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Social Work Social work education at Concordia College is framed by Concordia’s mission statement: “The purpose of Concordia College is to influence the affairs of the world by sending into society thoughtful and informed men and women dedicated to the Christian life.” The courses contribute to students’ liberal arts education through development of increased awareness of self, others, and social systems, enabling informed participation for leadership in community service and organizations. This is reflected in the social work program’s mission statement: “To promote human and community well-being by confronting disadvantage through a framework of scientific inquiry and human rights, favoring undervalued persons and providing conditions of hope, leading to individual and social change.” The social work program at Concordia College is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. Graduates of the program are qualified to seek licensure in accordance with various state regulations and are eligible to sit for the national board exam or pursue Minnesota Merit System eligibility. The following table presents the program’s three-year pass rate on the national social work board exam for individuals who indicated that they attended Concordia College.

Pass Rates Year First-Time Repeat Total 2009 100% 0% 100% 2010 92% 100% 93% 2011 86% 100% 89%

With a Bachelor of Arts degree in social work, many graduates pursue employment as generalist social workers, which feature application of generalist practice knowledge, values and skills of social work in a variety of settings. With a bachelor’s degree in social work, students are also eligible for advanced graduate placement in Master of Social Work programs. The social work program identifies the following competencies as its student learning outcomes: • Identify as a professional social worker and conduct oneself accordingly. • Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice. • Apply critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments. • Engage diversity and difference in practice. • Advance human rights and social and economic justice. • Engage in research-informed practice and practice-informed research. • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment. • Engage in policy practice to advance social and economic well-being and to deliver effective social work services. • Respond to contexts that shape practice. • Engage, assess, intervene and evaluate with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities.

The Purpose of the Social Work Profession From the Council on Social Work Education’s Educational Policy Statement: The purpose of the social work profession is to promote human and community well-being. Guided by a person and environment construct, a global perspective, respect for human diversity, and knowledge based on scientific inquiry, social work’s purpose is actualized through its quest for social and economic justice, the prevention of conditions that limit human rights, the elimination of poverty, and the enhancement of the quality of life for all persons.

Concordia’s Social Work Program The social work program has been accredited by the Council on Social Work Education since 1982. Students interested in majoring in social work must make written application for acceptance into the major after completing SWK 283 – Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare with a B- (2.7) or better. A Concordia GPA of 2.5 is required for admission to the program. Once admitted, students need to maintain a 2.5 Concordia GPA and a 2.5 GPA in social work courses to maintain active status in the program. All students planning to major

in social work should request from the registrar to have a faculty advisor from the social work program. Because courses follow a sequence, transfer students or students deciding on the major during or after the fall semester of their sophomore year should meet with the social work program director as soon as possible to develop an educational plan. The course requirements and recommended course sequence for major in social work are as follows: Freshman year, first semester: • SOC 111 – Human Society, 4 credits (prerequisite for SWK 310) Freshman year, second semester: • BIOL 101 – General Biology, 4 credits (prerequisite for SWK 310) • SWK 283 – Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare, 4 credits Sophomore year, first semester: • PSYC 111 – Introductory Psychology, 4 credits (prerequisite for SWK 310) • SWK 283 – Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare, 4 credits (if not taken earlier) Sophomore year, second semester: • SWK 310 – Human Behavior and the Social Environment, 4 credits Junior year, first semester: • SWK 383 – Social Work Methods I: Social Work Processes and the Helping Relationship: Individuals and Interviewing, 4 credits • SWK 385 – Social Work Practice with Families, 2 credits Junior year, second semester: • SWK 320 – Social Policy and Systems Perspective, 4 credits • SOC 228 – Research Methods and Statistics, 4 credits. Students who are double majors in social work and psychology may substitute PSYC 230 – Statistics and Psychological Measurement and PSYC 301 – Research Methods in Psychology for SOC 228. Senior year, first semester: • SWK 350 – Comparative Cultural Encounter, 4 credits • SWK 384 – Social Work Methods II: Social Work Processes and the Helping Relationship: Groups, Organizations and Communities, 4 credits Senior year, second semester: • SWK 490 – Practicum in Social Work, 10 credits • SWK 494 – Social Work Senior Seminar, 2 credits

Courses Sociology Courses SOC 111 S, U – Human Society, 4 credits. E. An introduction to sociology as a disciplined way of studying social and cultural aspects of human behavior. Students will be introduced to and apply the concepts, theories and methods of sociology that are used to analyze social structure and social processes. SOC 214 S, U – Social Problems, 4 credits. E1. An introduction to research methods and theories of sociology used to analyze and address major social problems in the United States. Some comparisons are made to problems and mitigation efforts of other countries. Public and private efforts to address social problems are evaluated and new approaches considered. Recent topics have included inequality, education, race, sexuality, crime, alcohol and drugs. SOC 217 G – Cultural Anthropology, 4 credits. E2. An exploration and comparison of cultural variations associated with the geographic and historic specifics of human societies. A study of species/culture development, emphasizing linguistic, technological, ideological and institutional systems. This course can also count toward the global studies program. SOC 228 – Research Methods and Statistics, 4 credits. E2. An introduction to beginning-level statistical and research skills in sociology and social work.

Academic Catalog 2013-14  

2013-14 Concordia College Catalog | June 2013, Volume III

Academic Catalog 2013-14  

2013-14 Concordia College Catalog | June 2013, Volume III