Page 1

ANNUAL REPORT

CORNELL LAW LIBRARY

1993-94

Submitted June 10, 1994 by Claire M. Germain Edward Cornell Law Librarian & Professor of Law


TABLE OF CONTENTS I.

Introduction

II.

Services A.

B. C. III.

Facilities A. B.

IV.

Partnership with the Educational Technologies Department Partnership with the Legal Information Institute

Major Issues Facing the Law Library A. B. C. D.

VII.

Collection Development Funding Rare Books Microforms U.S. Government Documents Preservation and Security

Technology A. B.

VI.

Open Reserve and Space Planning on Third Floor Organization of Collection

The Collections A. B. C. D. E. F.

V.

Faculty Services 1. Enhancements 2. Faculty Network Services 3. Publications Student Services Services to Others

Managing the transition from collecting legal information in multiple formats to greater reliance on electronic formats Developing more effective and efficient means for delivering legal information to the Law School Maintaining existing and creating new cooperative relationships with other law libraries and sources of information Enhancing and improving faculty and student computing services

Conclusion A. B. C.

Major Accomplishments during 1993-94 Areas of Concern Staff


I. INTRODUCTION This report highlights Library activities during 1993-94, the first year of the new Law Librarian. Since Library statistics will not be available until July 1994, a separate report on statistics and the budget will be issued at a later date. The Library started the year with the vision to become the dynamic research hub of the Law School. Attention was focused on strengthening the role of the librarians in providing information to faculty and students in print and electronic formats, creating a user-friendly facility, using new technologies, and expanding the collection, particularly in foreign and international law. These efforts were developed within the framework of the three-year draft Strategic Plan which will guide Library efforts to support the mission of the Law School.

II. SERVICES During 1993-94, the Library built on its excellent tradition of providing a broad range of traditional library services to its users, while improving those services through integration of new technologies. The Library started playing an enlarged role in supporting faculty and student use of the Cornell Law School network.

A. Faculty Services 1. Enhancements

The addition of a new reference position made it possible to implement several new faculty services and enhance some existing ones. The establishment of the faculty/librarian liaison program provided a heightened level of service to faculty who chose to use it. Librarians visit assigned faculty regularly and customize library and information services to individual faculty research needs. The compilation of faculty research profiles will be of help in collection development and current awareness services. The Library took over the student runner position, previously under Law School supervision. The position has now become part of an overall book and document retrieval system for faculty for materials in the Law Library and in other libraries. The plan is to enhance further the retrieval of documents for faculty. The "Selected Acquisitions List" was revamped and now includes a request form for faculty who want to get books or be put on the routing list for new periodicals.

1


2. Faculty Network Services

The Library started "News Flash from the Law Library," a special e-mail service for the Cornell Law Faculty. Several faculty members commented favorably on it. The Library started accepting reference and research requests through e-mail. The Library e-mail box is checked several times daily. A CD-ROM network was installed in the spring of 1994. It provides access to congressional and United Nations materials, as well as to full-text information sources, and CALI exercises. The Library is currently playing a leading role in the development of a new windows menu for the Cornell Law School network. During 1994-95, the Library is planning to offer demonstrations and individual visits to faculty about the new menu and information services. The Library intends to play a major role in training faculty in the new applications, and educating them about electronic alternatives to hard copy sources of information. The Library considers its work on faculty network services to be a matter of highest priority. The development of further improvements and staff educational efforts will be dependent on available staff resources.

3. Publications

The Library publishes a quarterly newsletter. Other Library publications include a Guide to the Library. Guide to Faculty Services, and several subject research guides. Next year, plans call for the creation of hypertext-based subject guides, available through the Cornell Law School network.

B. Student Services The Library started offering reference service in the morning. The expanded reference desk hours and increased availability of reference appointments have benefitted students, as well as other Library users. In August 1993, the Library adopted a new policy on food and drink in the Library, following the report of a task force on food and drink composed of Library staff and students. Library users are allowed to bring covered drinks into the Library. Food is not allowed. Several students commented that this new policy creates a friendly atmosphere in the Library. The Library is working with the Environmental Law Society on recycling issues, and on educating users as to the dangers of food and spilled drinks for Library materials.

2


The reference librarians continued their successful individual and group advanced legal research sessions. Class time was provided by law faculty for class presentations by reference librarians on conducting research for the following courses: Selected problems in European Community Law: Basic Rights, Trade and the Environment, and Antitrust (Barceld); Consumer Law (Taylor); Immigration and Refugee Law (Yale-Loehr). The brochure "Research in the Real World," advertised the sessions offered in late spring and ninety students signed up for the Bridge-the-Gap session. The four law-trained reference librarians continued teaching Practice Training I. Advances were made in coordinating the class with Peter Martin. The same coursebook will now be used. The Library adopted a new policy on laptop computer use in the Library, after consultation with the Library Committee.

C. Services to Others In addition to its primary clients in the Law School community, the Library offers a number of its services to the rest of the university, to other libraries through cooperative programs, to local and area attorneys, and to the general public.

III. FACILITIES

A. Open Reserve and Space Planning on Third Floor A Library task force was convened to examine two problems with the current use of space: (1) the operational problems of Open Reserve, and (2) Library users' difficulties in locating journals. (1) While the Ed. Tech, presence has improved law student use of the computer center in the same area, the Library operations that they were asked to handle (microforms, looseleaf filing, automated circulation) have declined in quality and need to be managed again by the Library. Current use of the Open Reserve collection (an average of 3 books checked-out per day) no longer warrants staffing of that area. (2) Journals are difficult to locate in the Law Library since there is more than one journal area. For instance, U.S. law reviews (classified as "KF10") can be found on the first floor, third floor, Open Reserve and the locked unbound journal room (inaccessible on the weekend).

3


The following temporary measures have been taken for the coming year. 1. Open Reserve is no longer a service point. 2. The unbound periodicals from Open Reserve and the ones currently shelved in a locked area within the Library administrative corridor will be moved there, so that there will be only one place to find unbound periodicals. These will be retrieved upon request. The room will be accessible to faculty with their key. These measures will result in savings of about $3,000/yr for periodicals purchased expressly for Open Reserve and student wage savings of $8,500/yr. In September 1994, the Library will present a comprehensive plan to reorganize the public service points on the third floor. Two documents will be of help in this task: (1) the preliminary study of a special Library task force on space planning on the third floor. Its recommendation is to increase the visibility of reference and research services with a more centrally located reference desk and locating reference librarians offices more closely together; (2) The report from a space consultant, Professor Dennis Stone, Law Librarian at the University of Connecticut, who visited the Library in March 1994. The Library plan will also consider the location of microforms. A Cornell structural engineer advised the Library that the microforms cabinets exceeded the floor load capacity. They may have to be moved or the floor will need to be reinforced. The Library is waiting for estimates on this.

B. Organization of Collection The Library still needs to convert about 50% of the Library collection to machinereadable form, so that the Library materials, including the foreign and international law collection, historical materials and rare books, can be accessible to researchers through the online catalog, across campus and throughout the world via the Internet. The staff is making steady progress in converting targeted areas of the collection. Further progress is dependent on the availability of staff. The Library will investigate the possibility of contracting out the cataloging in machine-readable form and reclassification of these materials. The Library also plans to work with the University Library on fund-raising for retrospective conversion of Library materials.

IV. THE COLLECTIONS

A. Collection Development The Library strives to develop and maintain a collection of print, electronic and other

4


resources that support the Law School curriculum, programs and research, and other legal information needs (draft Strategic Plan). The Library has taken steps and will continue to examine the needs for a strong in-house collection, the opportunities for resource sharing with other libraries on campus and other law libraries, and the appropriate mix of print and electronic resources. The Library started working on a collection development manual which will be organized by type of material and subject, and will include both print and electronic sources of information. The information gathered will be crucial in determining when to buy print sources and when to rely on electronic sources. Key areas of the collection will be assessed this year.

B. Funding The increased funding for acquisitions led to more purchases of materials, primarily in foreign and international law. Some of the large purchases were for United Nations materials, as well as French and German law. The Library needs for the law of other countries are currently under discussion. The emphasis is on getting most materials available in English. The Library also started subscribing to the Congressional Information Service microfiche collection. Both the CIS and United Nations collections of materials are accessible on the network through CD-ROM indexes. At a later point, a more detail report on the state and future of the foreign and international law collections will be submitted.

C. Rare Books After the discovery that a large number of 18th century books were still in open stacks, and upon the advice of several specialists that these books needed protection since they now have become quite valuable, several steps were taken. The Librarian convened a rare book task force, which issued recommendations on developing procedures to identify and transfer the rare books to secure locations, such as the Rare Book Room and the Library Cage. In the fall, the library is planning to take advantage of Clive Holmes' expertise, since he will be teaching a seminar on Anglo-American Legal History. The Library received several rare items of particular interest: The first was a generous gift from an anonymous donor, Taux. Moderations, Sallaires et Emoluments des Greffiers du Parlement. Aix-en-Provence, 1540. Its value is estimated at $3,750. It provides useful documentary information on lawyers in Provence in the mid-sixteenth century. The book is considered to be quite rare. There are only two copies held in the U.S., and one defective copy at the Bibliotheque Nationale. It is one of the first books printed in Provence. Milton Gould, a Cornell Law School graduate, gave the Library several early New York legal documents dated 1798 and 1803, valued at $700.

5


D. Microforms Much staff time was spent this year reorganizing the microforms collection. This involved putting the microforms in numerical sequence, organizing individual sets, relabeling the drawers with uniform, accurate information and preparing a guide. The microforms collection is now easier to use, and the number of fiche to refile suggests that more people are using it.

E. U.S. Government Documents The Government Printing Office inspected the Law Library for compliance with the depository program. The Library passed with flying colors. The staff had been working hard on making improvements in preparation for the inspection and made several changes to depository procedures.

F. Preservation and Security The Library will soon need to address the preservation of brittle books, and take steps to identify and prioritize items in need of preservation. The Library needs to do an inventory of the collection to determine whether books are lost or missing. This will be dependent on the availability of staff. Law students and faculty have 24-hour access to the building and Library through the use of a key that opens several doors to the building. Security of books and persons was an issue this year, both in the Library and in the Law School, because of the presence of unauthorized users after regular business hours. The Librarian convened a Law School-wide task force to address the issue and one person was hired to patrol the area at closing time during the exam period. The Law School needs to continue working on a security system that ensures that only authorized individuals will have access to the Law Library and the building after regular business hours.

V. TECHNOLOGY A. Partnership with the Educational Technologies Department The Library started working in close cooperation with the Ed. Tech, department with the goal to provide access to a variety of library and information sources through the Novellbased Law School network. Joint projects that developed out of the weekly meetings included the installation of a CD-ROM network, the design of a student computer-use survey, work on a new windows menu, and training programs for faculty, staff and students.

6


The primary responsibility for support and training of students in the Computer Lab is under the Ed. Tech, department. The Library started providing training and assistance to faculty for most research applications. Next year, the librarians will include network training as part of their regular faculty liaison assignments.

B. Partnership with the Legal Information Institute Peter Martin gave the librarians a demonstration of the capabilities of the cello software and the Cornell Law WWW site. He also explained that one of the goals of the Cornell Law School gopher is to become the preeminent gopher source for internet-based legal information sources. Following this meeting, the Library started cooperating with the LII and referring sources of information to Peter who mounts them on the Cornell Law School gopher and WorldWideWeb browser. The Library is interested in collaborating with the LII and its sophisticated technological experiments to the benefit of Cornell law faculty and students

VI. MAJOR ISSUES FACING THE LAW LIBRARY A. Managing the transition from collecting legal information in multiple formats to greater reliance on electronic formats Resolving this issue will require an operational collection development policy encompassing information published in electronic, as well as print format, and expanded efforts to educate faculty, law students, and other users of legal information about the availability and advantages of electronic information sources. B. Developing more effective and efficient means for delivering legal information to the Law School Effective access to information requires not only providing users with information about the existence of needed information and its location, but the development of improved systems to facilitate delivery of documents to law faculty and students. Better document delivery systems need to be developed both within the Law School and to obtain information from outside sources. C. Maintaining existing and creating new cooperative relationships with other law libraries and sources of information Access to information requires cooperative efforts in collection building and resource sharing with other libraries and information sources. A priority will be to determine the appropriate levels of participation in the Research Libraries Group and other regional, national

7


and international resource sharing group arrangements. D. Enhancing and improving faculty and student computing services Cornell Law School is far along in providing a variety of computing services via the Law School faculty network to the faculty, students, and support staff. The current infrastructure also allows for the use of information technology in the classroom. Most faculty and administrative offices are connected to the Cornell Law School faculty network. The student network at present consists of 20 PC-based workstations, located in the computer area on Level 3. There are also 3 outlets in the Library to connect laptop computers to the network. Some of the classrooms are wired. Remote access to the network is possible. Currently, up to five users can dial into the network simultaneously. The technological capabilities that put Cornell Law School at the cutting edge are not yet fully tapped. The Law School needs to develop means to keep faculty informed about uses of computers in the curriculum and abreast of improvements in software and technology. The Law School also needs to establish an effective administrative structure to meet demands of faculty, staff, and students. The Library is ready to refine and develop its role in relation to other units providing computing services to faculty and students.

VII. CONCLUSION

A. Major Accomplishments during 1993-94 — Establishment of faculty/librarian liaison program — Installation of CD-ROM network — Adoption of a new food and drink policy in the Library — Adoption of a new policy on laptop computer use in the Library, after consultation with Library Committee — Strengthening of foreign and international law collections, with a focus on France and Germany

B. Areas of Concern — Need for better reference desk area

8


— Need for better security of books and people in the Library and Law School building — Need to move rare books from open stacks to secure areas — Need to address preservation of brittle books — Need for an inventory of the collection — Need for more staff to handle increased acquisitions and outreach programs

C. Staff One major strength of the Library is its staff. The staff has shown much enthusiasm and team spirit in adjusting to the demands of a new Director. They are highly motivated and dedicated to their work. The Library staff has been developing a strategic plan which will be submitted to the Library Committee and faculty for approval by September 1994. The process started in January 1994, with Dean Richard Danner, of Duke, acting as a facilitator. Its purpose is to guide the Library efforts to serve faculty and student research needs better. It will be the guiding document for the staff in their daily work and help them understand how their work contributes to the mission of the Library. The Plan is detailed and concrete.

9


PERSONNEL

Pat Court was promoted to Head of Reference on July 1, 1993. Effective July 7, 1994, she will become Head of Public Services. Naz Pantaloni started as Reference Librarian in September 1993. He won the 1994 American Association of Law Libraries Call for Papers competition for his paper "Legal Databases, Legal Epistemology, and the Legal Order." The law-trained librarians received a faculty title. This faculty title will recognize the educational role of the law-trained librarians within the Law School. They teach a credit course and a number of advanced legal research classes in formal and informal settings. A more detailed listing of staff activities and publications will be issued at a later point.

10


AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION SECTION OF LEGAL EDUCATION AND ADMISSIONS TO THE BAR FALL 1994 LAW SCHOOL ANNUAL QUESTIONNAIRE

PART III - LIBRARY Report financial figures in whole dollars and all other figures in whole numbers, except where otherwise indicated. If exact figures are not available, enter your best estimate. Space has been provided at the end of the questionnaire to enter any comments on the data re ­ ported. An asterisk (*) marks a defined term. It may be helpful to review the definitions in the printed questionnaire before beginning. Return disk, one printed copy, and Dean's Certification Form by October 15, 1994, to: Rick L. Morgan Data Specialist American Bar Association Indiana University 550 West North Street Indianapolis, IN 46202

SCHOOL NUMBER Name of Law School: City:

ITHACA

99

CORNELL U. State:

NY

Name of Director:

Claire M. Germain

Name of Person to Receive Inquiries:

Claire M. Germain

Title of Person to Receive Inquiries:

Edward Cornell Law Libn

Telephone Number:

(607)255-5857

Fax Number:

(607)255-7193

Ext.

ABANET Number: Ending month of library fiscal year (number of month)

__ 6


10/19/94 CORNELL U. SECTION 1 - INFORMATION RESOURCES (1993-94 Fiscal Year) a. b. Added Withdrawn during during fiscal fiscal year year 1* Volumes*

(excluding microforms)

Page 2 c. Held at end of fiscal year

11,400

2,488

429,236

2. Microfilm reels*

135

0

5,302

3. Volume equivalent of microfilm reels (microfilm reels x 5)

675

0

26,510

111,265

161

526,085

18,544

27

87,681

0

0

0

4. Microfiche*

(include microcards)

5. Volume equivalent of microfiche and microcards (microfiche / 6) 6. Units of other microform formats

7 * Total volumes* and volume equivalents held (Questions lc + 3c + 5c)

543,427

a. Added during fiscal year 8 * Titles* (excluding nonbook titles) a. Is title quantity determined by shelf measurement? (Y/N) N 9* Microform titles*

(Question 8+9+10)

c. Held at end of fiscal year

2,023

451

160,535

919

3

2,247

6

0

525

2,948

454

163,307

10. Other non-book titles* 10a. Total titles

b. Withdrawn during fiscal year

11- Number of CD-ROM titles held or leased H a . Number of CD-ROM titles or tape load titles accessible through campus network, if any

12 18

12. Number of active serial subscriptions*

5,686

13. Number of active serial titles* 14. If library is a federal depository, what percentage of items are selected?

5,433 14.9


10/19/94 CORNELL U. SECTION 2 - INFORMATION ACCESS (1994-95 Fiscal Year)

Page 3 3

15. Number of microform readers

______

16. Number of microform reader printers

________2

17. Number of computer work stations* in the library or under library control: (Do not report a computer work station in more than one category.) a. b. c. d. e.

used predominately by law students used predominately by law school faculty used predominately by law school staff used predominately by law library personnel other (specify):_____________________________________

48 0 2 29 ________0

18. Number of computer printers in the library or under library control:

______ 43

19. How many CD-ROM players are installed in work stations identified in Question 17?

________5

20. Total hours of all online* computer assisted legal research (LEXIS/NEXIS, WESTLAW, DIALOG), last fiscal year 16,795 21. List the integrated automation systems you have, whether or not they are completed: NOTIS ___________________________ 22. Have you automated any of the following functions? a. c. e. g. 23.

(Y/N)

Public catalog Y b. Cataloging _y Budget & accounting Y d. Acquisitions _y Serials control Y f. Circulation _y Other______________________________________________ _____ _

Does the library participate in: ("Participate" means contribute records to the database)

24. This question deleted in 1992-93.

a. OCLC? b. RLIN? c. WLN?

_N __Y N


10/19/94 CORNELL U. SECTION 3 - PERSONNEL (1994-95 Fiscal Year)

Page 4 Part-Time

Full-Time

25. This question deleted in 1993-94. 26. Number of full-time equivalent* part-time librarians and other professional staff*

8.0

26a. Number of hours in institution's prescribed work week 27. Number of support staff (excluding hourly students and other temporary part-time support staff)

39.0

_____ 3_

28. Number of full-time equivalent* part-time support staff (excluding hourly students and other temporary part-time support staff)

____ ^

1.7

29. This question deleted in 1992-93. 30. Number of hours worked by hourly students and other temporary part-time employees, last fiscal year

31. Average hourly rate paid students or other temporary part-time employees, current fiscal year 32. This question deleted in 1992-93. 33. This question deleted in 1993-94. 34. This question deleted in 1993-94. 35= This question deleted in 1993-94. 36. This question deleted in 1993-94.

9,820

5.29


10/19/94

CORNELL U.

37. What is the minimum starting salary you would pay for a candidate new to librarianship for fall 1994? JD only MLS only MLS/JD Other (give degree code*) _______ 38. This question deleted in 1993-94. 39. This question deleted in 1993-94.

SECTION 4 - FINANCIAL RESOURCES (1993-94 Fiscal Year) NOTE:

Report expenditures in one category only.

40. This question deleted in 1993-94. 41. This question deleted in 1993-94. 42. This question deleted in 1993-94. 43. This question deleted in 1993-94. 44. This question deleted in 1993-94. 45. This question deleted in 1993-94. 45. This question deleted in 1993-94. 47. This question deleted in 1993-94.

Page 5

0 0 0 0


10/19/94

CORNELL U.

48. This question deleted in 1993-94. 49. This question deleted in 1993-94. 50. This question deleted in 1993-94. 51. This question deleted in 1993-94. 52. This question deleted in 1993-94. 53. This question deleted in 1993-94. 54. This question deleted in 1993-94. 55. This question deleted in 1993-94. 56. This question deleted in 1993-94. 57. This question deleted in 1993-94. 58. This question deleted in 1993-94.

SECTION 5 - LIBRARY PHYSICAL FACILITIES 59. Net square feet of space assigned for library purposes*

51,534

60. Linear feet of shelving capacity:* a. Occupied by library materials b. Not occupied

66,513 33,069

61. Number of volumes in working collection counted in Question 7 which are systematically retrievable and stored off-site

______ 0

62. Number of carrel seats available for library users

___ 188

63. Number of non-carrel study seats available for library users

255

64. Number of all study seats available for library users (Question 62 + Question 63)

443


10/19/94 CORNELL U. SECTION 6 - HOURS OF LIBRARY OPERATION

Page 7 Regular Schedule

65. Number of hours per week library is open a. Hours per week professional staff* on duty b. Hours per week only full-time support staff on duty c. Hours per week only students or other part-time staff on duty 6 6 . Number of hours of reference service provided per week

Abbreviated Schedule*

85

45

61

45

20

0

4

0

56

40

67. Number of weeks per year library operates on: a. Abbreviated schedule*

15

b. Extended schedule

6

6 8 . Is access to the library after hours, without any staff present, generally allowed for: a. Law students?

Y

b. Law faculty?

y

SECTION 7 - SERVICES TO OFF-SITE PATRONS 69. Requests for services to off-site patrons* last fiscal year: a. Sent by library _____ 621 c. Received by library _____ 767

554 627

b. Filled for library d. Filled by library

70. For the figure reported in 69d, how many requests were filled by: a. b. c. d. e.

Loan of original Photocopy Microform duplication Telefacsimile Other

“ " "

1 35 447 7 27 iff

71. What provision is made for access to information available through consortia or network arrangements? Answer Y for all that apply. a. b. c. d. e.

Telefacsimile Overnight courier Consortium staff delivery Library messenger E-mail (transmission oftext)

y ~y~ ~n ~ ~n ~ n


10/19/94

CORNELL U.

Page 8

72. This question deleted in 1993-94. SECTION 8 - COMMENTS 73. Please include here any descriptive information or comments you wish to make regarding the data entered in this questionnaire. 26. This is full-time professional and other professional staff; we have no part-time professional or other professional staff.


CORNELL

ABA LAW SCHOOL ANNUAL QUESTIONNAIRE - FISCAL 10/19/94 PAGE:

D.

Library Salaries

.

Salaries paid all professional law library personnel

$387,244

0

2.

Support staff salaries (non-professionals)

$283,887

0

3.

Tem p. Part-Tim e and S tudent Employees (not work study)

$

9,445

0

4.

Student W o rk Study (include both federal and institutional contribution)

$ 39,322

0

O ther

$

0

$719,898

0

5.

[Self Total D] E.

O ther Salaries N o t Included Elsewhere 1.

Research Assistants

S

0

2.

G raduate Program A dm inistration

$

0

3.

Foreign Program A dm inistration

$

0

4.

Clinical Salaries n o t included elsewhere

$

0

5.

S tu d ent W o rk Study excluding library (including both federal and institutional contributions)

$

0

O ther

$

0

6.

[Self Total E] F.

Fringe: Benefits 1.

Instruction (A l-15)

$

0

2.

Sum m er School (B 1-12)

$

0

3.

A dm inistrative and Student Services ( C l-22)

$

0

4.

Library (D l-7 )

$204,756

0

5.

O th er ( E l-7)

$

0

6.

T otal fringes

$

0

3


10/19/94

CORNELL U.

CO M M EN TS

Please include here any descriptive inform ation or com m ents you wish to m ake regarding th e data entered in this questionnaire.

G.6.

All RLIN costs are paid by the central university library system. W e have no rational way to prorate the Law Library's costs.

G.7.

All costs of m aintaining the library's autom ated system (NOTIS) are paid by th e central university library system. W e have no way to prorate the Law Library's share of these costs.


COLLECTIONS DATA Table la: Growth of Printed Volumes in Library July 1, 1993 - June 30, 1994 Table lb: Growth of Printed Volumes in the Library Annex July 1, 1993 - June 30, 1994 Table 2a & 2b:

Growth of Non-Book Materials-July 1, 1993-June 30, 1994

Table 3:

Growth of Microform Material - July 1, 1993 - June 30, 1994

Table 4:

Growth of Manuscript Material - July 1, 1993 - June 30, 1994


LIBRARY RESOURCES TABLE 1a: GROWTH OF PRINTED VOLUMES IN THE LIBRARIES - JULY 1,1993 - JUNE 30, 1994

Volumes in Library Beginning of Year

Volumes _____ Added_____

Volumes Subtracted

Total Volumes ______ in Library

Endowed Libraries Africans

13,954 265,483 144,002 26,509 411,417 136,268 42,895 105,563 2,881,707 87,680 _________ 170,438

Engineering Fine Arts Hotel Law Management Mathematics Music Olin/Kroch Physical Sciences Uris

Sub-Total

8,381

2,153

417,645

4,285,916

Statutory Libraries Geneva Exp. Station

54,392 184,198 607,532 77,849

Ind. & Labor Relations Mann/Entomology Veterinary

Sub-Total

923,971

TOTAL

5,209,887

Total Net Volumes Added to Libraries

0

Page 2


LIBRARY RESOURCES TABLE 1b: GROWTH OF PRINTED VOLUMES IN THE LIBRARY ANNEX - JULY 1,1993 - JUNE 30, 1994

Volumes in Annex Beginning of Year

Volumes Added to Annex

Volumes Subtracted from Annex

Total Volumes in Annex End of Year

Endowed Libraries Africans

0

Engineering

4 6,862

5,179

Fine Arts Hotel

0

Law

0

Management

.

Mathematics

0

0

0

20,748 0

Music

0

Olin/Kroch

2 43,867

Physical Sciences

5,580

0

Uris

Sub-Total

322,236

Statutory Libraries 1,087

Ind. & Labor Relations Mann/Entomology

39,722

Veterinary

6 ,697

Sub-Total

4 7,5 06

TOTAL

369,742

Total Net Volumes Subtracted from the Annex

Page 3


LIBRARY RESOURCES TABLE 2a: GROWTH OF NON-BOOK MATERIALS - JULY 1,1993 - JUNE 30,1994

MOTION M APS

Beg'ng of Year Endowed Libraries Africana Engineering Fine Arts Hotel Law Management Mathematics Music Olin/Kroch Physical Sciences Uris Sub-Total

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 203,418 102 0

FILMSTRIPS

PICTURES

End of Year

0

Beg’ng of Year 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 2,767 0 146

.& SLIDES

End of Year

1

Beg'ng of Year 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 333 42 3,503

YIPEQ-TAPES

End of Year

0

Beg’ng of Year 346 52 108 630 134 2 56 448 569 116 1,622

203,520

2,916

3,878

4,083

279 0 3,187 0

0 364 0 0

0 94 0 27,284

6 355 0 955

Sub-Total

3,466

364

27,378

1,316

TOTAL

206,986

3,280

31,256

5,399

Statutory Libraries Geneva Exp. Station Ind. & Labor Relations Mann/Entomology Veterinary

End of Year

Total Table 2a

140

141

Page 5


LIBRARY RESOURCES TABLE 2b: GROWTH OF NON-BOOK MATERIALS - JULY 1,1993 - JUNE 30,1994 SOUND RECORDINGS Beg'ng of Year Endowed Libraries Africana Engineering Fine Arts Hotel Law Management Mathematics Music Olin/Kroch Physical Sciences Uris Sub-Total

262 59 0 17 326 0 5 39,561 6,902 0 20,122

End of Year

356

COMPUTER FILE? Beg'ng of Year 0 49 0 8 6 273 0 2 284 49 8

67,254

679

10 1,647 0 537

11 59 1,069 475

Sub-Total

2,194

1,614

TOTAL

69,448

2,293

Statutory Libraries Geneva Exp. Station Ind. & Labor Relations Mann/Entomoiogy Veterinary

End of Year

Total Table 2b

7

363

Totals From Table 2a

141

Total Non-Book Materials (2a + 2b)

504

N

Total Growth of Non-book Materials - July 1,1993 - June 30,1994

8,088 Page 6


LIBRARY RESOURCES TABLE 3: GROWTH OF MICROFORM MATERIALS - JULY 1,1993 - JUNE 30,1994

MICROFILM End of

Beg'ng

Year

of Year

MICROFICHE Beg’ng of Year

MICROPRINT

MICROCARD

End of Year

End of

Beg'ng

Year

of Year

Beg'ng

End

Total

of Year

of Year

Microforms

0

531,347

Endowed Libraries

1,145

4,279

550

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

143,322

1,333,480

9,908

1,047,148

583

22,920

0

91.265

0 0

0 0

156,262

4,148,939

136,703

1,047,148

129

1,514

0 0

0 0

Africana

1,092

5

0

Engineering

1,304

1,552,541

84,052

561

5,987

0 0 0

Fine Arts Hotel

989

7,499

526,085

Law

5,167

Management

2,046

715,778

42,193

Mathematics

53

204

0

Music Olin/Kroch Physical Sciences Uris Sub-Total

5,262

414,981

0

Statutory Libraries Geneva Exp. Station Ind. & Labor Relations

4,158

32,231

Mann/Entomology

2,537

2,701

1,244

0

571,152 25,088

0

0

Sub-Total

6,824

629,985

2,701

1,244

TOTAL

163,086

4,778,924

139,404

1,048,392

Veterinary

Total Growth of Microform Material -- July 1,1993 - June 30,1994

296,461

Page 7


LIBRARY RESOURCES TABLE 4: GROWTH OF MANUSCRIPT MATERIAL - JULY 1,1993 - JUNE 30,1994

Cubic Feet at Beginning of year Unit Libraries/Departments Olin/Kroch Rare and Manuscript Collections

Ind. & Labor Relations Labor Mgmt. Documentation Center Sub-Total

Library Annex Olin/Kroch Rare and Manuscript Collections

Ind. & Labor Relations Labor Mgmt. Documentation Center

Cubic Feet Added

Cubic Feet at End of Year

16,248

8,985 + 25,233

N *

t

21,116

6,426

Sub-Total

27,542

TOTAL

52,775

tCorrected total, includes 2,412 cubic ft. of pamphlets not previously recorded. Page 8


TECHNICAL SERVICES DATA Table 5: Table 10a:

Material in Process for Cataloging - June 30, 1994 Cataloging of Titles - July 1, 1993 - June 30, 1994

Table 10b: Cataloging and Processing of Manuscript Material July 1, 1993 - June 30, 1994 Table 10c: Serial and Newspaper Titles Received and Processed July 1, 1993 - June 30, 1994


UBRARY RESOURCES TABLE 5: MATERIAL IN PROCESS FOR CATALOGING - JUNE 30,1994

P ro c es sin g C en ter

V o lu m e s /P ie ce s

Central Technical Services* ILR

Law

*2,543

Mann** Music (predominantly audio/video) Olin/Kroch (Rare and Manuscript Collections) TOTAL

‘ Includes processing for Africana, Engineering, Fine Arts, Hotel, Management, Mathematics, Music, Olin/Kroch (including maps and Asia Collections), Physical Sciences and Uris "Includes processing for Entomology and Veterinary.

*Total includes a count of 713 from the PL480 backlog not previously included. Page 9


LIBRARY SERVICES TABLE 10a: CATALOGING OF TITLES - JULY 1,1993 - JUNE 30,1994

Mono-

Serials on

Mono-

graphs on

Micro-

graphs

Microform

Reclassified Audio/

Computer

& Recataloged

Serials

form

Maps

Visuals

Files

TOTAL

183

19

0

5

2

2 ,4 2 4

Titles

Endowed Libraries Central Tech. Services* Law

1 ,3 1 8

897

6 95

Music*** Sub-Total

Statutory Libraries Geneva Exp. Station Ind. & Labor Relations Mann** Sub-Total

TOTAL

Total titles cataloged and recataloged

‘ Includes Africana, CISER Data Archives, Engineering, Fine Arts, Hotel, Management, Mathematics, Music (books & scores), Olin/Kroch, Physical Sciences and Uris titles. "Includes Entomology and Veterinary titles. •‘ Sound recordings

P age 14


LIBRARY SERVICES TABLE 10b: CATALOGING AND PROCESSING OF MANUSCRIPT MATERIAL - JULY 1,1993 - JUNE 30,1994

RUN Archives & Manuscripts Records Endowed Libraries Olin/Kroch Rare and Manuscript Collections

Statutory Libraries Ind. & Labor Relations Labor Mgmt. Doc. Center

TOTAL

Collections Processed

Finding Aids Produced

Manuscript Cards Produced


UBRARY SERVICES TABLE 10c: SERIAL & NEWSPAPER TITLES RECEIVED AND PROCESSED - JULY 1,1993 - JUNE 30,1994

Titles Beginning of Year Endowed Libraries Central Tech. Services** Hotel Law Sub-Total

Statutory Libraries Geneva Exp. Station Ind. & Labor Relations Mann*** Veterinary

Serials__________________ Total Titles Serial Subtracted* Added Titles

_________________ Newspapers Beginning of Year

39,330

383

1,373

11

5,226

2 35

52

5,409

7

45,929

401

940

7

3,811

4

9,101

20

1,234

4

Sub-Total

15,086

35

TOTAL

61,015

_______ _

_____________

____

Titles Added

Subtracted*

0

0

Total Newspaper Titles

7

_______ 436

*Titles subtracted includes titles that ceased to be published and subscriptions cancelled. ••Includes Africana, Engineering, Fine Arts, Management, Mathematics, Music, Olin/Kroch, Physical Sciences and Uris titles. •••Includes Entomology titles.

Page 16


SERVICES DATA Table 6:

Materials Use - July 1, 1993 - June 30, 1994

Table 7:

Reference Services - July 1, 1993 - June 30, 1994

Table 8:

User Access and Instruction - July 1, 1993 - June 30, 1994


LIBRARY SERVICES TABLE 6: MATERIALS USE - JULY 1,1993 - JUNE 30,1994 In Library Materials Use Endowed Libraries

General Circulation

Total Materials Use

Africana Annex Engineering Fine Arts Hotel Law

48,199

Management

582

48,781

Mathematics Music Olin/Kroch Physical Sciences Uris

Sub-Total Statutory Libraries Geneva Exp. Station Ind. & Labor Relations Mann/Entomology Veterinary

Sub-Total

TOTAL

P a g e 10


LIBRARY SERVICES TABLE 7: REFERENCE SERVICES - JULY 1, 1993 - JUNE 30,1994

Reference Questions Answered

Computer Assisted Search Service/ COMPASS

Total Reference Services

Endowed Libraries Africana Engineering Fine Arts Hotel 7,315

Law

1,379

8,694

M an ag em en t M athem atics Music Olin/Kroch Physical S cien ces Uris

Sub-Total Statutory Libraries G e n e v a Exp. Station Ind. & Labor R elations M ann/E ntom ology Veterinary

Sub-Total

TOTAL

Page 11


LIBRARY SERVICES TABLE 8: USER ACCESS AND INSTRUCTION - JULY 1, 1993 - JUNE 30,1994

Bibliographies & Handouts Endowed Libraries Africans Annex Engineering Fine Arts Hotel Law Management Mathematics Music Olin/Kroch Physical Sciences Uris Sub-Total

Statutory Libraries Geneva Exp. Station Ind. & Labor Relations Mann/Entomology Veterinary Sub-Total

TOTAL

24

Hpurs of Operation Per Typical Week

85

instruction Sessions Number Participants

11

336

Tours Number

Participants

34

374

Cornell Law Library Annual Report 1994  
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