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CORNELL UNIVERSITY LAW LIBRARY A YEAR IN REVIEW 2018-2019


CORNELL UNIVERSITY LAW LIBRARY A YEAR IN REVIEW 2018-2019 Message from the Director

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Cornell Law Library Welcomes Kim Nayyer

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Legal Research Clinic Leads Workshop in South Africa for

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GOALI PLatform League of Nations — Making History Visible

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Celebrating Tom Bruce, Research Associate and Director,

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Legal Information Institute Farewell to Femi Cadmus

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Reading Room Exhibits

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Reunion Exhibits

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“Be a Voice for Change” — Justice Sotomayor’s Inspiring

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Visit to Cornell Cantwell Research Prize

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Honoring Jack G. Clarke

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By the Numbers

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Professional Highlights

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Acknowledgements

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MESSAGE FROM THE DIRECTOR I’m delighted to contribute my first Director’s Message, and I’m thrilled to be leading a remarkable team in an extraordinary institution. I came to Cornell this spring, following the departure of my respected predecessor and colleague, Femi Cadmus, whose farewell you’ll read about in this Report. You’ll also see that I had the fortuitous opportunity to peek into this institution about a year before I joined it. I came to Cornell Law Library as part of a visitor and speaker series, to exchange thoughts on the administration of a law library organizationally similar to the one I led at the time, and to learn more about this exemplar law school library. As I write, I‘m reflecting upon what I’ve experienced in my time here to date. Sadly, we lost a pillar of our alumni community and a key contributor to the law library collection with the passing of Jack G. Clarke, LLB ’52 in late April. You will read about the tribute the law library produced to display to visitors a portion of his contributions to the school. You’ll also read celebratory notes, for example, a recap of the inspiring visit of a Supreme Court Justice. I’ve learned the Law School’s mission is to produce “…well-trained, large-minded, morally based lawyers in the best sense,” as Cornell President Andrew Dickson White stated at the time of our founding. It remains as relevant today as it was when the first students were admitted in 1887. I believe the law library continues to be an integral player in the achievement of this mission. To produce well-trained lawyers in an environment of rapid technological change requires the library to be a step ahead of change and to equip ourselves to guide our community through these developments. The large-minded, morally based future lawyers we work with call upon us to recognize and embrace each other’s diversity with inclusiveness, empathy, and judgment of our own – working together in the best sense.

Kim Nayyer Edward Cornell Law Librarian

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CORNELL LAW LIBRARY WELCOMES KIM NAYYER AS THE NEW EDWARD CORNELL LAW LIBRARIAN In May 2018, Kim Nayyer visited the Law

with implementing UVic’s indigenous plan and

School to study how the library integrates with

the law library’s role in a new joint degree pro-

the school and engages with the rest of the

gram combining indigenous law and Canadian

university’s twenty libraries. One year later, she’s

common law at UVic law school.

returning as Cornell Law’s new Edward Cornell Law Librarian, associate dean for library services, and professor of the practice. “I

came

for

purely

academic

Alberta, Nayyer majored in biology before graduating and then earning an LL.B. from York

reasons,”

University’s Osgoode Hall Law School in 1992

says Nayyer, who has spent the past four

and an MLIS from the University of Alberta in

years as Associate University Librarian at the

2001. In the years since, she clerked for the late

University of Victoria in British Columbia. “I’d

Associate Chief Justice Jerome at the Feder-

discussed our system with a Cornell Law

al Court of Canada, worked as legal counsel

librarian, and I thought it would be interest-

for the Alberta Court of Appeal, worked as an

ing to visit campus and see how Cornell’s sys-

attorney for large and small law firms in Cal-

tem is structured, how law library activities and

gary, Edmonton, and Toronto, and re-entered

operations are handled. So I spent a few days

academia as a law librarian and adjunct pro-

researching and meeting with library staff, and I

fessor at UVic.

just knew it was a great place.”

Along the way, she’s given dozens of presen-

While in Ithaca, Nayyer hiked through Cascadil-

tations on issues facing university law librarians

la Gorge, explored the downtown’s bookstores,

and law faculty, blogged regularly for Slaw.ca

and gave a presentation about her work with

and the Canadian Bar Association, and con-

indigenous law materials and retrospectively

tributed chapters to Human Rights Law in Can-

implementing a new classification for indige-

ada (2000) and Comprehensive Guide to Le-

nous law launched by the Library of Congress.

gal Research, Writing & Analysis (2016, 2018).

Then, after flying 2,800 miles home and telling

Nayyer currently serves as vice chair of the

her family about the steepness of Ithaca’s hills,

North American Cooperation Section of the As-

she saw a posting for the Law School’s librarian

sociation of American Law Schools, and was

position. She decided to apply, and had a first

recently named vice president of the Cana-

interview at the annual meeting of the Ameri-

dian Association of Law Libraries, a post she’ll

can Association of Law Libraries.

continue at Cornell Law. She’s raising a fami-

That interview led to another, and ultimately to a starting date at Cornell Law in the beginning of May 2019. For Nayyer, who grew up in Alberta, Ithaca is a long way from Victoria, where she headed the law library, taught

ly that runs 8K races together, and no matter how busy she was in Victoria — her resume lists current work responsibilities along with thirty-five committee memberships — she feels ready for this next opportunity.

courses in legal research and writing, directed

A version of this story originally appeared in the

collaborations with other institutions, led proj-

Cornell Law Spotlight Ithaca, NEW YORK, February 15,

ects for students, and served on dozens of com-

2019

mittees — including the working group tasked

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As an undergraduate at the University of


Kim Nayyer, Edward Cornell Law Librarian, Associate Dean for Library Services and Professor of Practice

Kim Nayyer with lead counsel Robert Janes QC acting pro bono for the Canadian Association of Law Libraries before the Supreme Court of Canada on March 29, 2019.

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Top row (starting from left): Ariel Scotese Bottom row (starting second from left): Dana Kinel (JD 2020) and Medhavi Nautiyal (LLM 2019) standing with participants

LEGAL RESEARCH CLINIC LEADS WORKSHOP In January 2019, the Law Library GOALI

Jacob Sayward, Director for Collections,

(Global Online Access to Legal Informa-

Faculty & Scholarly Services. Two Cor-

tion) team and the Cornell Legal Research

nell Law School Students, Dana Kinel (J.D.

Clinic collaborated to teach a three-day

2020) and Medhavi Nautiyal (LL.M. 2019),

workshop in Johannesburg, South Africa

were selected to co-teach the workshop

to African information professionals about

with Scotese. Scotese, Kinel, and Nautiyal

the structure of legal information, legal re-

travelled with Cornell Law Professors Muna

search, and how GOALI facilitates legal

Ndulo and Andrea Mooney, and their

research. With this inaugural workshop,

class to Johannesburg, South Africa. The

the information professionals can pro-

workshop was hosted by the University of

vide GOALI training to researchers across

Johannesburg.

sub-Saharan Africa.

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GOALI is the newest program in the

The workshop was developed by Ariel

Research4Life platform. Whereas the oth-

Scotese, Access and Research Services

er programs on the Research4Life plat-

Librarian and Assistant Director of the

form provide access to scientific research,

Legal

Scholtz,

GOALI is the first to provide access to legal

Director of Research and Instruction, and

content. GOALI promotes access to legal

Research

Clinic,

Nina


From left: Professor Andrea Mooney, Professor Muna Ndulo, Professor George Mpedi (Dean of the Faculty of Law at the University of Johannesburg), and Ariel Scotese.

IN SOUTH AFRICA FOR GOALI PLATFORM content from top academic publishers as

law professionals on how to use GOALI

well as training in developing countries.

since I can now understand where to start

Participants of the workshop came from

and the terms in law.”

multiple organizations including ITOCA (Information Teaching and Outreach Centre for Africa), the ILO (International Labor Organization), and DAR (UN Technology Bank - Digital Acess to Research). These participants had provided numerous trainings on the other Research4life platforms. Therefore, the curriculum of this training was specially adapted to provide these experienced instructors the law in context. As one of the participants wrote: “[The training] was very useful and it [gave] us a clearer context of how to tackle research in law and from now it will be easier to train

Kinel highlighted: “By helping ITOCA representatives understand the basics of the legal field, we formed the first link in a chain to justice for students, professors, researchers, government officials, and other players in the legal field in developing countries. ITOCA’s outreach and training programs are so important; through GOALI, they will help many gain better access to and understanding of the law. “ A version of this story originally appeared on the International Labor Organization Newsfeed on March 25, 2019. The original is available online at https:// www.ilo.org/goali/news/WCMS_679149/lang--en/index.htm

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LEAGUE OF NATIONS - MAKING HISTORY VISIBLE The League of Nations Collection of the

public is but a secondary object of pub-

Cornell Law Library consists of 311 titles

lication”. Initial receipts were recorded in

and 416 volumes, initially purchased by

December 1931 continuing through the

the library with funds provided by Myron

end of the League’s activity. With Taylor’s

Taylor. The material is first mentioned as a

donation, the Cornell joined fifty-five U.S.

named collection in the Announcement

libraries subscribing to the League of Na-

of the Law School 1932-33.

tions global service.

“… The Myron Taylor collection of the

The collection has been housed in vari-

League of Nations Publications, [was] giv-

ous locations within the Law Library, but

en to us by Myron C. Taylor, of the Class

was not comprehensively represented in

of 1894. With the fund given to the Uni-

the Library’s catalog. Over the 2018-2019

versity by Mr. Taylor we have procured a

academic year, Information Manage-

practically complete set of the League

ment staff developed and executed a

of Nations publications to date.”

plan to add this material to the Cornell University Library Catalog, enhancing the

The Law Library’s “practically complete

visibility of a historically significant asset in

set” represents a complete set of the

the Library’s collection.

documents placed on public sale in the United States through the World Peace Foundation as documented in Marie J. Carroll’s Key to League of Nation documents placed on public sale 1920-29 (Boston, World Peace Foundation, 1930). According to this publication, “League of Nations documents are produced primarily to facilitate the conduct of the international business which the organization forwards on behalf of the member states. Placing documents on sale for the

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The above photo features a small portion of the collection. The below photo is from Myron C. Taylor’s portrait, painted by Frank O. Salisbury.

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CELEBRATING TOM BRUCE RESEARCH ASSOCIATE AND DIRECTOR, LEGAL INFORMATION INSTITUTE Tom Bruce, co-founder and director of the Legal Information Institute, retired on June 30, 2019. A vision created 27 years ago changed the world of legal information online by providing free and open access to the law, while inspiring a worldwide network of legal information institutes and challenging the paradigm of legal publishing for profit. After serving for five years as Director of Educational Technologies at the Law School, Tom co-founded the LII in 1992 with Professor Peter Martin and became sole Director in 2004. Tom wrote much of the original software and also created Cello, the first Web browser for Microsoft Windows in 1993. He worked on related legal information projects on four continents. He served as visiting fellow at various schools and testified before Congress on legal information modernization. He was digital projects consultant for Harvard Law School Library for more than a decade. In 2009 the American Bar Association Journal named him one of 50 innovators doing the most to change the American legal profession. Tom has an MFA from Yale School of Drama and a BA from Yale College. We are sorry to see him go. His impact on the world of legal information online has been global.

Tom Bruce circa 1997

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Femi Cadmus (bottom row, center) surrounded by Law Library staff.

FAREWELL TO FEMI CADMUS In October 2018 we bid a fond farewell to Femi Cadmus as she left us for Duke Law School where she is now the Archibald C. and Frances Fulk Rufty Research Professor of Law, Associate Dean of Information Services and Technology, and Director of the J. Michael Goodson Law Library. Femi joined Cornell in 2011 as the Edward Cornell Law Librarian, Associate Dean for Library Services, and Professor of the Practice. During her time at Cornell she had many accomplishments and initiated several wide-ranging projects. Both the Global Online Access to Legal Information (GOALI) initiative and LawArXiv were launched under her aegis. She also developed the Cornell Law Institute for High School Students, a program which was launched in summer 2018. She also began the Law Library’s Diversity Fellowship program, which has resulted in four young law librarians advancing their careers at Cornell to date. The greater law library community thinks highly of Femi as well; she was elected president of the American Association of Law Libraries for the 2018-19 term. We wish her all the best at her new law school and look forward to seeing her positive effect on the profession for some time to come.

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READING ROOM EXHIBITS Celebrating Cynthia Farina, William G. McRoberts Research Professor of Law, Retirement Exhibit (Fall 2018) Celebrating Greg Alexander, A. Robert Noll Professor of Law, Retirement Exhibit (December 2018) Honoring Bob Summers (1933 - 2019), William G. McRoberts Research Professor of Law Emeritus, Memorial Exhibit (Spring 2019) Celebrating Tom Bruce, Research Associate and Director, Legal Information Institute, Retirement Exihibit (Summer 2019) Honoring Jack Clarke (1927-2019), L.L.B. ‘52, Extraordinary Benefactor to Cornell Law Library, Law School, and University (June 2019) Reading Room Exhibits curated by Elizabeth Teskey, Law Library

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REUNION EXHIBITS This Reunion, alumni had the opportunity to view exhibits of a few key pieces from the Law Library’s rare collection. Below are a couple of the exhibits that were displayed. Reunion Exhibits Curated by Elizabeth Teskey and Sabrina Sondhi, Law Library

Myron Taylor’s Medals Law school class of 1894, Cornell trustee and major benefactor, Myron C. Taylor was also a leading figure in American industry and politics. This collection includes his Presidential Medal for Merit, honorary knighthoods, and medals bestowed by several countries and institutions as well as the Pope.

Scottsboro Trial Models In an event considered one of the greatest miscarriages of justice of all time, nine black teenagers in Alabama were accused of gang raping two white women on a freight train in 1931. The “Scottsboro Boys” endured over a dozen trials, reversals, death sentences, and prison terms. Their principal defense attorney, Samuel S. Leibowitz (CLS 1915) ordered a replica train set from the Lionel company in order to demonstrate to the jury how the “Boys” could not have committed the crimes. Cornell Law Library now holds portions of this historic train set.

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“BE A VOICE FOR CHANGE” JUSTICE SOTOMAYOR’S INSPIRING VISIT TO CORNELL This year, Justice Sotomayor visited

In her hour-long talk, Justice Sotomayor

Cornell where she gave a talk and

discussed her struggle after being diag-

judged the final round of the Cornell Law

nosed with diabetes at the age of sev-

School Cuccia Cup Moot Court Compe-

en, the influence reading had on her ed-

tition. This event, which was planned by

ucation, her love of the legal profession,

Cornell Law School, was a rare opportu-

and her life on the Supreme Court. Her

nity for students, faculty, and staff to see

message to the students was clear and

the person behind the robe.

forthright.

When she walked onto the stage of

“The reason I’m here today and speak

Bailey Hall shortly after arriving on cam-

publicly is because I’m trying to engage

pus that fall morning, Justice Sotomay-

every student in this room to remember

or received a standing ovation from the

that your most important job in life as a

crowd of 1,200 students, staff, and fac-

member of this community is to be in-

ulty members. After an informal conver-

volved in bettering it, to be a voice for

sation with her friend, Judge Wesley, the

change, to take action when you see

Justice walked through the aisles of the

things you don’t like, and to be civical-

auditorium, shaking hands with anyone

ly involved in making this a better union,”

she could reach and calling students to

she said.

stand next to her as she answered questions they had submitted before the talk.

“I know how much pain there is in life,” she said. “The girl who was eight, who was taking injections and thought it was

Just Ju stic ice e So Soto toma mayo yorr ta talk lkss wi with th Judg Ju dge e We Wesl sley ey a att Ba Baililey ey H Hal alll

a pin needle—that girl is now sixty-four and knows there’s nothing easy about life. But it hasn’t taken away my innate optimism. I really do see the glass always half full, and I don’t let it overwhelm the goodness that I see in the world.” A version of this originally appeared in the Cornell Law Forum, Spring 2019

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CANTWELL RESEARCH PRIZE

FIRST PRIZE Regulatory Takings and the Constitutionality of Commercial Rent Regulation in New York City, by Henry Topper, Class of 2019 Henry Topper’s paper examines the Small Business Jobs Survival Act (SBJSA) bill pending in the New York City Council, the status of small businesses and commercial tenant law in New York City, and the constitutionality of the SBJSA and commercial rent control in light of current takings jurisprudence. The topic required in-depth interdisciplinary research in legal sources at the municipal, state and federal levels, in urban sociology and history, geographic sources, and traditional and new media. Topper concludes that the SBJSA would likely constitute a regulatory taking when applied to at least some commercial spaces.

SECOND PRIZE Incarceration or E-Carceration: California’s SB 10 Bail Reform and the Potential Pitfalls for Pretrial Detainees, by Ashley Mullen, Class of 2020 Ashley Mullen focuses on recently passed bail reform legislation in California in her paper. She confronts the apparent contradiction between the success of similar bail reform efforts in states such as New Jersey and the negative portrayal of bail reform in the media. Thus, she looks at the historical background of monetary bail, the bail reform movement in the United States and California, the potential legal and policy challenges to the California legislation, and the possible outcomes from the legislation. In doing the required research, Mullen says, she learned that “sometimes I would have to dig very deep not only in corroborating or debunking the information found in those articles, but also in researching the source of the article itself, which was often a person or a company being paid by the bail bondsman lobby or closely affiliated with it.”

About the Cantwell Prize: Funding for the Prize is provided by an endowment given to the Law Library by Barbara Cantwell in honor of her late husband, Robert Cantwell, a 1956 graduate of Cornell Law School.

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HONORING JACK G. CLARKE Jack Clarke, LL.B. ’52, died on April 26, 2019, a few months shy of his 92nd birthday. One of only two lifetime members of the Law School Dean’s Advisory Council, Jack was also a deeply devoted Cornellian and Presidential Councillor. His impact on the law school was profound. “Jack is quite simply one of the most transformative figures in the history of Cornell Law School,” said Dean Eduardo Penalver at the unveiling of a commissioned portrait of Jack Clarke in April 2017. “Inspired by the lessons he learned in his career [first with Sullivan & Cromwell and later as director and negotiator at Exxon] Jack has invested his Cornell philanthropy in the people and programs that operate on campus and around the world. He’s helped make Cornell a more global institution, and though his name is not on a building, his support has been so broad and so deep that his name is virtually synonymous with Cornell Law.” Jack Clarke’s generosity to the Library, most notably via the Jack G. Clarke International Comparative Law Collection endowment, has allowed the collection to grow in new areas to keep pace with the growing programs and centers in the Law School also made possible by his gifts.

Jack Clarke (left) with Dean Eduardo M. Peñalver at the unveiling of Clarke’s portrait, May 12, 2017

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PROFESSIONAL HIGHLIGHTS DAN BLACKABY

 Moderator, “Businesses Be Warned: Data Breaches Don’t Discriminate”, 2018 AALL Annual Meeting, Baltimore, MD.  Speaker at the 2018 National Blockchain Forum, San Jose, CA in August  Program Presenter, WESTPAC, “Blockchain: Separating the Hype from the Hysteria”, Anchorage, Alaska, Sept. 2018.  Contributor, Blockchain (Library Futures Series, Book 3), ALA Neal-Schuman (forthcoming Spring 2020).

PETER HOOK

 Developed and taught a new, one credit hour, advanced, experiential legal research course, Law 6329 Analytics for Lawyers: Leveraging Social Science Research for Effective Advocacy.  Co-presented, along with Paul Callister, a talk at the Institute for Law Teaching and Learning Summer Conference titled Mental Constructs, Techniques, and Stories—Must-Have Tools for Authentic Teaching.  Gave a CLE titled Litigation Analytics: Comparing and Contrasting what is on Bloomberg, Lexis, and Westlaw, and Insight-Need Frameworks to Make Sense of it All at the Cornell Law School Reunion Weekend.  Presented a Talk to the Association of Law Libraries of Upstate New York (ALLUNY) Spring Institute titled Visualizing Legal Information: tools and techniques to help make explicit the rich, intellectual infrastructure of the law.

JACKIE MAGAGNOSC

 Chair, American Association of Law Libraries Online Bibliographic Services Special Interest Section.  Editor, TSLL TechScans Blog.  Coordinated League of Nations Project.

MATT MORRISON

 Member, CUL Liaisons Steering Committee.  Webinar on SEC structure, sources, and research.

KIM NAYYER

 Appeared pro bono before the Supreme Court of Canada on behalf of Intervener Canadian Association of Law Libraries in Keatley v. Teranet as cocounsel and party representative.  Testified before a Canadian Parliamentary committee in a review of Canada’s Copyright Act.

JEAN PAJEREK

 Proposed, moderated, and coordinated the 2018 AALL Technical Services Special Interest Section’s Hot Topic program for AALL annual meeting.  Member, TS-SIS Metadata Management Standing Committee.  Member, Cornell University Library Promotion Review Board for Promotion to Librarian.  Chair, Search Committee for Assistant Director, Metadata Production – Library Technical Services.

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JACOB SAYWARD

 Chair, Cornell University’s New Selector Training Task Force.  Co-Chair, ALLStAR Advisory Board’s Content Subgroup.  Chair, Government Relations/Advocacy, Association of Law Libraries of Upstate New York.  Co-authored GOALI Goes to Johannesburg - Training and Outreach in South Africa for Research4Life’s Global Online Access to Legal Information Program, which will be presented at the International Federal of Library Associations and Institutions 85th World Library and Information Conference.

NINA SCHOLTZ

 President, Association of Law Libraries of Upstate New York.  Chair, Bylaws Committee, AALL Academic Law Libraries Special Interest Section.  Co-authored GOALI Goes to Johannesburg - Training and Outreach in South Africa for Research4Life’s Global Online Access to Legal Information Program, which will be presented at the International Federal of Library Associations and Institutions 85th World Library and Information Conference.

ARIEL SCOTESE

 Vice-President/President-Elect Association of Law Libraries of Upstate New York.  Vice Chair of American Association of Law Libraries Conference of New Law Librarians.  Co-authored GOALI Goes to Johannesburg - Training and Outreach in South Africa for Research4Life’s Global Online Access to Legal Information Program, which will be presented at the International Federal of Library Associations and Institutions 85th World Library and Information Conference.

SABRINA SONDHI

 Co-Chair, ALLStAR Advisory Board’s Content Subgroup.  Finished a two-year term as Treasurer for the AALL FCIL Special Interest Section.  Elected as Vice-Chair of the AALL Academic Law Libraries Special Interest Section.

LATIA WARD

 Taught an advanced legal research class in spring 2019, Research and Analysis in Law Practice.  Facilitator, “What Can Law Librarians Do to Facilitate Access to Justice?” American Association of Law Libraries Legal Information Services to the Public Special Interest Section Round Table Discussion, Baltimore, Maryland, July 2018.  Co-Presenter, “Backwards Design: Assessment, Alignment, Quality Matters, and Online Learning Consortium,” Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction Conference, Columbia, South Carolina, June 2019.  Presenter, “What Can Law Librarians Do To Facilitate Access to Justice?”, Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction Conference, Columbia, South Carolina, June 2019.

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WE GRATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGE THE FOLLOWING GIFTS RECEIVED IN THE FISCAL YEAR 2018 - 2019 AND CORNELL UNIVERSITY LAW LIBRARY ENDOWED FUNDS. $5,000 (LIBRARY PARTNER LEVEL) RICHARD H. GILDEN JD 67 $2,000 – $ 2,500 (PATRON LEVEL) EDWARD W. BERGMANN JD 66 HENRY H. KORN AB 68 $500 –$1500 (ASSOCIATE LEVEL) VALERIE J. ARMENTO JD 77 WALTER G. VON SCHMIDT JD 70 DR. CAROLYN B. MERVIS AB 72 (SOFT CREDIT: DR. JOHN R. PANI) WILLIAM L. HOFFMAN JD 92 PROFESSOR FRANK L. WISWALL JR. JD 65 ALEXANDER RITTER ANDREW RITTER GRETCHEN RITTER AB 83 MATTHEW RITTER ETHAN WILLIAMS $100 – $250 (SUPPORT LEVEL) ZELLA L. MERVIS JAMES A. MCBRADY JD 89 LISE MARTINA PETER L. LINDSETH AB 84, JD 87 ALFRED R. JOHNSON JR AB 76

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EARL J. BENNETT MEMORIAL BOOK FUND BITNER RESEARCH FELLOWS PROGRAM ENDOWMENT JACK G. CLARKE (LL.B. ’52) INTERNATIONAL LAW COLLECTION FUND CUCCIA HONOR WITH BOOKS FUND MARY HEAGEN CUCCIA MEMORIAL BOOK FUND ARTHUR H. A.B. (’19 & LL.B. ’23) & MARY MARDEN DEAN LIBRARY FUND THOMAS B. GILCHRIST MEMORIAL ENDOWMENT SHEPPARD GURYAN (J.D. ’67) LAW LIBRARY ENDOWMENT GURYAN FAMILY LAW LIBRARIAN’S ENDOWMENT KURT HANSLOWE MEMORIAL FUND HERBERT D. LAUBE ENDOWMENT FUND JUDGE ALFRED J. LOEW (LL.B. ’21) MEMORIAL FUND LINDSETH-MARTINA LIBRARY DIRECTOR’S DISCRETIONARY FUND NELSON & HATTIE ROSENBAUM BOOK FUND ARTHUR H. ROSENBLOOM (J.D. ’59) LAW LIBRARY ENDOWMENT SONYA A. SASUTA MEMORIAL FUND

Have questions or wish to make a gift to the Law Library? Contact the Law School Development Office at (607) 255-5877 or giving@lawschool.cornell.edu

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Cornell University Library

Credits: Compilation: Ariel Scotese (Cornell Law Library) Cover photo: Jason Koski (Cornell University)

Cornell University Library

Additional photography: Micaela Carignano and Elizabeth Teskey (Cornell Law Library); Jose Beduya and Carol Clune (Cornell University Library); Nina Hein (Cornell Law School); Jason Kossi (Cornell University); Matthew Estabrooks and Sheryl Sinkow Layout and editing: Ariel Scotese, Sabrina Sondhi (Cornell Law Library)

Profile for Cornell Law Library

Cornell University Law Library Year in Review 2018 - 2019  

Cornell University Law Library Year in Review 2018 - 2019