales operating levels. If the duration of the impact is short and market growth returns sales to previous operating levels within a reasonable amount of time (usually 2-3 years), then the impact may not be critical.

Similarly, if the opening of new retail space reduces sales at existing businesses to an operating level that is still within normal performance ranges, then the impact may also not be critical.

In order to fundamentally damage the current and long-term functioning of a retail area, the degree of business closure and lack of replacement tenants or alternative uses would have to be substantial.

South Delta’s residents, retailers and property owners are both excited by the opportunities that these new centres will offer in terms of product and service variety and new customers entering the area, while simultaneously wary of the potential impacts that the new centres could have on existing businesses within the town centres. The Ladner and Tsawwassen town centres are first and foremost local-serving, convenience-oriented retail and service commercial hubs. The success of these town centres fundamentally depends on the size of the local market, and the ability to attract and retain those local residents. The importance of a local and specialized focus will be compounded in the coming years, with success dependent on offering retail, services, food & beverage and leisure offerings that are complementary to what will be offered at the TFN malls. A table outlining the store categories used in this analysis, and the store types contained in each category, can be found in Appendix B.

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

4.2 Population Growth & Real Expenditure Growth  @@@ Methodology & South Delta Population Growth Forecasts Methodology

South Delta Population Growth

In order to assess what impact the TFN malls may have on the Tsawwassen and Ladner business districts, we first must understand what market growth might otherwise be expected in these two areas if the malls were not being constructed.

Population growth in South Delta has been projected for four distinct sub-areas: Tsawwassen, Ladner, the TFN Lands, and semi-rural areas in between. Growth forecasts are shown in the table below.

This analysis is premised on the assumption that no other notable changes will occur to the regional retail landscape that will otherwise alter the dynamics of spending flows into and out of South Delta over the projection period.

Under such conditions, the primary factors driving growth or decline in the retail market area:

(1)Change in population (2)Growth in real expenditures by category

Ladner’s population is expected to decrease from 2015 to 2024, attributable to a lack of new housing choices to attract young families, and an aging population throughout the village with associated decreasing household sizes as children leave the family home.

Tsawwassen is expected to grow to nearly 32,000 residents by 2024; this forecast accounts for expected additional population at Southlands.

TFN lands are projected to grow significantly given the scale of new housing development and the projected timelines for build-out.

Population Forecast, South Delta * Area

2011

2015

2018

2021

2024

Tsawwassen

21,181

23,536

26,400

29,513

31,986

3.2%

Ladner

22,204

23,443

23,733

23,381

23,150

0.3%

720

902

1,227

1,827

2,720

10.8%

Other South Delta

2,658

2,563

2,494

2,440

2,388

-0.8%

TOTAL

46,763

50,444

53,854

57,161

60,243

1.9%

2.2%

2.0%

1.8%

TFN

Avg. Annual Growth

Avg. Annual Growth

*Based on: Statistics Canada 2011 Census; Environics Analytics DemoStats 2014 Estimates & Projections; BC Stats PEOPLE 2014 forecasts; GPRA/Reurbanist/CMI estimates. 84

84


Richmond Population Growth

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential North Delta & Northwest Surrey PopulationMarket Growth Analysis

While Richmond residents make up only a small minority of shoppers in South Delta today (estimated at under 2% of total sales volumes), they are expected to come to South Delta in greater numbers in the future given the attraction of the new malls (particularly the Mills) and the ease of access created by the Massey Tunnel replacement.

The other population base that is likely to have much greater propensity to shop in South Delta in the coming years following opening of the new malls is that of North Delta and Surrey from King George Highway west. Residents of North Delta & west Surrey have unprecedented access to South Delta now via the South Fraser Perimeter Road.

Richmond has an estimated population of just over 215,000 residents in 2015. Population is expected to grow at an average annual rate of 1.7% over the coming decade, reaching 235,000 by 2020 and 254,000 by 2025.

The population of the area bound by Highway 91 in the west, the Fraser River in the north, King George Highway in the east and Highway 99 in the south is estimated at 215,500 in 2015. It is projected to reach 232,000 by 2020 and 248,000 by 2025.

4.2 Population Growth & Real Expenditure Growth Population Growth Forecasts

North Delta & West Surrey

Richmond

260,000

254,486

250,000 248,271

240,000 230,000 220,000 210,000 200,000 190,000 2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

85

85


4.2 Population Growth & Real Expenditure Growth  @@@ Growth in Real Expenditures Historical 

To establish future percapita expenditure levels in real terms, we reviewed the historic changes in consumer spending for the category groupings in the table at right. These categories represent the broad range of retail facilities being examined. Consumer Price Index (CPI) data is published by Statistics Canada and has been used in this analysis to remove the effect of inflation on retail expenditures thereby providing expenditure levels that can be compared between years. CPI data reflects changes in the cost of goods, including taxes.

Annual Real Growth in Spending Based on our review of data from 2004 to 2014, the average annual real rates of spending growth, expressed in constant dollar values, are adjusted to reflect the rates as appearing in the table at right.

These findings form the basis for future market growth estimates.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

General Merchandise, Apparel, Furniture, & Other Retail (1)

1.6%

Pharmacy & Personal Care (2)

4.2%

Food Stores (3)

0.5%

Beer, Wine & Liquor Stores (4)

2.8%

Building & Outdoor Home Supply Stores (5)

0.2%

All above use 2004-2014 Statistics Canada Retail Trade publication (63-005, NAICS) to calculate per-capita expenditures. This data is used in conjunction with Statistics Canada’s The Consumer Price Index, British Columbia to calculate per capita expenditures by year in constant dollars, using CPI category clusters as follows: (1) For all items, excluding food & energy (2) Health care goods, personal care supplies and equipment (averaged) (3) Food purchased in Stores (4) Alcoholic Beverages Purchased in Stores (5) All items excluding food & energy.

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis Elasticity of Retail Expenditures to Income

4.2 Population Growth & Real Expenditure Growth Elasticity of Retail Expenditures to Income

There is a clear correlation between expenditures and incomes. We can therefore use the relationship between the income levels of a given trade area and the province overall to estimate the average per capita retail expenditures in that trade area, based on expenditure levels in the province. This method allows us to benefit from the availability of income statistics at lower levels of geography, and the linkage of that data to GIS mapping software.

The relationship between income levels and retail expenditures is not direct. Rather, it is influenced by what is referred to as income elasticity, defined as the degree to which a change in retail expenditure results from a change in income.

General Merchandise, Apparel, Furniture, & Other Retail (1)

0.4

Pharmacy & Personal Care (2)

0.6

Food Stores (3)

0.2

Beer, Wine & Liquor Stores (4)

0.5

Building & Outdoor Home Supply Stores (5)

0.2

Elasticity calculations are based on: (1) BC Per capita income from 2004 to 2014, based on BC Stats Economic Accounts and Demography data; (2) Category-specific per capita expenditures based on Statistics Canada Retail Trade (63-005) (3) Elasticity figures have been calculated by dividing the percentage increase in per capita expenditures by category by the corresponding percentage increase in per capita income.

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Estimated Capture of Local Spending Market Analysis

4.3 Expenditure Potential & Gross Space Supportable – Baseline Current Expenditure Potential, 2015 Gross Expenditure Potential

In 2015, the estimated per capita retail expenditure (excluding food & beverage and service commercial) of residents is as follows:

• • • 

Estimated Local Capture Rate

South Delta:

$15,500

Supermarkets

75%

Richmond:

$13,840

75%

North Delta & NW Surrey:

$13,200

Convenience & Specialty Food Stores Beer, Wine & Liquor Stores

55%

Pharmacies & Personal Care Stores

70%

Department Stores

0%

With overall populations of 50,450, 215,400 and 215,430 respectively, this translates into overall gross expenditure potentials of:

• • •

Store Category

South Delta:

$782.7 million

Richmond:

$2,981 million

General Merchandise Stores

25-30%

North Delta & NW Surrey:

$2,845 million

Clothing, Shoes, Accessories, Jewellery

8-10%

Net Expenditure Potential

Home Centres, Hardware, Garden Stores

25%

The net expenditure potential represents the portion of gross spend that is captured in South Delta.

Home Electronics & Appliances

20%

It is estimated that approximately 34% of South Delta retail dollars are captured within the community today. This translates to an estimated $268 million in 2015.

Furniture Stores

<5%

Home Furnishings

<5%

Sporting Goods, Hobbies, Music, Books

25%

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

25%

Capture rates are highest in the convenience goods categories such as supermarkets, convenience, beer, wine liquor and pharmacies/personal care.

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Estimated Capture of Richmond, North Delta, NWAnalysis Surrey Spend

4.3 Expenditure Potential & Gross Space Supportable – Baseline Current Expenditure Potential, 2015

South Delta businesses are largely dependent on the spending of local residents.

While today there is some inflow of spending from Richmond, North Delta, Surrey and elsewhere, the totality of this additional spend is estimated to account for no more than 3-4% over and above the $268 million from the local population. Categoryspecific capture estimates are presented in the table at right.

There is also some inflow spending to South Delta from other areas of Metro Vancouver and the Island, but in most categories this spend is negligible.

Store Category

Estimated Local Capture Rate

Supermarkets

1%

Convenience & Specialty Food Stores

1%

Beer, Wine & Liquor Stores

<1%

Pharmacies & Personal Care Stores

0%

Department Stores

0%

General Merchandise Stores

<1%

Clothing, Shoes, Accessories, Jewellery

0%

Home Centres, Hardware, Garden Stores

<2%

Home Electronics & Appliances

0%

Furniture Stores

0%

Home Furnishings

<1%

Sporting Goods, Hobbies, Music, Books

<1%

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

<1% 89

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

4.3 Expenditure Potential & Gross Space Supportable – Baseline Projected Expenditure Potential & Retail Space Supportable

Based on the population growth projections discussed in Section 4.2 above, and assuming no changes in estimated spending capture rates , South Delta businesses could expect to benefit from an average annual growth in real expenditures of approximately $11.5 million over the next 10 years. Expenditures by category are divided by the estimated annual sales performance by category ($/sq.ft./year) to calculate the additional supportable floor area by category.

On the whole, under existing conditions it is projected that South Delta would be able to support approximately 20,000 square feet of net additional retail space per year, each year for the next 10 years.

If we add to this the demand for additional service commercial and food & beverage space, this figure increases to 40-45,00 square feet net additional per year.

Net Additional Square Feet Supported in South Delta (Cummulative), No TFN Malls Performance ($/sf/yr)

2016

2018

2020

2022

2024

Supermarkets

$550

4,961

15,139

25,007

36,015

45,226

Convenience and specialty food stores Beer, wine and liquor stores

$500 $925

1,413 1,303

4,370 4,084

7,365 7,007

10,723 10,325

13,787 13,550

Pharmacies and personal care stores

$775

3,359

10,690

18,688

27,966

37,466

Department Stores General merchandise stores

$425 $225

0 2,525

0 7,809

0 13,160

19,169

24,640

Clothing stores Shoe, clothing accessories and jewellery stores Home Centres, Hardware Stores/Garden Stores

$325

399

1,234

2,079

3,030

3,894

$275

146

450

758

1,105

1,420

$350

893

2,716

4,459

6,377

7,968

Home electronics and appliance stores

$275

768

2,376

4,005

5,835

7,499

Furniture stores Home furnishings stores Sporting goods, hobby, music and book stores

$250 $250

144 103

444 317

749 534

1,091 778

1,402 1,000

$350

555

1,715

2,890

4,209

5,411

Miscellaneous store retailers

$275

Categories

Cummulative Total

919

2,842

4,790

6,975

8,968

17,487

54,186

91,492

133,599

172,232 90

90


4.4 TFN Malls: Outflow Recapture, New Spending & Impact Introduction

One of the by-products of the TFN mall developments will be the expected draw of new customers and spending to South Delta from across the entire Metro Vancouver region and beyond.

Tsawwassen Mills in particular is expecting to replicate the super-regional draw experienced by the other Millstype malls in the Toronto region and Calgary.

This mix of value retail and entertainment in a large footprint is designed specifically to extend the customer draw to a very large trade area, in other parts of Canada and the US extending 100km or more. The expected trade area of Tsawwassen Mills extends south to the US border, north as far as Kitsilano and Point Grey in Vancouver, and east to the Surrey/Langley border. Its primary trade area encompasses all of Delta, Richmond and part of Surrey.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

In this section of the report, we explore the following questions:

How much local (South Delta) spending that currently leaves the community (outflow) can be expected to remain in South Delta (recaptured) as a result of the new malls?

How much additional spending (inflow) from across Metro Vancouver and beyond might be reasonably expected to come to South Delta?

What proportion of this new spending (recaptured outflow + new inflow) might reasonably be captured by existing businesses?

What are the potential sales impacts on existing businesses, in what business categories, and over what period of time might those impacts be mitigated?

In 2015, the gross retail expenditure potential of all residents residing within the Tsawwassen Mills trade area amounts to an estimated $12.5 billion (excluding food & beverage and service commercial).

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

4.4 TFN Malls: Outflow Recapture, New Spending & Impact How much outflow can be recaptured?

2015 S. Delta Capture Estimate

2016 S. Delta capture estimate

2017 & Onward S. Delta capture estimate

Supermarkets

75%

78%

80%

With the new malls, that figure is projected to be nearly $410 million in 2016, for a net uptick of $130 million or 47% increase over baseline.

Convenience & Specialty Foods

75%

78%

80%

Beer, Wine & Liquor

55%

75%

80%

By 2017, the first full year of mall operations, the uptick over baseline is projected to be $170 million, or 59% over baseline.

Pharmacies & Personal Care

70%

80%

85%

Department Stores

0%

50%

60%

General Merchandise

25-30%

80%

85%

Clothing, Shoes, Accessories, Jewellery

8-10%

45%

50%

Home Centres, Hardware, Garden Stores

25%

50%

60%

Home Electronics & Appliances

20%

50%

60%

Furniture Stores

<5%

25%

30%

Home Furnishings

<5%

25%

30%

Sporting Goods, Hobbies, Music, Books

25%

80%

85%

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

25%

50%

Without the new malls, we have projected South Delta to capture approximately $278 million in local South Delta expenditures by 2016.

On a category-by-category basis, South Delta capture rates are expected to change as presented in the table at right.

Category

60% 92

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis Tsawwassen Mills Projected Area of Influence

4.4 TFN Malls: Outflow Recapture, New Spending & Impact How much inflow can be expected?

Tsawwassen Mills and its accompanying Tsawwassen Commons power centre are together expected to draw significant new spending from across the region.

The following table shows estimated amounts of regional expenditure that could be drawn to South Delta following the opening of the TFN malls. Figures are presented as both a proportion of the gross expenditure potential of the source region, and an estimated dollar amount in both 2016 (year of mall opening) and 2018.

Regional Expenditure Attracted to S. Delta with TFN Malls % of Gross Expenditure

Est. South Delta Spend 2016 ($millions)

Est. S. Delta Spend 2018 ($millions)

Richmond

3-4%

$92-$123

$98-$132

N. Delta & NW Surrey

2-3%

$58-$88

$62-$94

Other Metro Vancouver

2-3%

$122-$133

$130-$195

$150

$220

Source

Inflow*

*Estimated at 20% of total projected spend from S. Delta and all Metro Vancouver

On a regional level, the transference of spending from across the region into South Delta is likely to have a modest sales impact on major retail destinations including Richmond Centre and Guildford Town Centre. 93

93


4.4 TFN Malls: Outflow Recapture, New Spending & Impact How much spending might be captured by existing businesses?

While a significant amount of new expenditure potential is expected to come to South Delta as a result of the new malls, the big question for local businesses is the extent to which some of that spending will spill over from the malls to the town centres.

Using clothing stores as an example, if the net uptick in clothing expenditure in South Delta in 2016 is $118.5 million ($122 million estimated after mall opening vs. $3.5 million captured today), will all of that new spend be absorbed by the TFN malls, or will a portion be ‘left over’ for existing businesses to capture?

In our opinion it is reasonable to expect that a marginal amount of that net new spend (perhaps up to 1%) could find its way to existing businesses in Tsawwassen and Ladner if conditions are such that those town centres offer an attractive commercial environment and market themselves effectively. Again using the clothing stores as an example, if 1% of net new spending were attracted to local businesses, that equates to nearly $1.2 million.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

However, while some residual sales spillover in many categories could occur, for the purposes of this study we require an analysis that explores a worst case scenario. The question we want to answer is, what is the maximum sales impact on local businesses that we might expect, and over what period of time will market growth allow that impact to be offset?

Therefore, for the purposes of this analysis we have adopted an assumption of zero local capture of new residual spending in all categories. In other words, our model assumes that local businesses must rely primarily on local population and spending growth, AND also must contend with short-term sales transference to the new malls, in varying amounts depending on the category.

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

4.4 TFN Malls: Outflow Recapture, New Spending & Impact Impact Analysis

As discussed in the introduction to Section 4 of this report (page 83), we have evaluated impacts in terms of potential sales transference from existing businesses following the opening of the TFN malls. In evaluating impacts, we look at:

1. 2. 3. 

Supermarkets

There is not expected to be a new stand-alone supermarket as part of either the Mills or Commons development. There will be a retail grocery component within the Wal-Mart at Tsawwassen Commons, with a likely floor area of under 25,000 square feet.

There is an estimated $98 million of supermarket expenditure captured within the South Delta market today. Following opening of the malls in 2016 this figure is expected to reach $115 million. We estimate that across all South Delta supermarkets there will be a 7-10% sales transference. This transference is likely to be higher for Tsawwassen area supermarkets (particularly the Save-On Foods) than for Ladner area supermarkets. A 7% sales transference in 2016 would equate to just over $7 million. A 10% sales transference would equate to $10 million.

Given projected market growth over the next year, a 10% sales transference in 2016 would result in a 7% loss in sales vs. the 2015 baseline estimate ($91m vs. $98m).

Projected market growth will result in sales loss of 5% by 2017, 2% by 2018, and 0% by 2019. By 2022 it is expected that sales volumes will be 8% above what they were in 2015. We would therefore classify this as a non-critical market impact.

Sales transference in dollar terms Sales transference as % impact vs. a 2015 baseline Dollar transference and % impact changes given projections for population growth and real expenditure growth by category (i.e. growth of the local market).

If sales impacts can be offset within 2-3 years and are under 15% in year 1, these are deemed to be non-critical impacts (although we acknowledge that for some businesses this will be critical). Under these conditions, most businesses that are currently healthy should be able to weather the shortterm loss of sales, assuming quick recovery. If sales impacts cannot be offset within 2-3 years, and/or if they are significantly over 15% in the first year, then it is more likely that these will represent a critical impact leading to business closure. In this section we discuss impacts on a category-bycategory basis. Supermarket Impact Analysis Estimated Sales Transference: $ Expected in S. Delta

7-10%* 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 $115,117,282 $127,635,497 $131,142,967 $134,399,060 $137,803,150 $141,397,336 $145,196,823

% Impact vs. 2015 Baseline

-7%

-5%

-2%

0%

3%

5%

8%

$ Impact vs. 2015 Baseline

-$7,363,545

-$4,902,313

-$2,325,307

$56,053

$2,559,517

$5,206,359

$8,008,187

*only the 10% transference scenario is modelled

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4.4 TFN Malls: Outflow Recapture, New Spending & Impact Impact Analysis Convenience & Specialty Food Stores

Beer, Wine & Liquor Stores

There is an estimated $13.8 million of Convenience & Specialty Food Store expenditure captured within the South Delta market today. Following opening of the malls in 2016 this figure is expected to reach $17 million. In 2016 without the malls, the figure is projected at $14.3 million.

There is an estimated $24 million in Beer, Wine & Liquor expenditures captured in South Delta today. Following opening of the malls, this figure is expected to reach $39 million. In 2016 without the malls, the figure is projected at $25 million.

Ladner has 9 businesses that fall into this category, including 3 bakeries, one fish shop, and five convenience stores. Tsawwassen has 12 businesses in this category including specialty shops like Coastal Olive Oils, Sticky’s Candy and Chocolate Bear confectionary.

The Tsawwassen Commons merchandising plan indicates that a liquor store (MetroLiquor) will be located at the shopping centre. It is anticipated that up to a 10% sales transference could occur.

Given the anticipated tenant mix of the new TFN malls we do not expect there to be any significant sales transference from this category. Through strong marketing campaigns, many of these local businesses can benefit from the increased traffic associated with the TFN malls.

Given the pace of real expenditure growth and population growth in the market, a 10% transference would result in a 2016 impact of 5.5% or $1.3 million vs. estimated sales in 2015.

By 2017 the impact would be under 1%, and by 2018 the market will have fully recovered and expanded.

Impacts could be higher or lower depending on the new store (or stores’) degree of specialization. In general, we would expect that impacts would be greater at Tsawwassen based non-specialty liquor stores (i.e. more impact at Liquor Quicker, less or none at Mud Bay Wines.)

Beer, Wine & Liquor Stores Impact Analysis Estimated Sales Transference: $ Expected in S. Delta

10% 2016 $39,202,690

2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 $45,652,767 $47,900,019 $50,131,159 $52,490,040 $55,000,751 $57,676,437

% Impact vs. 2015 Baseline

-5.5%

-0.8%

4.1%

9.0%

14.2%

19.8%

25.7%

$ Impact vs. 2015 Baseline

-$1,321,394

-$198,084

$993,848

$2,173,756

$3,427,269

$4,763,341

$6,189,250 96

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4.4 TFN Malls: Outflow Recapture, New Spending & Impact Impact Analysis Pharmacies & Personal Care Stores

Department Stores

There is an estimated $40 million in pharmacy and personal care store sales captured in South Delta today. Following the opening of the malls in 2016 this figure is projected to reach $57 million (vs. $43 million without the malls).

The TFN malls are likely to offer a range of pharmacy and personal care products. The Mills mall will likely contain retailers selling a variety of personal care retailers such as Bath & Bodyworks, Lush, Body Shop and others. The Commons power centre will offer pharmaceuticals and personal care goods at the Wal-Mart, and they may ultimately secure a pharmacy-driven retailer like a Rexall or Shoppers Drug Mart.

There are currently no department stores in South Delta. While South Delta residents currently generate nearly $39 million in department store-related expenditures, all of that spending is captured by stores in Richmond Centre, Lansdowne Centre, Metrotown, Guildford Town Centre, Downtown Vancouver, and elsewhere.

The new Wal-Mart at Tsawwassen Commons will significantly stem the outflow spending in this category.

Given the lack of competitive stores in this category currently operating in South Delta, the impact is modelled at 0%.

Given this variety of potential offerings, we expect that this category could see a sales impact of up to 20%. Given the pace of growth in population and spending growth, this would translate to a 15% sales impact in 2016, or $6 million less than estimated 2015 sales.

Given projected market growth, and particularly the rapid real growth in per capita expenditures in this category, the impact is expected to drop to 9% by 2017, 3.5% by 2018, and be offset entirely by 2019. Pharmacies & Personal Care Stores Estimated Sales Transference: $ Expected in S. Delta

20% 2016 $57,105,494

2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 $66,622,581 $70,847,968 $75,148,108 $79,751,385 $84,701,647 $90,031,480

% Impact vs. 2015 Baseline

-14.8%

-9.3%

-3.5%

2.5%

8.9%

$ Impact vs. 2015 Baseline

-$5,940,279

-$3,748,194

-$1,394,760

$993,891

$3,563,640

15.8%

23.2%

$6,331,485 97$9,316,412

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4.4 TFN Malls: Outflow Recapture, New Spending & Impact Impact Analysis General Merchandise Stores

The General Merchandise category includes stores like Canadian Tire, Dollarama, Costco, and other variety stores. In South Delta today, there are few stores that fall into this category, with the most significant ones being Dollarama and Dollar Joy in Ladner. There is an estimated $15 million in General Merchandise store sales occurring in South Delta today. The new malls are expected to have a variety of large general merchandisers, including Canadian Tire and Dollarama confirmed at the Commons (unclear at this stage if this will be a second store, or if it will relocate from Ladner).

It is expected that in 2016 general merchandise sales in South Delta will reach $95 million.

We would expect a significant sales transference from existing businesses to the TFN malls in this category, up to 20%. Given projected population and spending growth, this translates to a 17% sales transference in 2016 vs. 2015 baseline figures.

At a 20% impact, recovery to 2015 sales levels would not occur until 2022. This can be classified as a critical impact.

General Merchandise Stores Estimated Sales Transference: $ Expected in S. Delta

20% 2016 $95,499,067

2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 $114,445,994 $118,620,465 $122,737,731 $126,938,031 $131,346,979 $135,979,762

% Impact vs. 2015 Baseline

-16.9%

-13.8%

-10.5%

-7.3%

-3.9%

-0.3%

3.4%

$ Impact vs. 2015 Baseline

-$2,639,805

-$2,148,748

-$1,631,701

-$1,135,476

-$610,669

-$54,438

$535,877

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential expected to jump significantly, projected to reach $99 Market Analysis

4.4 TFN Malls: Outflow Recapture, New Spending & Impact Impact Analysis Clothing, Shoes, Accessories, Jewelry

million in 2016 and $160 million in 2017.

Both Ladner & Tsawwassen have a variety of smaller Clothing, Accessories and Jewelry stores. These include independent niche retailers like South Coast Casuals, Buttercups Children’s Boutique, Evan N. Fashion Studio, Xtreme Clothing, and The Urban Rack, as well as local and national chains like One Tooth, Shoe Warehouse and Mark’s Work Wearhouse. It is likely that the latter will be leaving Trenant Park Mall in Ladner’s Gateway Precinct to take up a new space in the Tsawwassen Commons development. There is a lack of shoe stores and men’s wear shops in South Delta today.

Altogether it is estimated that there are $6 million in sales generated within this category in South Delta today. Following the opening of the new malls this figure is

While there may be some sales transference from local retailers to some of the major chains expected to emerge at Tsawwassen Mills (e.g. Winners, H&M, Club Monaco, Forever 21 and others), it is likely that the specialized and local-serving nature of most existing stores will help to insulate them from sales impacts. For the purposes of this model we have assumed a moderate impact of 10% in this broad category, which, based on expected market growth, translates to a 6.5% impact in 2016. This impact would be entirely offset by 2018.

Clothing, Shoes, Accessories & Jewelry Estimated Sales Transference: $ Expected in S. Delta

10% 2016 $99,334,760

2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 $159,693,791 $107,194,236 $110,260,138 $113,296,641 $116,459,087 $119,755,051

% Impact vs. 2015 Baseline

-6.5%

-3.0%

0.8%

4.3%

8.1%

12.2%

16.4%

$ Impact vs. 2015 Baseline

-$286,039

-$130,404

$33,504

$190,683

$357,114

$533,564

$720,884

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4.4 TFN Malls: Outflow Recapture, New Spending & Impact Impact Analysis Home Centres, Hardware & Garden Stores

There are a number of home, hardware and garden-type stores in both Ladner and Tsawwassen. This includes chain or franchise stores such as Rona, Benjamin Moore and Home Hardware, as well as local independents like Ladner Village Hardware, Southside Flooring & Rugs, and West Coast Seeds.

The Rona store that is currently located in the Tsawwassen Shopping Centre is expected to relocate to Tsawwassen Commons.

We would expect some businesses in this category to be insulated from impacts due to their unique product offerings and well established customer base. This would include

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Other businesses selling general Market Analysis

West Coast Seeds. hardware, paint, and home building/renovation products are likely to be impacted to a larger degree due to the variety and price point offered at new businesses like Canadian Tire, Wal-Mart and even the new, expanded Rona.

Overall, we project the impact in this category to be up to 20%. Given the relatively slow projected real growth in this category, this impact is not expected to be offset within the next 10 years. This is therefore classified as a critical impact.

Home Centres, Hardware & Garden Stores Estimated Sales Transference:

20%

$ Expected in S. Delta

2016 $61,480,524

% Impact vs. 2015 Baseline $ Impact vs. 2015 Baseline

-18.1% -$2,349,580

2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 $105,699,823 $51,349,281 $52,534,540 $53,729,673 $54,981,250 $56,293,283 -16.2% -$2,099,780

-14.1% -$1,839,190

-12.3% -$1,599,020

-10.4% -$1,351,026

-8.4% -$1,089,703

-6.3% -$814,006

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential  Expenditure in this category in South Delta today is Market Analysis

4.4 TFN Malls: Outflow Recapture, New Spending & Impact Impact Analysis Home Electronics & Appliance Stores

Electronics & Appliances are available in South Delta today primarily at London Drugs and The Source. Some additional consumer electronics are available at telecommunication dealer stores like the Telus Store, Rogers or Bell Connections.

The TFN malls are likely to offer a variety of electronics & appliances. In addition to Wal-Mart, a retailer like Best Buy may elect to locate in Tsawwassen Commons. There are also likely to be a variety of small telecommunication stores and kiosks at Tsawwassen Mills, along with one or more shops carrying specialty electronics like cameras.

The existing retailer that will likely see a sales impact in this category is London Drugs at Trenant Park Mall. We do not anticipate that the impact will be critical however (under 10%), and it is likely that the impact will be offset within 3 years.

Home Electronics & Appliances Estimated Sales Transference: $ Expected in S. Delta % Impact vs. 2015 Baseline $ Impact vs. 2015 Baseline

10% 2016 $27,406,501 -6.5% -$356,221

estimated at $6.5 million. This is likely to reach $27 million by 2016 and $40 million by 2017.

Given the projected population and spending growth, a 10% transference will equate to a 6.5% sales impact in 2016, dropping to 3% by 2017 and dropping to zero before the end of 2018.

2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 $40,267,169 $41,720,988 $43,160,142 $44,620,212 $46,150,574 $47,756,201 -3.0% 0.8% 4.3% 8.1% 12.2% 16.4% -$162,400 $41,725 $237,469 $444,736 $664,480 $897,761

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4.4 TFN Malls: Outflow Recapture, New Spending & Impact Impact Analysis

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Furniture Stores

Home Furnishings Stores

The home furnishings category includes stores selling floor coverings, picture frames, bedding, linens, glassware, housewares, lamps, pottery, and all other home accessories.

Existing retailers operating in this category include Muddy River Landing, Blue Door Interiors, Heritage House Interiors, and Maison Rouge.

TFN Malls are likely to include a variety of retailers offering mid-market and specialty home furnishings, including the likelihood of Home Sense & Bed Bath & Beyond.

It is estimated that there are under $1 million of sales generated in this category in South Delta today. This figure is projected to jump to over $7 million by 2016 and $11 million by 2017.

Given the niche and specialty nature of most of the existing competition in this category, no impact is projected.

There are no mass market retailers in South Delta today selling home, office and outdoor furniture. Some limited furniture is available at London Drugs, and specialty, antique and custom furniture is available at Heritage House Interiors, Painted with Love, and others. The TFN malls are likely to include some furniture offerings within general merchandise and home furnishingspredominant stores (i.e. Wal-Mart, Home Sense etc.). There is also the potential to see a furniture store like The Brick, or a niche retail chain like Sleep Country, at the Commons development.

It is estimated that there are <$1 million of sales generated in this category in South Delta today. This figure is projected to jump to $11 million in 2016 and $16 million by 2017.

Given the limited and niche nature of most furniture offerings in South Delta today, no impact is projected. There will likely be significant spillover benefit to retailers in this category due to the additional traffic in South Delta, provided that these retailers are able to successfully market their products.

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4.4 TFN Malls: Outflow Recapture, New Spending & Impact Impact Analysis Sporting Goods, Hobbies, Music, Books

like Stillwater Sports may find on price and merchandise from Bass Pro Shops. That said, through strategic merchandising (i.e. ensuring little overlap in product lines) combined with proactive retention of a loyal customer base, impacts can be minimized.

This somewhat eclectic category includes South Delta businesses such as:

• • • • • • •

Dave’s Pop Culture, Games & Toys Quilted Bear

Overall spending in this category in South Delta today is estimated at $6 million. Following the opening of the mall (and particularly Bass Pro Shop), this is expected to reach nearly $63 million in 2016 and $95 million in 2017.

For the purposes of this ‘worst case’ modelling scenario, we have projected a 10% impact in this category overall. This would result in a 6.5% impact in 2016, 3% in 2017 and no impact by 2018.

Toys & Tech The Run Inn Albany Books

Black Bond Books Stillwater Sports

Many of the businesses in this category are likely to be insulated from mall-related impacts due to the specialty and niche nature of their businesses. For instance, a store like Dave’s Pop Culture in Ladner, or Toys & Tech in Tsawwassen, are unlikely to have significant merchandise overlap with chain stores like a Wal-Mart or EB Games.

On the other hand, a hunting and fishing specialty retailer

Sporting Goods, Hobbies, Music, Books Estimated Sales Transference: 10% 2016 $ Expected in S. Delta $62,955,567 % Impact vs. 2015 Baseline -6.5% $ Impact vs. 2015 Baseline -$328,406

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential significant competition Market Analysis

2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 $95,329,730 $98,646,025 $101,991,705 $105,299,908 $108,742,574 $112,327,453 -3.0% 0.7% 4.3% 8.1% 12.1% 16.4% -$150,372 $37,081 $216,996 $407,257 $608,906 $822,905 103

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4.4 TFN Malls: Outflow Recapture, New Spending & Impact Impact Analysis Miscellaneous Store Retailers

The “miscellaneous” category includes a variety of business types such as florists, pet stores, galleries, U-brew, gift and novelty shops, and used clothing stores.

There are over 2-dozen businesses in this category in South Delta today, including: • Fancy This Gifts • Sonia’s Flowers • Dragonfly Gallery & Antiques • Spencer Gallery • Sublime Art Supplies & Gallery • Flowers Beautiful • Bosley’s • Unforgettable Gifts • Bay Wine Works • Grapes 4 U

Given both the local-serving and specialized niche nature of many of the businesses in this category, no significant impact is projected.

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4.4 TFN Malls: Outflow Recapture, New Spending & Impact Impact Analysis Personal & Professional Services

One of the keys for long-term success in both the Ladner and Tsawwassen town centres will be a continued focus on retaining and attracting personal and professional service businesses geared toward serving the local population. This includes everything form administrative, educational and financial services, through to health care, personal & laundry, professional (e.g. accountants, lawyers) and entertainment and leisure services.

Both Ladner and Tsawwassen are heavily service-oriented today, with the compendium of businesses in the service commercial sub-sectors accounting for 48% and 42% of ground floor commercial floor area in Tsawwassen and Ladner respectively.

Service commercial will need to remain a core offering in both town centres.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Food & Beverage

A robust and diverse array of food & beverage offerings, ranging form casual sit-down and quick-serve grab-and-go restaurants to brew-pubs and wine bars, will allow Ladner and Tsawwassen to set themselves apart from the TFN mall developments.

By expanding the unique and diverse offerings in these categories, differentiating from the offerings at the TFN malls, the town centres will be well positioned to draw tourists and non-local mall patrons into the town centres. 105

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4.5 Synopsis & Conclusions •

The TFN malls will bring both great opportunity and potential short-term hardship to some Delta businesses.

Supermarkets are anticipated to experience some loss of sales to the retail grocery within Wal-Mart, but market growth will offset this loss within 3 years. Supermarkets will need to revisit their offerings and pricing in relation to the new competition.

Convenience & specialty food stores are not expected to be significantly impacted by the new malls.

Beer, wine and liquor stores overall are projected to experience a modest drop in sales, with recovery by 2018. Each business will need to be aware of the merchandise and pricing at the new store, and make adjustments accordingly.

Pharmacy & personal care stores are projected to see a significant sales drop due to personal care offerings expected at the TFN malls. This could be even higher if the Commons secures a major pharmacy tenant. However, real sales growth in this category has been rapid, and sales losses can likely be offset by 2019.

Department stores: none currently exist in South Delta, so no impact has been projected.

General Merchandise: impacts could be critical, but it will depend on business type and the extent to which existing local customers can be retained.

Clothing, Shoes, Accessories, Jewelry: some impact is anticipated, but recovery can occur within 2-3 years. The niche and specialty focus of current offerings will help to insulate some businesses from impact.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Home Centres and hardware stores are anticipated to be significantly impacted by the new retail offerings.

Home electronics & appliances: a modest sales drop is anticipated, with recovery by 2018.

Furniture Stores are not expected to be significantly impacted due to the niche and specialty nature of existing furniture-type stores in South Delta.

Sporting Goods, Hobbies, Toys & Books retailers are, overall, projected to experience a modest drop in sales. For some sub-categories there is likely to be no impact due to a lack of any merchandise overlap with the new malls. For others, particularly in the sporting goods category, a potentially critical sales loss could occur. Re-merchandising and efforts to retain a core local customer base may offset a portion of this impact.

Miscellaneous stores: not expected to experience significant impacts.

Having now analysed the existing and emerging context, recommended town centre precinct merchandising adjustments, and detailed potential category-specific business impacts, we turn in the remainder of this report to development of an action-oriented business sustainability strategy. The first step of this process was engagement with local land and business owners, the results of which are discussed in Section 5 to follow. 106

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5

Stakeholder Engagement

5.1 Stakeholder Engagement Overview 5.2 Ladner Stakeholder Engagement 5.3 Tsawwassen Stakeholder Engagement 107


5.1 Stakeholder Engagement Overview 

The Corporation of Delta organized and hosted two evenings of facilitated stakeholder meetings on February 3rd and 4th, 2015 at the Harris Barn in order to seek input and feedback from Tsawwassen and Ladner business and commercial property owners. Over 800 invitations were sent out, and approximately 100 individuals attended the two evenings (~50 per night). Each evening began with presentations by Corporation of Delta staff and the consulting team, and was followed by timed breakout table discussions guided by the following questions and prompts:

1.

2.

How can Ladner & Tsawwassen respond to the new mall developments? a. What building and physical infrastructure?

b. c. d.

What products / business composition?

e.

Other ideas?

S trengths:

characteristics of the community/communities that give it/them an advantage relative to other commercial destinations.

W eaknesses:

characteristics of the community/communities that place it/them at a disadvantage relative to other commercial destinations.

O pportunities:

elements that the community/communities could exploit to their advantage.

C hallenges:

elements in the environment that could cause trouble for the community/communities

What on-site promotional events? What off-site wayfinding?

advertising,

promotion,

For each main idea generated above: a. Who needs to be involved?

b. c.

What is a SWOC Analysis?

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Why do SWOC Analysis? • Allows us to focus and build on community strengths, minimize challenges, and take greatest possible advantage of opportunities.

Who should lead? What resources do you need?

Detailed notes were compiled at each table on flipcharts, and were subsequently summarized and categorized by broad theme by Corporation staff. In this section we provide summaries of documented feedback for each community, as well as feedback organized into SWOC analyses.

How is SWOC Analysis Used?

Community SWOC analysis supplements the consultants’ analyses, together leading to strategies.

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5.2 Ladner Stakeholder Engagement 1. Ladner Stakeholder Summary Wayfinding and Signage

Overall, stakeholders felt that it was difficult to find Ladner due to a lack of signage that directed visitors to the village core.

Events & Festivals

Attendees were vocal about the type and quality of events they wanted to see and contributed several ideas such as: music nights, fire n’ ice, jazz festivals, walking tours, hockey tournaments, beer & wine festivals, and more.

Branding & Marketing

Attendees felt that branding shopping areas and creating a certain “Ladner” brand was important. Ideas included, creating a slogan such as “Meet me in Ladner” or – “This is your community”. Residents also felt that Ladner residents should have their own “Ladner” address to improve the town’s visibility. The discussion on improving marketing efforts for Ladner proved to be a more lengthy and detailed in scope as ideas included advertising via promotions, placing ads on the ferry, creating a marketing website and local discount/loyalty card. Other ideas included transforming the Ladner Business Association to a business improvement association (BIA) to better promote the village so that additional funding can be accessed. Through the new BIA, staff would be in charge of organizing events and managing social media channels for the town.

Infrastructure/Parking/Beautification

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Meeting attendees were generally in favour of improving the town’s built environment by adding more public and community amenities such public spaces, washrooms, chess parks, and street furniture.

Residents generally supported the idea of multi-level parking facilities to enhance parking supply, especially behind MLA’s office.

Development/Waterfront/Densification

Waterfront development was seen as a key driver of growth for Ladner. Citizens also voiced their concerns about wanting to see more retail along the north end of Delta Street in order to connect downtown to the waterfront.

Social / Community

Business and property owners expressed that homelessness issues should be addressed due to negative social impacts. Ideas included providing shelter facilities.

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Analysis malls to promote events and Market gatherings within both

5.2 Ladner Stakeholder Engagement 1. Ladner Stakeholder Summary

When discussing other development opportunities and considerations, Ladner businesses appeared to be vocal about historic preservation/adaptive re-use of historic landmarks and affordable housing. Discussions about these two core themes included: providing government incentives for renters and owners to make it easier with fewer restrictions to make heritage/preservation development easier and providing more affordable housing in mixed-use developments. Attendees noted that the community at large is generally against density, and this has been reflected in the Area Plan. Attendees however were broadly supportive of additional density in Ladner, noting that this would be key for supporting business growth. There was discussion about the experience of Park Royal, where density has helped support retail growth. Two key sites that residents identified as potential for densification included Dunbar Lumber and Ladner Harbour Centre.

Tsawwassen First Nation Development

Attendees viewed the TFN development as an opportunity for independents since more local customers would stay in the community to shop rather than leaving Delta to do their shopping.

To capitalize on the TFN mall opportunity, stakeholders felt that a Delta kiosk or stand should be present at the

Ladner and Tsawwassen. Stakeholders also felt that there could be a shuttle bus service that takes people to and from the TFN malls into Ladner village.

Partnerships & External Factors

Attendees felt that accessing Ladner was difficult and expressed that transit links and urban barriers (South Fraser Perimeter Road) were major challenges. They also expressed worry about traffic concerns at Highway 17.

Some attendees mentioned that the Chamber of Commerce was inaccessible and not well located.

Other thoughts regarding partnership and joint efforts included linking Port Metro Vancouver, Federal, and Provincial governments in order to find easier ways to commit resources for local initiatives, minimize municipal/provincial red tape for improvements since TFN does not have that many restrictions.

Opportunities, Big Ideas & Challenges

Stakeholders thought that there are more opportunities to diversify the town’s mix of businesses (adding more restaurants in particular) and extending hours of operation for eateries.

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

5.2 Ladner Stakeholder Engagement 1. Ladner Stakeholder Summary SWOC Analysis STRENGTHS:

WEAKNESSES:

• Proximity to waterfront

• Not enough local residents / potential customers

• Abundance of heritage buildings in commercial core

• Fiscal weakness (i.e. increasing rents, unequal tax structure in relation to TFN)

• Positive reputation of existing businesses and strong local resident loyalty • Walkable and bikeable commercial core • Proximity to local customer base (certain tenants require immediate adjacencies to population centres) • Ladner has a unique “community vibe”

CHALLENGES • Population is not growing and is aging • Both have implications for amounts and types of retail spending • Downtown tenants could close, and some could move to the new malls

• Insufficient private development interest, and potential barriers (i.e. heritage buildings, public opposition to density, municipal regulation) • Deferred maintenance on some buildings and facades • Ongoing delays in waterfront revitalization • Public realm deficiencies and operational issues • Lack of parking availability caused by non-shoppers (residents, employees) using prime spots. • Insufficient regional signage; lack of wayfinding • Access challenges for visitors (insufficient public transit, SFPR does not connect with Ladner)

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

5.2 Ladner Stakeholder Engagement 1. Ladner Stakeholder Summary SWOC Analysis OPPORTUNITIES • Implement strategies to strengthen Ladner’s overall commercial offering: • Adjust tenant mix to better meet consumer demand (i.e. more restaurants, more diversity of merchandise, more unique/specialized businesses) • Operational changes: stronger customer service, later opening hours. • Incentives to encourage new businesses, and improve existing ones.

• Undertake physical improvement to public realm (i.e. lighting,

• trees, landscaping, banners, signs, walkability, access, street furniture, public washrooms, better activated space, wayfinding) • Redevelop waterfront into a unique destination

• Leverage TFN mall projects: • Use Events and festivals to attract/retain customers: • Broaden range of local events (i.e. music events, fire ‘n ice events, jazz, walking tours, public space activation, hockey tournaments, beer and wine festivals); • Capitalize on existing major events (i.e. Tour de Delta, Ladner Market) • Hold more off-season events (i.e. existing Xmas Tree Festival)

• Brand Ladner as a destination (themes could include shopping, community, fishing village, birds, local food, 100 mile diet) • Market Ladner as a destination (i.e. promotions, social media, ads on ferry, website, local loyalty program, ads in newspapers, welcome wagon, highway signage.

• New developments = less spending outflow  opportunity to spin-off spending to local businesses • T. Mills to be major tourist draw; Ladner could complement this positioning by implementing tourism-oriented themes and marketing. • Other strategies could include: Delta kiosk with marketing info in the malls; running shuttle bus between Ladner and new malls.

• Better collaboration between local groups, gov’t entities, regional orgs to implement initiatives. • Fund a staff person dedicated to supporting small business initiatives • Implement incentives to support small business; jointly pursue gov’t grants and funding

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5.3 Tsawwassen Stakeholder Engagement 2. Tsawwassen Stakeholder Summary

Wayfinding and Signage

Attendees felt that visitors don’t travel all the way into Tsawwassen since the entrance/gateway is undesirable and not well designed. They envision the welcome way into the town as something more than a sign that is to be of a grander scale. They also thought it was important to invest in an entrance feature at 52nd Street and to improve wayfinding signage within Tsawwassen. They referenced how White Rock has designed their main entrance.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Analysis • Attendees felt that to boostMarket marketing and raise

awareness of Tsawwassen, online initiatives would be needed; of these, social media was the primary method, while Google advertising was the second. Another initiative to boost marketing included creating a “Top 10 Tsawwassen” list and having it rotated monthly, creating a business/customer loyalty program, and having an ambassador to market the town on the ferry (or possibly installing a kiosk on the ferry).

Many attendees were passionate about raising awareness and educating Tsawwassen residents about the impact on their local economy if local residents shop outside of the community, particularly noting the resources that local businesses put back into the community (e.g. sponsorship of sports teams etc.).

Attendees were also vocal about “selling the beach”, the town’s largest draw; it will be important to extend the beach’s hours of operation. There was talk about a destination restaurant, as well as a public pier.

Events & Festivals

Tsawwassen stakeholders noted that Ladner hosts more events; they hoped to organize more events that bring more people, building on some of the more notable and popular current events such as Tour de Delta, SunFest, Harmony Arts Festival. They discussed the potential for food trucks, outdoor movie nights, and Christmas themed events.

Branding & Marketing

Attendees were afraid of being over-shadowed by the TFN development and wanted to develop their own brand by creating a slogan. One person put forward: “We’re not the mall…we’re better.”

The community also felt that 56th Street should be renamed to something more unique like Tsawwassen Boulevard to let visitors know it’s the main road into town.

Infrastructure/Parking/Beautification

Tsawwassen stakeholders were adamant about advocating for active transportation enhancements that are also universally designed since they felt that the community lacks connectivity to travel short distances. This active transportation element could differentiate Delta from others (e.g: “Active for Life).

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis events and to use the regional draw of the TFN malls

5.3 Tsawwassen Stakeholder Engagement 2. Tsawwassen Stakeholder Summary

They also expressed the need for more facilities that will promote active transport such as bike racks and benches; in line with active transport, citizens were vocal about creating better public spaces that they can use to gather at for future events.

Development/Waterfront/Densification

Stakeholders expressed that they were unhappy with traffic flow on 56th Street and waned to improve it by trying to coordinate signals or enhancing it through more efficient traffic calming methods.

Attendees appeared to be supportive of seeing mixed-use development in the downtown core; they envisioned multi-level buildings with retail/commercial uses on ground floors (e.g: cafes with al fresco seating) and residential uses on top. It was noted that density is needed to create a vibrant town centre. In order to accomplish this, attendees recommended updating the Area Plan to increase densities and unit allowances. They also called for development process streamlining.

to benefit the local community.

Partnerships & External Factors

Attendees expressed that the Corporation should relax property taxes for a period of time to allow businesses to adjust. Many felt that the BIA would play a significant role in supporting and growing the local businesses.

Opportunities, Big Ideas & Challenges

Meeting attendees felt that Tsawwassen needed more furniture/bedding, men’s clothing, trendy shoe stores, potentially a high-end grocery store (e.g. Urban Fare), and destination restaurant venues.

In order to prepare for the TFN malls, it was suggested that they develop an omni-channel retail strategy and feature price matching strategies with TFN mall businesses.

Tsawwassen First Nation Development

Like Ladner, Tsawwassen stakeholders also viewed the TFN development as an opportunity. They see it as an opportunity to cross-market each other’s

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5.3 Tsawwassen Stakeholder Engagement 2. Tsawwassen Stakeholder Summary SWOC Analysis STRENGTHS:

WEAKNESSES:

• Some of Tsawwassen’s greatest strengths are its proximity to natural assets, such as the beaches and wildlife (birds);

• Many visitors entering and passing through the community fail to come all the way in to the commercial core;

• There is a flow of pass through traffic destined for Point Roberts that is a captive market.

• Many people don’t know there is a commercial core;

• Tsawwassen is the sunniest place in Metro Vancouver • The population is engaged.

• Public realm is deficient in portions of the core (i.e walkability and pedestrian safety challenges, overhead power lines, minimal streetscaping)

CHALLENGES

• Commercial core has yet to attract significant redevelopment interest;

• Insufficient distinction between Tsawwassen commercial core and TFN developments (i.e. both auto-oriented environments.)

• Public opposition to density is a key barrier;

• Public resistance to density could jeopardize future planning efforts to create stronger town centre core.

• Fewer programming/events in comparison to Ladner; • The main street is a key thoroughfare so cannot be closed for events. • Weak/nonexistent regional branding of commercial core.

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5.3 Tsawwassen Stakeholder Engagement 2. Tsawwassen Stakeholder Summary SWOC Analysis

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

OPPORTUNITIES • Take advantage of passing traffic by creating more defined gateway to Tsawwassen (signage, landscaping, grand scale); • “Sell the Beach”, Tsawwassen’s biggest draw, and link this asset to existing and future businesses;

• Redevelopment of Town Centre Mall and/or nearby parcels is significant opportunity to strengthen the core (i.e. new customers through new density, new business, added public gathering places, ability to create “true downtown core” • Partner with TFN malls for cross-promotion (i.e. info kiosk)

• Organize events that bring people, and encourage them to return (e.g. Farm markets, Tour de Delta, SunFest, music festival, Harmony Arts Festival, Food Trucks, birding, concerts, outdoor movies, xmas lights) • Invest in pedestrian & cycling infrastructure to differentiate Tsawwassen from TFN (i.e. wider sidewalks, crosswalks, accessible streets, benches, bike racks, bike paths, traffic calming) • Create stronger brand identity for Tsawwassen • Explore new opportunities to market community through social media, online presence, geographically broader advertising; • Harness residents’ sense of pride for community through “buy local” education campaign and business loyalty program aimed at keeping more spending local; 116


South Delta Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Business Sustainability Strategy Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

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Business Sustainability Case Studies 6.1 Introduction 6.2 Downtown Napanee, Ontario 6.3 Downtown Canmore, Alberta 6.4 Downtown Revitalization Task Force Sidney, BC 6.5 Bernard Avenue Revitalization Kelowna, BC 6.6 Business Incubation Revelstoke, BC 6.7 Danforth East Community Association Toronto, Ontario 117


Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Evolving Infill ď&#x201A;§ The following six case studies were analyzed as part of the review process. Successful actions implemented elsewhere Residential help inform the recommended actions for South Delta, which appear in Section 8, 9, 10 and 11 of this report. Market Analysis

6.1 Introduction

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6.2 Downtown Napanee, Ontario Overview & Lessons Learned

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Overview

Lessons Learned

Napanee’s key to improving its downtown business district was having an urban design plan that helped residents and stakeholders buy into the BIA’s overall vision for the neighborhood.

Collaboration with other stakeholders is critical in terms of seeing revitalization come to realization. Reaching out to other public, private, and non-profit organizations to help fund/sponsor, organize/support the BIA’s infinitives plays an important role in its success.

Napanee also benefited from having a dedicated BIA staff person mandated with leading the revitalization of the downtown.

Napanee is a mid-sized town (15,500 residents) 2 hours east of Toronto that was negatively impacted by outflow spending to major retail centres in nearby communities. Despite the challenges in doing so, a small collection of trendy fashion-forward retailers have been able to create a cluster of businesses that attract comparison retail shoppers. The businesses offer something you cannot find at the nearby mall – great products, knowledgeable service, and a pleasant shopping environment.

Downtown Napanee

Downtown Napanee

Program from the BIA 119


6.2 Downtown Napanee, Ontario Downtown Napanee BIA Actions Research Findings

Downtown Napanee’s BIA, the main driving force for downtown revitalization, had three core responsibilities:

Urban Design & Physical Landscape Improvements  A third of the BIA’s focus were directed at beautification and physical improvements.  The Napanee BIA’s Urban Design Plan helped guide revitalization efforts. Priorities included streetscape and walkability improvements, new heritage lighting, better placemaking amenities and wayfinding signage, and the maintenance of sidewalks.  The BIA won several grants to assist with its urban design and beautification program (grants include: TD Green Streets (CAD$15,000), Rural Economic Development Program (CAD$150,000), PELA CFDC / INDUSTRY CANADA INVEST (CAD$8,000).

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

BIA Board Member Meeting Successful Events  The BIA created several downtown events to attract people, including the Bright Lights show that is hosted in winter and the annual Scarecrow Festival. Intensive Local Business Support  The BIA is responsible for attracting new businesses and retaining existing businesses through initiatives such as collaborative advertising / marketing programs and offering promotional help. The BIA has group advertising programs with media outlets, special newsletters, and social media avenues to help market and promote individual downtown businesses.

Community Living Lennox & Addington Clean-Up Team – Collaboration w/BIA

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6.3 Downtown Canmore, Alberta Overview & Lessons Learned

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Overview

Lessons Learned

Over the long term, progressive planning policies can fundamentally shape the commercial structure of a municipality in a positive manner.

Close collaboration and consensus among key players, and political and private-sector leadership, is essential to implementing actions.

Increasingly, consumers are seeking authentic, placebased destinations that offer shopping and dining in a compact, walkable environment.

Even successful commercial destinations require constant monitoring and review to maintain the sustainability of local businesses.

Contact: Andrew Nickerson, Canmore Business & Tourism

Canmore, a town of 13,000 located just over and hours drive west of Calgary, is widely recognized for the success of its vibrant, pedestrian-oriented commercial core. In comparison to many similarly-sized municipalities, Canmore’s commercial urban structure is predominately composed of small, locally-owned businesses located within a comfortable walking distance of the town centre.

Downtown Canmore

Drake Pub – one of Canmore’s most popular restaurant, bar and pub, with live music and bands family dining, draft beers, patio 121


6.3 Downtown Canmore, Alberta Municipal & Community Organization Actions considered, such as options to better capitalize on passing highway traffic through improved wayfinding/marketing. Other issues include vacancies, and a disconnect between asking rents and sales performance.

Research Findings

The success of Canmore’s main street environment, and the continued resilience of local businesses, demonstrates the longterm potential that can be achieved by focusing on placebased retail. For both visitors and residents, the ability to comfortably walk between businesses in Canmore has become one of the town’s biggest attractions. While Canmore is more tourism-oriented than South Delta’s current economy, the development of Tsawwassen Mills, a regional destination, increases the applicability of this case study. From a policy standpoint, Canmore is unique in that the municipality has placed stringent restrictions on the location, size, and urban design of commercial space. These policies have helped limit peripheral autooriented growth and encouraged intensification. Despite these successes, further actions are being

Perhaps most importantly, Canmore has a proven ability to proactively recognize and act on issues through:

strong leadership from local business owners (some of whom serve on Council);

the establishment of the Downtown Business Revitalization Zone (with authority to levy taxes to fund improvements); and

close coordination with local developers and associated organizations (such as Canmore Business & Tourism).

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Canmore & Banff Joint Town Council Meeting

Tapas restaurant, lounge/bar

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6.4 Downtown Revitalization Task Force Sidney, British Columbia Overview & Lessons Learned

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Overview

Lessons Learned

Major changes to the local business environment are an opportunity to bring stakeholders together to create strategies for improvements.

Temporary committees are capable of making informed recommendations, but implementation requires sustained leadership.

The composition of a steering committee and selection of its chair are critical to its success. Political representation helps actions move forwards.

Downtown revitalization initiatives are closely linked to economic development (business attraction, retention and expansion).

Contact: Randy Humble, CAO, Town of Sidney

Several large retail proposals have been made recently near to Sidney (including on First Nation lands), partially as a result of the proximity to ferry traffic. Although none of these proposals has been built, concerns around their impacts led to the creation of a Mayor’s Downtown Revitalization Task Force that was mandated to address the challenges facing businesses, property owners, residents, community organizations and other stakeholders. The plan was adopted by Council in the fall of 2014 and certain actions are continuing to move forwards.

Downtown Sidney Street Market

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6.4 Downtown Revitalization Task Force Sidney, British Columbia Task Force Structure & Recommendations Research Findings

The proposed retail developments brought together a wide variety of different stakeholders to discuss the future of Sidney’s downtown. Opinions on the impacts of the retail developments were divergent and both positives and negatives were identified. The taskforce chose to focus on supporting Sidney’s core strengths and leveraging potential positive spin-offs of the developments.

Task Force Overview  The Sidney task force was composed of influential members from the business community, Councilor and Mayor representatives, and supporting Town staff. The task force jointly undertook an analysis of existing conditions, a survey of business owners, a survey of shoppers, an analysis of tax rates, and assessed 108 actions to make their recommendations. While effective in that Council unanimously supported

the recommendations, the work involved was significant and impacted staff resources. The task force only operated on a temporary basis and is no longer active. Economic Development Models  One of the outcomes of the report was to explore various models to advance local economic development, which invariably supports downtown businesses. The Town is currently studying various models that could achieve this, including hiring an Economic Development Officer, or creating an Economic Development Commission without an assigned FTE.

Volunteers conducting surveys for the Reviltazation Task Force Final Report

Downtown Sidney Street Market

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6.5 Bernard Avenue Revitalization Kelowna, British Columbia Overview & Lessons Learned

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Overview

Lessons Learned

Developing a strong sense of place and distinct character was important for distinguishing between Bernard Avenue and competing retail destinations.

Strong City leadership, including a designated Economic Development staff position that works closely with local developers and associated organizations, has helped support the continued revitalization.

Contact: Patrick McCormick, Urban Design Planner, City of Kelowna

Kelowna is located in the heart of the Okanagan Valley with a population of about 120,000 people. The city has experienced significant suburban retail expansion which has put competitive pressure on the downtown area. To strengthen the downtown, the City initiated the “Bernard Avenue Revitalization”. This $14 million project involved a complete redesign and rethink of this four lane arterial road, transforming Bernard Avenue into Kelowna’s ‘principal retail promenade’ by creating a pedestrianorientated, mixed-use setting.

Downtown Bernard Avenue

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6.5 Bernard Avenue Revitalization Kelowna, British Columbia Bernard Avenue Revitalization Outcomes Research Findings

The Bernard Avenue Revitalization was completed in May 2014. The project leveraged abundant locally-owned food and beverage operations with traffic-calming and a placemaking component to create a “go-to” destination.

By capitalizing on the diversity of food and beverage opportunities and allowing them to spill into the public realm as sidewalk cafes, more animation has been added to the street. More animation has attracted a greater volume of people to enjoy the street’s ambience, which in turn is translating into higher sales for businesses.

In addition to City-funded initiatives, the City of Kelowna has partnered with the private, public, and non-profit sectors to enrich its principal urban centre. Recent projects include a public pier and marina, a high-tech Innovation

Centre, and upgrades to the Downtown transit hub to enhance the bus rapid transit service. A 206room boutique waterfront hotel has been given the green light for a 2015 construction start, and the City is partnering with Tourism Kelowna to relocate its facility to a prime waterfront location. Downtown Bernard Avenue

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Downtown Sidney Street Market

Bernard Avenue Pedestrianization Project

Bernard Avenue Block Party 126


6.6 Business Incubation Revelstoke, British Columbia Overview & Lessons Learned

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Overview

Lessons Learned

Successfully repositioning a community can take decades of constant leadership and action.

A combination of economic support and planning initiatives helps build the groundwork for more resilient communities.

Revelstoke would not have been able to achieve its current success without deep local collaboration and the strategic sharing of limited resources.

Contact: Kevin Dorrius, General Manager, Revelstoke Community Futures

Revelstoke is a community that has successfully overcome past economic hardship to rebuild itself as a vibrant destination enjoyed by locals and tourists alike. Following the recession of the mid-1980s, Revelstoke’s leaders took a unified approach to diversifying the economy and to revitalizing the downtown area. These initiatives have been supported by an environment of collaboration, resource sharing, and business incubation. Today, Revelstoke has become one of BC’s most popular tourist destinations.

Downtown Revelstoke

Revelstoke Business Incubation (coworking business networking space)

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6.6 Business Incubation Revelstoke, British Columbia Outcomes of Business Incubation & Downtown Revitalization Research Findings

Downtown Revitalization Revelstoke's successful downtown was driven by a revitalization program (undertaken in close collaboration with stakeholders) that initiated the following:

encouraged façade improvements through an incentive program;

created a summer street festival with live music every evening night;

created a public plaza ("Grizzly Plaza") which accommodates vendors and buskers; and

coordinated opening hours of businesses so everyone is open into the evening.

Business Incubation  Through the Revelstoke Community Futures Corporation, small businesses who could not otherwise qualify easily for bank loans are given both financial support and professional

mentoring. Since the foundation of the fund, the original $1 million in seed money has grown to over $7 million and has successfully started numerous businesses in Revelstoke. Collaboration & Shared Resources  Revelstoke Community Futures, the Community Economic Development Department, and the Chamber of Commerce have all historically been co-located in the same office. This co-location has proven to be a major asset over the long term in that it encourages collaboration and minimizes conflicts among these organizations.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Downtown Revelstoke

Revelstoke Vintage Car Club & Bygone Era Entertainment Society (BEES) event in downtown Revelstoke

Outdoor event in downtown Revelstoke

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6.7 Danforth East Community Association Toronto, Ontario Overview & Lessons Learned

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Overview

Lessons Learned

DECA is a resident-driven organization funded through alternative mechanisms that have helped build a greater sense of community. DECA’s non-profit/volunteer approach to community revitalization helped form a greater sense of community since households had to pay for membership to vote on issues that affected their community.

DECA has pioneered new ways to engage residents with the local business community, including a volunteer labour program that helps existing stores modernize to reflect changing demographics.

Danforth East Community Association (DECA) is a group of neighbours that started working together in 2007 to make their local community more vibrant, walkable, safe and fun. The group’s success comes from their well attended and sponsored events (Arts Fair, Festival of Lights, Farmers’ Market) and initiatives. Their most successful project is one that tackles the problem of vacant store fronts on main commercial streets; the Pop-up Shop project uses a tenancy model to fill vacant stores with vibrant businesses. This program has helped vacancies drop by half.

Reimagining the Laneway placemaking event by DECA

Then

Now

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6.7 Danforth East Community Association Toronto, Ontario DECA Actions & Results

Research Findings

Unlike a BIA that is funded through additional tax money, DECA is financed through alternative channels and funding mechanisms:

Grant Writing  DECA partnered with WoodGreen Community Services to win CAD$65,434 from the Metcalf Foundation’s grant fund for two years in order to share their Pop-up Shop Project as an alternative for vacant commercial storefronts with other regions experiencing similar hardships.

Partnership  In addition to sponsorship, DECA also partners with other organizations like Farmers’ Markets Ontario to host other community oriented events.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Membership Fee  In order to vote and be elected to the DECA Board members living within the community must pay an annual CAD$10 membership fee for one household. Currently the group has over 360 members.

Private Corporate Sponsorship  DECA also has routinely sought sponsorship from the private sector to host other large-scale events like their Festival of Lights and annual Arts Fair.

DECA’s Pop-up Shop Project helps convert vacant storefronts into vibrant main street businesses 130


South Delta Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Business Sustainability Strategy Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

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South Delta Business Sustainability Action Plan

131


Edmonton – Evolving Infill  The South Delta Action Plan for business sustainability is subdivided by the four main actors responsible for implementation: local community organizations, business owners, property owners and their representatives, and the Corporation of Residential Delta. Although Market each of these actors has their own list of responsibilities in terms of making this plan a success, the majority of actions doAnalysis require

7

South Delta Action Plan

collaboration across the various implementing entities.

    

Within each section, actions have been further subdivided by their relative stage in the process. First, the preconditions for change must be set to ensure that actions receive the necessary traction when they are implemented. Second, actions are implemented by each entity in a coordinated manner, building from the preconditions that were laid in the preliminary phase. By necessity, some actions can happen immediately and expediently, while others will require years of planning and coordination. Finally, the actors must take careful note of the impacts of their actions through monitoring and evaluation. By sharing the results of this monitoring with other stakeholders, future actions can be better informed and primed for success.

Understanding Existing Conditions Identifying Opportunities Responding to Weaknesses Building Organizational Capacity Establishing Networks

    

Meet Customer Needs Respond to New Competition Improving Business Performance Grow New Businesses Strengthen the Town Cores

    

Identify Monitoring Metrics Record Quantitative Data Develop Qualitative Information Evaluate Results of Actions Share & Consolidate Information 132


Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Shifting the trajectory of an existing urban environment requires significant foresight, planning, and resources. Successful actions do not get implemented in isolation. Rather, they build on a strong base that offers the right preconditions for success. These preconditions include an environment where all actors have full selfawareness of their strengths and weaknesses, and that of their peers. It also requires that the various actors commit to work collaboratively in a mutually supportive manner. Finally, having the right preconditions means that actors must review their own internal capacity to ensure they have sufficient resources to execute the forthcoming actions.

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Once the preconditions are in place, the community organizations, businesses owners, property owners, and the Corporation of Delta are ready to take action. Actions will take many forms depending on the implementing body, but at their core their objective is to strengthen the business sustainability of Tsawwassen and Ladner. Some of these actions directly relate to the businesses themselves, while others seek to improve the environment in which they operate. All actions ultimately seek to better connect the customer to local businesses, both directly and indirectly. By their nature, not all actions can be implemented immediately. Each actor must develop their own timeline for implementation, set goals, and ensure that their course of actions best responds to their core needs.

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Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Actions taken in the absence of effective monitoring and evaluation will fail to provide meaningful insight. From the outset, the various actors should be diligently monitoring conditions in their respective realms to set the base conditions for analysis. As actions move through to implementation, this monitoring and evaluation process will engage in a more fulsome manner. Systematically collecting both quantitative and qualitative data will enable the impacts of actions to be clearly observed in comparison to base case data. The results of this monitoring needs to be properly analyzed within the full context of the overall Action Plan. This context is only possible through the collaboration of various actors and the broad sharing of data. Through this evaluation, the merit of future actions can be properly identified.

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South Delta Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Business Sustainability Strategy Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

8

Community Group Actions 8.1

Formalize a Ladner Business Improvement Area

8.2

Review BIA Administrative Capacity

8.3 Collaboration & Consensus Building 8.4 Festivals & Events 8.5

Tenant Retention & Improvement Strategy

8.6

Tenant Recruitment

8.7

Marketing & Branding

8.8

Local Area Research & Monitoring 136


8.1 Formalize a Ladner Business Improvement Area

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

One of the key drivers for business district sustainability in Ladner & Tsawwassen is having an engaged, coordinated, well-staffed and well-funded local entity providing consistent leadership and oversight. The study team examined a variety of potential models, and concluded that the Business Improvement Association (BIA) model is the most robust for creating comprehensive business and landlord participation, expanding the available funds, and ultimately taking on a more comprehensive scope of work. The enabling legislation for BIAs contained in the Community Charter allows for a sufficiently broad scope of work, and provides the flexibility to accommodate the unique needs of South Delta communities and their various stakeholders.

Currently, Tsawwassen’s commercial core is overseen by a BIA that raises funds through a levy on member businesses. Ladner, on the other hand, is served by a voluntary Business Association (BA). While the Ladner Business Association (LBA) is certainly above average in terms of being proactive and having dedicated, insightful leadership, examples from across the Lower Mainland and Canada have shown that BIAs are significantly more effective than voluntary associations in creating local change. This effectiveness stems from their higher participation levels (for business and landlords), better funding, and ability to employ full-time staff members. It is recommended that as a first step the Ladner Business Association explore transitioning into a Business Improvement Area in a structure that meets their unique requirements and allows them to expand their scope of work.  Geographic boundaries will be determined through deliberations amongst business owners, property owners, and existing LBA members, with assistance from the Corporation of Delta.

 Ideally, this BIA would encompass the entirety of the commercial core of Ladner, including the mall properties in the Gateway Precinct.  The nascent Ladner Business Improvement Association should work with the Corporation of Delta to determine the overall funding implications (and impacts on a per-business basis) of different BIA boundary delineations, and use this information during a subsequent outreach and consultation with business owners and landlords.  The sponsoring group (in this case the LBA) should make every effort to reach out to all property owners and merchants within the proposed geographic boundaries of the BIA to ensure buy-in and understanding of the proposed local levy and associated benefits. 137


Edmonton – Evolving Infill If the LBA does elect to transition into a BIA, and finds there is sufficient local business and landlord support to do so, our research shows that there are at least two mechanisms that the BIA could enact to encourage Residential Market Analysis ongoing active participation of all current (or future) LBA members and others stakeholders: 1. An associate voting and/or non-voting member category, with fee structure to be determined by board of

8.1 Formalize a Ladner Business Improvement Area

2.

directors  It will be at the discretion of the BIA board of directors to accept members in this category, and to determine what fee they will pay for membership;  In the City of Vancouver, some BIAs offer this (although always as non-voting members);  To ensure fairness, it is recommended that these members pay a fee that is equivalent to what they would pay if they operated their business within the prescribed BIA;  Consideration and internal consultation will be required to determine if there should be a limit on the number of associate members who are eligible to become voting members, and what that limit should be.  Nearly all the existing BIAs in Metro Vancouver have a non-voting / associate member category in their enabling bylaws, with approval of those members and their associated fees at the discretion of the board. While we were not able to find examples of existing BIAs that allow for a voting associate member category, there is nothing in the legislation that explicitly prohibits this from occurring if desired. If this were enacted, there would likely need to be limitations on what proportion of total membership could be associates at any time Authorized representation nomination by a property owner or business within the BIA  A property or business owner within the BIA can execute an ‘authorized representative’ form, whereby one BIA member provides another individual with the authority to act as an authorized representative for all purposes with relation to participating in the BIA.  Most BIAs do accept authorized representatives (for example, a large grocery chain may have their onsite manager, who is neither a business owner nor property owner, act as an authorized representative).

Implementation: Organized by the Ladner Business Association with guidance and input from the Corporation of Delta, all stakeholders, and the Business Improvement Areas of British Columbia (BIABC). Coordination: Once established, the Ladner BIA should coordinate closely with all stakeholder groups to align event scheduling, joint marketing opportunities, and advocacy. Timing: Launch initial meetings and deliberations over boundaries in 2015 with a target of late 2016 or early 2017 to formalize the BIA through the Corporation of Delta. 138


Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Evolving Infill The core mandate of a BIA is to effectively promote businesses within a defined local service area. This responsibility involves performing a variety of marketing, research, coordination, and promotional tasks that Residential ultimately have a positive bearing on existing businesses and targeted future businesses. Following from this, Market Analysis

8.2 Review BIA Administrative Capacity

the core tasks of the Tsawwassen BIA and the nascent Ladner BIA will be to continue organizing events and promotional activity, and to initiate, drive and monitor a multi-layered effort of coordinated retail retention and attraction.

A key precondition for BIAs to achieve these objectives is having access to sufficient administrative resources. Each BIA will need to determine if it has sufficient capacity to effectively undertake the expanded scope of work that will be required of it, including significant research, coordination and outreach. These efforts typically build momentum over time, and without consistent staffing it will prove difficult if not impossible to do many of the things that are discussed on the following pages such as maintaining prospects lists, following up with interested tenants, building relationships with property owners, and keeping track of tenant mix and vacancies.

Timing: Immediate and ongoing.

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Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Evolving Infill To move forward effectively, there must be collaboration, inclusivity, and consensus amongst stakeholder Residential groups. Concurrent and coordinated actions will be required from BIAs, the Chamber of Commerce, Tourism Market Analysis Delta, business owners, property owners, and the Corporation.

8.3 Collaboration & Consensus Building

Action 8.3.1. Form Business Owner & Property Owner Advisory Groups

To strengthen the potential for collaboration, the BIAs should form advisory groups for business owners and property owners. The groups should be comprised of prominent individuals in each category that have the capacity to engage with their peers. The mandate of these groups will be to advise the local BIAs on the issues and needs of the respective groups. Through this process, the BIAs will be able to provide regular updates to a broad range of stakeholders in the community. The goal of these updates will be to coordinate these groups to jointly tackle major initiatives (such as a Buy Local campaign), and to enable the BIAs to implement actions that fall outside their direct control (such as tenant recruitment and leasing, based on sub-area retail positioning strategies). Implementation: This action should be organized through the BIAs by drawing on existing networks with partners and expanding these relationships into formal working groups. Working groups should meet at least once per quarter. Coordination: Events involving both business and property owner groups should be held jointly on occasion to connect the various stakeholders. As warranted, these events could be expanded to encompass both Ladner and Tsawwassen to enable attendees to broadly share initiatives, best practices, and to seek advice on ongoing issues. Timing: Form groups in summer 2015 with first meetings held in September.

Action 8.3.2. Proactively Engage with the Corporation of Delta

BIA directors, Chamber of Commerce staff and Tourism Delta representatives should frequently attend council meetings and present local emerging issues to staff and council. Having this constant communication and collaboration will make it easier for the Corporation to make decisions that are consistent with the vision developed by Tsawwassen and Ladner merchants and property owners. Timing: Immediate and ongoing. 140


Edmonton – Evolving Infill Action 8.3.3. Form Resident Membership Program Residential To strengthen the loyalty of local customers, a membership program could be created for residents. This Market Analysis membership program will entail a nominal annual fee (e.g. $10-$20) and will provide discounts at participating

8.3 Collaboration & Consensus Building

businesses. Prizes donated by local businesses could be given under certain conditions – such as shopping at the largest number of local stores. The main purpose of the membership is not as a revenue tool, but as a strategy to get residents to literally “buy into” their community and generate the support needed for an effective Buy Local campaign. Timing: Within 6-12 months.

Action 8.3.4. Examine Opportunities for Resource Sharing

One crucial success factor in the revitalization of downtown Revelstoke was the close collaboration and sharing of resources between the Revelstoke Community Futures group, the Economic Development Department, and the Chamber of Commerce. This close collaboration and resource sharing took place because the three agencies were located in the same office. Co-location was identified as a major asset over the long-term, as it has encourages ongoing collaboration, efficiently deploys scarce resources, and minimizes organizational conflict. While co-location may prove more challenging in South Delta because there are two separate town centres with separate business organizations and leadership, the Corporation of Delta should take a leading role in exploring options for these groups to more closely collaborate and share resources. The Corporation has already taken the first step in agreeing to host regularly scheduled roundtable discussions with the Tsawwassen BIA, the Ladner BA, Tourism Delta and the Chamber of Commerce. Timing: Immediate

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Both the Ladner BA and Tsawwassen BIA are already quite active in planning, promoting, and hosting local Residential events. These events include: business networking, parades (e.g. Easter Parade), markets, festivals, barbecues, car shows, banquets and others. Festivals and events are an excellent marketing tool for the town centres, Market Analysis

8.4 Festivals & Events

and serve to drive new traffic to local businesses. The BIAs should build on these successes with a wider diversity of events (particularly in low seasons) that are strategically targeted at supporting the sales of existing businesses, and providing opportunities to incubate the next generation of local businesses. (Action 8.4.1.)

BIAs should track the success of their events in multiple ways in order to make strategic decisions to improve events and/or prioritize event funding. (Action 8.4.2.) Success of a festival or event can be measured through metrics such as: • • • • • •

Pedestrian activity (% increase over baseline) Retail activity (retailer reported increases over seasonal average) Media coverage Feedback from constituent businesses and street users Spinoffs (e.g. concurrent or subsequent re-investment in spaces by local land and business owners) Auto traffic (differences in volume and speeds before and during event)

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Developing a tenant retention & improvement strategy should be a core element of the BIA work scope, and Residential will involve close collaboration between BIAs, the Chamber of Commerce, Tourism Delta and the Corporation Market Analysis of Delta.

8.5 Tenant Retention & Improvement

Proactively working on business retention is crucial for both Ladner and Tsawwassen, particularly in the next 1-3 years when impacts from the TFN malls are projected to peak. Typically, when businesses look for new locations they evaluate the success of nearby businesses as part of their decision-making. As discussed in Section 4 of this report, some categories of business will likely feel greater short-term competitive influences from the opening of the TFN developments, such as sporting goods, homewares and home improvement. The short- and long-term health of the town centres depends on maintaining the core anchor tenants, which generate customer traffic for other businesses. Therefore, executing business retention strategies, particularly targeted at retaining large anchors and unique destination businesses, should be a high short-term priority. In large shopping centres, there is typically a highly proactive in-house leasing manager or management team. They keep tabs on the health and vitality of each business in the centre and monitor the overall tenant mix through the evaluation of key metrics including vacancies and rent-to-sales ratios. In a town centre environment made up of a mix of street retail and shopping centre space, this overarching coordination and evaluation role must be taken on by another entity, in this case a BIA; effectively, the BIA becomes the town centre’s research and marketing arm. Based on our research and experience, we have found that several BIAled actions can be effective in tenant retention. The first step of the tenant retention & improvement strategy is to gain a deeper understanding of how businesses are performing, how that performance is changing, and how both business owners and landlords see their individual businesses/properties and each town centre evolving overall.

Action 8.5.1. Annual Business Surveys

 

Either as part of an annual in-person survey of business owners and property owners, or as a separately administered mail-back survey (recommended), there should be an annual check-in on local business health and vitality and how it has changed. The survey should include questions about business type (category), markets served, number and type of employees, lease rates paid, and annual revenues. This information will allow for annual measurement of business precinct health and trajectory, which is vital information in order to efficiently implement targeted interventions. The survey should also ask questions pertaining to space (do you have enough? too much?), location (are you in the right location? if not, where would you like to move to?), and lease clauses (problematic ones, or desired clauses). 143


Edmonton – Evolving Infill Action 8.5.2. Business & Property Owner Interviews Residential The BIAs, in collaboration with the Corporation of Delta and potentially the Chamber of Commerce, should Market Analysis arrange interviews with a representative sample of downtown business people, property owners, and realtors

8.5 Tenant Retention & Improvement

in Tsawwassen and Ladner. The interviews should be designed to gain an in-depth understanding of matters such as:

   

Why the business located in the town centre originally, and why they would locate there today

What are the top things that need to be done to increase the attractiveness of the town centres, and the individual precincts

What are the top concerns related to attracting people to the town centre in the day vs. the evenings What business types fit best into the town centres, and specifically in which precincts What business types would best complement and strengthen the existing business mix, and which would detract from the strength of the town centres

These interviews will supplement and build upon the work already undertaken for this report to develop an even more nuanced understanding of the experience of businesses and landlords, which will lead to refinement of each precinct’s ideal tenant mix/function, and ultimately allowing for more targeted and efficient municipal and BIA investment. Action 8.5.3. Landlord Workshop(s) The BIAs, in coordination with the Chamber of Commerce and the Corporation of Delta, should organize workshops with Tsawwassen & Ladner commercial landlords and real estate representatives. The workshops should include a multidisciplinary panel including a commercial leasing specialist, an expert in building retrofit/redevelopment, a landscape architect, and municipal officials. The goals of the workshop should be:

    

To understand landlord aspirations and challenges To gain landlord perspective on ideal tenant mixes To educate landlords and their representatives about changes to the competitive retail landscape and possible impacts on local businesses To set the stage for subsequent discussions between landlords, their representatives, and tenants around measures that could be taken to ensure both short and long-term success of businesses, as well as benefits associated with property reinvestment and redevelopment To understand what resources landlords and local businesses might need to help them overcome competitive challenges and operate successfully both in the short and long term. 144


Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Evolving Infill Action 8.5.4. Coordination between Tenants & Landlords Residential Building on the workshop(s), and with the assistance of Delta staff as required/requested, the BIAs should assist tenants in negotiating targeted rent reductions. In the near term, some businesses may be impacted by the Market Analysis

8.5 Tenant Retention & Improvement

mall openings in the form of reduced sales volumes. In order to help tenants through the near-term transition period, there will need to be a willingness on the part of landlords to engage in discussions with tenants on rent reductions.

Action 8.5.5. Business Mentorship Programs

The BIAs, with the assistance of Corporation of Delta staff responsible for coordinating the strategy, should be prepared to provide business expertise and advice (or arrange for such to be provided) to business owners with regards to how they can improve their image, merchandising, service, and sales performance. Some business owners may not have the resources required, and as such will look to the BIA to provide assistance. Some resources are available through Small Business BC. Ultimately this may require the BIAs to engage the services of a business consultant or market analyst.

Action 8.5.6. Hands on Volunteer Support

Coordinate resident volunteers to help new or struggling stores undertake retrofits that will revitalize their business, such as exterior wall panting, interior renovations, window cleaning, and signage. In addition to making physical improvements, these activities are major marketing boosts for these businesses through social media promotion and word-of-mouth associated with the volunteer support. Similar activities have been successfully used by the Danforth East Community Association in Toronto.

Action 8.5.7. Communication about Progress & Opportunities

Existing businesses need to know how the town centres and their precincts are progressing, and need to participate actively in the process of making their precincts stronger. Enthusiasm for change amongst businesses must be captured to build collective confidence and feelings of opportunity. Businesses should be kept up-to-date through regular newsletters or other communiques. Existing businesses should also be actively encouraged to relocate to precincts within the town centre where they can be the most successful and create the most synergy with nearby tenants. This will require strong relationships and cooperation between the BIAs, landlords, and businesses.

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Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Evolving Infill The BIAs, supported by the Chamber of Commerce and Tourism Delta, should play a leading role in retail Residential recruitment efforts. The recruitment strategies themselves would be developed in partnership with all Market Analysis stakeholders and Corporation of Delta staff (i.e. those related to Planning, Economic Development, or Culture)

8.6 Tenant Recruitment

through a series of workshops. As property owners and their representatives have ultimate control over tenants and leasing, building collective support and buy-in for these voluntary strategies among owners is paramount. The recommendations provided below by the consultant team offer a starting point for these conversations. These should be further refined during the workshops. After consensus on the targeted positioning of each precinct has been reached (again using the positioning strategies proposed in this report as a starting point), strategies to brand the specific precincts through external marketing and improved communication with local residents and businesses can be developed. BIAs and the Chamber of Commerce can support tenant recruitment and precinct branding by providing research and using their local expertise as follows:

Action 8.6.1. Inventory Available Supply ď&#x201A;§ A list should be kept of all existing vacant space in each precinct. Findings should be laid out in a retail listing map that shows square footages, availability, asking rent, broker contact, and any other information that could inform a retailer regarding the best use of the space (i.e. zoning restrictions, lease restrictions, parking, layout etc.). Quality of vacant space can also be ranked based on knowledge of property ownership, condition and locational adjacencies. This info should be readily available for local brokers and landlords to access.

Source: Kitsilano 4th Avenue Business Association

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Action 8.6.2. Conduct Retail Research Residential  Gathering, synthesizing and distributing retail market information is vital for supporting a retail recruitment effort. The BIAs should compile and make available market data such as: the size and age breakdown ofMarket Analysis

8.6 Tenant Recruitment

the population within the market area (residents and employees); population growth trajectories (by age group); household incomes and household expenditures; expenditures by goods/service category ($ and %); dwelling characteristics; and how the market is growing and changing. This data can be used by the BIA and local officials to refine the target tenant mix and function for each precinct (which will never remain static as the market is always changing), for helping potential businesses quickly identify whether there is a ‘fit’ for them in the town centre and in a given precinct, and for helping new businesses that need proof of market opportunity to secure financing.

 

All of this information not only helps in the tenant recruitment process, but also assists BIA staff in defining appropriate events and programming for the area. BIA staff can also use events like the Ladner Village Market as opportunities to seek out potential tenants for future inclusion in the town centre, perhaps first in a cart or kiosks, and eventually at an in-line location.

Source: Downtown Yonge BIA

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Action 8.6.3. Facilitate Leads & Match Space with Tenants Residential  BIAs should have a close working relationship with property owners, and agreements in place (formal or Market Analysis

8.6 Tenant Recruitment

informal, depending on the relationship) outlining what cooperation might be required. This could include making sure that spaces are easy to show, or that they have a representative available to answer questions. BIAs can provide introductions between prospective tenants and landlords or leasing agents

Action 8.6.4. Pedestrian & Vehicle Counts

Regular pedestrian and vehicle counts should be conducted, either electronically or in person. The data gathered will be a beneficial addition to other market research. This data will also be useful as baseline information against which to measure the impacts of marketing and event initiatives, and can also inform and help prioritize Corporation of Delta capital improvement projects that improve the streetscapes within the business precincts.

Implementation: Coordinated by BIAs, but implementation largely is dependent on property owners and management companies. BIAs and the Corporation of Delta can support the branding and marketing of various precincts. Coordination: BIAs to organize workshops to finalize the positioning focus of the precincts and oversee communication with property owners. Timing: Hold workshops in mid-2015 with goal of finalizing precinct positioning strategies by year end. Other actions should be ongoing.

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Joint initiatives should be facilitated to bring businesses and patrons to both Ladner & Tsawwassen together in Residential promotions for their mutual benefit. Regular Ladner & Tsawwassen business forums, with the Chamber of Commerce and Tourism Delta, would help to build teamwork and networking opportunities for town centre Market Analysis

8.7 Marketing & Branding

businesses, and would encourage them to work with other businesses for mutual strength. Potential actions to consider include:  Creating Buy Local and “Locally Made” campaigns (Action 8.7.1.) and implementing district-level discounts to encourage cross-shopping. The BIAs should have active social media accounts that link with other businesses, promote on business’ behalf, and provide up-to-date information on day-to-day happenings in the town centres;

Developing a comprehensive, shared Community Events calendar for Tsawwassen and Ladner and hosting it publicly; (Action 8.7.2.)

 

Launching a “Dine Around & Stay In Town” for Delta; (Action 8.7.3.)

A successful branding initiative may require the services of a professional brand consultant. Some of the initial branding themes and ideas that came out of the stakeholder events included:

Installing information displays on Ladner and Tsawwassen in the TFN developments (if feasible), and placing updated marketing material on BC Ferries with a focus on the town centres and the other attractions of South Delta. (Action 8.7.4.)

  

“Meet me in Ladner – this is your community” “Steveston’s 2nd Cousin” Re-name 56 Street to “Tsawwassen Boulevard” to let people know that this is the entrance to the community

Launching a pop-up retail initiative (with help of resident volunteers), where vacant storefronts are taken over by ‘pop-up’ temporary retailers, or for peak-season spillover of established retailers. Pop up shops have a number of benefits for marketing, as well as tenant retention and tenant recruitment: (Action 8.7.5.)

• •

Provides incubation space for small, startup businesses that are building a customer base;

Landlords get the benefit of having some nominal income from a property, and have some interior/exterior upgrades done (i.e. painting, cleaning).

Drives traffic to otherwise vacant storefront, with spillover benefit of additional customers and sales at established neighbouring businesses;

One of the best examples of a successful pop-up retail strategy is the Danforth East Community Association (profiled in the case studies). 149


Edmonton – Evolving Infill As mentioned throughout this section, one of the major ongoing rolls of the BIA is the collection, analysis and Residential dissemination of crucial data. Market Analysis

8.8 Local Area Research & Monitoring

Using the business inventory produced in this study as a starting point, local BIAs should regularly update the inventory of merchants and vacancies, the market research, and the traffic/pedestrian count data. As a parallel effort, the BIAs should also look at the tenant mix of other comparable business districts. Simple observations will help in developing insights into the kinds of retail and tenants that might be a good fit for the town centres and their component precincts. When considering other districts, pay particular attention to the kinds of services and amenities within the district that support those uses. The following questions should be kept in mind when undertaking this frequent inventory of merchants:

 

What does the current mix say about the type of retail and price points in the market?

Are the businesses in the area ‘on trend’ with the demographics and spending propensity/patterns of the area?

  

Who are the most successful retailers and what does this tell us about the typical shopper?

What does the attraction or loss of businesses since the last inventory say about the trajectory of the market and its likely position?

Would changes or improvements to the retail mix give shoppers a reason to shop in the district? Does the tenant mix match the identify of the district or its precincts?

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8.8 Local Area Research & Monitoring Toronto Downtown Yonge BIA Example

Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Torontoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Downtown Yonge BIA conducts regular monitoring of vacancy levels, retailer types, demographics, foot traffic (through automated counters), and helps advertise available space. In addition, the BIA measures the performance of festivals and events by surveying member businesses, helping them better understand related impacts. More information at: http://www.downtownyonge.com/

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South Delta Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Business Sustainability Strategy Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

9

Business Owner Actions 9.1

Research & Coordination

9.2

Business Self-Assessment

9.3

Identify Groups and Resources that can Help

9.4

Operational Adjustments

9.5

Physical Store Improvements & Merchandising

9.6

Research & Monitoring 152


Edmonton – Evolving Infill Each business needs to have a firm understanding of who their customers are, and what markets they aim to serve. Some businesses have the capacity and knowledge to conduct their own market research. In manyResidential Market Analysis cases, a strong BIA can help local businesses, both by providing them with the research they will already have

9.1 Research & Coordination

conducted as part of their retention and recruitment support and helping them undertake custom market research (or connecting them with those that can assist).

Whether undertaking their own market research or seeking the assistance of the BIA, some of the key pieces of information that all local business owners should aim to have at hand are:

    

Current customer demographics and location Trends in customer demographics and location Key competitors, their merchandise offerings, and pricing structures Emerging trends within the retail industry and within their particular segment of the industry Appropriate industry workshops, professional groups or other associations that they should be involved with

Implementation: Conducted by business owners. Coordination: Undertaken independently. Timing: Immediate and ongoing

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Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Evolving Infill Our research has shown that the top performers in their respective categories have certain things in common. Below we describe self-assessment practices that these top performers typically undertake. The outcomes ofResidential such assessments form the basis for subsequent actions for business improvement. We are not necessarily Market Analysis

9.2 Business Self-Assessment

recommending that every business perform each of these actions, but we do recommend that businesses consult this list of actions, do what they are able to, and seek out help where necessary.

Document & Review Retail Performance Metrics Daily Sales Turnover, Foot Traffic, Customer Conversion Rate (percentage of visitors that make a purchase), and Average Basket Size (amount spent per purchase). Stagnant sales, for example, are often an indicator of a pending drop in business and should trigger a reinvestment decision. Understand the Customer Base Speak with existing customers regarding their shopping needs and preferences, including place of residence, travel patterns, shopping hours, other stores they frequent, and reasons they visit. Consider which groups of potential customers are currently not visiting and investigate what their needs may be. Identify Primary Competitors Research existing and planned stores in the TFN developments that may compete with the subject businesses. Identify the strengths and weaknesses of these competitors to assess potential opportunities and merchandising gaps.

Action 9.2.1. Conduct An Internal Store Audit

1. Does the internal layout of the store allow for natural movement patterns? Typically, people entering a store in Canada will circulate in a counter-clockwise direction upon entering the store. Visitors should be able to move in a circle with limited dead ends and obscured sightlines. 2. Is your store design inconsistent? Patterns, styles, colours, and vintage (old or modern) looks should be consistent through the store. 3. Is the merchandise layout intuitive or does it create sensory overload? Organized and uncluttered displays allow customers to easily identify targeted items without feeling overwhelmed. 4. Does the store appear to be old and poorly maintained? Review both the style and physical condition of store interior to identify if updates are required to bring the space up to standard with new competitors. 154


9.2 Business Self-Assessment Action 9.2.1. Conduct An External Store Audit

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

1. Is the store “readable” by passing pedestrians and drivers? Pedestrians and drivers will only view a storefront for seconds or less. They must instantly be drawn to the store, while being able to “read” its content, merchandise offering, and positioning. Proper signage and window displays are essential to making this connection. 2. Is the street address and entrance visible and obvious? Even a delay of a few seconds in identifying the location and entrance point to a store can deter impulse customers. 3. Is the storefront and entrance welcoming and well-maintained? To overcome any psychological barriers dissuading visitors from entering, storefronts need to be bright, clean, welcoming and transparent (showing visitors that they can easily circulate and leave unhindered on entry). Store windows should be washed regularly and signage should be maintained and replaced entirely at periodic intervals. 4. Does the business storefront work well in nighttime conditions? Being open in the evening requires well-lit storefronts that illuminate both the window displays and some exterior signage. Even stores that are not open benefit from well-lit storefronts as it provides 24/7 window shopping opportunities and reduces the potential for crime. Implementation: Conducted by business owners. Coordination: Undertaken independently. Timing: Immediate (summer 2015)

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Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Evolving Infill Business owners should meet with their local BIAs to better understand ongoing and planned initiatives, as well Residential as potential mechanisms of support. For certain businesses, connections with the Delta Chamber of Market Analysis Commerce and Tourism Delta may also be beneficial.

9.3 Identify Groups and Resources that can Help

BIAs will play an important role in connecting business owners with one another, facilitating linkages, and fostering an environment of mutual learning from shared experiences. Through the Business Owner Advisory Group, engaged business owners can play a more formalized input role into the actions of the BIAs As the action plan moves through implementation, having a connection point to receive regular updates will help ensure the various groups are acting in tandem. Coordination: Business owners and community groups. Timing: Immediate (Summer 2015)

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9.4 Operational Adjustments

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Our research has indicated that many of the top performing businesses in their respective categories pay attention to a number of core items on the operations side in order to stay competitive. In the increasingly competitive South Delta business landscape, such items will be of growing importance for local businesses. These include:  High quality customer service experience, both in store and online;  Thorough understanding of who the customer base for your business is, and how that base is changing;  Ensuring that merchandise and pricing is both complementary and competitive, and in line with the incomes and demographics of the customer base;  Differentiating from large format and chain competition; and  Effectively branding and marketing .

One of the keys for business owners will be improving ‘access’ to customers. Access falls into three categories: 1. Store Hours Many businesses close at 6pm, and some are closed on Sundays and holidays. Extending hours of operation to align with the needs of dual-working adult families by staying open until 7 or 8pm and on Sundays is crucial to success. 2. Online Presence Increasingly people’s first interaction or most meaningful interaction with a given store or given brand occurs online. All businesses, regardless of size or category, should work to improve their online presence through development of interactive websites, or through social media (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram etc.). There are some examples of businesses in South Delta today with excellent online presence. This is not an exhaustive list, but rather meant to provide an example of some effective strategies:  South Delta Heels Company: Allows customers to walk into their store virtually in Google Streetview (as do a number of other businesses in Ladner).  West Coast Seeds: Does an excellent job of broadening their customer base by selling product online in addition to their retail store on Elliot Street. 3. Presence at Events: Business owners should have presence at all promotional and festival events. Implementation: Business owners Timing: Christmas Season 2015 (October to December)

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Action 9.5.1. Physical Improvements Residential Oftentimes stores get tired and dated. Those who are top performers in their categories tend to refresh their Market Analysis stores frequently (and oftentimes continuously). Responsibility for physical store improvements is shared

9.5 Physical Store Improvements & Merchandising

between business and property owners, with the balance of this responsibility depending on the terms of the lease contract.

Improvements can be made at any time, but often occur at the time of lease renewal or signing. Coordinating improvements on behalf of business owners and property owners in a strategic manner will help to use limited resources in a more effective manner. Businesses should work with their respective property owners to address the physical improvements identified in the self-assessment phase. These improvements may include new signage, awnings, internal lighting, and fixtures. In addition, “soft” improvements such as planters, window displays, store layout reconfiguration, and merchandise displays can be implemented independently by business owners. Implementation: Business owners, and potentially with involvement from property owners. Timing: Summer 2015 and onward

Action 9.5.2. Merchandising Improvements

Each retailer, particularly those in categories likely to feel the most impact from the TFN malls, will need to review pricing and inventory in relation to the emerging competition. Some may find that they are not be price competitive, or that they do not have the variety and selection required. Businesses may have to reevaluate their suppliers, or re-merchandise to position themselves to be complementary to the new malls.

The rapidly changing market represents both increased competitiveness, but also an opportunity to introduce some new customers to the business.  Be clear on who your existing customer is (as noted in Section 9.1 above)

  

Understand who the NEW customer potentially is, and where they are coming from Reach out to potential new customers through targeted advertising and promotion (social media etc.) Seek out advise from knowledgeable industry sources, such as suppliers. These can be valuable sources of information on changes in the marketplace, and can provide advise on positioning and pricing.

Implementation: Business owners with advise from BIAs Timing: Summer 2015 and onward 158


9.6 Research & Monitoring Staying competitive in a rapidly changing landscape requires ongoing research and business monitoring.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

 Businesses should monitor their sales performance frequently in order to initiate changes in real time as needed. Drop-offs in sales overall, or in a certain merchandise category, may indicate a need to reevaluate that merchandise line, pricing, and/or suppliers.

 Businesses should also keep up to date on emerging product lines and the offerings of their key competitors.  Businesses should continuously familiarize themselves with new stores coming into the market, both in order to understand how they might impact them in order to proactively adjust, but also to know their business neighbourhoods for the purposes of cross-promotion and joint marketing opportunities.  Maintain an open line of communication with the BIA. Review their market research and updates, planned festivals and events, and seek out their expertise as needed.

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South Delta Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Business Sustainability Strategy Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

10

Property Owner & Representative Actions

10.1 Assess & Improve Property Marketability 10.2 Coordinated Recruitment & Leasing Efforts 10.3 Monitoring Impacts & Coordinating with BIAs 160


Edmonton – Evolving Infill Having a firm understanding of the marketability of a commercial property is an important prerequisite for both retaining existing tenants and positioning for recruitment of new tenants in desired categories. PropertyResidential Market Analysis marketability assessments should be conducted by landlords regardless of whether there are existing

10.1 Assess & Improve Property Marketability

vacancies in the property. An assessment should examine the physical characteristics of the building, and whether or not lease terms and conditions are creating incentives or disincentives to attracting and retaining targeted tenant types. Every property owner has different investment objectives. Some are looking for stable long-term investments and desire high-quality tenants that are likely to stay for a long period. Others are buying holding properties, with an intent to flip or redevelop. Other still may hold a property as part of a larger property portfolio, and make their site-specific decisions in relation to a broader portfolio strategy. All this is to say that there will always be conflicting objectives, and it is unlikely that every property owner in a district or precinct will buy in to the vision and strategy.

Action 10.1.1. Physical Building Review

 Each property (and storefront if multiple) should be compared against new and emerging standards and trends in the marketplace, as well as the condition of nearby properties. Consider: exterior walls; paint; windows; signage; efficiency.  There should be a clear understanding of the link between a property’s configuration, condition, design and features, and the types of tenant that can be attracted and retained. Outdated or poorly maintained properties are less likely to attract stable, long-term, high-quality tenants.  Seek opportunities for basic building upkeep/upgrades to be conducted in creative ways. For instance, if a storefront is vacant, there may be an opportunity for that space to be used temporarily as a pop-up shop; community volunteers and/or shop proprietors may be able to cover holding costs while also doing façade and interior upgrades.  Encourage and assist tenants to modernize dated store concepts, storefronts, and signage. Often this can be done at the time of lease renewal. Landlords may propose upgrades to store exterior as part of an inducement strategy. Ideally, major storefront upgrades will be done concurrent with major capital investments from the Corporation in the public realm.

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Action 10.1.2 Market Trend & Tenant Category Review Residential  Landlords should review market research data prepared by the BIAs and other organizations to understand existing and emerging local market trends and their relevance for existing and future tenants.Market Analysis

10.1 Assess & Improve Property Marketability

This will allow for an evaluation of the congruency between existing space and tenant needs.  Evaluate current tenants: Are they paying market rents? Is the tenant type in the unit the highest and best use? Is the tenant mix in line with identified target mix and strategy for the town centre and its particular retail precinct?  Assess the health of the current tenant, either through evaluation of rent-to-sales ratio (if the tenant is paying percentage rent), and/or through tenant interviews. Action 10.1.3 Lease Terms and Conditions Review  Lease terms and conditions can be major incentives or disincentives for attracting and retaining desired tenants. Here we discuss some typical lease clauses that act as either incentives or disincentives: 1. Demolitions Clause: • Having a demolition clause in a lease can be a deterrent to attracting or retaining a quality tenant. Oftentimes if there is a demolition clause in a lease, this is because there is interest in holding the property with an eye to redevelopment. Under such circumstances, the investment goals of the landlord do not incentivize property upkeep or tenant retention. Without term certainty in the lease, it is unlikely that a quality long-term tenant will be retained or attracted.

2. Option to Renew • Some landlords do not provide tenants with the option to renew in their lease. This creates uncertainty for tenants; if a tenant builds a local-serving business with loyal customer base over a 5-year period, they will want the option to remain In their location. 3. Restrictive Use Clauses • In a rapidly changing retail landscape like South Delta, tenants will want a lease that either provides lots of flexibility to change and expand their business models, or assurances that a landlord is willing to be flexible in modifying the use clauses to allow businesses to change with the market.

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10.1 Assess & Improve Property Marketability

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

4. Rent Structures (basic + additional) • Competitive rents are one of the most important aspects of assuring the Ladner & Tsawwassen business precincts thrive in the near term. In light of the new competition, there will need to be much greater landlord awareness of not only how their rents compare to the mall properties, but how their rents compare to other properties within the town centre, and within each precinct.

• There also needs to be a recognition on the part of landlords that rents vary by business category and use. For example, a fast food outlet is able to pay significant more rent than a green grocer as a function of typical sales-per-square-foot. • Landlords should be open to negotiating short-term rent reductions, or providing inducements such as building improvements, to help businesses maintain and improve their viability following opening of the TFN malls.

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill Having evaluated the marketability of the property, given consideration to competitiveness from a leasing Residential standpoint, the next step is determining the tenant types and specific tenants that can and should be Market Analysis targeted. This ties back to the BIA actions around identifying precinct-specific retail categories (i.e. vision and

10.2 Coordinated Recruitment & Leasing Efforts

target mix for each precinct), and creating a continuously updated roster of potential businesses.

While it will be a BIA-led effort to complete the detailed marketplace and precinct assessments and to identify the groups and categories of retail that should be targeted, having landlord buy-in to the precinct vision and targeted leasing efforts is crucial. Action 10.2.1. Work with BIAs on a Pop-Up Shop Initiative  A pop-up shop retail initiative is a recommended BIA-led action, with the support of resident volunteers. Such an initiative will require the buy-in of local landlords.  Pop-up initiatives can be very beneficial for landlords with vacant space for a number of reasons: • It provides an opportunity to have basic maintenance performed on the property (painting & cleaning); • It allows the landlord to cover property holding costs; • It promotes the vacant space in the marketplace, increasing the likelihood of securing a long-term tenant. Sometimes that full-time committed tenant is a converted pop-up shop. • It increases the foot traffic and sales on the street, to the benefit of the pop-up shop and neighbouring stores. Long-term sales growth is associated with higher rent potential.

 As part of creating a viable and sustainable pop-up shop system, particularly one that supports new businesses looking to establish themselves in the market through eventual long-term tenancies, landlords should consider offering roll-over pop-up opportunities until their space is rented on a full-time basis. If many properties are participating in the initiative, this will give pop-ups the opportunity to stay in a single space or move to a number of spaces within the area for several months until space is rented. This will increase incentives among pop up shops to promote their shop. Action 10.2.2. Attend Property Owner Advisory Group Meetings  Share information on successful initiatives with applicability to other property owners  Provide references for area tenants and contractors  Coordinate investment and improvements  Advocate collectively with the BIAs and Corporation of Delta

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Edmonton – Evolving Infill The property owners are ultimately the key to the success of the overall strategy. Without property owner buyResidential in to the vision for the town centre and its precincts, and without close coordination with the BIAs, the tenants, and other stakeholders, it will be impossible to have a successful retail retention and attraction program. Market Analysis

10.3 Monitoring Impacts & Coordinating with BIAs

Therefore it is important that property owners be engaged and enrolled in the vision and efforts to improve the business district from the outset.  Landlords should ensure that they are provided with updated suggested/preferred tenancy lists for their vacant spaces, or approach the research entity (likely the BIA) when a vacant space comes up to understand what the preferred tenant type is and whether there are any specific tenant prospects that might be appropriate for the space.  Landlords should also have a real-time understanding of the trajectory of businesses in their properties. They should be tracking performance metrics and sharing that data with the BIAs, including:  Net rents  Sales performance of tenants  Vacancies  Turnover rates.

 Talk regularly with tenants about operational challenges, business strengths, and emerging market dynamics.

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South Delta Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Business Sustainability Strategy Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

11

Corporation of Delta Actions

11.1 Coordination & Oversight 11.2 Revisit Planning & Other Municipal Policy

11.3 Strategic Investments 11.4 Monitoring Plan Implementation & Progress 166


Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Evolving Infill In order to take the many positive ideas and strategies generated through research and stakeholder consultation and methodically implement them, a coordinated oversight role will be required. The entity Residential Market Analysis responsible for this oversight will help to ensure that the ideas and strategies needed to create both short and

11.1 Coordination & Oversight

long-term business precinct success in the Tsawwassen and Ladner town centre are pursued and implemented in a timely and coordinated fashion. Based on consultations with Corporation Staff, our understanding of Corporation resources, and the existing role allocations amongst Corporate staff and politicians as they relate to economic development activities, it is recommended that the South Delta Sustainability Strategy oversight and coordination role fall primarily to the Invest in Delta Mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Standing Committee. In undertaking this role, the Committee may elect to hold special meetings, and may also elect to explore other economic development opportunities and roles. As part of the coordination and oversight effort, the Corporation of Delta should (and as we understand, has at the time of writing already committed to) host regular meetings between Corporation staff and representatives of the Tsawwassen BIA, the Chamber of Commerce, Tourism Delta, and the Ladner Business Association. These meetings will be very important for ensuring that all groups are operating in a coordinated, mutually beneficial way. The Corporation, in partnership with all stakeholder groups, should look for outreach and partnership opportunities with the TFN malls to cross-promote Tsawwassen and Ladner as destinations. Look for opportunities to build on the TFN mall marketing campaigns to advertise the uniqueness that is the South Delta community, and its town centres.

167


Edmonton – Evolving Infill One of the most critical elements for both the short and long term vitality of the Tsawwassen and Ladner Residential commercial precincts will be increasing the number of people living in and near the town centres, and the number of visitors staying in and near the town centres. Residents who live in the town core (or within a Market Analysis

11.2 Revisit Planning & Other Municipal Policy 

reasonable walking distance) are much more likely to patronize local business, as they can access the core easily by foot or bike.

 Visitors tend to go wherever residents go. If the primary shopping and recreational destination of residents is not the town centre, then the town centre is equally unlikely to be the primary destination for tourists. An excellent example of a walkable town centre precinct that is a destination for locals and visitors alike is the Town of Canmore, Alberta. Canmore possesses a walkable, authentic, independent and small-scale commercial core that today remains the primary shopping destination for local residents. That core is also one of the main attractors for visitors, who gravitate towards Canmore’s unique and authentic mix of local independent businesses.

168


11.2 Revisit Planning & Other Municipal Policy Action 11.2.1. Encourage Population Growth in Town Centres The goal for both Ladner and Tsawwassen town centres should be to become thriving, mixed-use environments with activity into the evening hours. The latter requires strong adjacent population base to support after-work shopping and recreating. The current Area Plan policies around density, height and maximum unit restrictions are likely insufficient to trigger economically viable redevelopment, or create the critical mass necessary to sustain and grow the business districts.

For instance, in much of Ladner Village, new building heights are restricted to under 3 storeys. Due to the current income streams generated by existing properties, and the economic losses that result from demolition and replacement of space, 3 storeys is unlikely to provide sufficient economic incentive to trigger redevelopment.

In the Tsawwassen town centre, current policy around development height may not necessarily restrict redevelopment; MU(T)1 permits up to 6 storeys & MU(T)2 permits up to 4 storeys. However, the 1,000 multi-family unit restriction within the boundaries of the MU(T)1 area (Policy B.2) presents a barrier to creating a more vibrant mixed-use retail core, as it limits the number of potential local business patrons. We would also argue that allowing for some high-rise development in the Tsawwassen town centre can have multiple benefits, both increasing the number of residents in and around the town core, and providing visible landmarks for passing motorists on Highway 17, indicating that there is “something worth seeing” if they head south on 56th. Tall buildings can be a very effective wayfinding tool.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

The Corporation of Delta should consider strategies to achieve higher population thresholds within the core areas of Ladner and Tsawwassen. It should also examine the extent to which current policies may hamper appropriate development and redevelopment within the town centres.

169


11.2 Revisit Planning & Other Municipal Policy Action 11.2.2. Recognize Town Centre Precincts within Revised Area Plans

In Section 3 of this report, the town centres for both Ladner & Tsawwassen were subdivided into component precincts, with each precinct evaluated in terms of its current tenant mix, character, and position. Recommendations were made for future tenant mix and positioning.

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Recognition of distinct precincts in the Tsawwassen and Ladner town centres, each with its own character, mix, and target future mix/specialization, by the Corporation will help to solidify the trajectory of each and create certainty for landlords, businesses (existing and prospective) and developers. Certainty of direction and vision is crucial for creating an attractive investment environment. The precincts proposed and evaluated in this report should be a starting point; they may be discussed, evaluated and refined through collaborative efforts between the Corporation and stakeholders.

Action 11.2.3. Plan for Strategic Site Redevelopment

The evaluation of existing conditions in Section 3 also discussed the sites that are most suitable for redevelopment. In some cases, redevelopment has already been proposed and is moving through the planning process (i.e. Tsawwassen Town Centre Mall). In other cases, no known redevelopment initiatives are underway. If the Corporation wishes to accelerate the timeframe for redevelopment of some of the potential strategic sites identified in Section 3, it may consider a number of initiatives including:  Engaging in joint, streamlined site planning and approval process  Offering development incentives in the form of tax abatements, DCC waivers and other inducements.

Action 11.2.4. Develop Town Centre Design Guidelines

 Design guidelines for both Ladner and Tsawwassen town centres should be developed by the Corporation. Design Guidelines are intended to assist developers and others to understand basic design ideas and aspirations for each town centre, and to provide council with a tool against which new projects can be measured. It also provides developers with a clear idea of what is expected, ultimately reducing wasted time and energy on the part of both Corporation staff and the developer.

170


Edmonton – Evolving Infill Design guidelines should not be developed with the intent for them to be a rigid blueprint for design Residential approval; rather, they should be developed to outline the design elements and features that are important Market Analysis to the communities. Design guidelines should include discussion of the following elements:

11.2 Revisit Planning & Other Municipal Policy 

        

Building siting, grading, servicing Access, parking and loading Building interaction with public realm (i.e. solar access, use of sidewalks, patios etc.) Pedestrian area treatments (including paving materials, awnings and street furniture) Landscaping standards & elements Lighting, signage Building character and scale Pedestrian level design vs. upper floor design vs. roof design Building material selections & colour pallet.

 Guidelines should require that all retail premises be located along the street front. Internal malls or retail areas that are set back from the street should be discouraged. It has been well demonstrated in the retail industry that unanchored internal malls, storefronts set back from the street, storefronts with access either above or below grade, and second floor retail, are seldom successful.  It will ultimately fall to staff and council to determine what Corporation objectives the design guidelines should be developed to meet. These are likely to differ between Ladner and Tsawwassen.

Action 11.2.5. Ladner Waterfront Plan Bylaw Revisions

 Stakeholders are eager to see waterfront redevelopment occur in Ladner, with that waterfront becoming a hub for destination restaurants, pubs, cafes and niche comparison retail activity.  One of the major impediments to waterfront redevelopment is restricted development heights that are insufficient to allow for financially viable development. That, combined with relatively shallow lots on the water side of Chisholm street, creates serious challenges for waterfront revitalization.  The Corporation should revisit the Waterfront Plan bylaws, particularly with regards to development densities and alternate development concepts. This could include a public boardwalk/greenway along the river side of Chisholm, lot re-delineation, street narrowing, and other concepts. The goal should be a vibrant pedestrian-oriented waterfront focusing on leisure, food & beverage and unique retail, with strong linkages to both the waterfront and the Village core.

171


Edmonton – Evolving Infill Action 11.2.6. Incent Publicly Accessible Washrooms Residential  Throughout the stakeholder engagement process, the issue of public washrooms was noted multiple times. There are, it is felt, insufficient options for the public to access washrooms in Ladner and Tsawwassen townMarket Analysis

11.2 Revisit Planning & Other Municipal Policy

centres.

 During subsequent discussions on this issue with Delta staff, one idea that was raised was to offer a development amenity package that incentivizes those who are undertaking development and redevelopment within the town centres to construct publicly accessible washrooms within their buildings. This is an avenue that we would encourage exploring further. Additionally, the Corporation (in partnership with the BIAs) may wish to approach local businesses about their willingness to provide more public access to washrooms.  Delta is also exploring the idea of purchasing one or more portable restroom trailers for use at various events throughout South Delta.

Action 11.2.7. Explore Street Vending Bylaw

 Street vending opportunities, particularly in the food & beverage category, have been shown to dramatically improve the public appeal of commercial districts in many towns and cities. The City of Vancouver for instance has been expanding its food permits since 2010 to include a much more diverse array of vendors. There are now over 130 food trucks, carts, and vendors selling a wide variety of food throughout Vancouver.  Street vending bylaws should be crafted in close consultation with local BIAs. While oftentimes BIAs welcome the expansion of street vending due to its ability to draw more foot traffic into an area, there are also typically complaints from some local businesses who worry that open-air competitors will cut their profits. Such competitiveness concerns may be partially offset through proper pricing of business licenses, however pricing such licenses too high could hamper the ability of startup businesses to operate. A balance will be required.  In addition to the benefit that street vending can bring for the look, feel and vibrancy of a town centre, street vending locations can be important incubators for future permanent local businesses.

172


Edmonton – Evolving Infill Action 11.3.1. Wayfinding Residential Wayfinding signage contributes significantly to enjoyable and attractive shopping precincts by minimizing Market Analysis frustration and promoting hassle-free access to and throughout the area. Well-positioned wayfinding signage

11.3 Strategic Investments

and maps can help increase awareness of significant retail and non-retail anchors (i.e. cafes, parks, museums, waterfront walkways etc.). It also helps customers quickly develop an overall mental map of the precinct. From an auto circulation standpoint, wayfinding along major roads and at key intersections is crucial for quickly directing customers toward and through the town centres. In order to be successful, wayfinding needs to consider the dynamic processes of navigation and movement from the point of view of the pedestrian, the bike rider, and the driver: • Where are the arrival and orientation points in the town centre? • What are the key destinations people have in mind, and what might be overlooked? • What can be done to encourage people to make more ‘linked’ or ‘chained’ trips within the town centre (moving naturally from destination to destination)? Investments in wayfinding can take many forms, including:  Embedded into the environment, possibly in the form of public art or wall artwork. • For example, in Chemainus, BC, there are painted ‘yellow footprints’ throughout the town centre, used to guide visitors throughout. This is one part of a multi-layered wayfinding effort that also includes signs and maps.  Incorporate and utilize existing landmarks. Buildings themselves, or parts of them, can act as signs and landmarks, or have signs incorporated into them.  Stand-alone signs and maps, and/or decorative paving materials. We understand that at the time of writing, the Corporation is already in the process of committing additional resources to a variety of wayfinding initiatives in both Ladner and Tsawwassen. This will include: • New wayfinding signage within the town centres and precincts to help with pedestrian and vehicle circulation within the town centres. • New entrance feature for Tsawwassen. • Improved wayfinding signage along major roads, highways and entrances to the communities.

• The Corporation should look for funding partnership opportunities for local wayfinding with BIAs.

173


Edmonton – Evolving Infill Action 11.3.2. Other Public Realm Investments Residential  Ensuring that the retail environments are safe, clean, accessible, and attractive should be a joint effort of Market Analysis the BIAs and the Corporation of Delta. The Corporation has put and is continuing to put significant

11.3 Strategic Investments

resources into public realm improvements in both Tsawwassen and Ladner. Some of the recent and ongoing projects include:      

Neighbourood road improvements Improved traffic management and crosswalks Intersection improvements (turning lanes, pavement, street lighting signal upgrades) Bus bay pullouts Landscaping and rain gardens Annual beautification (flower baskets)

 Significant additional resources have been committed to public realm improvements, including paving, foliage, furniture and wayfinding.  To ensure maximum return on future public realm investments, it will be critical that the Corporation engage in a collaborative, long-term planning approach with property owners, BIA representatives, and other stakeholders. Capital works projects must be leveraged to improve operations and aesthetics of the areas simultaneously. Going forward, public realm investment actions should be prioritized based in part on the overlap between BIA proposals and anticipated Corporate works.  For instance, desired changes to a sidewalk, or removal or addition of planters or trees, should be coordinated to occur at the same time as a scheduled engineering project like road resurfacing, power pole replacement, or underground utility work.

174


Edmonton – Evolving Infill Action 11.3.3. Development Inducements Residential  Development inducements can consist of cash outlay incentives (e.g. grants, inducements), payment waiver/reduction incentives (e.g. DCC waiver, property tax waiver), development process incentive (e.g.Market Analysis

11.3 Strategic Investments

quicker approvals, waived requirements), or development certainty incentives (e.g. joint planning process, pre-zoning).

 Currently the density restrictions in Ladner and Tsawwassen are disincentives to redevelopment. Short & Medium Term (<3 years) • Utilize targeted property tax freezes and development fee waivers; • Consider allowing for reduced parking standards, or shared parking opportunities;  Examine ways to streamline approvals processes for desirable development and redevelopment, including entering into joint planning and approvals initiatives with landowners of strategic redevelopment sites;

 Examine opportunities to enter into joint ventures with developers, particularly in places where the Corporation has strategically located lands (e.g. Ladner waterfront) that could potentially be ‘vended in’ to a development project or exchanged as part of a development inducement and public amenity project. Long Term (>3 years)  Continue to explore options to resolve the Ladner harbour water lot lease issues, and consider other areas where targeted Corporate investments may incent private sector interest.  Explore economics and interest for waterfront-related investments such as boardwalks and public wharfs.

175


11.4 Monitoring Plan Implementation & Progress Monitor Parking Situation

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

As is the case in many town centres, both Ladner and Tsawwassen have a perceived parking shortage. However, recent parking audits have indicated that there is no real shortage of parking in either community, even during peak usage times. Furthermore, there are already many measures in place (or soon to be in place), designed to improve parking availability, including posted time limits and enforcement as well as redelineation of street parking spots to allow for more cars to fit along the curb. With all of this said, there are a few initiatives that the Corporation may consider to impro1ve the perception of parking availability: • Continue to regularly enforce parking time limits, particularly during peak periods, to help increase the turnover of prime spaces; • As part of the wayfinding initiative, place prominent signage to help direct traffic to nearby parking areas where there is likely to be availability. • If there are vacant or underutilized lots, property owners should be encouraged to provide parking as a temporary use. • Undertake regular parking surveys to determine usage at peak times, and assess requirements for additional spaces. • Consider alternate parking and circulation strategies for major events (e.g. Ladner Village Market). One such strategy could involve using one or more parking areas (possibly temporary) at the edge of the Village, with circulation into the Village core provided by shuttle bus. This could also improve the patronage at such events, as some people are undoubtedly deterred from coming due to perceived parking hassles.

176


South Delta Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Business Sustainability Strategy Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Appendix A

177


SUMMARY ACTIONS TABLE Immediate /Short Term = <1 year Actions

Medium Term = 1-3 years

Long Term = 3+ years

Responsibility

Timing

Applicable Area

Formalize Ladner BIA

Ladner BA

Immediate / Short Term

Ladner

5,6,7

Review BIA Admin capacity

TBIA / LBA

Immediate (Tsawwassen)

Ladner & Tsawwassen

7

Form business owner & property owner advisory groups

TBIA / LBA / Chamber

Immediate / Short Term

Ladner & Tsawwassen

6

Proactively Engage with Corporation of Delta (attending council meetings, presenting emerging local issues)

TBIA / LBA / Tourism / Chamber

Immediate & Ongoing

Ladner & Tsawwassen

7

Form Resident Membership Program

TBIA / LBA / Corporation

Short Term

Ladner & Tsawwassen

6,7

Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Associated “Principles of Strong Town Centre”

Community Group Actions

178


Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

SUMMARY ACTIONS TABLE

Actions

Responsibility

Timing

Applicable Area

Associated “Principles of Strong Town Centre”

Examine Opportunities for Resource Sharing

TBIA / LBA / Chamber / Tourism

Immediate

Ladner & Tsawwassen

7

Wider array of festivals & events, focusing on low seasons

TBIA / LBA

Immediate & Ongoing

Ladner & Tsawwassen

3,6

Track success of festivals & events using proposed metrics

TBIA / LBA

Immediate & Ongoing

Ladner & Tsawwassen

5

Conduct annual business surveys to check health, vitality & track categories, leases, revenues, space needs.

TBIA / LBA

Short Term (begin Feb. 2016)

Ladner & Tsawwassen

5,6

Conduct business & property owner interviews

TBIA / LBA / Chamber

Short Term

Ladner & Tsawwassen

6,7

Community Group Actions

179


Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

SUMMARY ACTIONS TABLE

Actions

Responsibility

Timing

Applicable Area

Associated “Principles of Strong Town Centre”

Conduct landlord workshops

TBIA /LBA / Chamber

Short Term

Ladner & Tsawwassen

5,6,7

Assist tenants to negotiate rent & other inducements with landlords

TBIA /LBA

Immediate /Short Term

Ladner & Tsawwassen

5,6,7

Create business mentorship programs

TBIA / LBA / Corporation

Short Term

Ladner & Tsawwassen

5,6,7

Coordinate volunteer support for business improvement

TBIA /LBA

Immediate

Ladner & Tsawwassen

5,6,7

Communicate progress & opportunities to businesses

TBIA /LBA

ongoing

Ladner & Tsawwassen

7

Community Group Actions

180


Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

SUMMARY ACTIONS TABLE

Responsibility

Timing

Applicable Area

Associated “Principles of Strong Town Centre”

Inventory available retail space

TBIA / LBA

Annually

Ladner & Tsawwassen

6

Conduct retail market research

TBIA /LBA

Bi-annually

Ladner & Tsawwassen

5

Facilitate leads & match space with tenants

TBIA / LBA

Ongoing

Ladner & Tsawwassen

6,7

Pedestrian & Vehicle counts

TBIA /LBA

Bi-annually

Ladner & Tsawwassen

5

Create buy local & locally made campaigns

TBIA / LBA / Corporation / Tourism

Immediate

Ladner & Tsawwassen

6,7

Develop shared community events calendar

TBIA /LBA / Corporation

Immediate

Ladner & Tsawwassen

7

Actions

Community Group Actions

181


Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

SUMMARY ACTIONS TABLE

Actions

Responsibility

Timing

Applicable Area

Associated “Principles of Strong Town Centre”

Launch “dine around & stay in town” initiative

TBIA / LBA

Immediate

Ladner & Tsawwassen

5,6,7

Install in formation displays / marketing materials in TFN developments & on BC Ferries

TBIA / LBA / Corporation

Begin research now, with implementation late 2015/early 2016.

Ladner & Tsawwassen

5,7

Consult with branding specialists to determine branding themes for Ladner & Tsawwassen

TBIA /LBA / Chamber

Immediate

Ladner & Tsawwassen

5,7

Launch pop-up retail initiative

TBIA / LBA / Landlords

Begin research now, with implementation in 2016.

Ladner & Tsawwassen

5,6,7

Ongoing analysis and dissemination of market data, & tracking of conditions (vacancies, mix etc.)

TBIA / LBA

ongoing

Ladner & Tsawwassen

5,7

Community Group Actions

182


Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

SUMMARY ACTIONS TABLE

Actions

Responsibility

Timing

Applicable Area

Associated “Principles of Strong Town Centre”

Undertake market research (who is customer, how changing, key competitors, merchandising, pricing, emerging trends, learning opportunities)

Business owners

Immediate & ongoing

Ladner & Tsawwassen

5

Conduct internal store audit

Business owners

Immediate

Ladner & Tsawwassen

6

Conduct external store audit

Business owners / Landlords

Immediate

Ladner & Tsawwassen

2,6

Identify resources for assistance

Business Owners / BIAs

Ongoing & as needed

Ladner & Tsawwassen

6,7

Extend store hours (evening, weekend)

Business Owners

Short Term

Ladner & Tsawwassen

6

Establish online presence (website, social media)

Business Owners

Immediate

Ladner & Tsawwassen

6

Business Owner Actions

183


Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

SUMMARY ACTIONS TABLE

Responsibility

Timing

Applicable Area

Associated “Principles of Strong Town Centre”

Be present at major events & festivals

Business Owners

Ongoing

Ladner & Tsawwassen

6

Physical store improvements (inside, outside)

Business owners & landlords

Immediate and Ongoing

Ladner & Tsawwassen

2,6

Merchandising improvements

Business owners

Short Term

Ladner & Tsawwassen

6

Monitor sales performance

Business owners

Ongoing

Ladner & Tsawwassen

5,6

Keep current on emerging product lines, competition, and opportunities for cross-promotion and joint marketing

Business Owners

Immediate and Ongoing

Ladner & Tsawwassen

5,6

Communicate and review research & other info from BIAs

Business Owners

Immediate and ongoing

Ladner & Tsawwassen

5,6,7

Actions

Business Owner Actions

184


Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

SUMMARY ACTIONS TABLE

Actions

Responsibility

Timing

Applicable Area

Associated “Principles of Strong Town Centre”

Property Owner & Representative Actions

Physical building review

Property Owner

Immediate

Ladner & Tsawwassen

1,2

Market trend & tenant category review

Property Owner / BIAs

Ongoing

Ladner & Tsawwassen

5,6

Lease Terms and conditions review

Property Owner

Immediate

Ladner & Tsawwassen

5,6

Work with BIAs on pop-up shop initiative

Property Owner / BIA / Corporation

Short Term

Ladner & Tsawwassen

5,6,7

Attend property owner advisory group meetings

Property Owner

Ongoing

Ladner & Tsawwassen

7

Network with other area landowners

Property Owner

Ongoing

Ladner & Tsawwassen

7

Monitor trajectory of businesses

Property Owner / Business Owner

Quarterly

Ladner & Tsawwassen

5

185


Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

SUMMARY ACTIONS TABLE

Responsibility

Timing

Applicable Area

Associated “Principles of Strong Town Centre”

Create coordination & oversight role for the Strategy through Invest in Delta Mayor’s Standing Committee

Corporation

Immediate

Ladner & Tsawwassen

7

Encourage population growth in town centres (i.e. more density, height, units)

Corporation

Medium Term

Ladner & Tsawwassen

5

Recognize town centre precincts within revised Area Plans

Corporation

Medium Term

Ladner & Tsawwassen

5,6

Plan for Strategic Site Redevelopment

Corporation / Landlords

Short Term

Ladner & Tsawwassen

1,2,3,4,7

Develop Town Centre Design Guidelines

Corporation /Landlords

Medium Term

Ladner & Tsawwassen

1,2,3,4,7

Explore Ladner Waterfront Plan Bylaw Revisions

Corporation

Immediate

Ladner

1,2,3,4,7

Incent publicly accessible washrooms

Corporation

Short Term

Ladner & Tsawwassen

3

Actions

Corporation of Delta Actions

186


Edmonton – Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

SUMMARY ACTIONS TABLE

Responsibility

Timing

Applicable Area

Associated “Principles of Strong Town Centre”

Invest in washroom trailers

Corporation

Short Term

Ladner & Tsawwassen

3

Explore street vending bylaw

Corporation

Short Term

Ladner & Tsawwassen

3,6

Invest in wayfinding

Corporation

Immediate

Ladner & Tsawwassen

3

Strategically Invest in public realm improvements, coordinating with business district priorities.

Corporation

Short Term and Long Term

Ladner & Tsawwassen

3

Incent development through variety of targeted measures including property tax freezes, fee waivers, reduced parking, streamlined approvals, joint planning, joint ventures.

Corporation

Short, Medium and Long Term

Ladner & Tsawwassen

1,2,3,7

Continue to explore water lot lease issue.

Corporation

Medium & Long Term

Ladner

3,7

Explore options for other public realm investments (e.g. public wharfs, boardwalks)

Corporation

Medium & Long Term

Ladner & Tsawwassen

3

Actions

Corporation of Delta Actions

187


South Delta Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Business Sustainability Strategy Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Appendix B

188


Category Definitions & Component Store Types ď&#x201A;§

@@@

Store Category

Store Types

Edmonton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Evolving Infill Residential Market Analysis

Supermarkets Convenience & Specialty Food Stores

Convenience, meat, fish and seafood, fruit and vegetable, bakery, candy , herbs & spices, milk, cheese, dairy products, coffee and tea, health food (not supplements), deli, bulk food, other specialty food.

Beer, Wine & Liquor Stores Pharmacies & Personal Care Stores Department Stores General Merchandise Stores Clothing, Shoes, Accessories, Jewellery

Home Centres, Hardware, Garden Stores

Home Electronics & Appliances Furniture Stores

Pharmacy / Drug Store, cosmetics, beauty supplies, perfume, opticians, health supplements (not food), medical aids and equipment. Traditional department stores, discount department stores Warehouse membership clubs. Home and auto supply (eg. Canadian Tire), Auto parts & accessories, tires. Dollar store, variety store, general store. clothing, athletic clothing, fur, leather apparel, bridal, lingerie, maternity, outerwear, swimwear, uniforms/work clothing, other clothing, shoes, athletic shoes, costume jewellery, clothing accessories (bags, hats, scarves, ties, gloves, umbrellas), jewellery, luggage, leather goods. Home improvement centre, hardware store, paint and wallpaper, kitchen cabinets, doors and windows, electrical supply, plumbing supply, lumber, other building materials (e.g. tile, fencing, glass, roofing), outdoor power equipment, nursery, garden centre. Computers, household appliances, consumer electronics, phones, personal care appliances. Vacuum Household furniture, office furniture, outdoor furniture, mattresses

Home Furnishings

Floor coverings (carpet, tile, wood etc.), window treatments (drapes etc.), print and picture frame, bedding, linen, bath, china/glassware/cutlery/kitchenware, housewares, mirrors, pottery, lamps/lighting, fireplace accessories.

Sporting Goods, Hobbies, Music, Books

Bikes, fitness equipment, bait and tackle/firearms, other sporting goods, hobby, toy, game (including arts & crafts, console games), sewing, needlework, yarn, fabric, musical instruments and supplies, books and news, music.

Miscellaneous Store Retailers

Florists, office supply and stationary, gifts, novelty and souvenir, greeting cards, used clothing, used furniture and appliances, used books, pet and pet supply, art dealer, beer & wine making, art supply, auctioneering, hot tubs, coins & stamps, collectibles, party supply, tobacco,.

189

189

South Delta Business Sustainability Strategy  

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