Page 1

CORNELL LAW LIBRARY Report of the Law Librarian 1975-1976 May 31, 1976 HIGHLIGHTS --

Computerized cataloging via a terminal to be installed by the end of June should result in substantial savings

-—

Library has about five years of workable space left

Technical Services activities have been combined into one section to improve efficiency

-—

Sale of over 9,000 books early in next fiscal year should considerably reduce carry-over of this yearns deficit into the next year

ADMINISTRATION The year was marked by the retirement of Prof. Harry Bitner who had served as Law Librarian for ten years. During his tenure the Library grew substantially both in size and in depth of its collection. Miss Jane Hammond has accepted appointment as Law Librarian and Professor of Law, beginning October 1, 1976. Prof. Hammond will be assisted by Robert L. Oakley whose appointment as Assistant Law Librarian takes effect on August 19 , 197 6. Following the departure of Prof. Bitner on December 12, 1975, Christian Boissonnas and Dale Alan Diefenbach have served as Co-Acting Law Librarians. Mr. Boissonnas has been in charge of Administration and of Technical Services, and Mr. Diefenbach in charge of Collection Development and of Public Services. COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT The book fund appropriation for this fiscal year amounted to just over / l8U,000. By February, it became apparent that at the then current rate, we would be running up a deficit by the end of the year that could be up to 15 percent above our available funds. As a result of a meeting in early March between the Director of Libraries, the Law Librarian-designate, and the two Acting Law Librarians, it was decided that the Law Library would have to cut back immediately on extra copies of very many law reviews, purchase monographs at sharply reduced rate, largely switch from "class A" to "economy" binding, prepare a list of materials for sale to generate income, and take any other measures to reduce the inevitable gap between resources and expenses. (A recent issue of the Law Library Journal indicated that loose-leaf services went up in cost 21 percent in one year, and that serials increased by 1 1 per­ cent annually. Since Anglo-American serial continuations, including loose-leafs, constitute 5/8 of our budget, the impact of inflation has been most heavy in this area.)


Seventy-nine additional copies of Anglo-American law reviews have been identified for cancellation after a careful review of their circu­ lation records for the last ten years. In no instance has it been necessary to drop our only (or remaining) copy. Approximately 150 titles of loose-leaf services of the Matthew Bender Company have been examined with an eye to putting a large number of them, after individual review, on a deferred supplementation plan which should result in significant savings for the Library. Unlike the practicing bar, the Law School's educational and research programs do not always need the most recent commercially available supplementation for every subject or, especially, for every jurisdiction. The Cornell Law Review is seeking to expand its book review coverage of major monographs and as a consequence is writing to an enlarged list of law publishers for review copies. The Law Review has agreed to examine such new titles as quickly as possible, and to divert copies not needed for review purposes to the Library. The Library will delay direct purchase of titles from companies known to send review copies to the Law Review because of the reasonable possibility it may secure a large number of titles as gif'ts from the Law Review. Such cooperation will undoubtedly strengthen our ability to continue to acquire quality monographs. It is precisely in the area of monographic purchases where our financial pinch has been felt the worst. We hope to extend this type of cooperation to include the International Law Journal as well. At the request of the Law Librarian-designate, the International Legal Studies Committee met to review our collection plan in this area. The Committee felt that the Library should provide it with more factual information on which to base policy decisions. Because of the heavy utilization of personnel throughout the Library in preparing for our major book sale, we have been unable to gather the necessary information up to this time. It is hoped that this summer may provide such an oppor­ tunity. Prof. Gifford, a committee member, asked us to draw up a listo of U.S. serials currently received in the tax area. After review, he hopes some U.S. serials can be dropped and funds transferred to support the international aspects of taxation. It is anticipated that this will be the first of many subject reviews of our Anglo-American serials in an effort to trim many titles to help bring our expenditures into line We envision a year-long project of preparing lists of serials, along with their costs, for each subject on which teaching or research is being conducted by members of the Law Faculty. This would serve two purposes: (l) provide a ready list of serials by subject for research purposes; and (2) enable the Faculty member to prune many marginal titles after comparing them with all others in the field now in the Library. Over the years serials have been added on a typical one by one basis as they appear. Neither the Law Librarian nor individual Faculty members have 1 had the chance for wholesale review of all titles in a specific area. Frankly, when a professor no longer wishes to have the current issue of a newsletter routed to him, it is time to reconsider subscribing to it; newsletters have proliferated in recent years, and, for the most part, they have neither internal indexing nor are they indexed elsewhere


Even where they will he retained, we plan to stop binding newsletter -type publications and keep them only for a specific period, e.g., two to three years. That will help save binding costs and reduce the rate of growth slightly. Serials below a specific size have since March been bound in a cheaper binding where experience indicated that they will hot be heavily used. Although we have no specific figures, we estimate 90 percent of that portion of our serials formerly bound in "class A" binding have been converted to "economy" binding. Funds for binding come out of the book funds so any economies here have a direct impact on our purchases. We had the first book sale in the Library in "living memory" last November. In April, we offered for sale a first edition of the first series of the National Reporter System that had seen better days. Hie income produced from both sales together amounted to around 0 500. A much more significant sale is the one contemplated, primarily to law book dealers, of over 9,200 volumes consisting of two groups: (l) over 3,000 volumes of discontinued, multiple copies of Anglo-American law review titles, and (2 ) the rest being "duplicate" volumes of largely gift materials, such as sets of law reports, encyclopedias, digests, etc. The processing of these is a time-consuming operation in that we must make sure that we have filled in any missing volumes in sets held by the Library. In some cases, we must exchange sets on the shelves with "duplicate" ones which are in better condition, and this involves adding and removing library identification on the books. We hope that this sale, a one-shot" deal, will considerably reduce the carry-over of this year*s deficit into the budget for 1976-1977 . Ihe urgency of book sales for financial purposes has a very welcome spin-off in providing growth space. In the past, we kept records only of the number of volumes added and withdrawn, but not of shelf space being used up. In order to join the "Club of Rome" and prognosticate when doomsday" might hit the Library, the time when we would push out our walls, we have to q u a m t f y the available space (both presently empty and space to become available through book'sales, etc.) and then divide this figure by the number of linear feet occupied each year. We should have 12,3^0 linear feet of shelf space available for use. (We counted only completely empty shelves, ignoring partially empty ones.) We have kept accurate measurements for four months of all material being added to the stacks; the figure has been fairly stable. It amounts to 1,368 linear feet on an annual basis. It must emphasized that this figure is highly tentative because of the short period involved, but it does give us for the first time some indication of our growth. Using this tentative formula, we would arrive at a figure of NINE years of space left. This assumes a constant growth rate, no transfers of material to an off-campus storage facility yet to be built, no internal compact storage, and no significant use of microform; in other words, business as usual as of this date. Let us examine the rate of growth factor. We are at a low in adding monographs at this time so we might initially think that our growth rate will considerably pick up but this may not be the case. Let us suppose that after one year with the aid of the Faculty we have been able to reduce the cost of Anglo-American serials by 10 to 15 percent and thus slow their growth rate; we will be able to some small degree


to shift some of that savings towards the purchase of monographs. (The level of monographic purchases might thus he somewhere between its present low and the relative high level of that during Prof. Bitner’s administration*)' As far as space is concerned these two trends tend to balance out. Let us assume that a specific sum will be set aside for the purchase of micro­ form o f •relatively current materials which, of course, acts as a downward factor in the growth rate. So the rate of growth calculated during this period may not be unrealistically low. Lest we become euphoric over a figure like "nine years", let us consider some dampening factors in the picture. The gut reaction of the staff on how much space we had left varied between 2 l /2 and 5 years. Our guesses were based on the general lack of free space, large "chunks" of open space in the stacks around which stack shifts are most easily made.^ About 83 percent of the empty space is what we might call "captive space" in that it is not freely available for easy stack shifts. The space now occupied by materials scheduled for sale represent the only space in the near future that could be considered "free space"; this "sale space" constitutes 1/6 of all the space listed earlier as being available, or 1 1/2 years * worth at our present rate of growth. This future open space is thus quite vital to any sensible plan for shifting. Like Chinese checkers, shifts depend on some open space with which to begin the process. Libraries are not warehouses of books and you can’t just fill the interstices of one area with books from another to make best use of space, certainly not as long as open stacks and classification have any meaning. Frankly, we feel, in spite of paper statistics, that five years is a much more realistic estimate of how much we have left of workable space on a business as usual basis using today's standards. As we approach effective working capacity, more funds will be needed for irksome stack shifts to make best use of remaining space. Hie present relatively logical arrangement of the collection will increasingly become more arbitrary as remaining space dwindles. Solutions which seem likely of accommodating our eventual space problems are listed in descending order of the relative probability of their coming to pass: (-0 off-campus storage facility in the yet unfunded campus archives center; (2 ) massive purchase of microform of retrospective materials; (3) conversion of lower two floors to an internal compact storage area by use of Ames "Stor-More" shelving; and (U) expansion of present I-tyron Taylor facility by adding underground area under courtyard in front of classroom part of building. Some comments might be in order on these possible solutions. First, it will be probably four to five years before any off-campus storage facility opens its doors. The facility is high on the list for prospective donors} no donor has been announced yet. If the Library runs out of space before such a facility is built, then funds simply must be found for purchase of retrospective microform with which to "buy space". Hie Libraiy is an example of the old-style building in which the fixed stacks constituted a large part of the structural support of the building. A building designed for compact storage is of modular design in which the stacks are freefloating, thus permitting flexibility in aisle sizes. The Ames Company Stor-More compact storage system, the only one known to fit our type of building, could double the capacity of the first two floors, our largest two,


5 (Ralph Ellsworth, a noted library space planner, says that for a five-story fixed stack arrangement, like that of ours, it probably is structurally sound enough for the first two floors to support the Ames system.) Whether it would be cheaper for the University to ever use this in preference to further construction of off-campus storage is problematical. As regards the fourth solution, that of an immediately adjacent underground facility, it would depend on how near the surface of the ground does bedrock lie. (Yale Law Library took this route.) Before leaving this area, comment should be made of our sending about volumes printed during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries to the Olin Library Rare Book Department. There will be cards on the books in our catalog. The first floor of Myron Taylor is very unideal with regard to both temperature and humidity. The offer of the Rare Book Librarian to receive our eighteenth century books awaits a decision by the new Law Librarian after her arrival.

160

A new "gift policy" was approved by the Law Librarian-designate and is attached as an appendix to this report. BUILDING REPAIR Ihe Law School raised with the University administration the then critical problem of leaks from the ceiling of the top floor of the Library's stacks. Several sections of material ? including out of print books, were badly soaked with oil as well as water. Vice President Matyas took personal charge of the problem and the offending equipment on the floor above was replaced promptly. No leaks have been detected since then on that half of the ceiling nearest the carrels. The other half of the ceiling (nearest the Reading Room side) is covered by the roof proper. Investigators from Physical Plant Operations have recommended that the roof directly above that half of the fourth floor be completely replaced because of the continual leaks, especially around thawing times. PUBLIC SERVICES Doris Jensen was transferred from the Technical Services Section where she had worked since April, 1968 , as a cataloger, to the Public Services Section to do reference work. She took up her duties full-time starting March 1, 197-6. Her transfer at this time was most welcome, especially in view of the fact that Alan Diefenbach had to spend most of his time with collection development and general library matters. Ms. Kathleen Quinlan, the Circulation Librarian, took over from Mr. Diefenbach,the everyday direction of the Section, conferring with him as need be on general policy matters. Outside use of the Law Library, primarily by undergraduates, increased greatly. The Section's inability to cope with such an influx caused the first complaints in years from law students in receiving prompt service. As a con­ sequence of the November crisis, discussions have taken place with the Director of Libraries and the Dean of the Law School. At Dean Cramton's suggestion, a detailed survey was undertaken in April to determine the extent of use by persons outside the Law School. Hie results are attached as an appendix.


The Public Services Section, like all other campus libraries, con­ tinues to increase its use of* the Student Employment Matching Program (SEMP), up from 30 percent in 1975-1576 to a projected 55 percent for 1976-1977. Hie Federal program pays for 50 percent of the wages of the student assistants involved. Because of the vulnerability of our dependence on such a Federally-funded program at a time when candidates of both parties are playing with cuts for the Federal budget, we should point out that should the program be suddenly ended, we would have only 70 percent of the total number of hours of student assistant time that we enjoyed in 1975-1976. TECHNICAL SERVICES In November 1975, the acquisitions and cataloging functions were merged into one department headed by Christian Boissonnas. Hie purpose of this change was to improve the work flow in the Catalog and Acquisitions units which interact to a great degree, and to prepare for a reallocation of staff resources in the light of planned cutbacks. Hiree accomplishments of the Technical Services Department are worthy of note. First, a backlog of three to four hundred uncataloged serials was eliminated. They had been accumulating over the past eight years. Second, the Dacklog of uncataloged monographs was reduced by about one fifth, leaving roughly k,000 titles received in the past ten years to be cataloged. The slowdown in orders of recent months allowed the diversion of staff to this activity. Finally, the Technical Services Department has entered the computer age with the acquisition of a terminal into the Ohio College Library Center network. This network at present includes about 1,200 terminals at several hundred institutions in the country. Its major functions are computerized cataloging and production of catalog cards although it also allows searching the collections of member institutions. Hie data base now includes over two million records including many from member law school libraries. A current assumption is that Cornell Law Library will find at least fifty percent of the records it needs in the OCLC data" base. The acquisition of this terminal will result in sub­ stantial savings. Although the extent of them cannot yet be accurately predicted, a saving of one and a half FTE of supporting staff for the Technical Services Department can be immediately realized. STAFFING Hie following details personnel changes among supporting staff of the Library. In the Public Services Section, Mrs. Patricia Hall accepted appoint­ ment as an Assistant Librarian in the Uris Library, and she was replaced as Reference Assistant by Mrs. Andrea Barnett. Mrs. Barnett in turn was replaced as Circulation Assistant by Mrs. Susan Oaks who resigned at the^end of the academic year. Mrs. Diane Smith moved into the Circulation Assistant's position from that of Foreign and Special Materials Assistant, ■tmrlier in die Fall, she had filled the vacancy caused by the resignation of Mrs. Sylvia Bloch. Mr. Stanley Jacoby replaced Mr. Stewart Epstein in the Fall as Stack Supervisor. Miss Diane Heller resigned as a secretary to accept a position with the staff of the Law School.


7

In the Technical Services Section, Mrs. Judith Marsh will he leaving to attend library school. ACTIVITIES

OF STAFF MEMBERS

Christian Boissonnas was a member of the Planning and Advisory Committee of the South Central Research Library Council. He was also a member of the Cornell University Libraries Task Force on the Future of Card Catalogs. He served as a member of University Senate. He was joint compiler of Thesaurus of Descriptions for Public Sector Labor Relations (Ithaca, N.Y.: New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Cornell University, 1976). Alan Dieferibach served as Chairman of the University Review Board until January, and he still continues as a member of that Board. Robert L. Oakley just completed his J.D. program at Cornell Law School. He had been awarded a scholarship from the American Association of Law Libraries for the completion of the final year of law school. He directed the compilation and production of a bibliography on organized crime for the Organized Crime Institute, under Professor G. Robert Blakey. He conceived, developed, and taught a course as an adjunct professor at the Syracuse University School of Information Studies titled: "Legal Problems of Information Transfer". He delivered a paper to the faculty of the University of Oregon College of Law entitled: "Bringing the Computer Into the Law School", on Jan. 1 6, 1976. Mr. Oakley was named as a con­ sultant to the Study of Federal Court Libraries being conducted by the Federal 'Judicial Center. He served on the American Association of Law Libraries Committee on Automation and Scientific Technology. He was a member of the A.A.L.L. Committee on Standards. He served as liaison from A.A.L.L. to the American National Standards Institute Committee Z-39 on Library Work and Documentatinn. He attended the annual meeting of the South Central Research Library Council. Ms. Kathleen Quinlan served as a member of Audio-Visual Committee of the American Association of Law Libraries. She was Shairman of the Circulation/Reserve Sub-group of the Public Services Group of the Cornell University Libraries. She attended A.S.I.S. convention in Boston in October, 1975. Mrs. Doris Jensen was a member of the Directories Committee and the Cataloging and Classification Committee of the American Association of Law Libraries. She plans to attend the 1976 convention of the A.A.L.L. to be held in Boston, June 19-2L. Mr. Christopher Sugnet is a member of the Committee on Library Resources and Services of the Academic Assembly of Cornell University Libraries. He worked on data collection for a study report on the feasibility of OCLC in the Law Library. Mrs. Crystal Bradford was just recently elected as Treasurer of the Cornell University Libraries Staff Association for the coming year.


DRAFTING NOTES Christian Boissonnas drafted the section on "Technical Services", and Alan Dieferibach drafted the remainder of the report, save for the individual contributions submitted by staff members regarding their own activities in the "Activities of Staff Members" section. Various appendices will be submitted at the close of the academic year when more information on the year's activities will be available.


C O R N E L L L A W L IB R A R Y MYRON TAYLOR HALL IT H A C A , N E W Y O R K

14853

July 7, 1976

TO:

Distribution Indicated Below

FROM:

Alan Diefenbach / J~f _,

Enclosed are the promised appendices to the Report of the Law Librarian for

1975-1976,

with the exception of

the analysis of the April survey of undergraduate use of the Law Library.

The latter will be submitted by Robert

Oakley after he becomes Assistant Law Librarian in August.

Distribution:

Dean Cramton J. Gormly Miller Jane Hammond Alan Diefenbach Christian Boissonnas Robert Oakley Henk Edelman file routing copy


Appendix 1

Cornell Law Library Statistics 1973/7*4-1975/76

COLLECTION held at beginning of year flumes added flumes withdrawn ^■°tal volumes at end of year

1975/76

197V75

1973 /7*4

30*4,1451

29^,058

28 1 ,*433

10,702

10,671

12,82*4

321

278

199

31*4,832

3014,1451

29*4,058

£29 ,315.69 8 ,126.146

£**6,355.05 7 ,058.58

£3 3 ,783.23 7,*462.30

128 ,898 .0*4 1 5 ,072.78

10*4,1147 .8*4 12,1*4*4.56

86 ,907.56 10 ,862.92

£l8l,*4l2.97

£169 ,706.03

£139 ,016.01

27,386.10

22 ,108.31

19,130.95

£208,799.07

£19 1 ,81 *4.3*4

£158 ,1 *46.96

EXPENDITURES K ®atises & Monographs Abglo -Amer ican F°reign C°btinuations Abglo-American Foreign ^°tal Treatises & Continuations Bi^ing ^otal Expenditures


C O R N E L L L A W L IB R A R Y MYRON TAYLOR

ITHACA, N S W Y O S : ;

HALL 1A353

GIFT POLICY

The Cornell Law Library welcomes and encourages gifts in support of the Law School's program. Indeed, it relies heavily upon the support of donors to help sustain its growth, and many of its most valuable resources and special collections come in this way. Gifts both of money and of book, periodicals, and other research material contribute to its development, and the support provided by a modest gift is appreciated in the same way as endowments and gifts of larger amounts. Because of the complex nature of the collection, it is often desirable for the Library to observe certain conditions in its acceptance of gifts. Gifts in kind are accepted with the understanding that upon receipt the Library becomes the owner of the material and, as such, reserves the right to determine retention, location, cataloging treat­ ment, and other considerations related to use or disposition. In general the Library will not accept outdated textbooks, duplicates, ephemeral association or corporate publications except as they are needed to complete its holdings of particular titles. The Library encourages donors to consider, in their own interest, having their gifts appraised for income tax purposes. The Internal Revenue Service considers recipient libraries to be interested parties and therefore often disallows appraisals made, or paid for, by them. ’ For this reason costs of appraisal must be borne by donors, although appraisal costs themselves are likely to be deductible items. As income and estate tax laws are subject to frequent revision, donors may wish to discuss appraisals with their attorneys. When requested to do so, the Library can assist by providing such information as auction records and dealers' catalogs, suggestions of appropriate professional appraisers who might be consulted, or, when necessary, by arranging for appraisal after receipt of the gift in the Library. The acceptance of a gift which has been appraised by a third, disinterested party does not in any way imply endorsement of the appraisal by the Cornell Law Library. All gifts to tification of the each volume added particularly well

May 1976

the Libraries are acknowledged and, for permanent iden­ gift, the donor's name appears on the book plate of to the Law Library. This form of recognition is suited to memorial gifts and endowments.


Appendix 3

Law Library Staff

ADMINISTRATION (Extension 6-4236) D. Alan Diefenbach, Co-Acting Law Librarian Christian Boissonnas, Co-Acting Law Librarian Crystal Bradford, Administrative Secretary I.

PUBLIC SERVICES (Extensions 6-3344 and 6-4775) D. Alan Diefenbach, Reference Librarian Robert Oakley, Assistant Reference Librarian (Part-Time) Kathleen Quinlan, Reference/Circulation Librarian Doris Jensen, Reference Librarian Andrea Barnett, Library Assistant III, A-15 Diane Smith, Library Assistant III, A-15 Guy Smith, Stack Supervisor, A-15 Janet Fisher, Library Assistant II, A-12 Pamela Martin, Library Assistant III, A-15 (institute of Criminal Justice)

II.

TECHNICAL SERVICES A.

Acquisitions Section (Extension 6-3668) Lois Hickson, Order Librarian Alice McPherson, Head Account Clerk, A-15 Alice 01sefski, Searcher, A-13 Gary Bogart, Kardex Clerk, A-13 Debra Gregg, Library Assistant I, A-10

B.

Cataloging Section (Extension 6-3982) Christian Boissonnas, Head Cataloger Christopher Sugnet, Cataloger Barbara Blanchard, Library Assistant III, A-15 Nancy McBride, Library Assistant II, A-12 Sharon Reeves, Library Assistant I, A-10 Lori Neiderman, Library Assistant I, A-10

July, 1976


C O R N E L L LAW LIBRARY MYRON TAYLOR HALL IT H A C A , N E W YO RK

Ao

14SS3

9

l f^

', & fc K

n Oakley > Assistant Law Librarian

TO:

Roger C. Cramton, Dean

SUBJECT:

Statistical Survey of Law Library Use: Appendix III to the Annual Report of the Law Librarian, 1975-76

DATE:

May 10, 1977

CONTENTS A.

Background

B.

Methodology

C.

Results

D.

Discussion and Conclusion

E.

Charts I.

Summary Chart Indicating Percentage Use of the Law Library By Law School and Non-Law School Patrons.

II.

Reference Statistics Survey, April 5 to May 2, 1976.

III.

Reference Statistics Survey, January 23 to February 25, 1977

IV.

Circulation Survey, April 5 to May 2, 1976.

V.

Reading Room Use Survey, April 5 to May 2, 1976.

VI.

Percentage Tabulation of Reference Statistics Survey, April 5 to May 2, 1976.

VII.

Percentage Tabulation of Reference Statistics Survey, January 23 to February 25, 1977.

VIII.

Percentage Tabulation of Circulation Survey, April 5 to May 2, 1976.

IX.

Percentage Tabulation of Reading Room Use Survey, April 5 to May 2, 1976.


C O R N E L L LAW LIBRARY MYRON TAYLOR HALL ITH A C A . N E W YO RK

TO:

Roger C. Cramton, Dean

SUBJECT:

Statistical Survey of Law Library Use: Appendix III to the Annual Report of the Law Librarian, 1975-76.

A.

14353

FROM:

Robert L. Oakley, Assistant Law Librarian

DATE:

May 10, 1977

Background

About one year ago you requested a survey of Law Library usage to determine how much use is made of our facilities by non-law patrons. From April 5 through May 2, 1976 we surveyed the users of the Law Library Reading Room, as well as the users of the Circulation and Reference services.

A second survey of Reference service only was conducted from

January 23 through February 25 of this year.

B.

Methodology

During the initial survey, the affiliation of each borrower was recorded for each circulation transaction.

In addition, each individual

who asked a reference question was asked to identify his or her college affiliation.

Since the impact of reference questions on the library

depends to a large extent on their complexity, the reference statistics were broken down by level of difficulty as follows:

"A" questions are

those which can be answered immediately, without reference to a library source; "B" questions may take up to 15 minutes to answer and/or require consultation of library source material; "C" questions take 15 minutes


-2 -

Memorandum to Dean Cramton

May 10, 1977

to an hour and may require consultation of several sources; "D" questions are "problem" questions which take substantial time to answer. Finally, each hour on the quarter hour, throughout the month, each person seated in the Reading Room was asked his or her college affiliation.

At

the same time we also noted how many people were not using Law Library material. After the first survey was finished, and a preliminary analysis completed, we realized that the results may have been misleadingly skewed to show heavier than normal undergraduate use.

The apparent

reason for this discrepancy was the timing of the survey; the study was conducted in April, when the heaviest Law School research was over, and undergraduate papers were at a peak.

As a corrective measure we repeated

the survey of Reference use at the beginning of the Spring 1977 semester, a time when law student research programs were in progress.

Charts II

and III do show increased use of the Law Library by law students in the second survey, but there is not as much of a difference as expected.

C.

Results

The figures gathered in the surveys were totaled.

A tabular summary

of the results, showing the percentage of law and non-law use in all of the functions is in Chart I.

Charts II through V show the numerical

totals of the surveys, as follows: Chart Chart Chart Chart

II: III: IV: V:

Reference Survey, April 1976 Reference Survey, February 1977 Circulation Survey, April 1976 Reading Room Survey, April 1976

The remainder of the charts, numbered VI through IX, show the percentage use made by students from each of the colleges in each of the surveys listed above.

Note that due to rounding off of some of the figures, the


Memorandum to Dean Cramton

-3-

May 10, 1977

totals in these charts may not equal exactly 100 percent.

D.

Discussion and Conclusion

It is evident from the statistics that the use made of the Law Library by persons other than those associated with the Law School is very heavy indeed.

It is interesting, however, that although non-law

school patrons make the heaviest use of Reference and Circulation services, by far the majority of people using our Reading Room at any given time are law students.

Thus, whereas 75 percent of the Reading

Room users are law students, 66 percent of the books and periodicals which are circulated are signed out to non-law students.

Similarly,

79 percent and 50 percent of the more difficult reference questions were asked by non-law students in the first and second surveys respectively.

In both surveys, charts F and G show that the heaviest

non-law use of our reference service came from the Arts college. I. & L. R . , Human Ecology, Engineering, and Agriculture followed with fewer questions (not necessarily in that order).

It will come as no

surprise that these colleges are the ones with substantial enrollments in law-related courses. The results of the survey suggest several possible conclusions. Most importantly, it is apparent that the patterns of Law Library use are very different for law and non-law students.

One possible

conclusion is that many of our law student users are using the library primarily as a study hall, rather than as a research facility.

If this

is true, then it may have important implications for the Building Committee. Another possible conclusion is that because law students have been trained in Practice Training I to use the research tools in our


Memorandum to Dean Cramton

-4-

May 10, 1977

collection, they are able to conduct much of their research independently, without the assistance of a Reference Librarian.

By

contrast, when the non-law students arrive at the Law Library they know nothing about either legal research tools or methodology. Consequently, the non-law student requires much more assistance from a Reference Librarian than the typical lav/ student. The magnitude of the undergraduate problem, combined with the observation that they have no training in legal research methods, suggests the possibility of several different approaches toward a solution:

(a) undergraduate faculty could be requested not to assign

papers that might necessitate research in the Law Library; (b) under­ graduate faculty who wish to assign such papers could be required to have their students attend one or more introductory lectures on legal research; (c) we could develop a series of three to five lectures to be attended on a voluntary basis by undergraduates desiring to use the Law Library; (d) we could make the program in (c) a requirement for doing research in the Law Library; (e) we could develop a one credit undergraduate course which would be given in tandem with any of the "problem" undergraduate courses, students being required to co-register in the legal bib. course in order to take the other, substantive one; (f) we could develop an auto-tutorial audio-visual program which undergraduate students (or anyone else) could take and work through, as needed.

Any of the foregoing programs presumably would be supported

with funds from the appropriate academic divisions of the University. (Parenthetically, I should note that I have spoken with several of the undergraduate faculty, and I believe they would be receptive— and recommend monetary support to their deans!— we might decide to undertake.)

to any such program that


Memorandum to Dean Cramton

-5-

May 10, 1977

The problem of non-law students using the Law Library has been with us now for several years, and it has been growing steadily as the number of law-related undergraduate courses has continued to grow. The statistics in this report now make the impact of the non-law students abundantly clear.

Some program should now be developed to

bring the situation under control.


Chart I Summary Percentage Use of Law Library By Law School and Non-Law School Patrons

Type of Use

Non-Law School

Law School

69

31

79

21

45

55

50

50

37

63

Books

66

34

Periodicals

66

34

Reserves

15

85

25

75

Total Reference Questions, 1st Survey B, C, D Questions, 1st Survey Total Reference Questions, 2d Survey B, C, D Questions 2d Survey Total Circulation

Reading Room Use


Chart II Law Library Public Services Department Reference Statistics Survey

Date April 5 to May 2, 1976

Law

Type A Questions (can be answered immediately)

348

Agr.

23

Arch.

Arts

B&PA

Eng.

Grad.

Hotel

Hum. Ec.

3&LR

Other (Non-student, staff)

Vet

TOTAL

20

179

2

34

42

3

51

154

0

127

983

•

Type B Questions (5-15 min. to answer)

80

11

13

81

0

12

21

0

38

45

1

52

354

Type C Questions (15 min.-l hr. to answer)

7

2

2

11

1

3

3

0

9

6

0

9

53

Type D Questions (Pore than to answer)

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

6

10

3

ioo

Total

1

hr.

435

36 _ J l i _______

273

49 1 i

66 ______

1 205 ______ L

194 *

/

y1400


Chart III Law Library Public Services Department Reference Statistics Survey

Date January 23-February 25, 1977

Eng.

Grad.

Hotel

Hum. Ec.

I&LR

Other (Non-student, staff)

Vet

Law

Agr.

Arch.

Arts

B&PA

Type A Questions (can be answered immediately)

369

33

12

70

9

37

16

14

7

5

0

65

637

Type B Questions (5-15 min. to answer)

183

20

7

31

5

37

7

0

3

7

0

53

353

13

4

0

2

1

0

1

0

5

1

0

9

36.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

Type C Questions (15 min.-l hr. to answer)

Type D Questions (Pore than to answer)

1

hr.

1

.

Total

1 565

j 57

19

103

_ n A

_— ___/

_ P L 1

TOTAL

I2S

j 1027


Chart IV Law Library Public Services Department Circulation Statistics Survey

Date April 5 to May 2, 1976

' No. of charges (signed out)

Total

Affiliation of Borrower Books

Periodicals

Reserves

252

146

1245

1643

11

3

13

27

5

4

4

13

145

33

46

224

13

0

5

B & PA

18

43

9

9

Engineering

61

94

27

26

147

Grad. School

3

0

0

3

Human Ecology

45

3

6

54

I & LR

41

7

38

86

0

0

0

0

78

200

65

343

730

432

1457

2619

Law Agriculture Architecture Arts & Sciences

Hotel

Vet Other (Non-student, staff, etc.) Total


VIIOL kLaw LibraryPublic Services Department Reading Room Use Survey Total Count Date April 5 to May 2, 1976

Time

Law

8:15

253

9:15

Agr.

Total Present

Arch.

Arts

B&PA

Eng.

0

1

0

0

0

2

0

0

2

0

7

4

265

384

3

3

6

1

1

7

0

2

7

0

16

12

430

10:15

577

6

6

16

2

4

10

1

2

18

0

38

18

680

11:15

826

11

7

33

1

5

29

2

4

28

0

38

24

984

12 :15

511

12

3

38

2

0

28

0

6

25

0

38

26

663

1:15

917

22

7

72

5

4

10

1

13

42

0

46

65

1139

2:15

976

16

9

104

6

10

21

2

26

65

0

57

81

1292

3:15

930

23

17

98

8

12

16

2

30

67

1

51

63

1255

1+:15

807

18

8

75

8

8

15

2

26

57

1

61

80

1086

5:15

350

7

3

40

3

1

9

1

21

24

0

29

30

488

6:15

190

8

5

26

3

3

10

1

16

14

1

17

26

294

7:15

456

17

3

58

5

11

13

0

30

46

3

20

51

662

8:15

685

25

9

125

9

16

16

1

46

70

2

27

109

1031

9:15

711

29

10

118

8

17

13

5

35

61

4

24

96

1035

10:15

572

25

12

109

13

12

19

6

35

62

1

16

72

882

11:15 (

360

ii / 78 L

5

13

2

26

38

1

37

524

T o ta l

A v- #

I 9505

/J l l/ 235

4

107

/

969

109

Grad.

/

231

Hotel

/_ 26 J

Hum.Ec.

318

I&LR

/

626

J

Vet

-J iL

Other (Non-student, staff)

492

7 1 J

Not using Law Lib. Book

294

Jj

12710


Chart VI Law LibraryPublic Services Department Reference Statistics SurveyPercentage Tabulation Date April 5 to May 2, 1976

13

11

13

0

15

0

17

11

0

17

0

0

20

0

0

60

6

0

3

4

0

5

23

0

3

6

0

4

21

2

6

6

0

20

0

0

Type A Questions (can be answered immediately)

35

2

2

18

Type B Questions (5-15 min. to answer)

23

3

4

Type C Questions (15 nin.-l hr. to answer)

13

4

0

0

B&PA

IScLR

hr.

3

B, C, D q u e s t i o n s

23 ____

Questions

0

0

Arts

All

16

Hotel

Arch.

1

Other (Non-student, staff)

Grad.

Agr.

Type D Questions ("ere than tc answer )

Vet

Hum. Ec.

Eng.

Law

J

31

/

3

/

5

/

20

j

° /

1

4

4

J

16

0

/

12 /

-

/

°

i

y f

"

J

14


Chart VII Law LibraryPublic Services Department Reference Statistics Survey Percentage Tabulation Date January 23-February 25, 1977

Agr.

Law

Type A Questions (can be answered immediately)

58

Type B Questions (5-15 min. to answer)

Type C Questions (15 min.-l hr. to answer)

Arch.

Arts

B&PA

Eng.

Hotel

Grad.

Hum. Ec.

Vet

I&LR

Other (Non-student, staff)

5

2

11

1

6

3

2

1

1

0

10

52

6

2

9

1

10

2

0

1

2

0

15

36

11

0

6

3

0

3

0

14

3

0

25

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

100

50

6

2

8

2

Type D Questions

(Pore

than

1

hr.

to a n s w e r )

B,

C,

D questions

All Questions

j

55

6/ 2 /

9/ zzz 2 1 2

H

Z

/

0// 2/ / L ____ i

-■

l

*

0 l __ ___ L

J

16

12


Chart VIII Law LibraryPublic Services Department Circulation Statistics Survey Percentage Tabulation Date April 5 to May 2, 1976

% of charges (signed out) Total

xu.x xjlicioj.oia ox sorrower Periodicals

Reserves

34

34

85

63

Agriculture

2

1

1

1

Architecture

0

1

0

0

20

8

3

9

B & PA

2

0

0

1

Engineering

6

2

1

2

Grad. School

1

6

2

6

Hotel

0

0

0

0

Human Ecology

6

1

0

2

I & LR

6

2

3

3

Vet

0

0

0

0

11

46

4

13

Books Law

Arts & Sciences

Other (Non-student, staff, etc.)


Chart IX Law Library rublic Services Department Reading Room Use Survey Percentage Tabulation Date April 5 to May 2. 1977

Not using Law Lib. Book

Eng.

Grad.

Hotel

Hum.Ec.

I&LR

Vet

Other (Non-student, staff)

0

0

1

0

0

1

0

3

1

0

0

2

0

0

2

0

4

3

1

2

0

1

1

0

0

3

0

6

3

1

1

3

0

1

3

0

0

3

0

4

2

77

2

0

6♦

0

0

4

0

1

4

0

6

4

81

2

1

6

0

0

1

0

1

4

0

4

6

1:15 2:15

76

1

1

8

0

1

2

0

2

5

0

4

6

3:15

74

2

1

8

1

1

1

0

2

5

0

4

5

1:15

74

2

1

7

1

1

1

0

2

5

0

6

7

73

1

1

8

1

0

2

0

4

5

0

6

6

5:15

64

3

2

9

1

1

3

0

5

5

0

6

9

6:15

69

3

0

9

1

2

2

0

5

7

0

3

8

8:15

66

2

1

12

1

2

2

0

4

7

0

3

11

9:15

69

3

1

11

1

2

1

0

3

6

0

1C: 15

65

3

1

12

2

1

4

Arts

Agr.

Arch.

95

0

0

0

9:15

89

1

1

10:15

85

1

11:15

84

12:15

Time

Law

3:15

7:15

2

11:15 / 69Ji _z^

1

/

__

___/

/

10

BScPA

/

1 /

1

1 z r x

1

W

^

z

2

/

-

2 —

9 2 2

7

8

_

J

5

/

^ _ _Z _

i i

1 0 / " __ Z—

7

/

4$


C O R N E L L U N IVE R SITY 1—3 R A R IE S

INFORMATION REQUESTED FOR VARIOUS ANNUAL REPORTS FOR THE YEAR

1975/76

-"-ease complete this form in duplies ^rn one form to J. Gormly M iller, Director, 201 Clin Library, and one to Elizabeth M. Murphy, 234 Olin Library before July 6, 1976. If you have supplied regular Monthly Reports on Circulation, Inter library Loans, Reference Service and Cataloging, it is not necessary to rurnish totals for the year. Libraries, other than the Central Libraries and its Departments, are asked to supply data on library income and expenditures for the year, and on those items in the annual report form which do not appear on the monthly reports, insofar as your records permit. Library

Lav

Librarian

Alan Diefenbach and Christian Boissonnas

Circulation and Reserve:

B.

C.

U.

Circulation 1. Home Use a. Regular b. 7 -day or other Total Home Use 2. Building Use a. Reading Rooms b. Carrels c. Studies d. Other (List) Total Building Use Total Circulation Reserve 1. Closed Reserve - Home Use 2. Overnight - Closed Reserve 3. Home Use - Open Shelf Total Reserve How many hours per week was library open for full-service in fall term 1975 (excluding pr e - examination periods and other special times)

11^06.9

11.065 a3.„553

93,553 104'6IS 13.^ 2 7

13,527

88 hrs/wk, Aug-Oct. 97 hrs/wk, Nov-Dec.

Reference Service A. B. C.

Information and Directions Reference Questions Search Questions

6,514

6,016 6l4


- 2 -

D. E.

IE.

Problem Questions Bibliographies Total Reference Service

51 13,200

Interlibrary Service (Loan and Photoduplication) A.

B.

C.

IV.

Lending 1. Titles Requested 2. Titles Loaned 3. Volumes Loaned

269 147 l6l

Borrowing 1. Titles Requested 2. Titles Borrowed 3. Volumes Borrowed

1 1

1

Photoduplication 1. Outgoing (Lending) a. Orders and Inquiries Received b. Orders Filled (by Title) 1. Photoprint (Xerox-Coinfax etc.) a. Xerox - Coinfax b. Xerox - Copyflo, photo­ stats etc. c. Microfilms d. Other Microforms 2. Incoming (Borrowing) a. Orders Written b. Orders Filled

183

0 134

1 0 6 9

Copy Service A.

9* ^ B.

Xerox External Use (No. of sheets) 1. Campus - (cash) 19,393 2. Mail Orders (ILL) 393 Total External Use Intern&FLibrary Use* (No. of Sheets) Coin-Op Copier 1. Total Coin Dial 2. All Other a. Jnterdepartment b. Interlibrary c. Known Internal d.

Unaccounted

199064

21.236 29,998 (Coin Reading: June '79, 330379 June ’7 6, 489443)

q

0 712 i ;^Q3~

''If work done for Interlibrary Loan Service Do Not count as "Internal Library U se ". Show as ILL. This will eliminate duplication of count.


- 3 -

V.

Acquisitions A. B. C. D.

E. F. G. H.

I.

J.

K.

L. M.

N.

No. of Orders Placed No. of Volumes at Beginning of Year No. of Volumes Added by Purchase No. of Volumes Added by Gift or Exchange Total No. of Volumes Added Total Volumes No. of Volumes Lost or Withdrawn from Records Total Number at end of year Microfilm a. No. of Reels (physical count) held at beginning of year b. No. of Reels (physical count) added c. No. of Reels (physical count) at end of year Microcards a. No. of Physical Units held at beginning of year b. No. of Physical Units added c. No. of Physical Units at end of year Microprint Sheets a. No. of Physical Units held at beginning of year b. No. of Physical Units added c. No. of Physical Units held at end of year Microfiche a. No. of Physical Units held at beginning of year b. No. of Physical Units added c. No. of Physical Units held at end of year TOTAL Microform Units held at end of year (addle, Jc, Kc) Motion Pictures a. No. held at beginning of year b. No. added c. No. at endof year Audio Recordings a. No. held at beginning of year b. No. added c. No. held at end of year

1,898

3 d ,151 -10.273 129 10,702 -315,197 321

311,832

21

0 21

0 0 0 0 0 381 13 I 27 JiSZ

0 0 0 38 19 57


O.

P.

Q.

Records a. No. held at beginning of year b. No. added c. No. held at end of year Filmstrips (include film loops) a. No. held at beginning of year b. No. added c. No. held at end of year Maps a. No. held at beginning of year b. No. added c. No. held at end of year

0

0

0

Cataloging A.

-b. C. D. E.

F.

New Titles 1. Original Cataloging 2. Li. C. Cataloging 3. Other Total New Titles Total New Volumes Maps

2 ____ 3

5.610 10,286

Micro-Reproductions (Pieces) Reclassified and Recataloged 1. Titles 2. Volumes Card Production 1. Printed Cards (LC or Other) 2. Typed Cards 3. Multilithed Cards Completed 4. Multilithed Cards Run

4

378 ____

68 3,052 55,614 65,609

Newspapers Currently Received A.

Number of subscriptions beginning of year 3B. Added by Subscription 1. Through C. U. Library 2. Directly C. Withdrawn D. No. of Subscriptions end of year r.. Added by Gift and Exchange F. Number of Gifts & Exchanges beginning of year E Through C. U. Library 2. Directly G. Withdrawn E. No. of Gift Exchange Subscriptions Total No. of Titles Received

2. _o 2 o_

7_

0 0. 2 2 2 7


- 5 -

VIII. Serials Currently Received (Excluding Newspapers reported above) A. B. C.

IX.

Number of Titles beginning of year 1,930 Titles Added during year _____ 35>2 No. of Withdrawals Cancellations _______ 9 Total No. of Titles Received

2,273

Library Expenditures A.

B.

Personal Services 1. Salaries a. Professional $ b. Clerical Total Salaries 2. Temporary Services a. Student $ b. Non-Student (Include full-time staff paid on hourly rate) Total Temporary Services Total Personal Services Books, Periodicals and Binding 1. Books & Periodicals a. Allocation $ ____________ b. Endowment Funds ____________ c. Special Gifts ____________ Total Books & Periodicals 2. Binding 3. Total Books, Periodicals and Binding 4. General Operating Expenses 5. Equipment a. New b. Replacement 6. Other Grand Total Library Expenditures

Library Staff A.

Salaried Staff (given in full-time equivalents) 1. Professional 2. Clerical Total

$

$

$


- 6 -

B.

XII.

Student and Other Hourly Assistants 1. Number of Hours of Student Assistants During Year 2. Number of Hours of Other Hourly Assistants (Include full-tim e staff paid on hourly rate) Total Hours

________

________

This Information will be treated as CONFIDENTIAL. For Consolidated Budget - 1976/77 Figures. A.

B.

C.

Total Number of Positions 1. Administration 2. Professional 3. Non-Professional Total 1976/77 Budget Figures 1. Personal Services a. Salaries b. Temporary Services Total 2. Books, Periodicals & Binding a. B o o k s and Periodicals b. Binding Total 3. Other 4. Equipment

________ ________ ________

________ ________

________ ________

Please furnish list of all staff with titles, grades and salaries, on attached form s.

This Report Prepared By

If you have prepared an annual report for the Department Head, Dean or Library Committee, we would appreciate having a copy filed with the University Library. A written statement of the activities of your library and your professional Activities will be very helpful.

Cornell Law Library Annual Report 1976  
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