Page 1

Cornell Law Library Myron Taylor Hall Ithaca, New York 14853

Annual Report 1987/88

Stress was a very prominent component of almost every activity in the Law Library this year. Two dedicated long-term employees left, Alan Diefenbach from the reference staff and Lois Peret from the cataloging staff. The acquisitions budget was cut for the year, creating great pressure on collection development. The implementation of the NOTIS system was not as smooth as had been hoped. Fortunately the construction around Myron Taylor had little impact on the library until the very end of the year.

Staff Alan Diefenbach joined the Law Library reference staff in 1970. Over seventeen years he developed a fine expertise in international and foreign law as well as the most thorough knowledge of this collection of anyone on the staff. When he moved to the Harvard Law Library in June 1987, he left a tremendous void here. We did not attempt to hire an experienced foreign law librarian to replace his expertise, rather we embarked on training other staff to fill his place. Margie Axtmann assumed responsibility for maintaining and developing the foreign and international collections, acquiring the additional title of "Foreign and International Bibliographer" to mark this responsibil­ ity. She attended a special foreign law institute following the Annual Meeting of the American Association of Law Libraries in June 1988 to advance her skills in this area and plans to audit certain law school courses. A recent library school graduate, with a law degree, was hired to fill the reference vacancy. Because of his inexperience, the Practice Training I course was taught by two people -John Hasko and Bruce Kennedy - rather than the three or four who had taught it for the past several years. Unfortunately the new reference librarian's front-line reference skills were disappointing, so he left at the end of the year. Another loss in the Public Services Department was felt deeply when Nancy Moore, the leader of the support staff, accepted a promotion to the inter-library lending staff in Olin Library. Nancy's promotion was the direct result of her effective and pleasant service in the Law Library. Lois Peret, who had been a copy cataloger in the Law Library for twelve years and had become a respected, stabalizing force in the Cataloging Department, married and moved to Vermont during the summer of 1987. Janet Gillespie moved from Public Services to take Lois' position, but when Nancy Moore left, Janet elected to move back to Public Services in Nancy's position. Mae Leckey was then promoted to Lois’ position and Kathy Hartman, who had started her library career in Acquisitions here some ten years before, was lured back from Uris Library to take Mae's position.


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Coping with the hiring, training and scheduling of 30-35 part-time students every year had become too burdensome for the staff, especially when high turn-over and the overall decrease in the number of work-study students made it difficult to get the necessary tasks accomplished in a timely, acceptable manner within our budget. So we created two part-time positions from the student wage budget and from approximately $7,000 in general purpose funds carried forward from the previous year. One position is a gifts and exchange clerk for the Acquisitions Department, the other is a shelver for the Public Services Department. The shelver has done wonders to improve the speed and accuracy with which books get back on the shelves. These two positions have proved to be very successful in filling great needs in the library s effective operation. Unfortunately, it means that we have no funding in the student wages line in our Cornell University Libraries budget. The funding must come from the Law School's direct contribution to the Law Library budget. George D. and Harriet W. Cornell generously endowed the position of Law Librarian. The librarian will be known as the Edward D. Cornell Law Librarian, in memory of the father of the donor. Edward D. Cornell was the law student first employed as law librarian for the Cornell Law Library.

Collection Development Over-spending of acquisitions budgets in other endowed libraries during 1986/87 created a negative opening balance for this year, drastically reducing the amounts available for acquisitions in 1987/88. For the Law Library this meant that the allocation for acquisitions went from $380,000 to $360,000 rather than to the appropriated $400,000, even though the Law Library had not overspent its funds in 1986/87. A modest increase in the funds given by the Law School directly to the Law Library, plus endowment income (which the University kept at 1986/87 levels), gifts and sales gave us a total of $524,311 for acquisitions in 1987/88, a 4% reduction from the $543,407 received in 1986/87. This in a year when the foreign exchange rates and the falling dollar increased the cost of our foreign subscriptions 49% from $28 316 to $42,200. By very careful monitoring, we were able to keep our total expenditures to $529,333, a shortfall of less than 1%. New acquisitions expenditures were held to $46,468 - 42% below the previous year. Using suggestions from all staff and after consultation with the faculty, we cancelled many subscriptions - 39 from Matthew Bender alone. We also cancelled all subscriptions for materials from Central and South America. The savings for many of these cancellations will not be realized until the coming year. Even so, we were able to keep the increase in the cost of our United States subscriptions to 5.7%, much less than the average price increase. For the coming year the funds available for acquisitions total $587,300. If we receive at least $10,000 in gifts and sales, as we have the past two years, this will give us $73,000 more than we had in 1987/88 and $44,000 more than in 1986/87. Coupled with at least $25,000 to be realized from the cancelled subscriptions, we expect to be able to resume our earlier level of acquisitions.


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Automation The Technical Services Department transferred their processing from RLIN (Research Libraries Information Network) to the local NOTIS system in midyg^j # However, the loading of Cornell tapes from RLIN was not completed for months and no direct method for downloading records from RLIN to NOTIS has been implemented because of delays in software development. This meant that our operations this year were less efficient than we had hoped. NOTIS fund accounting, which we had hoped to test before the end of this year, was not functioning as we required, so the Law Library is using the system which was developed in house for Olio and will continue to do so next year. The online catalog became available to the public in other libraries on campus in April. Because the construction in Myron Taylor will force us to move all of the communication lines to the NOTIS database, we postponed the installation of the public online terminals until after the moves next year. Remarkably, the Technical Services Department has been able to keep current with its work during all these changes, in part because of good management and in part because of the reduction in new purchases. Moveover, all books from our earlier backlogs, primarily foreign materials, are now in the NOTIS system as "in process." This means that these books can be located by anyone using the online catalog.

Construction The construction of the addition to the existing building had little direct, during this year. Workers upgrading the system in the stacks were careful not to absolutely necessary.

Myron Taylor and the renovation of negative impact on the Law Library lighting and installing the sprinkler disrupt library operations more than

Great quantities of staff time were consumed in planning for the work to be done in the construction and for the move of books and staff. The collection was moved in late May and early June. Approximately onehalf of the collection fit into the two library floors in the new wing. The remaining books were packed and moved into a warehouse, inaccessible until the old stacks are renovated and ready for us to reoccupy them.

From 1978 to 1993 In the past ten years this library has moved from being a collection of hard copy materials to a library which focuses upon access to information without regard to the format or location of that information. This trend will


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continue even as we acquire more and more printed pages to store in our new stacks. In the past ten years we have acquired 280,000 microfiche and 4,800 reels of microfilm. A great proportion of this was acquired to relieve our space constraints, e.g. replacing the bound back files of the Federal Register and the Code of Federal Regulations with microfiche and moving our subscription to the New York Court of Appeals briefs from hard copy to microfilm. Another factor in the growth of our microfiche collection has been the movement to microfiche by the U.S. Government Printing Office. This allows us to get Congressional hearings on deposit in microformat rather than one hundred feet of printed documents a year. As our space constraints are released, another factor, perhaps even more compelling, pushing us to more microforms is the need to preserve the intellectual content of books printed on rapidly deteriorating paper. Having climate control in our stacks will slow the disintegration of the paper shelved in them but it will not stop completely. Thus, we are facing an expensive conversion process over the next decades as part of the present collection becomes unusable. The shift to microforms has had an impact on more than shelving. We have been able to hold our binding costs at about $20,000 for several years as we stopped binding bulky materials in favor of acquiring the microform edition. In almost all cases it has been cheaper to purchase microform files of newspapers and court briefs than to bind the paper copy. In the case of the New York Court of Appeals briefs we also released one full-time staff member from binding duties. The microform collection still does not occupy more than one-third of a staff member's time. The next miniature technology for libraries is the compact disc (CD). We now have one periodical index in this format and expect to add another next year. The Government Printing Office is proposing to issue the Congressional Record only in this format. Since multiple users accessing the same database (which we take as a given in online databases) is not possible with the present CD technology, we are facing a very large equipment cost as CD publishing accelerates. The library first subscribed to an online database (LEXIS) ten years ago. Now we have both LEXIS and WESTLAW. We train all first year students to use both systems. The law review has its own LEXIS and WESTLAW terminals and many faculty dial in to one or the other from their office and from home. Some faculty, particularly those interested in business law, also use other online databases such as NEXIS. The original and still primary use of these databases is for sophisticated searching for specific information. In addition, we are now relying on them to provide our only access to some materials. Part of our reassessment of our acquisitions expenditures this year included considering what we could get online only. For instance, we cancelled our hard copy subscription to state public utility reports that are available on line.


-5-

We have one subscription to WESTLAW, with four passwords, plus the law review line. So far the contention for these library's lines has not been a problem, but when it does we are looking at a doubling in the annual cost of access to WESTLAW. The library is providing video replay facilities in the demonstration and study rooms being built into the old stacks, anticipating heavier use of video technology in the Law School. Bruce Kennedy has written an interactive video program to instruct viewers in the use of secondary legal materials. We will use equipment received through Project Ezra to run this program. Since 1976 Law Library Technical Services has moved from pencils and manual typewriters with a few cards purchased from the Library of Congress to computer workstations, a high reliance on cataloging copy from other law libraries, and no cards. We started to catalog online with OCLC in 1976, moved to RLIN in 1981 and brought all these records back to campus in 1988. We started online acquisitions records in 1981 and those too came on campus in 1988. We hope to have a totally online fund accounting system in 1989, complete with software to provide detailed analysis of our collection development patterns as well as our expenditures. The advent on the public access online catalog gives the Law Library community access not only to the records of all law books cataloged since 1976, but also to all materials on order and in process. Moreover, it offers the same breadth of records for all other libraries on campus, including materials on business, labor, economics and philosophy and all other specialties throughout Cornell. In the next year the system should offer dial-in access from the campus and perhaps beyond for anyone with a modem and a telephone line. Further enhancements of the online catalog that the public will see include immediate availability of selective periodicals check-in records, so that the online user will know which issues of a given law review have been received and which have been bound. Online check-in has begun in the Law Library. Further away, but definitely in the plans, is online circulation. This will tell the user which copies of an item have been checked out from any library on campus. Presently the online catalog has records for new titles acquired by the Law Library since 1976, all materials classified in JX (international law) and all current and most non-current periodicals. Libraries with experience with public online catalogs report that their patrons use the online catalog to the exclusion of the card catalog and so fail to find all the older materials not represented in the online catalog. For this reason, we should convert the rest of our records to machine readable form. The estimated cost of this conversion is at least $125,000.00. In the past ten years we have been through the complete cycle in foreign exchange rates. The dollar was low in the late seventies, high in the early eighties and very low now. When the dollar buys less abroad, our acquisitions budget suffers. Fortunately I was able to hoard some of the money realized in


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the days of the high dollar and put it into an interest-bearing fund. This money is to be used to create a current working collection in foreign law to support the research of any comparativist the Law School may add to the faculty. The immediate pressure on the book budget next year will be the need to acquire materials for the Open Reserve Room being built into the old stacks. Because we have not determined exactly what we will put into the space nor even made a general estimate of what it will hold, we have been unable to make a budget request to cover it in 1988/89. If and until other funds are available, the funds ear-marked for comparative law will be used for this purpose to the extent necessary. The Open Reserve Room is designed to solve some problems researchers have had in the Law Library with the most efficient use of resources. The inability to locate current journals and some reporters has been a chronic problem in this Law Library. This has led to pressure for a separate faculty library and for more copies of materials. When material has to be retrieved by staff from the unbound journal collection or from an office, the patron has to wait and the staff member is taken from other activity. Having a copy of these high-demand materials in an Open Reserve Room with adjacent Faculty Reading Room provides immediate access without staff intervention and without creating a separate collection for a limited number of users. Certainly we will be purchasing some addition copies of materials, but we will also be moving many presently owned second copies into this room. The room will allow us to continue our practice of very modest duplication of our holdings. Staffing of the Law Library is a matter that will need to be addressed in the next few years - the number of staff, their allocation within the library and their remuneration. Our staff if very small for a law library of our size. The proportion of professionals to support staff - 1 to 2 - is good, perhaps optimal. We need not more of one or the other, but more of both. When, as this year, we have vacancies as a result of staff turnover, the remaining staff are severely pushed to maintain our high standards of operation. The new space in the Law Library is very welcome, but it will also make even more demands on the meager staff. Books spread further take longer to reshelve. Another desk will have to be staffed as we open the Open Reserve area. Retrieving books from 580 lockers and searching through 200 carrels is much more time consuming than controlling 44 carrels and one range of shelves to which students could check out materials. Our professional staff have been very active in the American Association of Law Libraries taking on major assignments for that organization in addition to their more-than-full-time assignments here. Travel expenses for most of these activities are not fully reimbursed by Cornell and now they are not even tax-deductible. This makes the salary level even less competitive. The new space and refurbishing of the old space has brought great benefits, which the library staff and the library users are very grateful. can now turn our attention to other areas posing challenges in the years ahead. '

We

/ Jane L. Hammond Edward D. Cornell Law Librarian

/


Cornell Law Library Myron Taylor Hall Ithaca, New York 14853

July 6, 1988

(■60 V )"

TO: Distribution IndicatedBelow FROM: Law Library SUBJECT: Law Library Acquisitions Budget, year to date Available funds 1987/88 a. b. c. d.

2*

$360,000.00 127,500.00 23.762.00 13.049.00 $524,311.00

Appropriated funds Law School Endowment income Gifts and Sales Tota 1

Expenditures through June 30, 1988 June a.

New titles (monographs & new serials) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

b.

United States Public & private international Comparative British Commonwealth Other jurisdictions

$608.18 585.57 143.81 189.75 106.46

$22,811.59 8,900.84 2,765.03 8,827.25 3,263.61

6,755.66 370.30

329,899.98 35,152.93 4,458.04 53,783.50 42,199.60

Continuations (subscriptions) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

c.

Year To date

United States Public & private international Comparative British Commonwealth Other jurisdictions

1.870.47 1.372.47

17,270.80

Binding Sub-tota1s

$12,002.67

$529,333.17 -$5,022.17

Deficit, June 30, 1988 •j

J•

Accessions a.

Printed volumes added year to date

b.

Microforms added year to date (pieces) Reels Fiche

c.

6,976

2,873

144 12,372 37

Other

distribution:

613

Russell Osgood Herbert Finch Jane Hammond Gene Wheeler John Hasko M. M. Axtmann file


CORNELL UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORT FORM FOR THE YEAR 1987/88

Library:

Law

Librarian:

Jane L. Hammond

Prepared by:

Jane L. Hammond

Date Completed:

August 10, 1988

Please complete this form and return it to the University Librarian's office, 201 01 in Library, on or before August 12, 1988. Please complete the requested information appropriate to your departmental operation. Data for this annual statistical report encompasses the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1987, and ending June 30, 1988. Financial and personnel data for endowed unit departments will be completed by the account ing office, 01 in Library.

I.

SIZE OF COLLECTIONS (only cataloged volumes, i.e. monographs, serials and pamphlets, are to be counted; for other materials, count only those arranged and available for use) PLEASE NOTE! Reporting libraries are requested to show size of collection data for two specific areas: on-site collection and Annex Library collection. Collection Located On-Site At Annex Volumes 1. Number of volumes at beginning of year (If figure differs from previous year's report, please explain.) 2. No. of orders placed Volumes added 3. Acquired by purchase 4. Acquired by gift or exchange 5. Total volumes added (3 + 4) 6. No. of volumes withdrawn from records 7. No. of volumes lost/stolen 8. No. of volumes mutilated 9. Net increase in volumes (5 - 6 - 7 - 8) 10. No. of volumes at end of year ( 1 + 9 )

355,227 414

(376,821)

6,874

(6,976)

6,874 3,446

(6,976) (3,446)

3,428 358,655

(380,351)

— 2.1,594.

102

.... ____ mi.

102 21.696


t

- 2 -

B.

C.

D.

E.

Serials Currently Received (Excludes newspapers reported below) 1. Number of titles at beginning of year 2. No. of titles added during year 3. No. of withdrawals & cancellations 4. Total no. of titles received ( 1 + 2 - 3 )

4,766 136 58

4,844

Newspapers Currently Received 1. No. of subscriptions at beginning of year 2. No. of added subscriptions (exclude gifts & exchanges) 3. No. of withdrawals & cancellations 4. Total no. of subscriptions end of year (1+2-3) 5. No. of gifts & exchanges at beginning of year 6. No. of added gifts & exchanges 7. No. of withdrawals & cancellations 8. No. of gift & exchange subscriptions end of year (5 + 6 - 7) 9. Total no. of titles received at end of year (4 + 8) Microforms (show physical count data) 1. Microfilm a. No. of reels held at beginning of year b. No. added c. Total held at end of year (a + b) 2. Microcards a. No. of units held at beginning of year b. No. added c. Total held at end of year (a + b) 3. Microprint Sheets a. No. of units held at beginning of year b. No. added c. Total held at end of year (a + b) 4. Microfiche a. No. of units held at beginning of year b. No. added c> £j0> volumes withdrawn c. Total held at end of year (a + d J- c ) 5. Total Microform units held at end of year (lc + 2c + 3c + 4c) Miscellaneous 1. Motion Pictures No. units held at a. No. added b. Total held at end c. Audio Recordings a./ No. units held at No. added b/ Total held at end c.

beginning of year

____ 8_ (includes one title not in­ cluded in pre­ vious reports)

8

8

4,522 146 4.668 0

.

0. 0 0. 0 0 255.865 12.371 3,253

269,651

1 0

of year (a + b) beginning of year of year (a + b)

264.983

1

221 7 228


- 3 -

3. Records a. No. held at beginning of year b. No. added c. Total held at end of year (a + 4. Filmstrips (include film loops) a. No. held at beginning of year b. No. added c. Total held at end of year (a + 5. Maps a. No. held at beginning of year b. No. added c. Total held at end of year (a + 6. Videotapes a. No. held at beginning of year b. No. added c. Total held at end of year (a + II.

0_ 0_

b)

b)

______0 61 28

b)

No. of New Titles 1. Monographs 2. Monographs on microforms 3. Serials 4. Serials on microforms 5. Maps 6. Audio/Visual 7. Archival & Mss. Control 8. Totals (1 thru 7) Periodical Article, Analytics*

C.

Reclassified & Recataloged Titles

D.

Card Production 1. Printed cards (computer, LC or other) 2. Typed cards 3. Multilithed cards completed 4. Total ( 1 + 2 + 3 ) Archival & Mss. Processing 1. Collections processed 2. Finding aids produced

______0 0_ 0_

B.

E.

______ 2

b)

7. Software added CATALOGING Total

A.

III.

2_ 0_

_____89. 2

2

1.477 ____3_ 136 11

____ Q24 ____6_ 1.657 0 338 18.517 866 ____ 0_ 19.383 0 0

CIRCULATION AND RESERVE A.

Circulation 1. Home Use a. regular b. 7-day or other c. sub-total Home Use 2. Building Use a. reading rooms b. carrels c. studies d. other (list) e. sub-total Building Use 3. Total Circulation (lc + 2e)

7.103 7.103

42.113

49 i 2JA


4 -

B.

C. D.

IV.

Reserve 1. Closed Reserve -- Home Use 2. Overnight -- Closed Reserve 3. Home Use -- Open Shelf 4. Total Reserve ( 1 + 2 + 3 )

10.895

Total Circulation and Reserve (add A.3 + B.4)

60.111

Hours of Operation How many average hours per week was library open for full service during the academic year (excluding pre-examination periods and other special times)?

90

REFERENCE SERVICES A.

B.

Reference Questions 1. No. of Information & Directional Questions 2. No. of Reference Questions 3. No. of Search Questions 4. No. of Problem Questions 5. Total Reference Questions (add 1 thru 4) COMPASS (Commercial Online Sources) 1. No. of Subjeet-■Que stion? lexis

2. No-of-Item Quootiono 3. No. of End Users-

westlaw nexis

4,249 5,939 " 273 10,461

101 174 LI 286

4. Total eOW»AOC (add 1 thru 3) C.

V.

Library Instruction 1. No. of Tours 2. No. of Instruction Sessions 3. Total Tours/Instruction Session (1+2) 4. No. of Tour Participants 5. No. of Instruction Participants 6. Total Tour/Instruction Participants 7. No. of Bibliographies & Other Handouts

42 103

145 376 l, 179 1,555 111

INTERLIBRARY SERVICE (includes loans andphotoduplications) A.

Lending 1. Titles requested 2. Titles loaned

163 92

B.

Borrowing 1. Titles requested 2. Titles borrowed

127 112

C.

Photoduplication 1. Lending f a. orders & inquiries received b. orders filled (by title) c. no. of photocopies made 2. Borrowing a. orders written b.

orders f i l l e d

353 285 5,604 52 46


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VI.

VII.

COPY SERVICE (to be completed by the statutory and medical libraries only) A.

No. of copies made for internal use

B.

No. of copies made for interlibrary lending

C.

No. of copies made for CU departments (other than libraries)

D.

No. of coin-operated copies produced; i.e. income generating copies

STAFF SIZE/PERSONNEL EXPENDITURES (staff size determined by number of budgeted lines at end of year) Male A.

Professional Library Staff 1. Public Service a. no. of staff: full-time equivalents headcount b. salaries of staff in "a" above

Female

Total

$

¥

$

¥

$

¥

2. Technical Services a. no. of staff: b.

full-time equivalents headcount salaries of staff in "a" above

3. Special Collections a. no. of staff: full-time equivalents headcount b. salaries of staff in "a" above

B.

¥

4. Administration of the Unit a. no. of staff: full-time equivalents headcount b. salaries of staff in "a" above

¥ "

5. Total Professional FTE, Headcount & Salaries (1 + 2 + 3 + 4) a. no. of staff: full-time equiv. headcount b. salaries of staff in "a" above

$

¥

3

$

¥~

$

Exempt Library Staff (other than pro­ fessional librarians in "A" above) 1. Public Services a. no. of staff: full-time equivalents headcount b. salaries of staff in "a" above

¥

2. Technical Services a. no. of staff:

_

b.

full-time equivalents headcount salaries of staff in "a" above

'

¥

_

¥


- 6 -

Male

Total

Female

3. Special Collections a. no. of staff: full-time equivalents headcount b. salaries of staff in "a" above

f

3

4. Administration of the Unit a. no. of staff: full-time equivalents headcount b. salaries of staff in "a" above

T

3

$

5. Total Exempt Staff (1 + 2 + 3 + 4) a. no. of staff: b.

c.

full-time equiv. headcount salaries of staff in "a" above

Non-Exempt Support Staff (excludes temporary student and non-student help) 1. Public Services a. no. of staff: full-time equivalent headcount b. salaries of staff in "a" above

\

T

$

3

2. Technical Services a. no. of staff: b.

D.

full-time equivalent headcount salaries of staff in "a" above

$

3. Special Collections a. no. of staff: full-time equivalent headcount b. salaries of staff in "a" above

I

1

4. Administration of the Unit a. no. of staff: full-time equivalent headcount b. salaries of staff in "a" above

I

J

5. Total Non-Exempt Staff (1 + 2 + 3 + 4) a. no. of staff: full-time equiv. headcount b. salaries of staff in "a" above

I

Temporary Services (include all FTE equivalents and hourly wages in the appropriate area) 1. Public Services a. professional & exempt b. non-exempt/non-student 2. Technical Services a. professional & exempt b. non-exempt/non-student

5 Salary

FTE

j

_____

_____ _____

$

T

5


- 7 -

FTE

E.

VIII.

3. Special Collections a. professional & exempt b. non-exempt/non-student

_______ _______

$______ $

4. Administration of the Unit a. professional & exempt b. non-exempt/non-student

_______ _______

$______ $

Total Professional/Exempt FTE & Wages (la + 2a + 3a + 4a above)

_______

i______

Total Non-Exempt FTE & Wages (lb + 2b + 3b + 4b above)

_______

$______

# Hrs. _______ _______ _______

$______ $______ $______

_______

1______

Student Services 1. Non-Work Study 2. Work Study 3. Fed. Govt. Share of CWS Total Student Services (1 + 2 + 3)

NON-PERSONNEL EXPENDITURES A.

Expenditures

B.

Expenditures for Serials

C.

Total Expendtures for Books & Serials

D.

Expenditures for Binding

E.

Capital Equipment Expenditures (5000 series object codes)

$_____

General Operating Expenses (6000 series object codes)

$_____

G.

Miscellaneous Expenses

$_____

H.

Total Non-Personnel Expenditures (add C thru G)

F.

IX.

Salary

for Books

$______ $______ $______ $______

1______

INCOME AND TRANSFERS A.

Book Endowment Income

$_____

B.

Other Endowment Income

$_____

C.

Gifts Income 1. Principal added to or establishing new endowments 2. All other gifts income

$_____ $

D.

Fines & Lost Books

$_____

E.

Computer Searches

$_____

F.

Interlibrary Loan

$_____


- 8 -

G.

Royalties

$_____

H.

Sale of Duplicates

$_____

I.

Sale of Publicationsissuedby the library

$_____

J.

Photocopy

$_____

K.

Other (please specify) ________________________________ _________________

L. M.

$ ______

Total Library GeneratedIncome (add A thru K)

A

Transfers from other CUUnits* (please specify purpose and amount) 1. __________________________________ _____

$______

2. ________________________________ ___

S_____

3 . _____________________________________________ $______ 4 . _____________________________________________ $______ 5. $______

*Transfers may include only those funds directly placed in library accounts, such as added acquisitions funds for a specific purchase.

GRW:1b 6/30/88


AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION SECTION OF LEGAL EDUCATION AND ADMISSIONS TO THE BAR FALL 1988 LAW SCHOOL ANNUAL QUESTIONNAIRE

PART III - LIBRARY INSTRUCTIONS Report financial figures in whole dollars and all other figures in whole numbers, except where otherwise indicated. If exact figures are not available, enter your best estimate. An asterisk (*) indicates that the definition for a term used in a requested item may be found at the end of the questionnaire.

SCHOOL NUMBER 99 Name of Law School:

Cornell Law Library

Name of person to receive inquiries: Title of person to receive inquiries: Telephone number:

Jane L. Hammond Law Librarian ( 607)

255-

5857

Return disk, one printed copy, and Dean's Certification form by August 15, 1988, to: James P. White Consultant on Legal Education American Bar Association Indiana University School of Law - Indianapolis 735 West New York Street Indianapolis, IN 46202

Ext.


Page 2 SECTION 1 - COLLECTION

Questions 1 - 4

have been omitted for 1988.

5. Ending month of library fiscal year (number of month). 6. Net* Volumes* (excluding microforms) added during fiscal year* A. Volumes withdrawn = 3,446 7. Volumes* (excluding microforms) held at end of fiscal year. 8. Titles* (excluding titles of non-print items) added during fiscal year. 9. Titles* (excluding titles of non-print items) held at end of fiscal year. 10. Net* microform reels* added during the fiscal year.

______ 6

3,568

380,351

1,613 153,478 ____ 146

A. Reels withdrawn = _____0_ 11. Microform reels* held at end of fiscal year.

4,668

12.371

12. Net* microfiche* added during fiscal year. A. Microfiche withdrawn =

3,253

13. Microfiche* held at end of fiscal year.

264,983

14. Units of other microform formats added during fiscal year.

______ q_

15. Units of other microform formats held at end of fiscal year.

______0_

16. Microform titles* added during fiscal year. 17. Microform titles* held at end of fiscal year. 18. Other non-book titles added during the fiscalyear. 19. Other non-book titles held at the end of fiscalyear.

14 350

30 154

20. Number of serial subscriptions.*

5,037

21. Number of serial titles.*

4,852


Page 3 SECTION 2 - PERSONNEL

22. Number of full-time librarians and other professional staff.*

l_

23. Number of part-time librarians and other professional staff.*

_____ Q _

24. Number of part-time full-time equivalent* librarians and other professional staff.*

_____ Z _

25. Number of full-time supporting staff (excluding hourly students).

13

26. Number of part-time supporting staff (excluding hourly students).

4_

27. Number of full-time equivalent* part-time supporting staff (excluding hourly students) .

2^3.

28. Full-time equivalent* students and other temporary part-time employees.

LJL

29. Number of hours worked by hourly students and other temporary part-timeemployees,last fiscal year. 30. Median* base salary paid full-time librarians and other professional staff (exclude director of law library), current fiscal year.

6>040_

,$27^600—

31. Median* fringe benefits paid full-time librarians and other professional staff (exclude director of law library) , current fiscal year.

^7>72.§—

32. Median* base salary paid full-time supporting staff (exclude hourlystudents),current fiscal year.

$14»25Q_

33. Median* fringe benefits paid full-time supporting staff (exclude hourly students), current fiscal year.

$3,990—

34. Base salary* for entry level professional librarian, current fiscal year.

$20,000—

35. Average hourly rate paid students or other part-time assistants, current fiscal year.

Q.5—


Page 5 SECTION 7 - RESOURCES

56. Salaries*/wages (excluding fringe benefits*) paid all law library personnel, including permanent part-time employees and excluding student or temporary part-time employees, last fiscal year.

$417,491

57. Salaries*/wages (excluding fringe benefits*) budgeted for all law library personnel, including permanent part-time employees and excluding student or temporary part-time employees, current fiscal year.

.$478,235

58. Fringe benefits* paid to law library personnel, last fiscal year.

$121,097

59. Fringe benefits* budgeted for law library personnel, current fiscal year.

$133,906

60. Student and temporary part-time employee wages paid (excluding federal work/study wages), last fiscal year.

$11,917

61. Student and temporary part-time employee wages budgeted (excluding federal work/study wages) , current fiscal yr. _$16,87.5 61A. Total of salaries and wages paid last fiscal year (Questions 56+58+60).

$550,505

61B. Total of salaries and wages budgeted current fiscal $629,016 year (Questions 57+59+61). 62. Dollars spent for books* (excluding serial subscriptions and microforms), last fiscal year. — $41,275, 63. Dollars budgeted for books* (excluding serial subscriptions and microforms), current fiscal year.

— $50,000

64. Dollars spent for serial subscriptions* (excluding microforms), last fiscal year.

$454,393

65. Dollars budgeted for serial subscriptions* (excluding microforms), current fiscal year.

$500,000

66. Dollars spent for microforms, last fiscal year.

$14,197

67. Dollars budgeted for microforms, current fiscal year.

$15,000


Page 6

68. Dollars spent for audio-visual materials (excluding microforms), last fiscal year.

$2,198

69. Dollars budgeted for audio-visual materials (excluding microforms), current fiscal year.

$2,300

70. Dollars spent for binding and rebinding, last fiscal year.

$17,271

71. Dollars budgeted for binding and rebinding, current fiscal year.

$ 20,000

71A. Total dollars spent last fiscal year for items 62, 64, 66, 68, and 70.

$529,334

71B. Total dollars budgeted current fiscal year for items 63, 65, 67, 69, and 71.

$587,300

72. Dollars sper.*- for computer information retrieval services, last fiscal year.

$27,156

73. Dollars budgeted for computer information retrieval services, current fiscal year.

$27,460

74. Dollars spent for computer bibliographic services, last fiscal year.

$31,699

75. Dollars budgeted for computer bibliographic services, current fiscal year.

$28,000

76. Dollars spent for library equipment* (purchase and rental), last fiscal year.

$2,821

77. Dollars budgeted for library equipment* (purchase and rental), current fiscal year.

$3,500

78. Dollars spent for other library expenditures, last fiscal year.

$28,378

79. Dollars budgeted for other library expenditures, current fiscal year.

$28.000

79A. Total library expenditures, last fiscal year (Questions 61A, 71A, 72, 74, 76, and 78).

$1?169,893

79B. Total dollars budgeted, current fiscal year (Questions 61B, 71B, 73, 75, 77. and 79).

„ * 2---!--

80. Total federal contribution to work/study wages, last fiscal year.

$12,254


Page 7

SECTION 4 - LIBRARY PHYSICAL FACILITIES 81. Net square feet of space assigned for library purposes.*

65,700

(note)

82. Linear feet of shelving capacity occupied by library materials.*

57,125

(note)

83. Linear feet of shelving capacity not occupied.*

42,457

(note)

214

(note)

84. Number of carrels available for library users. 85. Number of non-carrel seats available for library users.

___ 252__ (note)

86. Number

of microform readers.

3

87. Number

of microform reader printers.

2

88. Number

of computer terminals available tousers.

89. Number staff.

of computer terminals available only to library

NOTE:

_____8

The law library is in temporary space Fall 1988. These answers apply to new space to be occupied by the end of calendar 1988.

14

(note)


Page 8

SECTION 5 - HOURS OF LIBRARY OPERATION 90. Hours per week library operates with professional staff on duty, regular schedule.

58

91. Hours per week library operates with professional staff on duty, abbreviated schedule.*

45

92. Hours per week library operates with only full-time support staff on duty, regular schedule.

21.5

93. Hours per week library operates with only full-time support staff on duty, abbreviated schedule.*

____ 2 _

94. Hours per week library operates with only students or other part-time staff on duty, regularschedule. 95. Hours per week library operates with only students or other part-time staff on duty, abbreviated schedule.*

10-5

____ 0 _

96. Number of weeks per year library operates on abbreviated schedule.*

13

97. Number of weeks per year library operates on extended schedule.

10

SECTION 6 - INTER-LIBRARY LENDING AND BORROWING 98. Inter-library borrowing requests* sent by library, last fiscal year.

I?9

99. Inter-library borrowing requests* filled for library, last fiscal year.

158

100. Inter-library loan requests* received by library, last fiscal year.

516

101. Inter-library loan requests* filled by library, last fiscal year.

377


SECTION 7 - READ E R AND TECHNICAL SERVICES

102. Does library subscribe to LEXIS? (Y/N) 103. How many terminals in the law school provide access to LEXIS? 104. Total hours of actual LEXIS use (not including off-line training time), last fiscal year. 105. Does library subscribe to WESTLAW? (Y/N) 106. How many terminals in the law school provide access to WESTLAW? 107. Total hours of actual WESTLAW use (not including off-line training time), last fiscal year. 108. Does library subscribe to any other computer information retrieval services either separate from or obtained through LEXIS or WESTLAW? (Y/N) 109. Does library participate in OCLC? (Y/N) 110. Does library participate in RLIN? (Y/N) 111. Does library participate in WLN? (Y/N) 112. Does library participate in any other computer bibliographic services? 113. Number of titles processed through computer bibliographic services. 114. Percent of titles cataloged using MARCrecords. 115. Percent of titles processed using shared cataloging by utility members. 116. Percent of titles processed through original cataloging 117. Code for classification scheme used for Anglo-American law materials (p 15 for codes). 118. Code for classification scheme used for foreign law materials (p 15 for codes). 119. Code for subject head authority followed in library. 120. Does library do all its own technical processing? (Y/N) 121. Does library have or have access to telefacsimile caoabil ity? (Y/'N)


Page 10

SECTION 8 - ADMINISTRATION

122. Does the central library administration of the sponsoring institution have any approval or veto authority over law library recommendations for staff, budget, services, etc.? __ X 123. Is the library a federal depository? (Y/N)

_____ Y

SECTION 9 - PRINCIPAL USERS The principle users your library was intended to serve consist of: 124. Number of full-time law students:

572

125. Number of part-time law students:

_____ °

126. Number of full-time law teachers:

______

127. Number of part-time law teachers:

_____ 1

41

1


Page 11 SECTION 10 - SUPPLEMENT

128. For the current fiscal year, and with respect to full-time professional law librarians, other than the director of the law library, please state: a. High salary paid $38,500 b. Low salary paid

$20,000

c. Median salary paid

$27,340

d. Average salary paid

$28,271

129. For the current fiscal year, and with respect to full-time non-professional members of the law library staff, please state: a. High salary paid $22>030 b. Low salary paid

$12>040

c. Median salary paid

$14,380

d. Average salary paid

$15,900

130. Please state the amount spent for law library staff professional development during the past fiscal year. This amount is presumably included in the amount already reported for Item 78, 'Dollars spent for other library expenditures, last fiscal year.' Expenditures for staff professional development could include registration and travel expenses for meetings and conferences, research and research assistant support, regular compensation paid during professional development leaves, and similar items. $5,700 131. For the number reported in Item 101, 'Inter-library loan requests filled by library, last fiscal year,' please report the following: 1,

92

Requests filled by loan

2, Requests filled by other than loan

a . Photocopy b. Microform duplication c. Telefacsimile d. Other

__

285


Page 12

132. For the number reported in Item 72, 'Dollars spent for computer information retrieval services, last fiscal year,' please report the following: 1. Amount paid by governing institution 2. Amount paid by users

$26,794 ____ $362

133. In connection with Item 123, 'Is the library a federal depository?' please state percent of items s e l e c t e d . _____ 17% 134. Does the library participate in any consortia, networks or other co-operative programs, other than national bibliographic networks? (Y/N) ______ 135. If answer to 134 is Yes, what provision is made for access to information available through such arrangements? Answer Y for all that apply. a. Telefacsimile

N/a

b. Overnight courier

N/A

c. Consortium staff delivery

n /a

d. Library messenger

N/A

136. For the amount reported in 79B, 'Total dollars budgeted for library, current fiscal year,' please indicate the amount of funds received from the following sources: a. Base instructional budget

$

b. Non-recurring appropriations c. Endowment or gift income d. Net miscellaneous income

$23,800

Cornell Law Library Annual Report 1988  
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