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Switzerland and Serbia

Traditional Support of Serbian Development 2013


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Switzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development


contents 6

 trong and S Growing Relations

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 eep Trust and D Friendship

Goran Aleksić, Assistant Minister in the Serbian Ministry of Foreign Affairs

H.E. Mr. Jean-Daniel Ruch, Ambassador of Switzerland to Serbia

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 conomic E Cooperation

Improvement at All Levels 25

 ervice Coupled S with Ambition

Switzerland and Serbia

Traditional Support of Serbian Development 2013

Dragan Tasić, Tasić Car Dealership 25

 e Cross W Borders for You Schöni Logistics doo

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 ur aim is O to increase investments

Željko Sertić, President of the Serbian Chamber of Commerce

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 alidation of V Quality

The Beauty of Diversity

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ART DIRECTOR Branislav Ninković PHOTOS Zoran Petrović TRANSLATORS Snežana Bjelotomić lecture Christen Bradley Farmer, c.farmer@aim.rs PROJECT MANAGERS Biljana Dević, b.devic@aim.rs Svetlana Okanović, s.okanovic@aim.rs Sandra Bandović, s.bandovic@aim.rs Irena Lalić, i.lalic@aim.rs Vanja Đorđević, v.djordjevic@aim.rs

Marinko Ukropina, Managing director of SGS ex YU countries

 he Power T of Oil

Rade Kostić, Managing Director of Petrobart d.o.o. and Member of AVIA International's Board of Executives

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 ulture of C Switzerland

EDITOR Jovana Gligorijević, j.gligorijevic@aim.rs

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Ruža Ristanović, r.ristanovic@aim.rs GENERAL MANAGER Ivan Novčić, i.novcic@cma.rs

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 ourism in T Switzerland

Enchanting Natural Beauty

 erbia is Poised S to Grow

FINANCIAL DIRECTOR Ana Besedić, a.besedic@aim.rs EDITORIAL MANAGER Tanja Banković, t.bankovic@aim.rs office manager Nataša Nešić, n.nesic@aim.rs PRINTING Rotografika d.o.o. Segedinski put 72, Subotica

 ersonalized P Medicine

Switzerland and Serbia Traditional Support of Serbian Development published by: alliance international media

Ana Govedarica, General Manager of Roche Serbia 34

 anguages and L Customs Multilingual World

Dragica Tomcic, conomic Attaché, Embassy of Switzerland to the Republic of Serbia and to Montenegro

Makenzijeva 67, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia Phone: +(381 11) 2450 508 Fascimile: +(381 11) 2450 122 E-mail: office@aim.rs www.allianceinternationalmedia.com ISSN no: 1451-7833 All rights reserved alliance international media 2013

Switzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development

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The Swiss work a lot, but they also know how to enjoy their time off. Spending time with friends, reading and going for walks are among the most popular pastimes. More than half the population engages in some kind of sports activity at least once a week.

The geography of Switzerland is notable for its great diversity. Switzerland’s three main geographical regions are the Jura, Plateau and the Alps. The climate varies greatly from one region to another.

Switzerland’s economy is based on a highly qualified labour force. The main areas include microtechnology, hitech, biotechnology and pharmaceuticals, as well as banking and insurance know-how. Most of the people are employed by small and medium-sized enterprises.


Switzerland is divided into 26 cantons. The cantons vary greatly as to size and character. The canton of Zurich has 1,373,068 inhabitants, while the entire population of canton Appenzell Inner-Rhodes, for example, has a total of 15,688.

Switzerland’s existence as a modern federal state dates back to 1848. The Federal Council, Switzerland's government, has seven members. Each year, a different member becomes Federal President.

Switzerland has a population of about 7.95 million. Foreigners account for around 22.7% of the resident population.

At the end of 2011 Swiss banks managed assets totalling CHF 5,600 billion. In terms of cross-border private wealth management, Switzerland is the undisputed world market leader with a share of 27%, or CHF 2,100 billion.

Switzerland has four national languages: German 63.7%; French 20.4%, Italian 6.5% and Rhaeto-Rumantsch (Rumantsch) spoken in the only trilingual canton, GraubĂźnden 0.5% Switzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development

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interview

H.E. Mr. Jean-Daniel Ruch, Ambassador of Switzerland to Serbia

Strong and Growing Relations There is potential in trade relations which have suffered from the economic crisis. The same can be said for Swiss direct investment in Serbia, which remains a potentially attractive location for Swiss companies. Last year, thanks to Nestlé’s acquisition of Centroproizvod, Switzerland was ranked second as a foreign direct investor in Serbia.

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hile Switzerland is not a member of the EU, the small neutral European country sees Serbia’s efforts at EU accession to be very important for the development of further economic and business ties between Switzerland and Serbia. In this exclusive interview for CorD, Ambassador of Switzerland to Serbia H.E. Mr. Jean-Daniel Ruch describes the current state of cooperation between the countries as being full of potential, noting that structural reforms as well as political and economic stability further make the case for Swiss investors to look to Serbia as a place for growth.

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■ What are the key aspects of diplomatic cooperation between Serbia and Switzerland? - Switzerland and Serbia have enjoyed a longstanding relationship. Diplomatic relations were established almost 100 years ago, in 1919, when Switzerland recog-

The focus of the cooperation strategy remains on three specific areas: economic development, the rule of law and democratization with the strong support to the social inclusion as a frame policy, the efficient use of energy and the development of renewables

Switzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development

nized the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes. Our two countries have an intense and highly diversified relationship, covering practically all areas of international life, including regular political dialogue. Bilateral relations between Switzerland and Serbia are dynamic, varied and well developed, characterized by intense human and cultural ties and a wide range of bilateral agreements in many areas as well as good cooperation in multilateral organizations. There are regular, frequent contacts between our ministers. Many agreements exist, notably in relation to economic questions, migration and social insurance.


Community

Support

Interaction

The presence in Switzerland of a large Serb community also impacts positively on our relations.

Switzerland has supported Serbia’s transition since 1991 with a total of CHF 300 million, with an annual contribution of CHF 15 million

Our aim is definitely to increase the level of economic interactions between our two countries.

The presence in Switzerland of a large Serb community also impacts positively on our relations. Cooperation in the multilateral area is excellent, with the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) chair to be held by Switzerland in 2014, followed by Serbia in 2015, as well as cooperation within the Swiss group at the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. ■ What does the economic cooperation between our two countries entail? - Economic cooperation includes annual government meetings in

the form of mixed economic commissions and forums, making it possible to establish priorities, discuss any difficulties and develop opportunities for investment. There is potential in trade relations, which have suffered from

Cooperation in the multilateral area is excellent, with the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) chair to be held by Switzerland in 2014, followed by Serbia in 2015 the economic crisis, and the same can be said for Swiss direct investment in Serbia, which remains potentially an attractive location for Swiss companies.

Through its cooperation programme Switzerland has supported Serbia’s transition since 1991 for a total of over CHF 300 million, with an annual contribution of CHF 15 million. The Swiss Cooperation Office is currently finalizing a new cooperation strategy for the period from 2014 to 2017, with an overall budget of CHF 84 million. The focus lies on three specific areas: economic development, governance, and energy efficiency plus renewable energy . ■ How developed is the economic cooperation and is there any room for improvement? - It is certainly not as intense as it could be. Our bilateral trade is

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process promotes the resolution of political issues and the implementation of various reforms in Serbia. On the other hand, this will contribute also to peace and stability in the Balkan region, which is the first prerequisite for a successful business climate. I believe that the EU accession efforts of the countries in the region will make this region more attractive and that Swiss companies will take this opportunity to develop more intensive economic relations with Serbia and the Balkan countries.

still modest. We have had some important Swiss investments here over the past ten years, for instance from companies such as Holcim and Nestlé. However, there could be much more. A number of small and medium sized companies are approaching us, because they see the potential of Serbia as an investment place. Unfortunately, they are often deterred by corruption, red tape and weak legal security. The authorities have expressed their determination to tackle these issues, which is very positive. The beginning of EU accession talks is another very positive signal to potential investors. My expectation is that the improvement of the business conditions here in Serbia and a better global environment will lead to an intensification of our economic relations in the years to come. ■ In which way has the embassy been helping Swiss companies which have expressed interest in investing in Serbia or existing Swiss investors in Serbia? -The embassy is there to provide knowledge, advice and contacts to Swiss companies and investors. Our aim is definitely to increase the level of economic interactions between our two countries. Serbia’s comparative advantages are numerous, in particular in the IT and agricultural sector, but also in the manufacturing of textiles and metal products. Investors can rely on a cheap and usually well-educated labour. We are cooperating closely with the Swissbased institution tasked with promoting business, “Switzerland Global Enterprise.” A representative was here recently and the interest she receives from Swiss companies is encouraging. We have also assisted various delegations in the last month including a very high-level delegation led by the Swiss bank UBS.

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Every country knows its own security situation best. Following the policy of neutrality, Switzerland is not a member of NATO but has developed a strong partnership over the years, since the country joined the Partnership for Peace programme in 1996 ■ As a country that is not an EU member, what is Switzerland’s view of Serbia and the West Balkan accession process? - First I would like to congratulate Serbia once more on the decision of the European Council to launch EU accession talks by January 2014. This is a decisive step towards Europe and a major incentive to carry out long overdue structural reforms. Although Switzerland is not a member of the EU, it strongly supports Serbia on this road. The EU integration

Switzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development

■ Considering Switzerland’s neutrality, what is your view of the prevailing opinion of both the Serbian citizens and top Serbian officials apropos Serbia’s membership in NATO? - Every country knows its own security situation best. Following the policy of neutrality, Switzerland is not a member of NATO but has developed a strong partnership over the years, since the country joined the Partnership for Peace framework in 1996. Swiss armed forces are making a valuable contribution to the NATO-led force in Kosovo. Switzerland has also distinguished itself in terms of its significant contribution to promoting work with partners in the area of defence reform, education and training. Within the limits of its neutrality, Switzerland participates in peacesupport operations or multilateral cooperation in military training. Currently 220 soldiers are deployed as part of the Kosovo Force (KFOR). The Swiss armed forces have been contributing to KFOR since 1999, and took over the command of the “Joint Regional Detachment North” in 2012. Serbia has in recent years been a reliable partner in the Partnership for Peace programme and has significantly increased its military missions abroad.


■ Could you tell us something about the cultural and educational cooperation between Serbia and Switzerland? - Cultural relations between Switzerland and Serbia are particularly diverse, extending from dance, music and theatre to film and literature. Switzerland supports a number of cultural festivals in Belgrade which enable Swiss artists and groups to be heard and seen. Swiss films, theatre, artists and performers are traditionally present at all major festivals in Serbia such as FEST, the Belgrade Dance Festival (BDF), BITEF, BELEF, Belgrade Design Week (BDW), and others. This year will be particularly intense, as many top Serbian artists will perform in Switzerland in the context of the renowned “Culturescapes” Festival. In parallel, more than a dozen Swiss artists will perform in Belgrade, Novi Sad and Kragu-

Serbia has in recent years been a reliable partner in the Partnership for Peace programme and has significantly increased its military missions abroad jevac between 12 October and 22 November. ■ Close to 200,000 Serbian nationals live and work in Switzerland. How important

are they for Switzerland, economically and culturally? - Persons originating from the countries of the former Yugoslavia count for roughly 5 % of the Swiss resident population. This is much more than our fourth national group, the Rumanch Grichun, and almost as much as our third, the native Italian speakers! Immigration from Serbia into Switzerland is not a new phenomenon. It started in the sixties and seventies, mainly with doctors and dentists. When I was a child, my dentist was Mr. Mitrovic and my doctor Mr. Popovic! Serbs, and more generally persons from this part of Europe, have therefore become a part of the Swiss social fabric. Their contributions to our economy, culture, but also sports are highly appreciated. Without them, Switzerland would probably not be among the top 20 football nations! ■

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Interview

Željko Sertić, President of the Serbian Chamber of Commerce

Our aim is to increase investments Economic relations between the two countries are currently dominated by trade exchanges, though there is great potential for the development of more intensive and complex forms of economic cooperation. Incentive for this will also come from reforms undertaken by the Serbian government, aimed at creating a better environment for business, investment and increasing the competitiveness of the domestic economy. A contribution is also certainly provided by the activities of the Serbian Chamber of Commerce aimed at promoting Serbia’s economic potential

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witzerland represents an example of a stable, rich and modern economy with low unemployment, a highly skilled workforce and one of the highest GDPs per capita in the world. The Swiss economy is developed thanks to the services sector, which is dominated by the financial services, and a manufacturing industry that specialises in the development of high technology and innovation. In recent years Switzerland has adapted to the functioning of the European Union in order to improve its position on the international market, but a few sectors remain quite protected, particularly small agricultural producers. Swiss industry relies on highly developed specialised products and services. The competitiveness of Swiss companies is based on the high quality and innovativeness of

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Serbia and Switzerland signed significant agreements in 2005 and 2007 on the promotion and protection of investment and avoidance of double taxation

their products and services. When it comes to cooperation with Serbia, Switzerland belongs to the middle group of Serbia’s important trade partners. The value of Serbian exports to Switzerland represents 0.8 per cent of total Serbian exports, while at the same time the value of Serbian imports from Switzerland represents 0.9 per cent of total Serbian imports. Of a total of 169 countries with which Serbia conducted external trade in 2012, Switzerland is ranked 25th in terms of the value of exports from Serbia, as well as in terms of the value of imports. Switzerland is among Serbia’s most significant investor countries. The most important greenfield investment is Pharmaswiss, which operates in the chemical and pharmaceutical industry sector. Another example of a successful Swiss investment in Serbia

Switzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development

is undoubtedly Holcim, which entered the Serbian market after successfully winning the tender for the purchase of a majority stake in the Novi Popovac Cement Factory in 2002. The Executive Board of Switzerland’s Holcim has approved investments of €155 million in Serbia over the next five years in Serbia and, according to the Serbian Chamber of Commerce President Željko Sertić, the company provides an example of successful business operations in Serbia. ■ How important to Serbia is Switzerland as an economic partner? - Switzerland is Serbia’s most important partner among the members of the European Free Trade Association (EFTA). At the same time, measured on the basis of the value of imported and exported goods, Switzerland is 25th among the


try’s largest business association, which will provide a true service to the local economy, but also to foreign investors.

164 countries with which Serbia conducted foreign trade relations last year. Economic relations between the two countries are currently dominated by trade exchanges, though there is great potential for the development of more intensive and complex forms of economic cooperation. Incentive for this will also come from reforms undertaken by the Serbian government, aimed at creating a better environment for business, investment and increasing the competitiveness of the domestic economy. A contribution is also certainly provided by the activities of the Serbian Chamber of Commerce aimed at promoting Serbia’s economic potential and connecting local companies with the international business community. ■ What do the numbers say when it comes to foreign trade exchanges and the level of foreign investment from Switzerland? - Trade amounted to nearly $160 million during the first six months of this year. The value of this exchange and the export-import ratio was slightly up compared to the same period in 2012, but in truth, with Switzerland, as well as with most Western European countries, Serbia records a deficit in foreign trade. More than 150 Swiss companies have representative offices in Serbia, but our goal is to increase investments from Switzerland, as one of the world’s most stable and competitive economies. Swiss investments in Serbia since 2005 amount to €434.1 million. Attracting new investors is the joint task of the Serbian government and the Serbian Chamber of Commerce, as the coun-

■ What are the most significant agreements regulating economic cooperation between our two countries? - Serbia and Switzerland signed significant agreements in 2005 and 2007 on the promotion and protection of investment and avoidance of double taxation. Those agreements have created a favourable institutional framework for the development of economic cooperation and attracting investment. Also contributing to the development of bilateral economic relations is the cooperation of the Serbian Chamber of Commerce with the Swiss Import Promotion Programme (SIPPO), the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) and Switzerland’s Federal Ministry for Foreign Affairs and the State Secretariat for Economics (SECO) within the Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs.

Swiss companies have shown interest in renewable energy sources biomass, hydro, wind, solar and geothermal energy - food production, the chemical and pharmaceutical industries and the IT sector

■ Serbia has recorded a significant growth in exports to Switzerland since 2011. What is the reason for this? - One of the reasons is the application of the Foreign Trade Agreement with EFTA countries, which came into force in 2010 and contributed to the creation of favourable conditions for trade with Switzerland. Simultaneously, Serbian companies are adapting more and more to the demands of highly developed markets like that of Switzerland, while producers of some intermediate and final products from the wood industry, food processing and metal processing are increasingly competitive. There is also the fact that the large Serbian expatriate community in Switzerland contributes to the establishing and strengthening of business ties with Swiss companies. ■ What requirements of the Swiss market should Serbian businesses consider when seeking to offer their products and services?

Switzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development

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Lekova. Basler, one of the most important and largest Swiss insurance companies, is also present in Serbia.

- Successfully exporting to the Swiss market, as well as other European countries, requires thorough preparation, informing themselves regularly about EFTA regulations and laws, the possession of competitive products, financial capacity, as well as knowledge and skills on the international market. Serbian firms are increasingly present on the Swiss market, which testifies to their willingness to do business on this challenging but – in terms of cooperation – exceptionally promising market. ■ What makes Swiss investors specific, given that they come from a country that is not an EU member, and what are they most interested in? - Swiss investors are also seeking investment destinations that offer long term stability and a predictable business environment, simplified procedures and transparency in doing business. Serbia is of additional interest to them due to its preferential trade status with the EU, the Russia Federation, Kazakhstan, Belarus and Turkey. Swiss companies have shown interest in investing in the energy sector (particularly in renewable energy sources - biomass, hydro, wind, solar and geothermal energy), food, the chemical and pharmaceutical industries and the IT sector. The trade and transport sectors are also interesting for investment. ■ What are the most significant Swiss investments in Serbia? - Switzerland's largest investment in Serbia is Holcim’s investment in the

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The Serbian Chamber of Commerce has excellent cooperation with the Swiss Chamber of Commerce for Central Europe, based in Zurich

privatisation and modernisation of the production and operating of the Novi Popovac cement factory. It entered the Serbian market in 2002, after winning the tender for the majority stake in the factory, and to date it has invested a total of more than €100 million. Holcim Serbia has been among the country’s most successful companies in terms of net income for years. With an acquisition worth €52 million, Nestle became the owner of Centroproizvod, which last year raised Swiss investments in Serbia to €72.5 million and led to Switzerland topping the list of foreign investments in the country in 2012. Switzerland’s Home Art & Sales Services bought Centrotekstil and Jugošped, Mineko entered Fidelinka, while Pharmaswiss entered the Belgrade medicine factory, Fabrika

Switzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development

■ What activities does the Serbian Chamber of Commerce undertake in order to connect businesses from the two countries? - The Serbian Chamber of Commerce has organised a series of business forums aimed at connecting Serbian and Swiss entrepreneurs and providing adequate information about doing business on the Swiss market. The last one was held in May this year. At that time Serbia was visited by around 30 influential business leaders from Switzerland and business meetings were held with Serbian companies in the metal processing, textile and food industries. The Serbian Chamber of Commerce also regularly attends the annual meetings of the mixed commission at the governmental level. The aim of these sessions is to define priorities in cooperation, solve any eventual problems arising in doing business, as well as to promote economic cooperation. ■ Do you cooperate with Swiss chambers of commerce and, if so, in what way? - The Serbian Chamber of Commerce has excellent cooperation with the Swiss Chamber of Commerce for Central Europe, based in Zurich. That cooperation is characterised by a continuous exchange of information aimed at improving bilateral cooperation and connecting Serbian and Swiss businesses. ■


Interview

Ana Govedarica, General Manager of Roche Serbia

Personalized Medicine Close to 18 million patients all over the world use our drugs in treatment, and if we add to this the drugs that have been developed from our patents, the number rises to 64 million.

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oche is one of the oldest multinational pharmaceutical companies in Serbia. The company has been supplying Serbian market with medications for over 80 years. Today, Roche d.o.o. has over 50 highly educated, diligent and motivated employees striving to contribute to the development of the Serbian healthcare system. “We have been trying to provide access to new scientific developments and modern medicines which are developed in our laboratories, and, in that respect, we are pioneers in healthcare and one of the first companies to enable medical treatment adapted to specific groups of patients. Such an approach to healthcare is more efficient, safer and more profitable, but, unfortunately, not always easy to administer considering the economic hardship in

Serbia. Regardless, we have never stopped supplying hospitals and pharmacies in Serbia because we know this market and believe in it,” says Ana Govedarica, General Manager of Roche Serbia. ■ In 2012, Serbia was ranked last on the list of the Euro

world use our drugs in treatment, and if we add to this the drugs that have been developed from our patents, the number rises to 64 million. At the same time, we are a responsible company which, only last year, contributed to the development of healthcare institutions in the world with CHF 176 million. We are fully aware of the fact that the quality of medical treatment heavily hinges on finances, hence, our approach is guided by the need to have high quality medical treatments and availability of the latest medical therapy as our top priorities.

proach to treatment which entails the administration of personalized medications. Before the treatment begins, having a good diagnosis is a must, followed by the latest innovative therapy which precisely targets tumour cells. Apart from oncology, we have been investing a lot in neurology, virology, autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We always try to submit our applications for registration of medications in Serbia immediately after receiving the approval for that medication in the EU, since our goal is to make the cuttingedge medicines available to our patients here ASAP.

■ Which are the most important products from Roche’s portfolio, and which therapeutic areas do they cover? - Roche’s priority is investing in research and development of new therapies. The goal of these

■ Could you tell us something about your company’s most important clinical trial activities in Serbia? -In Serbia, Roche conducts clinical trials in fourteen different therapeutic areas. Roche tests the efficiency and safety of its medication in closely monitored international clinical projects involving a substantial number of countries. Such clinical trials provide patients in Serbia with a unique opportunity to make the latest therapy for their diseases available. Also, we conduct trials here even after the medication in question has already been approved by the Serbian Medicines and Medical Devices Agency. In this way, we monitor the safety and efficiency of medication used in routine medical practice. ■

Roche’s priority is investing in research and development of new therapies Health Consumer Index. What is the solution to the current situation in our healthcare system? - With our activities on the Serbian market, we have been trying to contribute to improving patient treatment and to the overall advancement of the Serbian healthcare system. The latest data show that our almost 18 million patients around the

investments is applying the latest scientific achievements in innovative treatment of many diseases, including the most severe ones. Last year, 11 of our clinical studies had a positive outcome which clearly indicates a promising future and success of our medications in treatment. Oncology is one of our leading business segments. We have been developing a cutting-edge ap-

Switzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development

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Interview

Goran Aleksić, Assistant Minister in the Serbian Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Deep Trust and Friendship Good political cooperation between Serbia and Switzerland is accompanied by similar cooperation in other areas too. We consider economic cooperation especially important

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n giving an overall assessment of the quality of relations between Serbia and Switzerland, Assistant Foreign Minister Goran Aleksić underlines that they are special indeed: “Our cooperation is also exclusive, both bilaterally and multilaterally. Our foreign ministers have regular contact which just reflects the strong alliance, and deep international trust and friendship. Certain Swiss nationals are an important part of Serbian history. The first person that comes to mind when we mention Switzerland is certainly Archibald Reiss, and today we also think of Franz Weber. Near the end of her term in the office, the former President of the Swiss Confederation Micheline Calmi-Rey expressed her support for Serbia. Switzerland's consecutive presidencies over the OSCE in 2014 and 2015 will add a new quality dimension to the relations between our two countries. This is a new presidency format according to which the two countries will carry out joint activities, opening up the possibility of long-term planning for the organization's work and its strategic positioning in ongoing international relations. We think that the joint activities relative to Switzerland’s presiding over the OSCE will provide an impetus to bolstering overall bilateral relations.”

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Our foreign ministers have regular contact which just reflects the strong alliance, and deep international trust and friendship

■ What are the most important segments of this cooperation? - Good political cooperation between Serbia and Switzerland is accompanied by similar cooperation in other areas too. We consider economic cooperation especially important. Switzerland is a moderately important foreign trade partner to Serbia, but a very important investment partner which, in the last ten years, has made €450 million worth of investments (in construction, insurance, pharmaceutical industry and the media). There are over 150 Swiss companies operating in Serbia. The biggest Swiss investor is Holcim which has recently embarked on a new phase in greenfield investing by opening a series of ready-mixed concrete production facilities all

Switzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development

over Serbia. The recent investments made by reputed Swiss companies just validate their satisfaction with their operations in Serbia. There is a potential for bolstering cooperation and increasing investments primarily in infrastructure, energy and agriculture. There is an initiative for setting up an association of Swiss business people in Serbia which could additionally advance the economic cooperation between the two countries. I have to mention the cooperation of our two police departments and defence authorities. The cooperation between the police departments is one of the most important segments of the bilateral cooperation, especially in issues like migration and human trafficking. In terms of defence cooperation, the Serbian


Defence Ministry has been collaborating with the Swiss Armed Forces College on educating human resources. ■ What bilateral agreements have been concluded between Serbia and Switzerland, and why are they so important? - The contractual foundation and the overall bilateral relations are developed and diverse. The foundation is comprised of over 40 bilateral agreements which is a good basis for further development of the bilateral cooperation. The two countries have also concluded agreements on trade and business cooperation, debt consolidation, double taxation, technical and financial cooperation, air traffic, promoting and protecting investments, re-admission, police cooperation on fighting crime, social security, passenger transport

local self-governments. Also, Serbia is the beneficiary of financial assistance that Switzerland has allocated to West Balkan countries. These funds are mostly spent on social inclusion of vulnerable groups, retraining of unemployed people, modernizing state administration, judiciary and healthcare reform, the energy sector and strengthening entrepreneurship. During the global economic downturn, when countries usually focus on solving internal issues, Switzerland has continued with its donations to Serbia. We are extremely grateful for the humanitarian and donor aid that Switzerland has been giving and is continuing to give to us. ■ Do you think that the beginning of the EU accession negotiations will lead to further improvement of

There is a potential for bolstering cooperation and increasing investments primarily in infrastructure, energy and agriculture and road transport. Both sides have expressed interest in signing agreements in other areas which could further bolster our bilateral cooperation. ■ Switzerland has been supporting and assisting Serbia during its transitional period since 1991. How has this assistance evolved in the last two decades, and what is it like today? - Switzerland is one of the biggest donors of aid, humanitarian and other, to Serbia. Since the 1990s, Switzerland has disbursed over €200 million with most of the money going towards budget assistance, energy, education and

the relations between Serbia and Switzerland, despite the country not being an EU member, and if you do, in which way? - Switzerland supports Serbia and it strategic course for joining the EU. Every step forward that Serbia makes in the European integration process adds more quality to relations with other countries, including Switzerland. Although Switzerland is not an EU member, it does comply with the European standards and practices to a large degree. Hence, Switzerland and its support are important for Serbia on the country’s road toward the European membership. Switzerland knows just how imSwitzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development

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professional courses and campaigns initiated by institutions and individuals. Serbia will be participating at Culturescapes Art Festival in Basel (October – December 2013) which will showcase cultural heritage and artistic tendencies in the Balkans. This will be a good opportunity for our representatives and artists to present Serbia, its tradition and culture to the Swiss people.

portant the West Balkan countries are for the stability and prosperity of the region, and the successful completion of the project called ‘United Europe’. ■ In early July, Serbia and Switzerland signed an agreement on enhancement of social inclusion in Serbia. What does this agreement entail and how is it going to enhance social inclusion? - Social inclusion is an important issue, particularly in the context of the European integration. Switzerland is one of the countries that have been helping us in this segment. The agreement stipulates a Swiss donation to the project “Supporting the improvement of the social inclusion process in the Republic of Serbia”. The donation is around €3 million. The aim of the project is enhancing social inclusion in Serbia which entails inclusion of particularly vulnerable groups – Roma, elderly, women, children, young population, rural population and people with disabilities. Implementing such projects will lead to progress in one of the priority segments in the EU accession process. ■ Could you tell us something about the latest developments in implementing the anti-organized crime and re-admission agreement concluded with Switzerland? - Our law enforcement cooperation with Switzerland is one of the best examples of such cooperation in Europe. The implementation of agreements on re-admission and police cooperation in fighting crime is going smoothly. The cooperation between the two sides was especially pronounced in overcoming the problem with false asylum seekers. Swiss provisions have contributed greatly to the resolution of this problem. This approach could serve as a

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Our law enforcement cooperation with Switzerland is one of the best examples of such cooperation in Europe. The implementation of agreements on readmission and police cooperation in fighting crime is going smoothly model for resolving problems in other European countries that have a problem with an increasing number of false asylum seekers from the West Balkans. ■ In terms of cooperation, we have been mostly talking about economy. However, our cooperation with Switzerland is strong in culture and education. Could you single out some aspects of this cooperation? - Culture can significantly contribute to the two nations getting to know each other better, apart from further developing bilateral relations. This cooperation is reflected through our artists participating in international events,

Switzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development

■ There are 200,000 people from Serbia living in Switzerland. In which way does Serbia foster relations with its diaspora? - The number you’ve mentioned is just a ballpark estimate. According to Swiss authorities, this number is much lower; there are close to 90,000 Serbian citizens living in Switzerland which is 5% of the total number of foreign nationals living there. Quite a few of them have already obtained Swiss citizenship. Serbia tries to foster active relations with its diaspora, and our people living in Switzerland are no different from our people living anywhere else. Our contacts are primarily of an institutional nature and are aimed at improving their position and creating the closes possible relations with their native country. We are especially focused on additional school curriculum in the Serbian language. It is in Switzerland that the biggest number of Serbian children attends such classes. Also, we have summer internship projects for our young people living in Switzerland, and our goal is to get them to know their native country as much as possible and motivate them to apply their knowledge and experiences in Serbia too. For the past three years, one of such projects has been supported by the Swiss Embassy in Belgrade. ■


Interview

Marinko Ukropina, Managing director of SGS ex YU countries

Interview

Rade Kostić, Managing Director of Petrobart d.o.o. and Member of AVIA International's Board of Executives

Validation of Quality The Power of Oil Because our company treats its clients as equal partners, we have been successfully operating on the Serbian market even during turbulent times for the region

SGS Belgrade was founded in 2001. Since its establishment, this branch office has been developing in keeping with the tradition of the 135-year old company certification services. The company has been constantly investing efforts for bettering its four main business segments, namely improving processes, investing in human resources and establishing the adequate and valid methodology for implementation of services. In this way, the findings verified by SGS can be trusted.

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GS was founded as a wheat quality control company in 1878 in the French port of Rouen. The company quickly expanded its core business activity, which was quality control, and, in 1919, evolved into an international corporation headquartered in Geneva under the name Société Générale de Surveillance. Today, SGS group has 75,000 employees and a runs a network of 1,500 offices and laboratories in over 180 countries. SGS also renders inspection, verification, testing and certification services for industry. ■ How important are the services you provide? - Ever since its establishment, SGS has been aspiring to create additional value for its clients, employees, shareholders and overall society through independent inspection, verification, testing and

■ What standards and principles have you been implementing in your business? - SGS Belgrade was founded in 2001. Since its establishment, this branch office has been developing in keeping with the tradition of the 135-year old

SGS group renders inspection, verification, testing and certification services in all segments of industry company. Integrity is the cornerstone of our reputation. Implementing existing strategies and developing new ones hinges on SGS being recognized as a fair and trustworthy partner. SGS is perceived by the leading global organizations, corporations and institutions as a role model for having the highest expertise, quality and integrity standards. SGS’s Code of Integrity and Professional Conduct Code sets the core principles on which the company’s integrity is based on and underlines ethics as priority in its everyday business. ■

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etrobart Company, a daughter company of Gibraltar Ltd, was founded in 1990 as Petromed. The company’s HQ is in London, while Moscow and Belgrade are its commercial centres. The company flourished during the formation of new states following the disintegration of the USSR when Petrobart was one of the first Western companies to establish a link successfully between all of the new markets and recognize their challenges as a development opportunity. ■ Could you tell us more about the company’s history? - Petrobart came to Serbia in 1993 as the first privately owned oil company in the country. On the former Yugoslav territories, Petrobart was a strategic partner to NIS in processing oil derivatives, while, in 2011, Petrobart also started to import oil derivatives. In 1997, we became the official holders of Avia franchise for South East Europe. Today, Avia’s network has

over 3,000 petrol stations in 14 European countries while 90 companies work under Avia Group. On the markets of South East Europe, the Avia association assembles wide network of petrol stations with which the association has concluded supply agreements. More than 45 of them bear Avia brand in Serbia. ■ What are the novelties in your company? Because our company treats its clients as equal partners, we have been successfully operat-

The right quality/product price ratio is the principle on which we build trust ing on the Serbian market even during turbulent times for the region. The right quality/product price ratio is the principle on which we build trust. Our company has a storage facility spanning 18,500 m3 in Barič, near the Sava-DanubeBlack Sea international channel, and we have managed to fully utilize the advantages of waterway transport too. This storage capacity and our strategic position enable us to react quickly to market needs. ■

Switzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development

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Interview

Dragica Tomcic, Economic Attaché, Embassy of Switzerland to the Republic of Serbia and to Montenegro

Serbia is Poised to Grow Serbia has, indeed, over the past several years, dedicated major efforts to improve the business environment and to enhance the overall investment climate. Many world-renowned companies, including Swiss, have recognized Serbia’s potential and decided to locate their operations in the country. We are pleased that Swiss investors are here and that they show increasing interest for the Serbian market. It is evident that Swiss companies would come even in much higher number if the degree of competitiveness of Serbia would be better.

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erbia has, indeed, over the past several years, dedicated major efforts to improve the business environment and to enhance the overall investment climate. Many world-renowned companies, including Swiss, have recognized Serbia’s potential and decided to locate their operations in the country. We are pleased that Swiss investors are here and that they show increasing interest for the Serbian market. It is evident that Swiss companies would come even in much higher number if the degree of competitiveness of Serbia would be better. While Switzerland is a significant investor in Serbia, it is clear that the depth of economic relations could be further improved. The evidence of major Swiss companies and their investments here appear to show the potential of the market for Swiss

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The European track of Serbia is the best guarantee that the economic and business ties between our two countries will be deepened and widened

players. According to Dragica Tomcic, Economic Attaché in Embassy of Switzerland in this exclusive interview, transparency and an easing of the bureaucratic obstacles to doing business in Serbia are of vital importance. While she notes and praises the progress made in these areas, she is very clear that better conditions would lead to more investment. ■ What is the basis of economic cooperation between Serbia and Switzerland and what are the main activities in this respect? - Switzerland and Serbia have an intense and highly diversified relationship. Economic cooperation includes annual government-level meetings in the form of mixed economic commissions and forums, making it possible to establish priorities, discuss any difficulties and develop opportunities for investments. There is potential in

Switzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development

trade relations that have suffered from the economic crisis, and the same can be said for Swiss direct investment in Serbia, which remains an attractive market for the Swiss companies present. I firmly believe that there is realistic potential that relations will grow in the future. The European track of Serbia is the best guarantee that the economic and business ties between our two countries will be deepened and widened.

■ How would you rate the development level of the economic collaboration between our two countries, and which aspect of this collaboration can be improved further? - Our bilateral trade, counted in traditional measures, is still modest - but nevertheless improving. According to Swiss foreign trade statistics, the foreign trade exchange in the first six


tics should only create a legal framework which allows private business to operate and to flourish. Once the framework is there, it’s up to the private economy to move ahead and

months of 2013 amounted in the field of Swiss exports to CHF 87.2 million and in imports CHF 46 million. The exchange of goods with Switzerland has risen in 2012 compared to 2011 by 16 % which means that positive trends in bilateral economic cooperation as well as growing interest of businessmen of both countries are intensifying further joint business activities. With Serbia’s clear commitment towards becoming a member of the EU, there have been significant developments in the foreign trade regime, especially as the Serbian exports to Switzerland grew 25% in the first six months of this year compared to the same period in 2012. Serbia’s market opportunities are certainly in the agricultural sector, infrastructure, transportation, ICT and construction sector. Lohn jobs, especially in the metal and textile industry have also a great future. The automotive industry in Serbia has grown in a short time into one of the main drivers of the Serbian economy.

■ In which ways has the Embassy been helping the cooperation between the Swiss and Serbian businesses? - The Embassy of Switzerland has very much endeavoured to promote trade and investment flows in both directions: from Switzerland to Serbia and vice versa. Foreign direct investment (FDI) and an export-oriented industry are the keys to Serbia’s further development, based on a competitive market economy. Switzerland has therefore put commensurate efforts in projects aimed at boosting Serbia’s attractiveness for FDI and contributing to Serbia’s transformation processes. Among such instruments are the Start-up Fund aimed at financing promising joint ventures between Swiss and Serbian companies and export promotion through our trade cooperation program. If there are opportunities, investors are there, and trade is coming. A proper entrepreneur doesn’t need political support. The key word is competitiveness. Poli-

then we are there to support them, to give them advice and also to help them if and when difficulties come.

■ What are the most important

Swiss companies operating in Serbia brought Swiss know-how, modern green technologies and Corporate Social Responsibility, having created several thousands of jobs

Swiss investments in Serbia and how much have they contributed to the overall progress of Serbian economy? - Serbia and Switzerland have signed two important Agreements: The “Agreement of Investment Protection and Promotion” and the “Double Taxation Agreement”. These agreements are providing the framework for better economic cooperation and further investments. We are very pleased about the ongoing interest of well known Swiss companies – such as Nestlé, Holcim, Basler Insurance and Ringier in maintaining and even expanding their investments. Switzerland is among the 10 biggest foreign investors in Serbia with around €450 million of investments. In 2012, thanks to Nestlé’s acquisition of Centroproizvod, Switzerland was ranked second among foreign investors in Serbia. Individually, Holcim is still the biggest Swiss investor with around €200 million since it bought cement factory in Novi Popovac in 2002.

Switzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development

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progress that Serbia has achieved in the meantime? - Serbia’s business environment and regulatory framework is improving: Swiss support contributed to the simplification of the regulatory environment in ten municipalities, resulting in cost savings amounting to US $208 million for local businesses. The introduction and promotion of corporate governance standards and practices helped improve company performance, resulting in investments of US $134 million.

Swiss companies operating in Serbia brought Swiss know-how, modern green technologies and Corporate Social Responsibility, having created several thousands of jobs.

■ Do you think that the Serbian market, its regulatory framework and the tax policy are appealing enough to attract potential Swiss investors? - Serbia has, indeed, over the past several years, dedicated major efforts to improve the business environment and to enhance the overall investment climate. Many world-renowned companies, including Swiss, have recognized Serbia’s potential and decided to locate their operations in the country – be it for the reason of favourable tax incentives and employment subsidies programs, existing Free- Trade Agreements which enable duty-free exports to a market of almost 1 billion people or the highly-skilled, easily-trained, English proficient workforce. We are pleased that Swiss investors are here and that they show increasing interest for the Serbian market. It is evident that Swiss companies would come even in much higher number if the degree of competitiveness of Serbia would be better.

■ What else can be improved in order for Serbia to become even more attractive to Swiss investors? - As I said before, competitiveness, a business friendly environment, less bureaucracy, a stable legal framework and real economic opportunities are

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■ The Swiss Development and

Politics should only create a legal framework which allows private business to operate and to flourish

the key factors to attract more investments to Serbia, including those from Switzerland. When it comes to small and medium sized companies it is important that they can focus on their economic advancement, meaning less political involvement and less administrative obstacles.

■ Switzerland has been helping Serbia throughout its transitional period, practically since 1991. So far, Switzerland has disbursed a total of CHF 300 million in assistance to Serbia. Speaking from a donor's perspective, do you think that you can say that you've spent your money wisely considering the

Switzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development

Cooperation Office is putting a new strategy together which will cover the period from 2014 to 2017. Could you tell us something about annual budgets and the segments that the office will be focusing on? - The cooperation is indeed one of the key elements of our activities here in Serbia. Switzerland’s cooperation with Serbia is worth CHF 15 million yearly. Since 1991, it has amounted to over CHF 300 million. The Swiss contribution within the Cooperation strategy 2010-2013 was CHF 63 million over four years. The new cooperation strategy for the period from 2014 to 2017 which is currently being prepared by the Swiss Cooperation Office envisages a Swiss contribution of total CHF 84 million over the mentioned four year period. The focus will be on three main areas: economic development, governance and energy efficiency, including renewable energy. ■


corporate

Tasić Car Dealership

Service Coupled with Ambition The Tasić Car Dealership has had a long-standing cooperation with leasing companies in our country so that its clients can enjoy an easy, carefree purchase.

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olkswagen dealership and service centre Tasić Car Dealership was established on October 8, 2008 in Jagodina. The dealership sells and services vehicles during and after the warranty period. The Tasić Car Dealership has had a long-standing cooperation with leasing companies in our country so that its clients can enjoy an easy, carefree purchase. We offer various discounts to our clients/buyers, as well as special gifts for every vehicle they purchase. Our premises also have an authorized repair shop, while our warehouse spans 130 m2 and has all the spare parts that your vehicle might need at any given moment. Apart from these services, we also perform car detailing services, on top of delivering purchased vehicles to the client’s address, and providing ve-

corporate

hicle registration, technical inspection and insurance services. In 2011, the quality of services rendered by the Tasić Car Dealership was validated when the dealership won the award for the best service company in Serbia. The company’s director, Dragan Tasić, was presented with an award and an accompanying plaque in Dresden (Germany). The Tasić Car Dealership has its own taxi service called AKT TAXI which transports the vehicles from our premises to the desired address and vice versa at the scheduled times. Since 2011, AKT Group has been branching out, and now the company has AKT PIZZA parlour and AKT CAFFE, including premises for Volkswagen fans. The company plans to extend its facilities by additional 3,000 m2 in 2014.

Dragan Tasić accepts the award for the best service company in Serbia for 2012 (Dresden)

AKT Group currently has over 50 employees. Director and proprietor of the abovementioned companies, Dragan Tasić was educated and has worked in Switzerland. In 2008, he returned to Serbia, his country of birth, where he set up the company with the aim of applying the know-how he gained in Switzerland and transforming his workers into dilligent, ambitious and promising people. ■

Schöni Logistics doo

We Cross Borders for You The company provides transportation services domestically and abroad, namely along Swiss - Balkan - Swiss routes, and transport tracking services.

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chöni Transport AG was founded in Rothrist/AG, Switzerland in 1969. Through providing top-quality services, we have managed to earn trust both here and abroad which is the cornerstone of our operations. In order to meet newly-created needs, in 2011, we

opened an independent company called Schöni Logistics d.o.o. in Serbia and Montenegro. The company provides transportation services domestically and abroad, namely along Swiss-Balkan-Swiss routes, and transport tracking services. The loading services are carried out by a team of professionals, who, together with the company’s management, meet your requirements in the best manner possible and at any time. Each of our vehicles has a CMR insurance policy worth up to €350,000 per vehicle which guarantees the safety of your cargo from loading to unloading. All of our vehicles also have CEMT permits which enable us to transport your goods without any limitations whatsoever.

Our holding company has over 500 vehicles and two logistics facilities which provide transport and logistics support 24/7, particularly when there is a need for urgent transport. Our company’s slo-

Our holding company has over 500 vehicles and two logistics facilities which provide transport and logistics support 24/7 gan – “Yes, we can!” - perfectly fits our operations. We cross borders and barriers for you, any borders and any barriers – international, language, culture, and the borders of what has been possible and doable so far. ■ www.schoeni.ch | www.schoeni.rs office@schoeni.rs Tel.: +381 60 659 11 11

Switzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development

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Economic Cooperation

Improvement at All Levels In 2012, Switzerland invested €78 million in Serbia, while, this year Serbian exports (to Switzerland) went up, which all indicates there is enough room for bolstering trade, investments and overall economic relations between the two countries. Switzerland is considered an important foreign investor and a moderately important foreign trade partner to Serbia.

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witzerland is a moderately important foreign trade partner to Serbia. Serbian exports to Switzerland make up 0.8% of the total Serbian exports. At the same time, the value of Serbia’s imports from Switzerland makes up 0.9% of the country’s total import. Out of 169 countries that Serbia traded with in 2012, Switzerland took the 25th place among the biggest export and import partners of Serbia. According to the data collated by the Serbian Chamber of Commerce, the trade results between Serbia and Switzerland in the last eight years are as follows: since 2005, exports have been growing at an annual rate of 36%, with the export value in 2008 being 3.9 times bigger than in 2001. Trade with Switzerland in 2008, relative to 2007, went up by 18.9%, while the export to import ratio jumped from 28% to 40%. The exponential growth in 2009, compared to 2008, slowed down following the global economic downturn. In 2009, Serbia reduced its deficit in trading with Switzerland, relative to 2008, by 32% and the export to import ratio went up from 38.8% to 45.8% due to a 20% drop in trading (during the same period, exports were reduced by 11% and imports by 23.6%).

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In 2012, trade between the two countries amounted to US $267 million, while, in the Q1 of this year, this amount stood at US $75 million

In comparison to 2009, exports in 2010 went down by 26.8%, while, in the same period, imports increased by 9.4%. Cumulatively, this led to a 1.9% drop in trade with Switzerland, as well as a drop in the export to import ratio from 45.1% to 28.5%. According to 2011 data on trade with Switzerland, there was a notable increase in exports of 33%, while the export to import ratio grew from 30.2% to 47.7%. In 2012, the trading volume grew just slightly compared to 2011, while the export to import ratio stood at 52.8%. In 2012, Serbia mostly exported the following goods to Switzerland: electricity, fuels and lubricants, plates, sheets, refined copper strip in coils, wood furniture parts, components and accessories for printing machines, raspberries, upholstered wooden seats, compounds for washing dishes, brooms and brushes made of plant-derived materials, rubber elements for scaffolding, prefabricated houses, and marble slabs. The following companies were the biggest Serbian exporters in 2012: Sevojno Copper Mill AD from Sevojno,

Switzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development

Dam-Mont d.o.o. (national and international contractor), FIAT Automobili Srbija, Impol Seval Valjaonica, Sevojno, RTB-Invest d.o.o., NIS a.d. Novi Sad, furniture maker Kolarević d.o.o, Mikrotek Optika d.o.o., Emilio Strecher, Extraform d.o.o., Siemens d.o.o. Belgrade, Tigar Tyres d.o.o. from Pirot, Tobler-Skele d.o.o. Preševo, and Soja Protein AD Bečej. In 2012, Serbia mostly imported the following from Switzerland: electricity, medicines, polyamides in primary forms, plastic products, watches, rubberbased adhesives, pacemakers and medical appliances, devices used in the textile industry, diagnostic and laboratory reagents, moulds for rubber, plastics and pressure casting, chocolate with cereals and hazelnuts, and jewellery. The following companies were the biggest Serbian importers in 2012: EFT Trade d.o.o. Belgrade, Roche d.o.o. Belgrade, Phoenix Pharma d.o.o. Belgrade, Hemofarm Vršac, Beohemija d.o.o. Belgrade, Tetra Pak Production d.o.o. Belgrade, Tent Obrenovac, Identico International, Bimed d.o.o., Mikrotek Optika, Inpharm Co. d.o.o., Anlek d.o.o., ABB d.o.o., Spektar d.o.o., Avala


Ada AD, Erma d.o.o. Belgrade, Pharmaswiss d.o.o., Yura Corporation, and Elixir Group .d.o.o. from Šabac. In 2005 and 2007, Serbia and Switzerland signed two important treaties covering promotion and protection of investments and double taxation

acquisition of a majority share in the Novi Popovac Cement Plant. Holcim’s Executive Board gave its approval to the company’s investing €155 million in Serbia in the following five years. With the goal of increasing cement production in Serbia, in 2010, Holcim invested €83 million on dou-

From 2001 to 2012, Switzerland has donated €122 million in aid which are the foundation for a better economic cooperation and higher investments. Switzerland is among the important investors in Serbia. Pharmaswiss (pharmaceutical production facility in Belgrade) is the biggest Swiss investment in the Serbian chemical industry amounting to €3 million. This investment was made in 2006. Holcim came to Serbia in 2002 by winning a tender for the

bling the daily clinker production (cement is derived from grinding clinker) in the Popovac cement plant from 2,200 to 4,000 tons. The project also entails increasing the annual clinker production capacity to 1.2 million tons, as well as a series of infrastructural and technological activities like upgrading the vertical mill for grinding raw materials. Another €72 million will have been invested in increasing production

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capacity and overhauling the factory by 2016. Surplus products will be sold in Serbia and exported to Bulgaria and Romania. Last year, Holcim completed its mandatory investment program worth over US $90 million which was devised when the company acquired the Popovac cement plant in 2002. Basler is the first Swiss greenfield investment in Serbia. The company operates under Swiss-based Baloise Group, an insurance company that was established over 150 years ago. In terms of significant acquisitions through privatization, we should mention copper company CDI from Geneva acquiring two companies from RTB Group. Swiss companies have also bought the Majdanpek Coopp-er Pipes Plant and Dušan Dugalić Company from Batočina at auctions. The last Serbia-Switzerland Business Forum took place in the Serbian Chamber of Commerce in May this year. "In order for Serbia to attract as many investors as possible, the business environment needs to improve, stabilize and become more predictable. There has

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The current unemployment rate in Switzerland is 3.3% and it is expected that, in 2014, it would drop to 3%

to be legal security and a decisive fight against corruption,” Swiss Ambassador to Serbia H.E. Mr. Jean-Daniel Ruch said on the occasion. The Ambassador added that Switzerland has been helping Serbia with the reform process by securing €15 million of financial assistance which would continue to be disbursed in the following four years. From 2001 to 2012, Switzerland has donated €122 million in aid. It was also pointed out at the Forum that, in 2012 alone, Switzerland invested €78 million in Serbia, while, this year, Serbian exports (to Switzerland) went up, all of which indicates that there is enough room for bolstering trade, investments and overall economic relations between the two countries. Also, Swiss businessmen have expressed a strong interest in investing in Serbia. In 2012, trade between the two countries amounted to US $267 million, while, in the Q1 of this year, this amount stood at US $75 million. Switzerland imports a lot of raw-materials and is one of the biggest exporters of highly sophisticated products. Phar-

Switzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development

maceutical products make 40% of the country’s total exports. The representatives of the Serbian Chamber Commerce have said that the goal was for Serbia and Switzerland to find mutual interest for trade and investment cooperation, since, apart from new markets, Serbia needs strategic investors. While giving a presentation of the Swiss economy, the State Secretary in the State Secretariat for Economic Affairs Eric Martin stated that the country had recovered from the global economic downturn relatively quickly but that the crisis did leave its mark. Mr. Martin also said that a flexible labour market, non-discriminatory approach to the EU market and substantial investments in innovation (3% of the national GDP) were the three most important factors for the Swiss economic success. The current unemployment rate in Switzerland is 3.3% and it is expected that, in 2014, it would drop to 3%. One of the challenges that the country has been facing is higher state allocations for welfare and healthcare due to an increase in elderly population. ■


serbia at your fingertips

The Best Option for All Your Needs in Serbia Comprehensive, constantly updated news on events and happenings in Belgrade. Features and reviews authored by fellow Expat residents of Serbia. Up-to-date accomondation and entertainment information. Serbia: Support of Serbian Development | 25 Useful links, listing and informationSwitzerland on services,and offers and Traditional the best deals.


Culture of Switzerland

The Beauty of Diversity

Switzerland boasts a thriving arts scene and has a rich heritage of historical architecture. Its central position in Europe, its neutrality and shared languages with neighbouring countries, made Switzerland attractive for artists and intellectuals who took refuge from political upheaval in their own countries from the 19th century onward 26 |

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hat defines Swiss Culture? Most likely, visitors see this country as a chocolate-snacking, cheese-eating, alphorn-blowing and yodelling nation that is ruled by perfectionism, and timed by precision watches; a lawabiding nation that takes seriousness very seriously and sleeps with

ZĂźrich was the birthplace of the nihilistic Dada movement, which grew out of the disgust and disillusionment produced by World War I guns under their pillows in well-ordered and efficient Switzerland. On the official web site of the Swiss Federal Department of Foreign Affairs (www.swissworld.org) it is said that, there's always a little

Switzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development

truth in every stereotypical clichĂŠ. Though neither Alphorn nor yodelling are exclusively Swiss, nor is chocolate for that matter, though the Swiss - who knew - set the standard in terms of quality for the latter. It is said that the origins of the Alphorn come from Asia. Over the centuries though, the people of Switzerland managed to find their own distinct folk music style that is typically Swiss, albeit with distinct differences between regions. So, what is typically Swiss Culture? The influence of so many different cultures makes it sometimes hard to tell. Switzerland was inhabited by the Celts in the West, the Helvetii (the most powerful Celtic tribe) in the North and the Rae-


tians - a stubborn Roman alpine tribe - in the East. Switzerland's culture is shaped by all of them, and the many different languages spoken in the small country make the mix even more interesting. Remnants of pagan culture still affect seasonal celebrations, even though the protestant reformers did their best to change that. Just think of the Swiss spring customs of scaring off winter like the Sechseläuten in the protestant Zwingli city of Zürich and the Chalandamarz in the Engadin. The culture of Switzerland is multi-faceted and age-old traditions thrive. “We don't just celebrate for the sake of tourism; we dwell in keeping ancient folk customs alive and wear our ethnic dress with pride, albeit more and more only on special occasions. Although we are maybe a bit on the conservative side, take our time to warm up to each other and visitors and are slow in adapting to new trends, we have gotten a bit bolder over the years in expressing our attitudes,” says Swissworld. In its early history, this landlocked country had little to offer in terms of natural resources. Peasants - persistent, inventive and stubborn like stand-up tumblers - carved out a simple life in this mountainous country. They are shaped by the environment, rituals, languages and characteristics born out of necessity. Ultimately, inventiveness saved this country and finally brought economic wealth. Switzerland is amongst the world leaders in technology, trade (every second franc is earned in export) and finance. Most businesses are small to medium-sized, and although the Swiss company Nestlé is the world's biggest food company 97 percent of its workforce resides outside of Switzerland. The different laws and rules made by each Canton don't make life easy for Swiss companies but make them master negotiators

Sechseläuten parade

in order to succeed. New jobs are created every year, and - remarkably - Switzerland is internationally competitive despite the highest salaries paid in Europe. Art Switzerland boasts a thriving arts scene and has a rich heritage of historical architecture. Its central position in Europe, its neu-

The most famous Swiss literary creation is undoubtedly Heidi, who, was the main character of one of the most popular children's books ever

trality and shared languages with neighbouring countries, made Switzerland attractive for artists and intellectuals who took refuge from political upheaval in their own countries from the 19th century onward. Arts and culture programs are actively supported and promoted by Pro Helvetia, the Swiss arts council, and a foundation under public law. Well-known artists of the 19th and the start of 20th centuries include Albert Anker, Arnold Boecklin and Ferdinand Hodler. Some of the important figures in 20th cen-

Alberto Giacometti Switzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development

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tury art were Swiss/Swiss-born, respectively: Alberto Giacometti (1901-66), famous for his sculptures of elongated figures, and Paul Klee (1879-1940).

Alberto Giacometti

Switzerland also boasts Jean Tinguely (1925-1991) with his creative and colourful installations, whose philosophy was that though machines made of scrap metal have no purpose they can have a meaning. Bernhard Luginbühl (1929-2011), a friend of Tinguely's, also used scrap iron to create huge sculptures. In the 1950s, Swiss artist Max Bill (1908-94) further developed and popularized the style "Concrete Art" (as opposed to "abstract"). Its principles: economic use of materials and rationality. Bill defined Concrete Art as "the pure expression of harmonic measurement and law". Perhaps one could argue it was no coincidence that Concrete Art should have appeared in a country which appreciates practicality and order. On the other hand, Zürich was the birthplace of the nihilistic Dada movement, which grew out of the disgust and disillusionment produced by World War I and was the forerunner of surrealism. One of its exponents in Zürich was Hans Arp, several of whose works can be seen at New York's Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). Many Swiss artists have made their names with

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absurd and playful works of art. Surrealist Meret Oppenheim's most famous work, "Fur Breakfast", is on display at MoMA.

In the 1970s, mainly Frenchspeaking Swiss directors such as Alain Tanner and Jean-Luc Godard helped to put Swiss films on the cinematographic map

Music Yodelling and the alphorn are likely to spring to mind at the mention of music in Switzerland, although neither is exclusively Swiss. It is believed that yodelling began during the early stone age and has a long tradition outside Switzerland - in Poland, for example. In Switzerland, it is said to have developed from a form of long-distance communication and cow-calls. The alphorn originated in northern Asia and was brought to Europe by nomadic tribes. Originally a call and signal instrument, it was first used to play tunes at the end of the 18th century. Add instruments such as the Schwyzerörgeli (a type of accordion), the Hackbrett (hammered dulcimer) and the Trümpi (mouth harp), and you have some basic ingredients of traditional Swiss folk music. Literature The most famous Swiss literary creation is undoubtedly Heidi, who, as the main character of one of the most popular children's books ever, has come to be a symbol of Switzerland. Her creator, Johanna Spyri (1827-1901), wrote a number of other books around similar themes, most of which have now been forgotten. The classics of Swiss German literature include the pastor and writer Jeremias Gotthelf (17971854), who depicted farming life in the Emmental. Middle-class life in the 19th century was portrayed by short-story writer and novelist Gottfried Keller (1819-1890), who opposed the idea of a Swiss national literature, insisting that every writer should remain within his own language community. He regarded his own works as belonging to German literature.

Switzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development

Max Frisch

In the early part of the 20th century, Robert Walser (18781956) was a pioneering modernist writer, and yet his name was and is often obscured by his contemporaries Hermann Hesse, Franz Kafka and Robert Musil. For his part, German-born Hesse (1877-1962), whose works include Siddartha, Narziss and Goldmund, Steppenwolf and The Glass Bead Game, became a Swiss citizen in 1923. And in 1919, it was a Swiss who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature - Carl Spitteler (1845-1924). Olympischer Frühling (Olympic Spring) is the title of his epic work, consisting of five volumes.

Albert Anker

The undisputed giants of 20th century Swiss literature are Max Frisch (1911-91), whose works include Homo Faber, Biedermann


und ers), and 90),

die Brandstifter (The Fireraisand Stiller (I'm Not Stiller), Friedrich Dürrenmatt (1921whose repertoire includes Die

such as Rolf Lyssy, Daniel Schmid, Fredy Murer and Yves Yersin, on the other hand, have taken Swiss life as the basis for their films. The most succesful Swiss film is Lyssy's Die Schweizermacher (The Swissmakers), made in 1978, a satirical comedy that deals with the difficulties facing foreigners who want to become Swiss citizens. Schmid's Beresina, or the Last Days of Switzerland,

three of Europe's major languages, but apart from Rumansch - spoken by only 0.5 % of the population - it has no written language of its own. Whichever language group they belong to, the different Swiss communities have linguistic and cultural ties with one of their larger neighbours. It's easier for someone from Geneva to speak to a Parisian than to a fellow Swiss from Bern,

The language communities eat different things and have different traditions and customs. Even their shared history only goes back about two centuries Robert Walser

Physiker (The Physicists) and Das Versprechen (The Promise), released in 2001 as a Hollywood film. Film Switzerland does not have a large film industry, and, like other small European countries, is heavily dependent on state support. Film support has the potential to make a decisive contribution to the cultural identity of the country. However, the subsidies are not high enough to maintain an industry that produces films in French, German and Italian, and output has lagged behind that of other European countries. Swiss films are not well known around the world, except perhaps to a handful of movie buffs. Of course, there is the question of defining what makes a film Swiss - is a Hollywood film by a Swiss director as "Swiss" as a film set in Switzerland, using Swiss actors and focussing on life in Switzerland? In the 1970s, mainly Frenchspeaking Swiss directors such as Alain Tanner and Jean-Luc Godard helped to put Swiss films on the cinematographic map. Godard, born to a Swiss family in Paris, spent his early years in Switzerland but later returned to France and was very much influenced by the French cinematic tradition. Swiss film-makers

which appeared in 1999, is a comedy which also did fairly well outside Switzerland. One of Murer's best-known films is Höhenfeuer (Alpine Heights), about incest in a remote Alpine setting. And Yersin's Les Petites Fugues (The Wild Oats), made in 1979, was voted best Swiss film of all times by a panel put together by the national SonntagsZeitung newspaper in 2001. The film tells the story of a farm hand who buys himself a motorcycle and embarks upon a discovery of the world and himself. Journey of Hope, directed by Xavier Koller, won an Oscar for best foreign language film in 1991. The film tells the tale of three members of a Kurdish family in search of a better life in Switzerland. Swissness Switzerland is in the highly unusual situation of being home to

or for a native of Ticino to read Milan's Corriere della Sera than the Neue Zürcher Zeitung. The language communities eat different things and have different traditions and customs. Even their shared history only goes back about two centuries. Before the Napoleonic invasion of 1798, some of the cantons even ruled other parts of Switzerland. The inhabitants of what is now Canton Vaud, for example, were the subjects of Bern, and did not enjoy the same rights as the Bernese. The Swiss themselves are sometimes puzzled about what they have in common apart from their passport, what it is that makes them Swiss. The Swiss say they are held together by the desire to stay united. The general attitude is summed up in the formula "unity, but not uniformity." ■

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Tourism in Switzerland

Enchanting Natural Beauty

The first organised tourist holidays to Switzerland were offered during the 19th century by the Thomas Cook and Lunn Travel companies.

S

witzerland has a long tradition of tourism. Its history begins with British mountaineers climbing the main peaks of the Bernese Alps in the early 19th century (Jungfrau 1811, Finsteraarhorn 1812). The Alpine Club in London was founded in 1857. Convalescence in the Alpine climate, in particular

long especially known as a tourist destination. Meiringen's Reichenbach Falls achieved literary fame as the site of the fictional death of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes (1893). The first organised tourist holidays to Switzerland were offered during the 19th century by the Thomas Cook and Lunn Travel companies.

ism in the publication of yearly "Swiss Tourism Figures". In the year 2011 there were a total number of 4,967 registered hotels or hostels, offering a total of 240,000 beds in 128,000 rooms. This capacity was saturated to 41.7 % (compared to 39.7 % in 2005), amounting to a total of 38.8 million lodging

nights. 14% of hotels were in Grisons, 12% each in the Valais and Eastern Switzerland, 11 % in Central Switzerland and 9 % in the Bernese Oberland. The ratio of lodging nights in relation to resident population ("tourism intensity", a measure for the relative importance of tourism to local economy) was largest

Because Switzerland is a small country, its attractions are near each other and can be reached quite easily from tuberculosis, was another important branch of tourism in the 19th and early 20th centuries, in Davos, Graub端nden for example. Because of the prominence of the Bernese Alps in British mountaineering, the Bernese Oberland was

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Official statistics of tourism were planned as early as 1852, but were only realized from 1934, and continued until 2003. Since 2004, the Federal Statistical Office had discontinued its own statistics, but collaborates with Switzerland Tour-

Switzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development

The Rhine Falls


in Grisons (8.3) and Bernese Oberland (5.3), compared to a Swiss average of 1.3. 56.4% of lodging nights were by visitors from abroad (broken down by nationality: 16.5% Germany, 6.3% UK, 4.8% USA, 3.6% France, 3.0% Italy).

republic an excellent tourist destination. With its low crime rate, it is also very safe for tourists. The major airport of Switzerland is at Zurich, main railway connections are to Geneva, Zurich and Basel. The main connection across the Alps is

and Laufen-Uhwiesen, near the town of Schaffhausen in northern Switzerland, between the cantons of Schaffhausen and Zürich. They are 150 m (450 ft) wide and 23 m (75 ft) high. In the winter months, the average water flow is 250 m³/s, while

Piz Gloria, Murren

The total financial volume associated with tourism, including transportation, is estimated at CHF 35.5 billion (as of 2010) although some of this comes

via the Gotthard tunnels (road and railway). The most visited Swiss tourist attractions are first, the Rhine Falls, second, the Berne Bear

The total financial volume associated with tourism, including transportation, is estimated at CHF 35.5 billion (as of 2010) from fuel tax and sales of motorway vignettes. The total gross value added from tourism is 14.9 billion. Tourism provides a total of 144,838 full time equivalent jobs in the entire country. The total financial volume of tourist lodging is CHF 5.19 billion and eating at the lodging provides an additional 5.19 billion. The total gross value added of 14.9 billion is about 2.9% of Switzerland's 2010 nominal GDP of CHF 550.57 billion. Because Switzerland is a small country, its attractions are near each other and can be reached quite easily. Mountain resorts, lakes, forests, castles, museums, and ancient and modern architecture make this federal

exhibit (both for free), and third, with over 1.8 million paid entries: Zoo Basel. The Rhine Falls

Situated near the town of Schaffhausen, Europe's largest waterfalls, is a magnificent natural wonder. Near the falls is the medieval castle, Schoss Laufen, which houses a restaurant, a youth hostel, and shops. On Swiss National Day, August 1, the Rhine Falls is host to a fantastic display of fireworks which attracts thousands of tourists. The Rhine Falls is the largest plain waterfall in Europe. The falls are located on the Upper Rhine between the municipalities of Neuhausen am Rheinfall

anything I had ever before seen; however, not to be wet through, I was obliged quickly to tear myself away." Piz Gloria, Murren

It was the world’s first revolving restaurant on a moun-

Chateau de Chillon, Montreux

in the summer, the average water flow is 700 m³/s. In 1840, author Mary Shelley visited the Falls while on a tour of Europe with her son. She described her visit in a travel narrative that she published in 1844, “Rambles in German and Italy”. She says: "A portion of the cataract arches over the lowest platform, and the spray fell thickly on us, as standing on it and looking up, we saw wave, and rock, and cloud, and the clear heavens through its glittering ever-moving veil. This was a new sight, exceeding

tain roost. Piz Gloria at over 3,000 metres is so high it offers a true 360-degree view of 200 summits — including Monch, Jungfrau, and the famous Eiger — as well as France’s Mont Blanc and Germany’s Black Forest. While perched precariously on Switzerland’s Schilthorn, your view may appear familiar. Piz Gloria was featured in 007’s Her Majesty’s Secret Service. Try the meat and cheese platters; it is a great way to sample Murren’s airdried sausage and the region’s

Berne Bear exhibit

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this eleventh-century castle, the most frequently visited historical building in Switzerland where its numerous rooms house weaponry, frescoes, and furniture. The castle can be reached by walking along the lakefront or taking the train or trolley bus. Fasnacht Spring Carnival, Basel

Fasnacht Spring Carnival, Basel

best cheese. Wash it down with a Swiss Rose and you will have the fortitude to make it back down the mountain. The Berne Bear exhibit

The Bärengraben, or Bear Pit, is a well-known tourist attraction in the Swiss capital city of Bern. It is a bear pit, or enclosure housing bears, situated at the eastern edge of the old city of Bern, next to the Nydeggbrücke and the River Aar. Although still in use, the Bärengraben has been supplemented since 2009 by the adjacent BärenPark, a larger and more natural enclosure alongside the River Aar. The Bärengraben and BärenPark are administered as a geographically discrete part of the

city's Dählhölzli Zoo. The Bärengraben is a Swiss heritage site of national significance, and is of particular significance in Bern because the bear is a symbol of both the city and surrounding canton, and is featured in their coat of arms. Legend has it that, in 1191, Duke Berthold V of Zähringen vowed to choose as namesake the first animal his hunt met in the wood that was to be chopped down for his new city. As Konrad Justingers chronicle puts it: “Then they caught a bear first, which is why the city was called Bern; and so the citizens had their coat and shield, which was a black bear in a white shield, going upright.” The first records of bears being kept in the city come from 1513.

Chateau de Chillon, Montreux

The town of Montreux is located in the heart of the Swiss Riviera on the shores of Lake Geneva. Walk by the lakeside and explore the Chillon Castle, or take a tour of the tower, courtyards, dungeons, and rooms of

Matterhorn, Zermatt

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Switzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development

Be sure to visit Basel, Switzerland's second largest city for the Fasnacht Spring carnival. Its world-famous three-day carnival features participants in colourful costumes and masks parading in the streets. The carnival starts on the Monday after Ash Wednesday, and cafes and bars are open all night as confetti, sweets, and flowers are thrown to the crowd. Swiss National Park

The Swiss Natural Park is 169 square kilometres of moun-

Geneva

Swiss National Park


restaurants and lots of energetic nightlife for visitors to enjoy. St. Moritz

A famous playground of the wealthy, St. Moritz is a winter resort which offers skiing and a variety of summer and winter sports as well as mud and mineral baths and mud therapies. Savour caviar and truffles in some of the resorts' fine restaurants or a spa treatment at the Health Spa Centre. This town is also known for its active and expensive nightlife. Mt. Pilatus St. Moritz

tains and woodland. It is home to a variety of wildlife such as large red deer, chamois, ibex, and marmots. Walk around its trails and admire its breathtaking views. Geneva

Hugging the shores of lovely Lake Geneva, this city is the third biggest in the country. You can find the world's tallest fountain, enchanting museums, and fine restaurants here.

Near the lakeside city of Lucerne stands Mt. Pilatus, a

For those with a turn towards alternative arts, Geneva is a place not to be missed. The Matterhorn, Zermatt

The most famous peak in the Alps, the Matterhorn in Zermatt stands 4,478 meters high. Mountaineers flock to this town to conquer this technically difficult peak, and Zermatt also offers skiing and beautiful views. There are also non-skiing activities, good

St. Gallen

2,120-meter-tall mountain. Tourists can take a cable car to reach its top and enjoy the thrilling view. It is also a great venue for walking with numerous trails, and visitors here can witness the spectacular scenery of the Swiss Alps. St. Gallen

Mt. Pilatus

An Irish monk founded St. Gallen in 612 AD. What was once a medieval centre has now grown into the seventh largest city in Switzerland, and this old town has a lot of picturesque buildings, with carved balconies, colourful murals, and relief statues. The large twin-towered cathedral has remarkable ceiling frescoes and stucco designs. â– 

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Languages and Customs

Multilingual World The four national languages of Switzerland are German, French, Italian, and Romansh. All but Romansh maintain equal status as official languages at the national level within the Federal Administration of the Swiss Confederation

T

he four national languages of Switzerland are German, French, Italian, and Romansh. All but Romansh maintain equal status as official languages at the national level within the Federal Administration of the Swiss Confederation. Native speakers number about 64 percent (4.6 million) for German (mostly Swiss German dialects, though Swiss Standard German is used in writing and in speaking in a few official contexts), 20 percent (1.5 million) for French (mostly Swiss French, but including some Arpitan dialects), 6.5 percent (0.5 million) for Italian (mostly Swiss Italian, but including Lombard dialects), and

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less than 0.5 percent (35,000) for Romansh. The German region (Deutschschweiz) is roughly in the east, north and center; the French part (la Romandie) in the west and the Italian area (Svizzera italiana) in the south. There remains a small Romansh-speaking native population in Graubünden in the east. The cantons of Fribourg, Bern and Valais are officially bilingual; Graubünden is officially trilingual. In 17 Swiss cantons, German is the only official language. In the cantons of Bern, Fribourg and Valais, French is co-official; in the trilingual canton of Graubünden, more than half of the population speaks German, while the rest

speak Romansh or Italian. In each case, all languages are official languages of the respective canton. While the French-speaking Swiss prefer to call themselves Romands and their part of the country la Romandie, the German-speaking Swiss used to refer to (and, colloquially, still do) the French-speaking Swiss as "Welsche", and to their area as Welschland, which has the same etymology as the English Welsh (see Walha). In Germany Welsch and Welschland refer to Italy; there, the term is antiquat-

lishments is high, particularly in western Switzerland. Chocolate has been made in Switzerland since the 18th century but it gained its reputation at the end of the 19th century with the invention of modern techniques such as conching and tempering which enabled its production on a high quality level. Also a breakthrough was the invention of solid milk chocolate in 1875 by Daniel Peter. The Swiss are the world's largest consumers of chocolate. The most popular alcoholic drink in Switzerland is wine.

Chocolate has been made in Switzerland since the 18th century but it gained its reputation at the end of the 19th ed, rarely used, and somewhat disparaging attitude. The cuisine of Switzerland is multi-faceted. While some dishes such as fondue, raclette or rösti are omnipresent through the country, each region developed its own gastronomy according to the differences of climate and languages. Traditional Swiss cuisine uses ingredients similar to those in other European countries, as well as unique dairy products and cheeses such as Gruyère or Emmental, produced in the valleys of Gruyères and Emmental. The number of fine-dining estab-

Switzerland and Serbia: Traditional Support of Serbian Development

Switzerland is notable for the variety of grapes grown because of the large variations in terrain, with their specific mixes of soil, air, altitude and light. Swiss wine is produced mainly in Valais, Vaud (Lavaux), Geneva and Ticino, with a small majority of white wines. Vineyards have been cultivated in Switzerland since the Roman era, even though certain traces can be found of a more ancient origin. The most widespread varieties are the Chasselas (called Fendant in Valais) and Pinot noir. Merlot is the main variety produced in Ticino. ■


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SWITZERLAND 2013