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Cornell Law Library Myron Taylor Hall Ithaca, New York 14853

Report of the Law Librarian 1978/79

Three and one-half years have passed since Harry Bitner's retirement as Librarian.

These years have been marked by a number of changes including

the introduction of computers and microforms into the library and the shift of some library materials to the Library Annex.

Some innovations were made

to create greater efficiency in use of staff; some, to provide better or new services to our clientele; others to postpone the day when the stacks in Myron Taylor reach full capacity.

All were made with great concern about

cost, balancing both short-term costs and long-term costs against service. Almost all of these changes are now under review as part of our long-range planning.

Computers The first computer terminal in the Cornell Law Library was installed July 1976 to provide computer-assisted cataloging and computer—produced catalog cards through the OCLC system, the system used by the rest of the Cornell University Libraries.

The projection was that the system would be cost

effective if cataloging information from other libraries were found in the system for fifty percent of the books we were cataloging. found more than seventy percent of the records we need.

We have consistently With this system,

we have been able to stay current'in our cataloging, even with staff vacancies, and to reclassify and amend the cataloging of our older collection when at full staff.


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In January 1979 we received a grant of almost $20,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities to upgrade and enter our serial records into this data bank where they will be available not only for us, but also to the 1700 other libraries on the 0CLC system and very probably to many outside the system. In return we have on-line access to the cataloging records of these 1700 libraries. This past year we have undertaken a project we could not have attempted without access to the 0CLC records— the classification and recataloging of the English special subject and nominative reports.

Finding records for about

two-thirds of these titles, we have been able to do all of the special subject reports and get half through the nominative reports in nine months. Some of the OCLC records are of very good quality; others are not. Christian Boissonnas, when Head of Technical Services, did a study on the quality of OCLC records which was published this year in the Law Library Journal.

He concluded that "[w]hatever one's definition of quality may be,

all institutions which use the OCLC database for cataloging face a serious problem."

(C. A. Boissonnas.

Cornell Law Library Experience.

The Quality of OCLC Bibliographic Records:

The

72 Law Lib. J. 80-85 (Winter 1979) at 85.)

A competing bibliographic data base known as RLG/RLIN became available this year.

Its promoters promise better quality control than OCLC as well

as better and more diverse points for access to its records.

The Law Library

staff has been participating actively with the University Libraries staff in consideration of the merits of each system preparing for the decision as to whether Cornell should switch from OCLC to RLG/RLIN.

For many years law

librarians have discussed a bibliographic network for law libraries only. Present specifications for such a network require its acceptance of information in both the OCLC and RLG/RLIN formats, so Cornell would be able to participate in law network whichever system we are using.

A revised code of rules for


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cataloging goes into effect in the United States January 1, 1981.

For many

reasons any change from OCLC to RLG/RLIN should be in place by that date or not in the foreseeable future, so a final decision should be reached during the coming year. The second computer terminal in the Law Library was LEXIS, which arrived March 1977.

All first year students are trained in its use and may use it,

without cost, for the rest of their Law School career (except when working for a fee-paying client).

In June 1979 LEXIS users are offered access to AUTOCUE,

Lawyer's Cooperative Publishing Company's on-line citator service, for $77 per hour connect time but no other costs.

The New York Times Information Bank is

also available through the LEXIS terminal for an additional, substantial charge.

A question to be faced in the future is whether such additional data

bases should be made available to our users and how the costs would be controlled and assessed to the users.

The University Libraries presently

charge approximately 50% of the cost of on-line searches to the users.

Would

we want to absorb a similar percentage of the cost?

Microforms The other technology introduced to the Law Library since the Bitner era is microforms.

This collection is growing so rapidly that we have already

filled the trays originally purchased, have added more trays for microfiche and expect, next year, to move the vertical file materials into another unit and use all of the present cabinets for microforms.

We also hope to add a new

microfiche reader that is easier to use than the present multipurpose unit which would, then, be used primarily for microfilm. This growth in the microform collection arises primarily because we are acquiring some extensive collections available in this form which had not been available to us in any form before, e.g., Records and Briefs of the U.S. Second


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Circuit and the legislative history file of the General Accounting Office (an estimated 40,000 fiche).

The secondary cause of the growth is the availability

through the U.S. Government Printing Office depository program of microfiche editions of materials otherwise available only in hard copy.

Included are the

U.S. bills (which we will keep in microfiche permanently rather than throw away at the end of the Congress as we have been doing), the Congressional Appropriations Hearings, G.A.O. Reports, and C.F.R. of C.F.R.

(We purchase two sets of the paper edition

The fiche edition will become the historical reference set, so we

probably will not retain any of the paper copies more than one or two years after they are superseded.) These sets are in addition to the materials which have been acquired in microform on a regular basis since the equipment was obtained:

the Records

and Briefs of the U.S. Supreme Court and the New York Court of Appeals, and legal newspapers. To encourage use of these materials and to overcome user antipathy, we do not charge for prints made from our microforms, a policy contrary to that of other libraries on campus.

The use of the printer is still very low, and

the free privilege is not abused, so we propose to keep this policy. The next innovation in the Law Library may be a legal periodical index on COM (computer-output microform) which can be read only on its own microreader. Plans to publish such an index, to be much more inclusive than the Index to Legal Periodicals and to cost roughly $1,500 per year, are well underway.

Acquisitions Budget Not changed since the Bitner era is concern about the acquisitions budget. Some relief has occured so the concern is not so intense as it was in 1975/76. The Dean of the Law School has generously increased his contribution from $30,000 in 1975/76, to $62,000 in 1978/79, and $67,000 in 1979/80, an increase which has enabled us to expand our monographic collection during a


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period of serious inflation in annual costs for the very large collection of serials.

The University Library budget allocation also has included a

percentage increase each year in recognition of inflation.

With these

increments, the total acquisitions budget has risen from $165,000 in 1975/76 to $254,213 in 1978/79 and will go to $277,113 in 1979/80. Two steps have been taken to reduce the inroads the binding costs were making into the book budget.

First was the decision to stop binding briefs

and newspapers, substituting microforms for the current hard copy.

In all

cases the microfilm cost is less than the cost of binding, with the savings in staff processing time and in long-term storage costs as additional benefits. The other step was to change the specifications for binding which reduced the cost per item because the binder no longer removes advertising or covers from most journals. last year.

This change offsets in part the 104 increase in binding rates

Our annual binding costs have dropped from a high of $27,386 in

1975/76 to $21,523 in 1978/79. Under a law effective October 1, 1978, the Law Library became eligible for designation as a depository for U.S. government publications.

Taking

advantage of this opportunity, we were able to get the microfiche discussed above as well as many items in hard copy. We had been purchasing many, if not most, of the items selected, so the depository status was of direct benefit to our book funds.

We were very selective in the items we chose to receive on

deposit, taking only 351 of the 3700 items offered.

The staff has found the

shipments easy to process, thus our staff cost has been minimal.

The funding

for this program was in jeopardy for a few months this Spring, but Congressional sources report that this is temporary and that the program should be fully funded in coming fiscal years.


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6

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Library Space Space pressures in Myron Taylor Hall are becoming more acute each year. Even with the acquisitions of microforms we added 9,500 volumes in hard copy this year, the inexorable annual increase in our need for space.

To relieve

some of this pressure— perhaps five years worth— all bound New York Court of Appeals records and briefs, New York State bills, and all but the last ten years of the U.S. Supreme Court records and briefs were moved to the University Library Annex.

These materials can be retrieved within a day whenever requested.

Moving these documents created room to make major shifts in the collection and to achieve some long-term objectives:

moving the official state reports

from locked cages to the open stacks on 2M, moving all KF (U.S. law) materials including federal documents to the fourth floor in space created by moving the non-law materials to the first floor, and other, smaller relocations.

This

also provides space on the first floor for expansion of the foreign materials now crowding level 2.

The University Libraries made a special appropriation

of $4,000 so these shifts could be made in the summer of 1979. What do we do next for book space? easy, but expensive solution. the Annex.

An addition to Myron Taylor is the

Other, smaller sets might be transferred to

Present hard copy holdings could be converted to microforms— not

an economical solution if new space is available but a feasible method of releasing present space in increments as needed.

In other words, at present

prices it is cheaper in the long term to build new space than to convert holdings to microform.

In the short term, however, the thousands of dollars

needed to convert year by year are easier to absorb than the millions for bricks and mortar. The pressure for seating space in the Law Library was a grave concern last year.

Additional copies of several sets of books used heavily by under­

graduates were placed in other libraries on campus last Fall.

This Spring


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the undergraduate use of the Law Library was markedly less than in previous years.

We will be watching the use pattern this coming year to see if we

have, indeed, relieved this situation. This year we are moving the unbound periodicals from a cage on the first floor to the former Xerox room on the Reading Room level.

This change makes

these heavily used materials much more readily accessible to all library staff (the room will be locked).

It may be feasible to retrieve these journals for

users more than once an hour. 1000 was removed from use.

The Xerox room became available when the Xerox

We will have two reliable coin-operated machines

for general use and plan to have an internal copier for staff use relieving the other machines of that competition. The LEXIS terminal and the micro-reader/printer are located in the Harris Room, an incongruous use of such a beautiful room.

As our need for such

equipment increases, the need for appropriate space with light and sound controls will increase. Rare books would be more appropriate to the Harris Room— given better environmental controls. books.

At present, we have no suitable place for our rare

Most of them are presently housed in the Olin Rare Book Collection,

including the Thorne collection purchased this year.

This collection, purchased

from the eminent legal historian, Professor Samuel Thorne, expands our existing collection to provide an excellent source for research in AngloAmerican legal history.

Would that we had an appropriate place to house it

in Myron Taylor!

Staff For the first time in at least three years, members of the Law Library staff compiled a comprehensive legislative history and an extensive bibliography to accompany it.

These documents, tracing the history of the Bankruptcy Reform


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Act from 1969 to its passage in 1978, represent many hours of work by Robert L. Oakley and Diane Smith.

Such work was possible because the staff

did not have the very heavy pressures from undergraduates as mentioned above and, to a lesser extent, because the first year research and writing program was concentrated in the intersession period rather than throughout the Spring Term. Only two professional staff members remain from the Bitner years. Alan Diefenbach continues to provide the excellent reference service he has come to epitomize.

He also shares freely with all— colleagues and patrons—

his great knowledge of the resources available in this collection.

Lois

Hickson provides steady, reliable continuity as Order Librarian— a position in which such traits are particularly valuable.

She has assumed, effectively,

additional responsibilities during the many months that we have not had a Head of Technical Services. In my report last year, I reported the imminent arrival of Sonya Sasuta as Head of Technical Services. excellent choice.

Miss Sasuta did come and proved to be an

She quickly achieved respect as a librarian and as a person,

which made her death in an auto accident in January 1979 particularly poignant. Miss Sasuta's parents have established an endowed book fund for the Law Library in her memory. Robert L. Oakley, Associate Law Librarian, concluded 15 years at Cornell as student and librarian, when he resigned his position this Spring to become Law Librarian and Associate Professor of Law at Boston University. Mr. Oakley's dedication to effective library service resulted in innumerable improvements, large and small, in all aspects of the Law Library's operation. Diane Hillmann, cataloger for the Law Library since April 1977, was promoted to Head of Technical Services effective May 31, 1979.

Miss Hillmann


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is upholding this library's national reputation for quality cataloging while keeping our cataloging current. Doris Jensen resigned October 1978 to accept a position with the Law Library of the Library of Congress.

She had been here ten years, first as a

cataloger and then as Reference Librarian. Joanne Scanlon joined the staff in April 1979 as Reference Librarian, replacing Doris Jensen.

Miss Scanlon had been with the law libraries of

SUNY-Buffalo and the University of Virginia before coming here.

Staff Activities Jane L. Hammond is one of seven members of a new advisory committee for the Index of Legal Periodicals, published by the H. W. Wilson Company.

The

committee, composed of lawyers and librarians, was created by the publisher to provide advice on editorial policies for the Index. Miss Hammond attended the committee's organizational meeting in New York City, April 2-3. She served as consultant to the dean of the Seton Hall University School of Law on the development and planning of the school's library, particularly book acquisitions and staffing.

As part of this assignment she

visited Seton Hall in Newark, February 5-6. As chairman-elect of the Council of National Library and Information Associations (CNLIA), Miss Hammond represented the Council and its eighteen constituent associations at a meeting May 29-30 of major library and information industry associations to coordinate planning for the White House Conference on Libraries and Information Service to be held November 1979.

She attended the

CNLIA regular meetings in New York May 4 and December 1, and the meeting of its Executive Board in Haverford, Pa., March 16 and October 6. Miss Hammond was a panelist on library budgeting at the Senior Administrators' Workshop, sponsored by the Association of American Law Schools in New York, September 20-21.


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She continued working with two special committees of the American Association of Law Libraries, one on law library network development, the other on law school library governance.

She also served on an ad hoc

committee created by the American Bar Association's consultant on legal education to review his annual questionnaire for law school libraries, the questionnaire that is the basis for comparative statistics of law school libraries and for accreditation reviews. She attended two meetings of the Board of Consultors of the Villanova University School of Law. Robert L. Oakley served as the Secretary of the Academic Assembly of the University Libraries and met with the Steering Committee of the Assembly. He served on the Search Committee for Head of Technical Services for the Law Library, and attended two Management Forums— the Problem Employee and Performance Appraisal— sponsored by the Personnel Office.

Mr. Oakley continued

to serve as representative of the American Association of Law Libraries to the American National Standards Institute Committee Z-39 on Library Work, Documentation, and Related Publishing Practices, attending the annual meeting in Washington, D.C. on May 9, 1979.

He is a member of the Committee on

Intellectual Freedom and Due Process of the New York Library Association. Publication:

Book Review:

The Innocence of Joan Little, to appear in

the Criminal Law Bulletin. Diane Hillmann served on the Cornell University Libraries Resources and Services Committee (which issued a "Report on RLG/RLIN and Related Automation Considerations"), the Serials Control Advisory Committee and the Committee on Quality Control of Bibliographic Data.

She is a member of the American

Association of Law Libraries OCLC Special Interest Section, and represented that Section on a committee to discuss merger with the Technical Services SIS


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and Cataloging and Classification Committee.

She also attended the Annual

Meeting held in San Francisco July 1-4, 1979, where she was on a panel discussing bibliographic control of serials at a joint program of the OCLC/SIS and the Technical Services SIS. In October, 1978, Miss Hillmann became the Newsletter Editor of the Association of Law Libraries of Upstate New York.

She presented a paper

entitled "Job Hunting in Today's Market" as a participant in a panel discussion on career development at the Annual Meeting of the Northeast Chapter of the Pennsylvania Library Association in November, 1978. Alan Diefenbach attended the annual meeting of the American Association of Law Libraries, July 1-4, 1979 in San Francisco.

He completed his seventh

year as a member of the campus judicial system at Cornell University. Joanne Scanlon served as Secretary/Treasurer of the American Association of Law Libraries' OCLC Special Interest Section, and was on the Program Committee of that Section for the Association's Annual Meeting in San Francisco, California, which she attended July 1-4, 1979.

Miss Scanlon also toured the

United States Supreme Court Library with Law Librarians of Washington, D.C. on September 19, 1978; attended a Workshop on AACR II sponsored by Potomac Technical Processing Librarians, Alexandria, Virginia, on November 11, 1978; attended workshops on MARC Monograph and Serials cataloging formats presented by SOLINET, Atlanta, Georgia, November 13-14, 1978; and attended a training session for use of New York Times Information Bank, Rosslyn, Virginia, November 21, 1978. Crystal Hackett continued to serve on the Support Staff Advisory Committee for the University Libraries.

Law Librarian

/ / /


APPENDICES

Expenditure Statistics Gifts Law Library Staff Personnel list


Appendix 1

Cornell Law Library

Expenditure Statistics 1976/77-1978/79

EXPENDITURES

1978/79

1977/78

1976/77

$41,519

$14,205

$15,663

8,656

8,200

7,590

184,622

152,900

141,457

24,570

18,745

17,203

4,530

4,852

$263,897

$198,902

$181,913

21,523

18,919

22,682

$285,420

$217,821

$204,595

Treatises & Monographs Anglo-Amer ican* Foreign** Continuations Anglo-American Foreign** International** Total Treatises & Continuations Binding Total Expenditures

*Includes two purchases charged to proceeds from sale of duplicates: collection and $14,230 for second sets of law reviews.

$18,000 for Thorne

**Through 1976/77 "foreign" included all non-English materials from all sources, including Puerto Rico. Beginning with 1977/78 "foreign" includes all materials from countries out­ side the U.S. and the British Commonwealth; "International" is a new category for publications of and about international organizations including the European Community.


Appendix 2

Gifts 1978/79

An endowed book fund established by Mr. and Mrs. Peter Sasuta, Endwell, New York, in memory of their daughter, Sonya. Class of 1949, a cash contribution. M. William Krasilovsky, '49, Feinman & Krasilovsky, New York, New York, an autographed copy of the fourth edition of This Business of Music. Professor Howard S. Levie, '30, St. Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri, his book Prisoners of War in International Armed Conflict. Professor William Clarkin, State University of New York at Albany, Albany, New York, a copy of his book Serene Patriot: A Life of George Wythe. Materials from the Estate of Judge Samuel S. Leibowitz, '15, New York, New York. Mrs. Elizabeth C. Reece, Ithaca, New York, a monetary gift in memory of Ruth Shaw. Mr. D. Boardman Lee, '29, Ithaca, New York, a copy of "The Mandate for Mesopotamia and the Principle of Trusteeship in English Law." Melvin J. Koestler, '30, Koestler & Koestler, Elizabeth, New Jersey, an unbound copy of the New Jersey Law Journal, 1956 through 1976. Richard J. Morrison, '74, Ithaca, New York, a gift of various law books. Several members of the Law School faculty contributed books and periodicals.


Appendix 3

Law Library Staff

ADMINISTRATION Jane L. Hammond, Law Librarian and Professor of Law Daniel J. Freehling, Assistant Law Librarian Crystal Hackett, Administrative Aide I.

PUBLIC SERVICES D. Alan Diefenbach, Reference Librarian Joanne Scanlon, Reference Librarian Margaret Beers-Schnock, Reference Assistant Debra Gregg, Circulation Assistant Kevin Miller, Stack Supervisor Diana Harrington, Special Collections Assistant

II.

TECHNICAL SERVICES Diane Hillmann, Head of Technical Services A.

Acquisitions Section Lois Hickson, Order Librarian Alice McPherson, Head Account Clerk Alice Olsefski, Searcher Gary Bogart, Kardex Clerk Kathleen Emery, Clerk-typist Willie Mae Louis, Clerk-typist

B.

Cataloging Section Diane Hillmann, Head Cataloger Lois Horton, Cataloging Assistant Elizabeth Hand, Reclassification Assistant Nancy McBride, Bindery Clerk

July, 1979


Cornell Law Library Myron Taylor Hall Ithaca, New York 14853

November 7, 1978

TO:

Dean Cra

FROM:

Jane L.

, Prof. Hanslowe

Appended is tl>e monthly financial statement of the Law Library. Herewith are added a few interpretation comments and some further information that you may find useful. With one-third of the fiscal year past, we appear to have spent 35% of our budgeted funds. The amount spent for monographs is much higher than normal because the Thorne collection is included in that line even though it will not ultimately come from the budget allocation (the adjustments will be made at the end of the year). Without the Thorne purchase, we have spent 28% of the available funds. We have converted most of our binding instructions from "Class A" to "Standard." The quality of the binding remains the same but the binder does not remove advertising, covers, etc. Nancie McBride will now do as much of this as we think necessary, saving us 10q-70c per volume, which will offset the more than 10% increase in the basic price this year. Doris Jensen has left the staff to join the American-British Law Division of the Law Library of Congress. A search is in progress for her successor. We hope to find a person who can assume the responsibility for student employees that Bob Oakley took on when Kathy Quinlan left. Proposals for further easing the pressure of the undergraduates on the Law Library are being pursued. The faculty involved have been cooperative, but the present level of duplication of materials has not proven to be adequate. A proposal for expanding the legal collections in other libraries on campus has been drafted and redrafted by Bob Oakley before, during and after conferences with the librarians involved in the proposal. The final proposal— expected sometime this month— will be designed to avoid creating problems elsewhere as well as to alleviate the problems in the Law Library.

JLH:ch


<$:â&#x2013; Cornell Law Library yr

Myron Taylor Hall Ithaca, New York 14853

December 5, 1978

TO:

Dean Cramton, Mr^ Miller and Prof. Hanslowe

FROM:

Jane Hammond /

This month we selected the materials we wish to receive from the U.S. Government Printing Office under our new designation as a depository library. We are calculating the value of the items to be received on deposit, so we will know how much we are saving in direct acquisitions cost through this depository program. We selected about 12% of the available "items," including many items requested by the Olin Library as second copies for their collection (primarily heavily used Census publications). This is a direct return for che items we have received through the Olin depository for the past several years. The use of the microform options now offered by the Government Printing Office means that our savings will be in space as well as in purchase cost. With the cooperation of the Mann Library we will receive the daily Congressional Record in hard copy and in microfiche. Because of its great bulk we have never been able to retain the daily version of the Record, but we will be able to do so in the microfiche format. We will continue to receive the permanent edition of the Record in hard copy. Beginning with the 96th Congress (January 1979) the Government Printing office will supply depository libraries with microfiche copy of the Congressional bills and resolutions. The Law Library will receive the microfiche version, solving a major filing problem and allowing us to retain the bills permanently rather than discard them after two years as we have done in the past. The Olin Library will be receiving the hard copy version of the bills, so those users who dislike microforms can use the Olin collection until it, too, is replaced by microfiche at the end of the Congress. At last, at the very end of November, we received the U.S. Supreme Court Records and Briefs for the October 1977 term in hard copy from the Court. We have had the briefs and records available in microfiche throughout the term, because we receive them a few weeks after the briefs are filed rather than months after the term ended. For instance, we had the Bakke briefs on fiche last October, well before the case was argued. This, again, raises the question of whether we should continue to pay the $250 a year for the hard copy when it comes so late. The company from which we are buying the U.S. briefs is now offering the records and briefs of the Second Circuit in microfiche for about $1,300 a year, a very reasonable cost for this amount of material made possible because the Court is paying the conversion costs. We are considering a subscription to this material for which we have had requests in the past.


%

Cornell Law Library

rrrVlsi

Myron Taylor Hall Ithaca, New York 14853

December 5, 1978

TO:

Dean Cramton, Mr. Miller and Prof. Hanslowe

FROM:

iond Jane Hammond

r

This month we selected the materials we wish to receive from the U.S. Government Printing Office under our new designation as a depository library. We are calculating the value of the items to be received on deposit, so we w n l know how much we are saving in direct acquisitions cost through this depository program. We selected about 12% of the available "items," including many items requested by the Olin Library as second copies for their collection (primarily heavily used Census publications). This is a direct return for che items we have received through the Olin depository for the past several years. The use of the microform options now offered by the Government Printing Office means that our savings will be in space as well as in purchase cost. With the cooperation of the Mann Library we will receive the daily Congressional Record in hard copy and in microfiche. Because of its great bulk we have never been able to retain the daily version of the Record, but we will be able to do so in the microfiche format. We will continue to receive the permanent edition of the Record in hard copy. Beginning with the 96th Congress (January 1979) the Government Printing office will supply depository libraries with microfiche copy of the Congressional arils and resolutions. The Law Library will receive the microfiche version, solving a major filing problem and allowing us to retain the bills permanently rather than discard them after two years as we have done in the past. The Olin Library will be receiving the hard copy version of the bills, so those users who dislike microforms can use the Olin collection until it, too, is replaced by microfiche at the end of the Congress. At last, at the very end of November, we received the U.S. Supreme Court Records and Briefs for the October 1977 term in hard copy from the Court. We have had the briefs and records available in microfiche throughout the term, because we receive them a few weeks after the briefs are filed rather than months after the term ended. For instance, we had the Bakke briefs on fiche last October, well before the case was argued. This, again, raises the question of whether we should continue to pay the $250 a year for the hard copy when it comes so late. The company from which we are buying the U.S. briefs is now offering the records and briefs of the Second Circuit in microfiche for about $1,300 a year, a very reasonable cost for this amount of material made possible because the Court is paying the conversion costs. We are considering a subscription to this material for which we have had requests in the past.


Cornell Law Library Myron Taylor Hall Ithaca, New York 14853

March 2, 1979

TO:

J. G. Miller, R. Cramton and K. Hanslowe

Enclosed is our February financial statement. in our expenditures.

We are staying on target

On February 23 the G.P.O. notified us that, effective that day, the Law Library would receive no more depository shipments because the House Appropriations Subcommittee had, the day before, unexpectedly refused the G.P.O. request for a supplemental appropriation to fund this program for law school libraries. Unless the lobbying campaign to reverse this decision is effective, the Law Library will have to make other arrangements to receive the 350 items which had been selected on deposit and try to fill in the gaps that will be an inevitable result of the change-over. The current bills from Canada show a very sharp increase in pricesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; 30-40% after conversion to U.S. dollars. The total dollars involved are not a noticable percentage of our budget, but they do accentuate the erosion of world-wide inflation. Miss Joanne Scanlon will join the Law Library as a Reference Librarian beginning April 15, 1979. Miss Scanlon>. presently with the University of Virginia Law Library, is from Buffalo and looks forward to returning to upstate New York. She will take the position vacated by Doris Jensen. Early in February Associate Law Librarian Robert L. Oakley announced his decision to accept an offer as Director of the Boston University Law Library. Bob expects to move mid-summer. Searches for his successor and for the Head of Technical Services are underway.

JLH:ch Enclosure


Cornell Law Library Myron Taylor Hall Ithaca, New York 14853

May 3, 1979

TO:

nslowe

FROM: SUBJECT:

Law Library, March and April 1979

The two enclosed monthly reports show expenditures much below our average of $22,000. This leaves us with a larger balance than usual this late in the year; however, invoices in hand but not yet processed for a variety of reasons will make up the difference. We expect to finish the year right on target. The professional staff has been deeply involved in evaluating the RLG/RLIN system as an alternative to OCLC for the Cornell University Libraries and the Law Library. Diane Hillmann was a member of the University Librarians Committee which submitted an exceptionally well-done report assessing the alternative computer-based systems that Cornell might use. Jane Hammond attended a meeting in New York City at which RLG/RLIN's Executive Director presented his program to the directors of the major law libraries in the U.S. Cornell's final response to the RLG/RLIN proposals has not been decided as of this date. The NEH funded project to put our serial records into CONSER format began, finally, on April 19. Diane Hillmann has effectively organized this project and trained a new, temporary employee, Frank Lepkowski, to work with her on this for the next fifteen months. Mr. and Mrs. Peter Sasuta presented the Law Library with $5,000 to create an endowed book fund in Sonya's memory. Interviews for Sonya's successor were held during April. is expected in early May.

An appointment

Several changes are taking place in the public services department. Bob Oakley formally submitted his resignation anticipating assuming the position of Law Librarian at Boston University. He presently expects to leave here June 15. Interviews for his successor are scheduled for early June. Joanne Scanlon arrived April 15 to assume her duties as Reference Librarian succeeding Doris Jensen. Diane Smith, our very capable Circulation Assistant resigned. She and her husband expect to leave the Ithaca area this summer, so she will not be returning after her maternity leave.

JLH:ch Enclosures


CORNELL UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES INFORMATION REQUESTED FOR VARIOUS ANNUAL REPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1978/79

Please complete this form in duplicate and return one form to Louis E. Martin, University Librarian, 201 01 in Library, and one to Elizabeth M. Murphy, 234 01in Library before July 10, 1979. If you have supplied regular Monthly Reports on Circulation, Interlibrary Loans, Reference Service and Cataloging, it is not necessary to furnish totals for the year. Libraries, other than the Central Libraries and its Departments, are asked to supply data on library income and expenditures for the year, and on those items in the annual report form which do not appear on the monthly reports, insofar as your records permit. ibrary:

law

Librarian:

Jane L. Hammond

Circulation and Reserve: A.

B.

Circulation 1. Home Use a. Regular b. 7-day or other Total Home Use 2. Building Use a. Reading Rooms b. Carrels â&#x20AC;˘ c. Studies d. Other (List) Total Building Use Total Circulation Reserve 1. Closed Reserve - Home Use 2. Overnight - Closed Reserve 3. Home Use - Open Shelf Total Reserve

C.

Total Circulation & Reserve

D.

How many hours per week was library open for full-service in fall term 1978 (excluding pre-examination periods and other special times)

2,929 2,929 33.445

33,445 36,374

14,444

14,444 50,818

97

. Reference Service A.

Information and Directions

4,700

B.

Reference Questions

3,772

C.

Search Questions

44


-2-

D. E.

Problem Questions Bibliographies Total Reference Service

1978/1979 235 29 8.780

III.Interlibrary Service (Loan and Photoduplication) A.

B.

C.

Lending 1. Titles Requested 2. Titles Loaned 3. Volumes Loaned

0

Borrowing 1. Titles Requested 2. Titles Borrowed 3. Volumes Borrowed

0

Photoduplication 1. Outgoing (Lending) a. Orders and Inquiries Received b. Orders Filled (byTitle) 1. Photoprint (Xerox-Coinfax etc.) a. Xerox - Coinfax b. Xerox - Copyflo,photostats, etc. c. Microfilms d. Other Microforms 2. Incoming (Borrowing) a. Orders Written b. Orders Filled

770

IV. Copy Service A.

Xerox (see coin-op) External Use (No. of sheets) 1. Campus - (cash) 2. Mail Orders Total External Use Internal Library Use*(No. of Sheets)

B.

Coin-Op Copier (includes Xerox 1000, 3100, Savin & Olivetti) 1. Total jOodxiQOiaax 293 198 2. All Other -------5--a. Interdepartment b. Interlibrary c. Known Internal 30.351 (See attached sheet for further breakdown)

*If work done for Interlibrary Loan Service DO NOT count as "Internal Library Use". Show as ILS. This will eliminate duplication of count.


-

V.

3

1978/1979

-

Acquisitions A.

No. of Orders Placed

B.

No. of Volumes at Beginning of Year

C.

No. of Volumes Added by Purchase

8,154

D.

No. of Volumes Added by Gift or Exchange

1,930

E.

Total No. of Volumes Added

1.020 314 rl 87

10,084 324,271

Total Volumes

929

F.

No. of Volumes Lost or Withdrawn from Records

G.

Total Number at end of year (use new figure from count)

H.

Microfilm a.

323,342

No. of Reels (physical count) held at 178

beginning of year

I.

J.

K.

b.

No. of Reels (physical count) added

c.

No. of Reels (physical count) end of year

181 359

Microcards a.

No. of Physical Units held beginning of year

0

b.

No. of Physical Units added

0

c.

No. of Physical Units, end of year

0

Microprint Sheets a.

No. of Physical Units held beginning of year

0

b.

No. of Physical Units added

0

c.

No. of Physical Units held, end of year

0

Microfi che a.

No. of Physical Units held beginning of year

b.

No. of Physical Units added

c.

No. of Physical Units, end of year

5,929 18,870

L.

TOTAL Microform Units held end of year (add: Ic, Jc, Kc)

M.

Motion Pictures

N.

24,799 24,799

a.

No. held at beginning of year

0

b.

No. added

0

c.

No. at end of year

0

Audio Recordings a.

No. held at beginning of year

28

b.

No. adde<^

18

c.

No. held at end of year

46


-

0.

p.

Q.

4

1978/1979

-

Records a. No. held at beginning of year b. No. added c. No. held at end of year Filmstrips (include film loops) a. No. held at beginning of year b. No. added c. No. held at end of year Maps a. No. .held at beginning of year b. No. added c. No. held at end of year

*

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

VI. Cataloging A.

B. C. D.

New Titles 1. Monographs 2. Monographs on microforms 3. Serials 4. Serials on microforms 5. Maps 6. Audio/Visual Totals Periodical Article, Analytics* Reclassified & Recataloged Titles Card Production 1. Printed Cards (Computer, LC or Other) 2. Typed Cards 3. Multilithed Cards Completed Totals

2,591

____ 2 382

6

2,981 1,617 38,690 1,382 78 40,150

VII. Newspapers Currently Received A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H.

Number of subscriptions beginning ofyear Added by Subscription 1. Through C.U.Library 2. Directly Withdrawn No. of Subscriptions end of year Added by Gift and Exchange Number of Gifts and Exchanges beginning of year 1. Through C.U.Library 2. Directly Withdrawn No. of Gift and Exchange Subscriptions Total No. of Titles Received

7_ 0_ 0_ 0_ 1_ 0_ 0_ 0_ 0_ 0_ _________7

VIII. Serials Currently Received (Excluding Newspapers reported above) A. B. C.

Number of Titles beginning of year Titles added during year No. of Withdrawals & Cancellations T o t ^ No. of Titles Received

*not included in new titles cataloged. column.

2,578 382 18 2,942

Other analytics included in monographs


-

5

1978/1979

-

Library Expenditures A.

B.

Personal Services 1. Salaries a. Professional b. Clerical Total Salaries 2. Temporary Services a. Student b. Non-Student (Include full-time staff paid on hourly rate) Total Temporary Services Total Personal Services Books, Periodicals and Binding 1. Books & Periodicals a. Allocation b. Endowment Funds c. Special Gifts Total Books & Periodicals 2. Binding 3. Total Books, Periodicals and Binding 4. General Operating Expenses 5. Equipment a. New b. Replacement 6. Other Grand Total Library Expenditures

Library Staff A.

Salaried Staff (given in full-time equivalents) 1. Professional 2. Clerical Total

B.

Student and Other Hourly Assistants 1. Number of Hours of Student Assistants During Year 2. Number of Hours of Other Hourly Assistants (Include full-time staff paid on hourly rate) Total Hours

$_____________ $____________ ,

$_____________

$'

$ $' $â&#x20AC;&#x153;

$ $ _____________ $ _____________

$_____________


1978/1979

-6-

This Information will be treated as CONFIDENTIAL. For Consolidated Budget - 1979/80 Figures. A.

Total Number of Positions Administration 1. Professional 2. Non-Professional 3. Total

B.

1979/80 Budget Figures Personal Services 1. a. Salaries b. Temporary Services Total Books, Periodicals & Binding 2. a. Books and Periodicals b. Binding Total Other 3. Equipment 4.

C.

Please furnish list of all staff with titles, grades and salaries, on the attached forms.

/ Cfi /V

This Report Prepared By If you have prepared an annual report for the Department Head, Dean or Library Committee, we would appreciate having a copy filed with the University Library. A written statement of the activities of your library and your professional activities will be very helpful.


Budget Payroll Salary Name 1979/80 Line_________ Title_________ Grade______________________ Salary

Difference + or -

Budget Line

Salary Grade

1978/79 Remarks Salary_____________

I

1978/1979


CORNELL UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES MONTHLY TALLY SHEET FOR ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORT Library/Department:

Law. Public Services______________ IIG.

1978/79

JUNE

TOTAL

Services - Photocopy FEB.

MAR.

____ 1 —

____1 —

3

3

3

33.732

38,946

24,739

27,423

127

43

40

70

50

2.782

3,116

1,815

2,405

2^662

2,243

21,918

34.624

37,141

35,590

41,391

27,471

29,716

251 201

340 274

279 242

298 255

141 125

307 240

300 253

296 238

45 40

52 33

1Q1 ___ U l

79 68

98 79

55 42

141 118

78 59

1,512

5.996

Biq

5.535

k£2k

4.274

63968 42499 •

64762 43018

No longer in use

1689 69179 44968

1868 81911 57501

2051 90181 65493

2253 1Q4.4Q2. 79451

3461 124377 98202

3600 139148

322 541

8393 8726

20100, 208'69

28805 30481

43631 45736

AUG.

JULY

Year:

NOV.

JAN.

SEPT.

OCT.

____ 3. __

3

3

_

____ 1 _

__

_

3

3

3

3

3

_

_

___

_

4,985

19,048

19.382

31., 7.7.1

33.898

14

51

57

___ Z1

d. Internal Library Use

2,509

2,290

2,479

Total

7,508

21,389

Retrievals Periodicals Req. Periodicals Ret.

75 58

Other Req. Other Ret.

DEC.

MAY

APR.

1. No. of Machines 3

a. Coin-Operated b. Staff-Opera'd

Total

3

3

3 —

3 —

2

3 —

2

3

2

2

30,446 25,628

3,200

293,198

39

52

156

770

3,845

2,351

1,854

30,351

34,330 28,031

5,210

324,319

251 202

152 124

67 61

2,757 2,273

50 41

93 80

25 22

24 18

841 674

4.545

6,889

7,260

2,083

_

3764. 154875 128275

3846 164874 1 38204

4026 177275 150383

4107 4275 188691 199944 161701 172782

4552 201005 173570

61 /.89 64363

71748 75069

a m 03 84110

91158 103622 95973 110438

115128

3

2. No. of Copies a. Copy Service b. Self-Service c. ILL

Xerox 1000 Self-Service Olivetti Main Reading Coin Reading SAVIN Hecon meter Master meter Coin meter Xerox 3100 A-Coin Meter B-Master Meter

5.416

_ _ _

7/77

Cornell Law Library Annual Report 1979  
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