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CORNELL UNIVERSITY LAW LIBRARY A YEAR IN REVIEW 2015-2016


CORNELL UNIVERSITY LAW LIBRARY A YEAR IN REVIEW 2015-2016 Message from the Director

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Summer College

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Law Library Research Clinic

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Law Library Diversity Fellow

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Preserving Law School History

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Library Salon: The Nuremberg Trials Collection

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Speaker Series

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Bitner Fellow

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Cantwell Research Prize

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Exhibits

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Charts

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Scholarship@Cornelllaw 2 Millionth Download

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Professional Highlights

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Acknowledgements

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MESSAGE FROM THE DIRECTOR The Librarian’s Door through the Ages. That’s what I call the nicely weathered, oak-paneled door leading to my office. In place since Myron Taylor Hall was built in 1932, it has stood through generations of distinguished librarians: Lewis Morse (1928-65); Harry Bitner (1965-75); Jane Hammond (197593); and Claire Germain (1993-2011). It’s provided entry to a place where great insights and big ideas were born. The annual report is another kind of doorway. This year, the 2015-2016 Annual Report offers access to exciting stories of library activities. From our international outreach activities to our newly launched Legal Research Clinic, which serves the needs of nonprofits and the self-represented, these efforts all embody our vision of advancing excellence. I hope you are inspired by and enjoy reading these accounts. As always, my deep and sincere thanks go to our benefactors, whose gifts ensure that we are able to maintain our collections, support research and scholarship, and continue with exciting and innovative programs.

Femi Cadmus Edward Cornell Law Librarian

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SUMMER COLLEGE Each year the Law Library holds its Foundations in American Law Summer College class, hosting students from high schools and colleges around the world.

“I just wanted to say thank you for everything. With your help and support, I got into 14 of the 20 top universities I ap­plied to... this would not have been possible without you, and I just want to say thank you for helping this young kid from Har­lem get into one of the most prestigious universities in the country.”

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Scheck Mulbah, inaugural Foundations in American Law class 2015

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LAW LIBRARY RESEARCH CLINIC HELPS STUDENTS AND THE COMMUNITY A new Legal Research Clinic supplies law

uploading and organizing documents in

students with the practical skills they’ll need

an orderly fashion.

in their careers – and provides no-cost legal assistance to local nonprofit organiza-

At the end of their coursework, clinic stu-

tions, public interest attorneys, low-income

dents enter the legal profession with not

individuals and startup businesses.

only practical skills but a strong commitment to contributing to civic engagement

An initiative of the Cornell Law Library,

in the form of public interest law practice.

the Legal Research Clinic is a three-credit course (Law 7885) offered to second- and

The Cornell Legal Research Clinic was re-

third-year law students.

cently awarded an Engaged Cornell Development Grant, to grow the clinic within

The Legal Research Clinic fills a significant

the Law School curriculum and formalize

void that currently exists for those who

partnerships with the local community. The

need not ongoing legal representation,

grant will provide the funds to hire a teach-

but specific answers to one-time questions

ing fellow and an administrative assistant,

best addressed by research. Often, for

allowing the clinic to more than double its

those who can’t afford an attorney, these

capacity and enroll up to 15 students per

questions go unanswered.

semester. These students, in turn, will provide services to significantly more clients.

The clinic accepts referrals of research

The clinic will also further expand its ser-

problems through its website. Law stu-

vices on an international level, providing

dents, closely supervised by a practicing

legal research assistance to foreign judg-

attorney, conduct research, analysis and

es to promote access to justice.

writing. The selection of the Legal Research Clinic The clinic also serves to prepare law stu-

by Engaged Cornell underscores not only

dents for the business of law practice. To

the need the clinic fills by providing pro

this end, the course includes a strong case

bono legal research services, but its strong

management component.

pedagogical basis in experiential learning.

Using case

management software, students are responsible for creating matters, conducting conflict checks, tracking their time and

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Spring 2016 Legal Resarch Clinic Students Caroline Ahn, Tara Param, Michael Chern, Allison Eitman, Alyssa Jones, Christine Jordan

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FIRST LAW LIBRARY DIVERSITY FELLOW In August 2015, Malikah Hall began her appointment as assistant law librarian under the auspices of the new Cornell Law Library Diversity Fellowship. The two-year fellowship seeks to provide opportunities for qualified new law librarians from underrepresented groups. Fellows are mentored by Cornell law librarians, while contributing to the mission of the library, Law School and university. One year into the fellowship, Hall has gained invaluable experience in many areas of law librarianship, serving as a faculty liaison, reference librarian and co-instructor in the Law School’s first-year Lawyering Program and the Law Library’s Summer College course, Foundations in American Law. In the coming year, Hall is continuing to build her credentials. She is preparing to launch a new advanced legal research course, Research and Analysis in Law Practice, in fall 2016 and publishing an article analyzing Juris Doctor/Master of Library Science dual-degree programs in North America. Prior to arriving at Cornell, Hall received her J.D. and M.L.S. degrees in 2015 from North Carolina Central University in Durham, North Carolina, and received her undergraduate degree from Chicago State University.

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Malikah Hall, Research Services Librarian, Lecturer-in-Law and Cornell Law Library Diversity Fellow

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PRESERVING LAW SCHOOL HISTORY The Cornell University Law School Heritage Project is a collection of videos documenting significant events in the Law School’s history, as well as a series of oral-history interviews with Law School faculty, alumni and others who have made a significant impact on the history of the Law School and the world. The project was first developed by former Law School Dean Peter W. Martin, the Jane M.G. Foster Professor of Law, Emeritus. The video recordings of interviews and historical moments date from 1988 to the present day, and more are being filmed every year. Martin conducts most of the interviews himself. The Law Library recently took on an increased role in the preservation and production of the project by hosting the videos on its digital repository, Scholarship@ Cornell

Law

(scholarship.law.cornell.

edu), and making newer videos more widely available on its YouTube channel (YouTube.com/CornellLawLibrary). With 100 entries and counting, the Law Library will continue to digitally preserve the legacy of Cornell Law School for years to come.

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Peter Martin, Jane M. G. Foster Professor of Law, Emeritus

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LIBRARY SALON: THE NUREMBERG TRIALS COLLECTION In the summer of 1998, Henry Korn ’68 got

York University Law School, served as an

a phone call from a young lawyer and

assistant U.S. attorney before entering pri-

fellow Cornell alumnus that changed his

vate practice, and is also an adjunct pro-

life.

fessor of law at Pace University.

“’You won’t believe what I’m seeing

After he found out about the Donovan

here,’” Korn recalled being told by an

papers in 1998, Korn got in touch with ad-

associate at Donovan, Leisure, Newton &

ministrators at Cornell Law School and

Irvine. “’I’m seeing an enormous collec-

Cornell University Library, as well as a

tion of bound and unbound papers that

friend, Nathaniel Lapkin, who had pre-

were the late William Donovan’s, and the

viously funded programs at Cornell and

firm is going out of business and doesn’t

other law schools. The Nathaniel Lapkin

know what to do with them.’”

Foundation ultimately funded the collection’s digitization, and that summer, Korn

What followed led to the establishment

and his wife, Ellen Schaum Korn ’68, trans-

of the Donovan Nuremberg Trials Collec-

ported hundreds of pounds of books and

tion at Cornell University Library’s Law Li-

boxes from Manhattan to Ithaca.

brary – the only Nuremberg collection containing the personal archive of Gen-

The collection, now partly digitized and

eral “Wild Bill” Donovan. During World

freely available to the public, contains

War II, Donovan headed the U.S. Office

Donovan’s private papers, original trial

of Strategic Services, the precursor to

transcripts and a rare copy of a psycho-

the CIA, and was special assistant to the

logical profile of Adolf Hitler, one of only

chief U.S. prosecutor during the trials of

30 ever printed, all of which were sup-

Nazi war criminals.

posed to be destroyed.

Korn spoke about the collection, and told

A version of this story originally appeared

the dramatic tale of its origins, at a Cor-

in Ezra Update.

nell University Library Salon last fall in New York City. Korn, who graduated from New

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The Donovan Nuremberg Trials Collection, now partly digitized and freely available to the public, contains a rare surviving copy of a psychological profile of Adolf Hitler. 

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SPEAKER SERIES

ALSO IN THE 2015/2016 SPEAKER SERIES “Competitive Intelligence as a Leadership Tool” Zena Applebaum Bennett Jones LLP, Director, Competitive Intelligence October 19, 2015 “The Work of the Legal Information Institute” Tom Bruce Legal Information Institute, Director January 25, 2016 “Back to the Future” Blair Kauffman Yale Law School, Law Librarian and Professor of Law April 19, 2016 “Less is the New More”

Director Femi Cadmus and Yale

Marie Hamm

Law Library Director Blair Kauffman.

Regent Law School, Assistant Director for Collection Development and Adjunct Professor

LAW LIBRARIES IN THE DIGITAL AGE Just before the rise of the internet, Blair

Kauffman’s findings demonstrated that

Kauffman sat in the audience as former

many law school libraries are much bet-

Cornell Law School Dean Peter W. Mar-

ter situated today than ever before, with

tin observed that librarians could go the

improved physical spaces, more chal-

way of flight engineers if they failed to

lenging professional work and access to

properly navigate the move from print to

information resources pre-internet librar-

digital.

ians only dreamed of. Conversely, the rapidly evolving landscape and the loos-

A quarter-century later, the Yale Law Li-

ening of accreditation requirements has

brary director revisited Martin’s observa-

also caused some institutions to drastical-

tions to examine whether the profession

ly cut back on library support.

has properly heeded his call. Kauffman

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presented his program “Back to the Fu-

Kauffman’s program highlighted the

ture: Law Libraries in the Digital Age” as

various advantages and challenges of

part of the Cornell Law Library Speaker

the modern law library, while pondering

Series in April 2016.

what it will take to continue to thrive in the digital age.

April 21, 2016 “Law School Oral Histories Project” Peter Martin Cornell Law School, Jane M.G. Foster Professor of Law, Emeritus, and former Dean May 2, 2016 Writing and Getting Published Janet Sinder Brooklyn Law School, Director of the Law Library and Associate Professor of Law May 3, 2016 “Combatting Impostor Syndrome” Jenn Colt Cornell University Library, User Experience Designer June 13, 2016

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BITNER FELLOW: EVELYN LAGOS AROS The Law Library welcomed Evelyn Lagos Aros, the fifth Bitner Research Fellow, to Cornell in April 2016. Lagos arrived from Santiago, Chile, where she serves as an analyst librarian and oversees collection development for the Library of the National Congress of Chile. She also has significant experience in cataloging and public services from the Universidad de Chile. During her two-week stay, Lagos spent time in all of the library’s departments, learned about Cornell’s collection-development efforts, attended lectures, classes and other specialized sessions for librarians, and even spent time working at the circulation desk. Lagos finished her stay with a presentation highlighting her research efforts with the Library of the National Congress of Chile and tracking the development of Chilean think tanks. “The two weeks that I was in the Law Library of Cornell University was a great experience for me,” Lagos said. “It was the first time I was in America and my first immersion in English. Despite this, each person took the time to listen and understand me. I met a great professional group, but above all a great human group that showed concern and empathy with me.” The Bitner Research Fellowship for foreign law librarians offers a unique opportunity for visitors to experience American law librarianship, learn the American legal system, and network with professional librarians to create lifelong personal and professional connections. The endowment funding the Bitner Fellowship is a tribute to the late Professor Harry Bitner, Cornell Law Librarian (196576), by his family, Lorraine and Richard Gilden.

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2016 Bitner Fellow Evelyn Lagos Aros

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CANTWELL RESEARCH PRIZE FIRST PRIZE

SECOND PRIZE

An Ode to Sea Turtles & Dolphins: Expand-

The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act: Im-

ing WTO’s Mandate to Bridge the Trade-En-

posing An American Definition Of Cor-

vironment Divide, by Geary Choe, 3L

ruption On Global Markets, by Mateo J. de la Torre, 3L

Geary Choe’s ambitious paper showcased a diverse and sophisticated under-

Mateo de la Torre’s research also had

standing of research in public internation-

an international focus in examining the

al law and interdisciplinary sources.

cross-cultural implications of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA).

Choe said his research facilitated a deeper understanding of conflict of norms and

“The challenges that international sourc-

hierarchy of sources in public international

es present enhanced my ability to be a

law. “I aspire to be a trade lawyer and this

resourceful researcher,” de la Torre said.

research was the ultimate experience for

“And on a broader level, I discovered

me to increase my knowledge of interna-

that researching international law and

tional economic law and policy,” he said.

foreign legal topics presents an intricate

Donovan Nuremberg Trials Collection: Commemorating 70 Years (September 2015) Supreme Court Justices from India poring over the Donovan Nuremberg exhibit with Law School Dean Eduardo Peñalver. Photo by Cornell University Photography

EXHIBITS

and fascinating cross-section of law, politics, and culture.” Remembering Dean Thoron, 1917 – 2015 (October 2015) (Pictured) Student Research Prize winners 2015 (October 2015) David Bowie, 1947 - 2016 (January 2016) Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, 1936 – 2016 (March 2016) Recent Faculty Publications (May 2016)

About the Cantwell Prize: Funding for the Prize is provided by an endowment given to the Law Library by Barbara Cantwell in honor of her late husband, Robert Cantwell, a 1956 graduate of Cornell Law School.

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Circulation activity inched up overall with charges and renewals increasing slightly over three percent in FY2016.  Borrow Direct (an unmediated lending service in which users can directly request books from participating libraries through the catalog), has continued to increase in use over traditional interlibrary loan.  This is likely due to the ease of use and faster turn around time for delivery of materials.

SCHOLARSHIP@CORNELL LAW The Law Library digital repository Scholarship@Cornell Law reached a major milestone in June 2016 with its 2 millionth download. The article "African Customary Law, Customs, and Women's Rights," by Cornell Law School Professor Muna Ndulo originally appeared in the Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies in 2011. The average daily number of downloads from the repository increased this year to an average daily total of 1,980, up from 1,550 per day last year. Muna B. Ndulo, Professor of Law and Director of the Berger International Legal Studies and Institute for African Development Programs.

Print acquisitions increased for the second straight year while we also continue to expand our digital collections including numerous e-book titles from publishers Brill, Elgar, Lexis and Hart.

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PROFESSIONAL HIGHLIGHTS

MARGARET AMBROSE § § “Two Birds, One Stone: Repurposing Office Technology to Meet Knowledge Management Needs,” co-presenter, Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction Conference, Atlanta, June 2016. § § Elected board member of Association of Law Libraries of Upstate New York. § § Completed Management for Academic Professionals Certification at Cornell University.

DAN BLACKABY

§ § “Two Birds, One Stone: Repurposing Office Technology to Meet Knowledge Management Needs,” co-presenter, Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction Conference Conference, Atlanta, June 2016. § § “The Cloud, Metadata, and Social Networking: How Technology is Changing the Practice of Law,” co-presenter, Tompkins County Bar Association CLE, March 2016 and Cornell Reunion Weekend, June 2016. § § Internet columnist for the Technical Services - Special Interest Section newsletter

AMY EMERSON

§ § “Meet Your Decision Maker,” panelist, American Association of Law Libraries Legislative Advocacy Training, July 2015. § § “Lean Process Improvement at Cornell Law Library,” co-speaker, Association of Law Libraries of Upstate New York Annual Meeting, October 2015. § § “Public Interest Law Career Symposium” panelist, Cornell Law School, January 2016.

MALIKAH HALL

§ § Developed new class for fall 2016, Research and Analysis in Law Practice. § § Forthcoming article, an analysis of Juris Doctor/Master of Library Science dual degree programs in North America

JACKIE MAGAGNOSC

§ § TechScans blog, contributor and editor. § § Technical Services Law Librarian, columnist. § § “BIBFRAME: How did we get here and where are we going?” co-coordinator and co-moderator, American Association of Law Libraries Annual Meeting, Philadelphia, July 2015.

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THOMAS MILLS

§ § “General ‘Wild Bill’ Donovan and the Nuremberg Trials Collection,” presenter, Cornell University Library Salon series, New York City, October 2015. § § Foreign, Comparative and International law - Special Interest Section workshop coordinator and speaker, “Two Sides of the United Nations: Working with Public and Private International Law at the U.N.” American Association of Law Libraries Annual Meeting, Chicago, July 2016.

MATT MORRISON

§ § Forthcoming article in Law Library Journal, “Due Diligence: Company Information for Law Students”

JEAN PAJEREK

§ § Represented the American Association of Law Libraries as a member of the international MARC Advisory Committee. § § Published two book reviews in the journal “Technicalities.” § § Taught a workshop on linked data for Cornell University Library staff.

NINA SCHOLTZ

§ § “International Attorneys and LLMs: Filling Research Gaps,” co-presenter, American Association of Law Libraries Annual Meeting, Philadelphia, July 2015. § § “Two Birds, One Stone: Repurposing Office Technology to Meet Knowledge Management Needs,” co-presenter, Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction Conference, Atlanta, June 2016.

MARK WILLIAMS § § Developed new class for spring 2016, Advanced Legal Research in Intellectual Property Law. § § “The Cloud, Metadata, and Social Networking: How Technology is Changing the Practice of Law,” co-presenter, Tompkins County Bar Association CLE, March 2016.

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WE GRATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGE THE FOLLOWING CORNELL UNIVERSITY LAW LIBRARY ENDOWED FUNDS. EARL J. BENNETT MEMORIAL BOOK FUND BITNER RESEARCH FELLOWS PROGRAM ENDOWMENT JACK G. CLARKE (LL.B. ’52) INTERNATIONAL LAW COLLECTION FUND CUCCIA HONOR WITH BOOKS FUND MARY HEAGEN CUCCIA MEMORIAL BOOK FUND ARTHUR H. A.B. (’19 & LL.B. ’23) & MARY MARDEN DEAN LIBRARY FUND THOMAS B. GILCHRIST MEMORIAL ENDOWMENT SHEPPARD GURYAN (J.D. ’67) LAW LIBRARY ENDOWMENT GURYAN FAMILY LAW LIBRARIAN’S ENDOWMENT KURT HANSLOWE MEMORIAL FUND HERBERT D. LAUBE ENDOWMENT FUND JUDGE ALFRED J. LOEW (LL.B. ’21) MEMORIAL FUND LINDSETH-MARTINA LIBRARY DIRECTOR’S DISCRETIONARY FUND NELSON & HATTIE ROSENBAUM BOOK FUND ARTHUR H. ROSENBLOOM (J.D. ’59) LAW LIBRARY ENDOWMENT SONYA A. SASUTA MEMORIAL FUND

Have questions or wish to make a gift to the Law Library? Contact the Law School Development Office at (607) 255-5877 or giving@lawschool.cornell.edu

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Bitner Fellowship Endowment benefactors Lorraine and Richard Gilden

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Cornell University Library Credits: Compilation: Thomas Mills and Mark Williams (Cornell Law Library) Cover photo: Reading Room chandelier, Nina Hien Back cover photo: Foundations in American Law Moot Court Session, Malikah Hall. Additional photography: Carol Clune (Cornell Law Library) Layout and editing: Carla DeMello and Melanie Lefkowitz (Assessment and Communication, Cornell University Library)


Law Library Year in Review 2016