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CORNELL UNIVERSITY LAW LIBRARY A YEAR IN REVIEW 2016-2017


CORNELL UNIVERSITY LAW LIBRARY A YEAR IN REVIEW 2016-2017 Message from the director

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Honoring a Foremost Benefactor

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New tradition for the Gould Reading Room

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Bitner Fellow visit: New connections

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Law Library Diversity Fellowship

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Exceptional students win Cantwell Research Prize

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Law Library Legal Research Clinic

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Summer Law College

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LawArXiv promotes access to research

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Cornell Law Library Speaker Series 2016-2017

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Femi Cadmus voted president of AALL

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Farewell Thomas Mills

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By the numbers

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Exhibits

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Professional highlights

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2017 gifts to the Law Library

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MESSAGE FROM THE DIRECTOR I am excited to

A couple of transitions occurred this year,

once again bring

with our first diversity fellow, Malikah Hall,

you up to date on

completing her fellowship and assuming

exciting develop-

a full time appointment at the Dee J. Kelly

ments in the Law

Law Library at Texas A & M Law School. We

Library

the

welcomed two new librarians, Ariel Erbach-

past year and pro-

er and Carlos AndrĂŠs PagĂĄn, through our

vide a preview of a significant collaboration

continuing diversity fellows program. We

launching in spring 2018.

bade farewell to Thomas Mills, our director

over

of collections and faculty services, who left Our dedicated librarians and staff have

to become director of the Kresge Law Li-

been busy on many fronts, preparing prac-

brary at Notre Dame Law School.

tice-ready students and providing instruction in various specialized research class-

I have had the distinct pleasure of meeting

es, from law and technology to continuing

up with friends and alumni here in Ithaca

work in our community with our Legal Re-

and as far as Hangzhou, China in the past

search Clinic, now entering its second year.

year. It has also been very rewarding and intellectually stimulating to host a variety of

This past spring we pushed the frontiers of

guest speakers through the Cornell Law Li-

open access by collaborating with partners

brary Speaker Series, discussing topics rang-

to launch LawArXiv, a first-of-its-kind, free,

ing from artificial intelligence in the legal in-

open access repository for the dissemina-

dustry to developing and creating digital

tion of legal scholarship. I am also excited

strategies in libraries.

to announce that we have been working on a partnership, the Global Online Access

As always, I extend a warm welcome to vis-

to Legal Information, under the auspices

it the Law Library whenever you are in the

of Research4Life, which will provide free or

area, or virtually through our website or so-

very low-cost access to commercial sourc-

cial media, to keep up with all of our new

es of legal information in developing coun-

developments.

tries starting early next year. Both of these projects will ensure access to legal informa-

Femi Cadmus

tion and promote access to justice for the

Edward Cornell Law Librarian

most vulnerable and underserved.

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HONORING A FOREMOST BENEFACTOR A new portrait of Jack G. Clarke ‘52, one

“As I thought about this day, I reflected

of the Law School and Law Library’s great-

about how fortunate my life has been

est benefactors, now hangs outside of the

and how important Cornell Law School

Gould Reading Room.

has been to me,” said Clarke, a longtime director and negotiator at Exxon, at the

“Jack’s generosity through his support

unveiling.

and significant endowment of our foreign, comparative and international collections

Stewart Schwab, the Jonathan and

has made a major impact on our ability to

Ruby Zhu Professor of Law and a friend

build strong collections in these areas, and

of Clarke’s, said the portrait reflects his

to effectively support the research and

friend’s best qualities.

scholarship of our faculty and students,” said Edward Cornell Law Librarian Femi

“It looks like he’s about to ask a quiet ques-

Cadmus.

tion, one that really gets to the heart of what’s most important. That’s Jack’s style.

The portrait was unveiled three months be-

He has a way of seeing the best in peo-

fore Clarke’s 90th birthday, at an April cer-

ple and expressing his emotions when he

emony in the lobby of Myron Taylor Hall.

feels deeply about something,” Schwab said. “Certainly, my life has been enriched

Clarke is one of only two lifetime members

by Jack, but I think that could be said by

of the Cornell Law School Advisory Coun-

all of us, by everyone who’s ever passed

cil and one of only a small number of Cor-

through these doors.”

nell alumni to be named Foremost Benefactors. His gifts to the Law Library include

A version of this story originally appeared

the Jack G. Clarke International Compar-

on lawschool.cornell.edu.

ative Law Collection Endowment for acquisitions in foreign, comparative and international law.

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Jack G. Clarke ‘52

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NEW TRADITION FOR THE GOULD READING ROOM At the opening of Myron Taylor Hall in 1932,

As the Class of 2017 posed for photos,

the Law School celebrated with speeches

the most persuasive evidence of the eve-

in the Moot Court Room, a formal presen-

ning’s success was that no one wanted

tation of the building’s keys to President Far-

to leave. “Tonight was great,” said Kendyl

rand, and a buffet luncheon in the library.

Keesey ’17, who begins work in the Phila-

It took another 85 years before the Gould

delphia office of Hogan Lovells this fall. “It’s

Reading Room hosted its second meal, a

rare we all get a chance to share a meal,

party for the soon-to-be-graduating Class

and for me, it represents one of the last op-

of 2017 and the start of what might be-

portunities I’ll have to see all these people

come a new Law School tradition.

in the same room. I know I’m going to miss them desperately.”

“We instituted this 3L dinner to celebrate your completion of the JD program,” said

“If you’d asked a few months ago, when I

Eduardo Peñalver, the Allan R. Tessler

was a first-semester 3L, I would have said I

Dean and Professor of Law, who proposed

was anxious about graduating,” said Ade-

the idea last fall. “This majestic reading

bola Olofin ’17, who will spend the next

room is the spiritual heart of Cornell Law

two years clerking on the U.S. Court of Ap-

School, and as your time here draws to

peals for the Fourth Circuit and the U.S. Dis-

a close, I can think of no better place for

trict Court for the Southern District of New

us to come together as a community of

York. “But now, I think I’m ready. Being

students, faculty, and administrators who

here tonight, you can see how much the

have worked and studied together for the

Law School values us as both students and

past three years.”

future colleagues. Because in a couple of weeks, we’ll all be lawyers.” A version of this story originally appeared on lawschool.cornell.edu.

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Top Right: Gould Reading Room table set for 3L Dinner Bottom Right: Franci Blassberg ‘77 and Dean Eduardo Peñalver

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BITNER FELLOW VISIT: NEW CONNECTIONS

About the Bitner Fellowship

Janet Odetsi-Twum, head librarian of the

“My experience at the Law Library went

League school. I am especially grateful

The Bitner Research Fellows program was established to

Ghana School of Law, was the October

beyond my expectations. I expected to

to all the librarians who planned this fel-

provide opportunities for foreign law librarians to access

2016 Bitner Research Fellow at the Cor-

finish my fellowship with an idea on how

lowship, the sponsors and all staff. It was

Cornell Law Library’s resources and the expertise of its staff

nell Law Library. Odetsi-Trum manages

to create legal guides online for students

indeed a first-hand experience of a de-

while learning about advanced legal research in a glob-

the planning, administrative, personnel

to use, but I left Cornell Law Library with

veloped and well-resourced law library

al context. The endowment funding this opportunity is a

and budgetary functions of the library at

so many ideas and innovations to try my

as well as the caliber of staff. The Library

tribute to the late Professor Harry Bitner, Cornell Law Librar-

the Ghana School of Law, the only insti-

hands at in my library. The Cornell expe-

staff were full of enthusiasm in helping us-

ian (1965-76) by his daughter and son-in-law, Lorraine and

tution in Ghana which offers professional

rience has been insightful, education-

ers and made my stay there a worthwhile

Richard Gilden, J.D. ’71, carrying on his legacy and con-

legal training.

al, fun and a great opportunity to con-

learning experience.”

tributions to the Cornell law community and to the field of

nect with the best law librarians in an Ivy

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law librarianship.

From left: Andrew Gilden, Lorraine Gilden, Janet Odetsi-Twum, Richard Gilden

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LAW LIBRARY DIVERSITY FELLOWSHIP In August, Ariel Erbacher became the Cornell Law Library’s second diversity

Additionally, Carlos Andrés Pagán joined

fellow.

the Law Library for six weeks as a summer

EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS WIN CANTWELL RESEARCH PRIZE

diversity fellow in residence. Pagán holds

FIRST PRIZE

SECOND PRIZE

The two-year fellowship aims to provide

a J.D. from Universidad de Puerto Ri-

Truth or Dare: A

Columbia

opportunities for qualified new law librar-

co-Río Piedras Law School, an LL.M. from

Framework for An-

sity and Incarcer-

ians from underrepresented groups. Fel-

Harvard Law School, a Licenciatura en

alyzing

Credibility

ated Worker Labor

lows are mentored by Cornell law librar-

Derecho from Universitat de Barcelona

in Children Seeking

Unions under the

ians, while contributing to the mission

and an M.I.S. from Universidad de Puerto

Asylum, by Karen

National Labor Re-

of the library, the Law School and the

Rico-Río Piedras.

Smeda, 2L

lations Act, by Kara

Univer-

Goad, 3L

university. Smeda examined the legal ramifications Erbacher holds a master’s degree in li-

of denying child asylum seekers an equita-

Goad’s research examined the forms and

brary and information science from Uni-

ble credibility determination, arguing that

terms of labor that incarcerated workers

versity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

certain changes should be prioritized and

perform in American prisons, seeking to

School of Information Sciences and a

that the U.S. immigration system may be vi-

demonstrate that labor law could pro-

law degree from IIT Chicago-Kent Col-

olating constitutional protections that ex-

vide potential remedies for work-related

lege of Law.

tend to asylum seekers.

grievances.

The Law Library’s inaugural diversity fel-

“I learned that scholarship on topics with

“The Corrections Corporation of Ameri-

low, Malikah Hall, completed her two-

international implications requires a pro-

ca describes prison labor as an ‘inmate

year appointment in June 2017.

longed,

service’ or ‘vocational training.’

thorough

research

process,”

How-

Smeda said. “Generally, a simple Goo-

ever, reports from incarcerated individu-

“I am forever grateful for my time at Cor-

gle search will not yield necessary infor-

als and others commonly describe prison

nell. I learned so much about myself as

mation from other countries. Instead, the

labor as a form of modern-day slavery,”

an instructor, a librarian, and a team

library’s online and book resources have

Goad said. “From these discrepancies, I

member. I will carry these lessons with me

offered me valuable tools to assist me in

learned that it was necessary for me to

as I continue my career,” said Hall, now

pursuing my creative endeavors in legal

seek out as many sources as possible to

a reference librarian and instructional as-

scholarship.”

present the fullest picture of prison labor.”

sistant professor at the Dee J. Kelly Law Library at Texas A & M University School of Law.

Funding for the Cantwell Prize is provided by an endowment given to the Law Library by Barbara Cantwell in honor of her late husband, Robert Cantwell, a 1956 graduate of Cornell Law School. In addition to a monetary award, winners are invited to publish their papers in Scholarship@Cornell Law, the Law Library’s digital repository, and to feature their papers in Reading Room displays.

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LAW LIBRARY LEGAL RESEARCH CLINIC Cornell Law School students made a differ-

source, and the clinic now provides reg-

tions,” said the Rev. Christina Culver, exec-

faculty this year. The clinic also hired a

ence in the community this year through

ularly scheduled office hours at Loaves &

utive director of Loaves & Fishes of Tomp-

part-time administrative assistant to over-

the Law Library’s Legal Research Clinic,

Fishes of Tompkins County as well as its orig-

kins County.

see its daily operations and outreach. Its

now in its fourth semester and expanding

inal location, Rev Ithaca Startup Works.

through a grant from Engaged Cornell.

size increased to 11 students, who comThe Legal Research Clinic, founded by

pleted 25 discrete matters in fall 2016 and

“The clinic’s uniqueness lies in its ability to

law librarian Amy Emerson, welcomed a

31 discrete matters in spring 2017.

The funding provided by Engaged Cor-

deal with deeper issues in nearly any area

new part-time teaching fellow, Jonathan

nell has allowed the Legal Research Clinic

of law and to provide assistance beyond

Feldman, a senior attorney with the Em-

“The Cornell Legal Research Clinic has

to grow into a well-known community re-

the limits of typical legal aid organiza-

pire Justice Center in Rochester, to the

been invaluable in preparing me for practice. I’ll be spending my first year out of law school clerking for a federal district court judge, and my three semesters of clinical work have given me exposure to a broad range of the substantive and procedural issues I’ll be addressing in that position,” said Christine Jordan, J.D. ‘17. “In doing that work, I’ve had the opportunity to apply the lessons I’ve learned in doctrinal classes to the real legal issues of members of the Central New York community. It has been personally and professionally fulfilling to work in teams of law students to not just build these skills, but to give back in this way.”

Clinic students from left: Christine Jordan, Thomas Caruso, Adena Wayne, Ke Hui Foong, Jessica Lam, Gerald Salvatore, Michael Hodess, Jay Wexler, Krsna Avila, Carrie Montgomery and Ra’ana

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Samad

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SUMMER LAW COLLEGE

Madeline Greenberg knew from the age

what I was looking for while at Cornell,”

of 5 that she wanted to be a lawyer. But

said Greenberg, of Boca Raton. She is

her 2016 experience at the Law Library’s

now a student at New York University’s

Summer College course, Foundations

Tisch School of Performing Arts, where

in American Law, helped her begin to

she plans to major in performance stud-

make that goal a reality.

ies and dramatic literature. She hopes to eventually work in entertainment law.

“Cornell’s Summer College gave me the

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confidence to apply to and then decide

Of her summer college experience, she

on a path that will lead me to a career

said: “I now have my own personal con-

in the legal field. I decided where to ap-

nection and love for Cornell. The ivy-cov-

ply based on the people that I would be

ered walls, fantastic liberal arts programs,

able to connect with on a daily basis, ex-

and opportunities that are accessible

tensive alumni support systems, and the

around every corner are all amazing

academic rigor and reputation of the

qualities. I’m very proud that I was able

schools. I was able to form a guideline of

to attend.”

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L AW A R X IV PROMOTES ACCESS TO RESEARCH The Cornell Law Library is partnering in

“Our partnership in the LawArXiv project is

the development and management of

a reflection of Cornell Law School’s deep

LawArXiv, a new online database of legal

and enduring commitment to open ac-

scholarship that aims to make important

cess principles, and the availability of le-

research more widely available to schol-

gal information to all,” said Femi Cadmus,

ars, legal researchers and the public.

Edward Cornell Law Librarian.

LawArXiv (lawarxiv.info) is a free, open ac-

Members of LawArXiv said they are com-

cess repository for legal scholarship, main-

mitted to long-term stewardship of the

tained and owned by legal scholars and

site, which they created to meet a grow-

law librarians.

ing need for access to this information. LawArXiv is designed to make it easier for re-

The Law Library developed, supports and

searchers to search and retrieve the latest

manages LawArXiv in collaboration with

legal research, which can otherwise be

the Legal Information Preservation Alli-

hidden behind paywalls or difficult to find.

ance, the Mid-America Law Library Consortium and the NELLCO Law Library Consortium. Through grants, the Center for

A version of this story originally appeared

Open Science serves as the technology

in the Cornell Chronicle.

partner and hosts the platform.

CORNELL LAW LIBRARY SPEAKER SERIES 2016-2017 “Cultural competence and emotion-

“Scholars@Cornell”

al intelligence: Can we just all get

Sandy Payette

along?”

Director of IT for Research and Scholar-

Eugenia Charles-Newton

ship, Cornell University Library

Legal Researcher, Manager & Liaison

Muhammad Javed

September 21, 2016

Ontology Engineer/Semantic Applications Developer, Cornell University Library

“Building the bridge: creating a digi-

March 22, 2017

tal strategy for the Harvard Library.” Suzanne Wones

“The practical obscurity of the green

Director of Library Digital Strategies

screen terminal - The Jury Sunshine

and Innovation, Harvard Library

Project in North Carolina and the N.C.

October 5, 2016

Supreme Court’s imposed limits” Liz Johnson

“One things leads to another.”

Reference Librarian, Wake Forest School

Malikah Hall

of Law

Research Services Librarian, Cornell

April 24, 2017

Law Library October 27, 2016 “Can robots be lawyers?” Andrew Arruda, CEO & Co-founder, Ross Intelligence November 21, 2016

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Andrew Arruda CEO & Co-founder, Ross Intelligence

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FEMI CADMUS VOTED PRESIDENT OF AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF LAW LIBRARIES Edward Cornell Law Librarian Femi Cad-

when she sat on the Executive Board Ad-

mus has been named the president-elect

ministration and Executive Board Strate-

of the American Association of Law Li-

gic Directions Committees.

braries (AALL). She will become president in July 2018 after serving a year as its vice

“Femi’s elevation to this new position re-

president. With nearly 4,500 members,

flects her stature within the law library

the AALL is the principal professional or-

community and represents an important

ganization for law librarians.

recognition by her colleagues at other schools of her many leadership talents,”

“I am elated and thankful for the oppor-

said Eduardo M. Peñalver, the Allan R.

tunity to lead the only national associa-

Tessler Dean of Cornell Law School. “We

tion dedicated to law librarians and oth-

are fortunate to be able to call her our

er legal information professionals,” said

own.”

Cadmus. “The economic pressures and

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technological innovations we face to-

The AALL was founded in 1906 on the be-

day provide unparalleled opportunities

lief that people need timely access to rel-

to reimagine law libraries and the role of

evant legal information to make sound

the law librarian. I look forward to working

legal arguments and wise legal deci-

with the board and members in charting

sions. AALL fosters its profession by offer-

new paths, as we leverage our tremen-

ing its members knowledge, leadership

dous expertise and press forward strate-

and community to help strengthen the

gically with old and new partnerships.”

legal system.

Cadmus previously served as an AALL Ex-

A version of this story originally appeared

ecutive Board member from 2013 to 2016,

on lawschool.cornell.edu.

Top photo

Bottom photo

From left: Cynthia Lange, Jane Drum-

Dean Eduardo Peñalver, Thomas Mills

heller, Thomas Mills, Mae Lewis and

and members of the Cornell Law faculty.

Kathleen Hartman

FAREWELL THOMAS MILLS In July, we celebrated Director of Collections and Faculty Services Thomas Mills for his 14 years of service to Cornell Law Library, as he left to become the Director of the Kresge Law Library at Notre Dame Law School. Jacob Sayward, currently of Fordham Law Library, will join the library as the new director of collections and operations starting in October 2017.

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EXHIBITS Law Librarian and Professor of Law Harry Bitner, 1916 – 2001 (November 2016) Recent Faculty Publications (November 2016) Cornell Law School Dean and Robert S. Stevens Professor of Law Emeritus Roger C. Cramton, 1929 – 2017 (February 2017)

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PROFESSIONAL HIGHLIGHTS

MARGARET AMBROSE § § Co-author and presenter, “Beyond the Hypothetical: Experiential learning in Advanced Legal Research,” Boulder Paper Conference July 2016. § § Co-presenter, “LEAN Process Improvement at Cornell Law Library,” American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) Annual Meeting & Conference, July 2016. § § Contributor, Research Instruction & Patron Services - Special Interest Section, AALL Blog.

DAN BLACKABY

§ § Created new class, “Researching American Legal History.”

AMY EMERSON

§ § Radio interview, “Cornell Legal Research Clinic Offers Free Law Advice to Community,” Cayuga Radio Group, December 2016. § § Co-speaker, “Finding Time: Lean Six Sigma,” AALL Annual Meeting & Conference, July 2016. § § Fellow, Boulder Conference on Legal Information: Scholarship and Teaching, July 2016.

MALIKAH HALL

§ § Vice chair, AALL Professional Engagement, Growth, and Advancement Special Interest Section, 2017. § § Co-chair, AALL Black Caucus, 2017.

JACKIE MAGAGNOSC

§ § Promoted to rank of Associate Librarian. § § Blog contributor and editor, TechScans. § § Vice chair, AALL Online Bibliographic Services Special Interest Section, 2017.

MATT MORRISON

§ § Author, “Due Diligence: Company Information for Law Students,” Law Library Journal, 2016.

JEAN PAJEREK

§ § Panelist, “Promoting the Value of Technical Services at Budget Time: Practical Advice for Directors and Managers,” AALL Annual Meeting & Conference, July 2016. § § Panelist, “Librarians engaged in IRs: An Interactive Panel and Group Discussion,” NELLCO Symposium, March 2017.

NINA SCHOLTZ

§ § Book Review, “Glass Half Full: The Decline and Rebirth of the Legal Profession” by Benjamin H. Barton. International Journal of Legal Information, 2016. § § Presenter, “Please, Ask Me Questions: Teaching an Experiential Research Course for International LLMs,” Teaching Foreign and International Legal Research Interest Group, AALL Annual Meeting & Conference, July 2016. § § Co-chair, Cornell University Library Reference and Outreach Committee, 2016-2017.

MARK WILLIAMS § § Presenter, “It Takes a Community to Cultivate an Assessment Crop,” LOEX Annual Conference, May 2017. § § Chair, Cornell University Library Social Science Selectors Team. § § Co-presenter, “The Cloud, Metadata, and Social Networking: How Technology is Changing the Practice of Law,” Cornell Law School Alumni Weekend CLE, June 2017.

THOMAS MILLS

§ § Workshop coordinator and speaker, “Two Sides of the United Nations: Working with Public and Private International Law at the U.N.,” Foreign, Comparative & International Law – Special Interest Section, AALL Annual Meeting & Conference, July 2016. § § 2017 FCIL Spirit of the FCIL SIS Award.

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WE GRATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGE THE FOLLOWING GIFTS RECEIVED IN THE FISCAL YEAR 2016-17 AND CORNELL UNIVERSITY LAW LIBRARY ENDOWED FUNDS $10,000 and above (Library Partner Level) Richard Gilden JD ’71 $2,000 – $ 2,500 (Patron Level) Valerie Armento JD ’77 Edward Bergmann JD ’66 Henry Korn AB ’68 $500 –$1000 (Associate Level) Stanley Chess JD ’72 Walter Von Schmidt JD ’70 Frank Wiswall Jr JD ’65 In September, Steven Weinberg, JD ’71 (center) donated to the Law Library a rare 12 edition th

set of Blackstone’s Commentaries (1793—1795), in honor of his 45th reunion.

$100 – $200 (Support Level) James McBrady JD ’89 John Mulcahy Jr JD ’59 EARL J. BENNETT MEMORIAL BOOK FUND BITNER RESEARCH FELLOWS PROGRAM ENDOWMENT JACK G. CLARKE (LL.B. ’52) INTERNATIONAL LAW COLLECTION FUND CUCCIA HONOR WITH BOOKS FUND MARY HEAGEN CUCCIA MEMORIAL BOOK FUND ARTHUR H. A.B. (’19 & LL.B. ’23) & MARY MARDEN DEAN LIBRARY FUND THOMAS B. GILCHRIST MEMORIAL ENDOWMENT SHEPPARD GURYAN (J.D. ’67) LAW LIBRARY ENDOWMENT GURYAN FAMILY LAW LIBRARIAN’S ENDOWMENT KURT HANSLOWE MEMORIAL FUND HERBERT D. LAUBE ENDOWMENT FUND JUDGE ALFRED J. LOEW (LL.B. ’21) MEMORIAL FUND LINDSETH-MARTINA LIBRARY DIRECTOR’S DISCRETIONARY FUND NELSON & HATTIE ROSENBAUM BOOK FUND ARTHUR H. ROSENBLOOM (J.D. ’59) LAW LIBRARY ENDOWMENT SONYA A. SASUTA MEMORIAL FUND

Have questions or wish to make a gift to the Law Library? Contact the Law School Development Office at (607) 255-5877 or giving@lawschool.cornell.edu

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Cornell University Library Credits: Compilation: Mark Williams (Cornell Law Library) Cover photo: View of the Gould Reading Room from front entrance of Myron Taylor Hall, Cheryl Chalmers Back cover photo: Doors to Law Library reading room, Nina Hien Additional photography: Femi Cadmus and Carol Clune (Cornell Law Library) Layout and editing: Carla DeMello and Melanie Lefkowitz (Assessment and Communication, Cornell University Library)

Cornell Law Library Year in Review 2017