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FDI Foreign Direct Investment

Italy and Serbia

Excellent Relations for Future Development 2013


contents 4

 he Best T Relations So Far

18

Ivan Mrkić, Serbian Foreign Ministerer

 eeing is S Believing

Giovanni Roncucci, Founding Partner and Chairman Roncucci & Partners Bologna

L  egal Protection for Better Business

20

 aking M Strides in Investment

14

ART DIRECTOR Ilija Petrović, i.petrovic@aim.rs

25

Business

Home for Investors

Aleksandar Ostojić, Chief Development Consultant in Business Park Bački Petrovac 26

 igh Quality H Cargo Transport Dunavska Transportna Logistika

Homeland of Many Civilizations Culture

21

Greater

M  ore than Just Business

29

30

Andrea Simoncelli, President and CEO of Delta Generali Osiguranje

32 22

Serbian Planes

in World Skies

Milorad Matić, Director of Aero-EastEurope

SlodesTrade

Awareness Will Bring Greater Success

S  weet Success

Wonderful

Patients are

Always Right

Darko Jelić, Development Director at the Jedro Community Health Centre

23

PHOTOS Zoran Petrović TRANSLATORS Snežana Bjelotomić

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Ruža Ristanović, r.ristanovic@aim.rs GENERAL MANAGER Ivan Novčić, i.novcic@cma.rs FINANCIAL DIRECTOR Ana Besedić, a.besedic@aim.rs

Cuisine

office manager Nataša Nešić, n.nesic@aim.rs

Land of

PRINTING Rotografika d.o.o. Segedinski put 72, Subotica

Opposites People

36

PROJECT MANAGERS Biljana Dević, b.devic@aim.rs Svetlana Okanović, s.okanovic@aim.rs Sandra Bandović, s.bandovic@aim.rs Irena Lalić, i.lalic@asim.rs

EDITORIAL MANAGER Tanja Banković, t.bankovic@aim.rs

N  ew Leasing Solutions

Nebojša Janićijević, President of Intesa Leasing Executive Board

lecture Christen Bradley Farmer, c.farmer@aim.rs

Mixture of Influences

Teodora Deak, Director of TE-TO Sugar Refinery, Senta 16

Excellent Relations for Future Development

EDITOR Jovana Gligorijević, j.gligorijevic@aim.rs

Romano and ENRICO Rossi, CEO Progetti , Belgrade

 irst-Rate F Partnership

Italy and Serbia

2013

Economic cooperation between Italy and Serbia 13

S  upporting Change

Dubravka Kosić, Partner and Founder of the Kosić Law Firm

Andrea Simoncelli, President, Italo -Serbian Chamber of Commerce (CCIS) 10

24

Dr. Christian Otto Neu, General Director DDOR 19

8

Insuring the Future

Culture and

Civilization Tourism

"Italy and Serbia - Excellent Relations for Future Development" published by: alliance international media Makenzijeva 67, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia Phone: +(381 11) 2450 508 Fascimile: +(381 11) 2450 122 E-mail: office@aim.rs www.allianceinternationalmedia.com ISSN no: 1451-7833 All rights reserved alliance international media 2013 This issue is audited by ABC Serbia

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

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interview

Ivan Mrkić, Serbian Foreign Minister

The Best Relations So Far Italy and Serbia think alike in matters like the development trajectory of bilateral relations and multilateral cooperation through institutions like the UN, OSCE and Council of Europe. In the bilateral segment, this is specifically relevant to economic and technological cooperation and an intensive cultural cooperation which is constantly developing. I would especially like to underline the importance of the continued political support that Italy has been giving us in terms of Serbia’s obtaining a date for the beginning of EU accession negotiations

I

f there were one country with which Serbia has been intensely developing diplomatic relations at all levels that must be Italy. We established diplomatic relations with Italy over 130 years ago. The first diplomatic office of the Principality of Serbia was opened in Rome on January 18, 1879. Italy has been providing strong and consistent support to our country on its road to EU membership. Serbia and Italy have very advanced bilateral relations, particularly in economy. The political dialogue between the two countries is very dynamic. Their strategic partnership was forged in Rome in 2009 which further solidified the understanding and friendly relations between these two countries. That year, the first

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Italy-Serbia summit took place which was attended by a delegation of Serbian ministers, with the President of the Republic of Serbia at its helm. At the summit, the two

With over €900 million of invested capital, excluding investments in the financial sector and Fiat, Italy is among the six biggest investors in Serbia sides signed a series of bilateral agreements on economy, energy, agriculture and industry, security, culture, environment etc. Also, Serbia has signed memoranda of understanding with the regions Friuli Venezia Giulia, Veneto and Lombardia. The second Italy-Serbia summit took place on March 8, 2012. Chairman of the Italian

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

Council of Ministers Mario Monti, together with eight Italian ministers, visited Belgrade where he signed a Memorandum of Understanding on cooperation in the field of European integration. Italy is the third biggest trading partner of Serbia, and, out of the EU countries, takes second place in terms of the value of trade with Serbia (after Germany). In 2012, Serbia exported €933.1 million to Italy and imported €1.4 billion worth of goods. With over €900 million of invested capital, excluding investments in the financial sector and Fiat, Italy is among the six biggest investors in Serbia. There are over 600 Italian companies, banks and insurance companies that operate in Serbia where their turnover has amounted to over €2.5 billion and where they employ more than


Relations

Support

Contribution

Serbia and Italy have very advanced bilateral relations, particularly in economy. The political dialogue between the two countries is very dynamic.

Italy has been giving us continued political support in terms of Serbia’s obtaining a date for the beginning of the EU accession negotiations.

I would also like to underline the contribution of former Italian foreign minister Franco Frattini in Serbia’s being granted the visa-free regime.

20,000 workers. We are talking to the Serbian Foreign Minister Ivan Mrkić about these topics, as well as the future of relations between the two countries. ■ Seeing how dynamic and comprehensive the communication between Italy and Serbia has been, we could conclude that the cooperation between the two countries has never been better. Do you agree? - I absolutely agree with you. Italy and Serbia think alike in matters like the development trajectory of bilateral relations and multilateral cooperation through institutions like the UN, OSCE and Council of Europe. In the bilateral segment, this is specifically relevant to economic and technological cooperation and an intensive cultural cooperation which is constantly developing. I would especially like to underline the importance of the continued political support that Italy has been giving us in terms of Serbia’s obtaining a date for the beginning of the EU accession negotiations. ■ In terms of economic cooperation, Italy is the number one partner to Serbia. What are the most important facets of that cooperation? - The most comprehensive cooperation is in the car industry (FIAT-FAS). Also, Italy has made significant investments in the energy sector and the textile industry (Benetton in Niš), as well as the food and chemical industries. These investments have created new jobs for our citizens and with the implementation of new tech-

nology, the international competitiveness of our economy grows and we have an opportunity to export to third markets like the Russian Federation, Ukraine and Kazakhstan (countries with which

- There are so many, but I will mention a few – the Agreement on Economic, Industrial and Technical cooperation, the Agreement on Cooperation in Culture and Education and the Agreement on Scien-

Italy and Serbia think alike in matters like the development trajectory of bilateral relations and multilateral cooperation through institutions like the UN, OSCE and Council of Europe

■ Apart from economy, in which areas the two countries have been successfully cooperating? - First and foremost, in culture and protecting the priceless cultural heritage in Kosovo, which is done by the UNESCO. We are very grateful to the Italian contingent of the KFOR and the EULEX.

tific and Technical Cooperation. These are successive agreements. There are also agreements covering energy sector and the Agreement on Conversion and Recognition of Foreign Driver's Licence. The establishment of the strategic partnership between Italy and Serbia during the First Summit in Rome 2009 gave a special impetus to the development of the relations between the two countries. Also, the Memorandum of Understanding on the Civil Protection and the European Integration was signed.

■ Which are the most important bilateral agreements between Serbia and Italy?

■ Many anti-corruption and anti-organized crime tools that Serbia has been using

we have signed duty-free agreements). These are markets that can be catered to only by a strong economy.

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

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were developed in Italy. Why are they good and what are their advantages? - It is clear to everybody that Italy is very experienced in fighting various forms of organized crime and terrorism. They shared their experiences with us with the purpose of adopting anti-crime technology and mechanisms by the relevant authorities in Serbia in a more efficient and faster manner. We are cooperating in this area via Europol and Interpool too especially in fighting organized crime, embezzlement and corporate crime. ■ It seems that the cooperation on fighting crime is the most important one considering Italy's vast experience in dealing with this problem. Do you agree? - I think that I made that clear. There is a Joint Statement on the cooperation between the Serbian and Italian interior ministries when it comes to fighting organized crime, drugs, psychotropic substances and precursor trafficking, international terrorism, weapons and people trafficking, illegal migration, IT cooperation between the Italian Financial Police and the Serbian Tax Police. The new government has been providing a strong impulse to this cooperation and has been doing everything in its power to advance it. ■ Last year, in March, Italy and Serbia signed six agreements covering various areas from recognizing driver's licences to cooperating in ecology and agriculture. Have these agreements already yielded results? - Yes, we have seen the results from implementing the Agreement on Conversion and Recognition of Foreign Driver's Licence since that Agreement facilitates the movement and employment of our citizens in Italy. The Energy Agreement makes it possible for

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our two countries to cooperate on using the potential we have. I have to say that it would be important if we concluded another agreement and that is validating each other's diplomas. We did

- This provides a sufficient legal framework for the cooperation between the two foreign ministry departments. We are cooperating on organizing seminars and having the two Diplomatic Academies working together. This agreement is definitely going to have positive effects on regional initiatives that involve the both countries – the Central European Initiative, the Adriatic-Ionian Initiative and the South-East European Cooperation Process. I would also like to underline the contribution of former Italian foreign minister Franco Frattini in Serbia’s being granted the visa-free regime. We expect similar results in other segments too, particularly because the prominent EU countries, including Italy, can easily spot the obstacles on our way to EU membership and help us in finding solutions. It is enough to say that the European Union has validated its international reaffirmation in resolving conflicts in the Western Balkans, and es-

The establishment of the strategic partnership between Italy and Serbia during the First Summit in Rome 2009 gave a special impetus to the development of the relations between the two countries have such an agreement in the past, and renewing it would significantly contribute to the mobility of skilled professionals with the aim of overcoming together the effects of the economic crisis, which has gripped the entire world. ■ The Memorandum of Understanding on cooperation in the European integration process, concluded between the two foreign ministries, entails Italy's expert help in this area too. What does this assistance entail and how helpful is it going to be to Serbia?

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

pecially the historical conflict between Serbs and Albanians in Kosovo and Metohija. ■ Italy has always been providing strong assistance to Serbia in its European integration process. How would you describe the overall relations between the two countries? - Our diplomatic relations have always been and will always be of high quality. Of course, apart from many links that bring us together, there is always room to build new and advance the existing ones to mutual satisfaction. ■


Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

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interview

Andrea Simoncelli, President, Italo-Serbian Chamber of Commerce (CCIS)

Seeing is Believing I prefer looking at the progress made more than what should still be done. In terms of crime, Serbia is a safe country, and the school and university systems work properly. Less than 1% of Italians work in our companies based in Serbia, showing that investors can find all the professionalism they need locally

T

he biggest proof of the excellent economic relations between Serbia and Italy lies in the large number of Italian companies who have come here, invested, and provided quality jobs – including management positions – for local hires. One sign of this large Italian presence in Serbia can be seen at the Italo-Serbian Chamber of Commerce (CCIS) whose membership, 150 strong, attests to the strength of the economic bonds between the countries. In this interview, CCIS President Andrea Simoncelli waxes optimistic about the collaboration between Italian companies investing here, and the partners whom they find. ■ The Italian-Serbian Chamber of Commerce, which you chair,

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belongs to a global network of a total of 74 Italian chambers of commerce in the world. What are your main goals and tasks in Serbia? - The Italo-Serbian Chamber of Commerce (CCIS) was founded in Belgrade in 2002, and relies on 150 members. It is the second largest Chamber of Commerce among the 22 operating in Serbia. Its main tasks are to foster bilateral trade through promotion and support Italian companies willing

The qualified labour force, proximity to Italy, business friendly environment, low taxation, competitive cost and support from local authorities – these are the main points that make Serbia an optimal choice for Italian investors to invest in Serbia. Information, legal and fiscal advisory, logistic, finance and insurance support, B2B meetings, fair participations, networking and business trips arrangement are among main services provided by CCIS.

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

■ Speaking as the Chairman of the Italian-Serbian Chamber of Commerce, how would you assess the business climate in Serbia, bearing in mind that, for years, foreign investors have been complaining about the same problems – bureaucracy, crime, the judicial system to the schooling system – and the fact that these problems have not been resolved at all or their resolution has been very slow? - The business climate between two countries is excellent and the constant growth of bilateral trade testifies to this. Of course, there are still some specific issues to be addressed, but I prefer looking at the progress made more than what should still be done. In terms of crime, Serbia is a safe country, and the school and university system work properly. Less than 1% of Italians work in our companies based in Serbia, showing that investors can find all the professionalism they need locally. Workers, employees management are fully available in Serbia, and with appropriate training they are very


CCIS

Business climate

Foreign investment

The Italo-Serbian Chamber of Commerce (CCIS) was founded in Belgrade in 2002, and relies on 150 members.

The business climate between two countries is excellent and the constant growth of bilateral trade testifies to this.

The Serbian authorities fully understand the importance of foreign investment and provide various forms of support.

competitive indeed. Bureaucracy is still a problem but the Ministry of Finance and Economy together with the Ministry of Regional Development is making strong progress to reduce red tape and delays in obtaining authorizations. ■ Italian investors are becoming more prominent in Serbia and, this year, Fiat has been called one of the pillars of Serbia’s economic growth. What are your expectations in terms of future Italian investments here? - Italy is second largest commercial partner for Serbia with 500 companies present in several businesses. Automotive and car components, finance, banks and insurance, textile, civil engineering, energy, furniture, fashion, film production, consultancy and advisory, food and agriculture, chemistry, transport and logistics, health, and education, among others, are main fields of the Italian presence. Direct investment or joint ventures are the principal ways to set up a new activity, and the prospects are bright. During first quarter of 2013, the CCIS organized double the amount of business trips to Serbia over last year. ■ The Chamber often holds successful and well-attended meetings between the business people from the two countries. What do Italian investors see as the special advantages of the Serbian market? - The qualified labour force, proximity to Italy, business friendly environment, low taxation, competitive cost and support from local authorities – these are the main

points that make Serbia an optimal choice for Italian investors. Last but not least, the preferential trade agreement with Russia opens a rich and promising market to Serbian-made products. ■ What do you think of the contribution that the Italian companies have made to the stability of the Serbian financial sector? - A great contribution with 20,000 jobs created, with extensive cor-

Italy is second largest commercial partner for Serbia with 500 companies present in several businesses porate social responsibility and a fundamental source of foreign currency to support Serbian dinar. ■ Italy is one of the biggest export markets for Serbia. Of what should Serbian exporters be especially mindful when selling their products to Italy? - Quality, quality, and again quality. Italy is a mature and sophis-

ticated market where quality is a given in all aspects, from packaging to transportation. Let’s take an example. Serbia is one of main producers of strawberries and you can find very few of them in Italian green markets even though Italy imports a large amount of these precious fruits. The reason is the wrong packaging! Serbian exporters should invest more to better introduce their product. ■ What is your assessment of

the overall cooperation between the Chamber and Serbian institutions? - Odlično! The Serbian authorities fully understand the importance of foreign investment and provide various forms of support to single businessman or to associations. Ministries, agencies, and the SIEPA in particular, are always very supportive and friendly with CCIS, providing information and guidance to all our members. That’s why we say DOĐITE U SRBIJU (“Come to Serbia”)!!!

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

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review

Economic cooperation between Italy and Serbia

First-Rate Partnership Close to 400 Italian companies operate in Serbia with turnover of around US $2.4 billion, employing more than 20,000 workers

I

n the last 20 years, Italy has always been among the top three trade partners of Serbia. Serbian exports to Italy made up 22.4% of all Serbian exports to EU countries in 2010 and 12.3% of overall imports. In terms of the balance between export and import (the 2011 export-to-import ratio stood at 80%), Italy is ahead of our other EU trade partners, and even the EU as a whole. In 2009, for the first time in ten years, trade between Serbia and Italy dropped by 29%. This was also a common trait marking trade between Serbia and the EU and Serbia and the rest of the world in the same period. Despite the decline, Italy has managed to stay one of the top trade partners of Serbia with a 10% share in Serbia’s overall foreign trade. In 2010, in terms of achieved export results, Italy was once again the biggest foreign trade partner of Serbia with an exportto-import ration reaching 78.1%, generally thanks to a 36.3% export hike compared to 2009. In the same period, imports fell by 7.6%. In 2011, the value of trade with Italy reached almost US $3 billion, but this growth trend did not continue in 2012. In 2012, exports dropped by 6.7% relative to the same period in 2011, mainly owing to a drastic decline in the export of ferrous metal products manufactured by Smederevo Steelworks which, tra-

10 |

ditionally, have been one of the most important export goods for Serbia. At the same time, exports of the non-ferrous industry (processed copper) and chemical rawmaterials also fell. The export of finished cars, produced by Fiat in Serbia, significantly went up last year – by US $300 million – which

In terms of the balance between export and import (the 2011 export-to-import ratio stood at 80%), Italy is ahead of our other EU trade partners, and even the EU as a whole

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

Fiat, Kragujevac

made Fiat cars the most important export product (25% of the total exports to Italy that year). In the same period, imports declined by 9% which resulted in an 8% drop in trade with Italy, making an export-to-import ratio of 82.1%. In terms of the goods that are most frequently exported to Italy, the following dominate – finished cars, additionally processed clothing and footwear, non-ferrous metals (copper and aluminium in various processing phases), timber products (lumber, compensators, elements and veneer), agro-food products (mushrooms, sugar, beet sugar, fresh and frozen fruits and vegetables), tires, raw cowhide, polyethylene, and magnesium. We mostly import the following from Italy - raw materials for the clothing and footwear industry (finishing works for the Italian partners), packing machines also used in the plastics industry, new and used cars and trucks and their parts, appliances, furniture parts, seamless pipes, confectionary


products, paper and cardboard, marble and granite, and others. Close to 400 Italian companies operate in Serbia with turnover of around US $2.4 billion, employing more than 20,000 workers. Italian companies have mostly invested in Serbia through privatizations or through forging partnerships with the state-owned companies (as in the case of Fiat) or local governments and municipalities (Acegas installing gas systems in Požega and Arilje). In certain cases, local governments leased land to investors without any compensation (as in the case of the Italian motor oil and lubricant producer Dytech Dynamic Fluid which operates in Niš) or by charging a very small fee (such as with the municipality of Inđija). Apart from Fiat, which made one of the biggest investments in Serbia by opening a car plant in Kragujevac, the Italian-Serbian

Sirmium Steel, Sremska Mitrovica

Italian companies have mostly invested in Serbia through privatizations or through forging partnerships with the stateowned companies

Life is full of ups and downs.

joint venture Zanini-Hemofarm invested in production of a pharmaceutical paper packaging. Venice-based Pometon formed a joint venture with the Bor Smelting

Plant with the goal of extending the production of copper dust. Italian companies have expressed a lot of interest in investing in the wood processing sector. Casa Italia has opened a furniture plant in the Bačka Palanka Free Zone which is considered one of more successful investments. In regards to the textile industry, Pompea and Fulgar have invested US $25.5 million in the municipality of Zrenjanin by opening a nylon stocking and yarn-based synthetic fiber factories respectively. Golden Lady has also invested in a new sock production facility in Šabac, while Calzedonia has opened an underwear factory in Sombor. Dalle Carbonare invested in the existing spinning mill in Paraćin. In January 2010, an agreement stipulating opening of a clothing factory was signed with

We’re there for both. We understand life doesn’t always go according to plan. That’s why we always listen carefully to your needs. So whatever challenges and opportunities come your way, you can be sure we’ll be there. It’s what we call real-life banking. Contact Center: 011 3777 888 www.unicreditbank.rs

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

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Leading SITC segments in exporting to Italy

Leading SITC segments in importing from Italy Specialized machinery for certain industrial branches

Road vehicles

8%

Non-ferrous metals

6% 5%

9%

29%

General purpose industrial machinery Metal products, not mentioned before

64%

Clothing

5%

Iron and steel

44%

Rubber products

6%

8%

8%

Yarn, textile and textile products

9%

Road vehicles

Other

the renowned Italian company Benetton. The investment was worth €43.2 million, and Benetton was supposed to hire 2,700 workers. In March 2011, Benetton bought Nitex. The Italian company STG Group has opened an iron smelting plant, Sirmium Steel, worth €40 million, while the Italian motor oil, lubricant and fuel line (car industry) company Dytech plans to complete its facility in the Donje Medjurovo industrial zone in Niš by the end of 2012 and hire close to 400 people. In June 2011, another Italian company, Goldoni, signed an agreement with the Ministry of Economy and Regional Development, which confirms this Italian company’s intention to acquire a 70.63% share in the Belgrade company 21. Maj-Fabrika Malolitražnih motora at a public

Other

auction. The Italian company also undertook to invest €10 million in the annual production of 13,000 cultivators and tractors in the Serbian company. In accordance with the new privatization legislation, Italian company Bitumi Adige bought a surface quarry (Kijevo-Straževica), which was the first case of privati-

The export of finished cars, produced by Fiat in Serbia, significantly went up last year – by US $300 million – which made Fiat cars the most important export product (25% of the total exports to Italy that year) zation by a foreign company in Serbia. This opened the door to the privatization of many building companies in Serbia. Pierro Zanella has acquired the Zlatibor Mermer Company, while

Export to import ratio, in %

Trade exchange between Serbia and Italy, in million USD 100

2500 2000

80

1500

76.33

80.04

73.9 72.12

1000

60

500 0 -1000

82.14

53.57

61.49 51.5

40

-500

20

-1500 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Export in USD

12 |

Franco Caporale Company from Pescara bought another surface quarry. SFIR from Vicenza is now the majority shareholder in the Senta and Nova Crnja sugar refining plants. In late 2006, the renowned Italian plywood panel manufacturer Fantoni from Udine acquired Špik Ivanjica. The Italian company plans to invest a total of €30 million in order to reach an annual production of 300,000m3 of plywood panels. Fibest now owns Belgrade-based clothing chain Ateks, while Lorenzetti bought footwear manufacturer Aska from Kula. Tegola Canadese has acquired a roof tile factory in Kanjiža. In February 2011, the Electric Power Industry of Serbia (EPS) and Italian company SECI Energia reached a preliminary agreement on building hydro-power plans on the Drina River worth over €800

Import in USD

Balance in USD

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

0 2005

2006

2007

2008 2009 2010 2011

2012


million. The plan is to have these plants generate 1,200 gigawatts of electricity annually. The agreement constitutes an operational implementation of the Agreement on Strategic Energy Cooperation between Serbia and Italy, which the two governments signed in 2009, and a continuation of the collaboration between EPS and SECI Energia on the construction of hydro-power plants on the Ibar River of 103-megawatt capacity. In April 2009, another Italian company, Hidro-One, instigated a process of acquiring land on the territory of the mu-

Benetton, Niš

nicipality of Priboj (the river Njutina). Also, the Italian company Enervoda plans to build six small power plants on the river Lim in the municipality of Prijepolje. In October 2012, the Serbian Ministry of Infrastructure and Italian Ministry of Economic Development signed in Rome an agreement on the Italian government’s buying electricity produced jointly from renewable energy resources in Serbia that would be distributed in Italy at the price of €155 per megawatt hour.

Goldoni, Belgrade

This means that Serbia won’t have to pay incentive fees for the renewable energy. The clean power will be supplied through Montenegro and a submarine cable crossing the Adriatic Sea between Bar and Bari to Italy. Italian company Edison has expressed its interest in participating in the completion of construction of the Kolubara B thermal power plant. Also, Italian companies are very interested in taking part in utilizing alternative energy resources in Serbia, which is a very promising economy segment. ■

corporate

DTL

High Quality Cargo Transport DTL is dedicated to the middle and lower course of the Danube from Hungary to the Black Sea and especially to the development of inland waterways

D

TL is a company with its operational center in Belgrade, which already 15 years deals with mass transport of all types of cargo by river way on the Danube River as well as inland waterways (Sava, Drava, Tisa and DTD channel system). DTL is dedicated to the middle and lower course of the Danube from Hungary to the Black Sea and especially to the development of mentioned inland waterways. Being positioned in Belgrade, DTL is specialist for inland waterways at the area of ex-YU republics. In its property and under its operational management DTL has very high quality and operational convoys for transport of any kind of cargoes, such as various types of vessel, all hatch covered and steel floored, duly suitable for loading of any kind of cargo: - Barges Eurotaf type volume 2.800 m3 - DWCC 2.100 mt (also suitable for using as a storage capacity), ideal for the transport of containers; - Barges Europe 2B type volume 1.700 m3 - DWCC 1.700 mt; - Self-propelled vessels - DWCC 2,000; - Pushers/tug boats Also, DTL has numerous open top barges, steel-floored, Europe 2B type volume 1.700 m3 - DWCC 1.700 mt, as well as barges with volume 1.600 m3 - DWCC 1.250 mt.

Depending on the navigation conditions on the Danube River and his contributories DTL is able to handle every month between around 50.000 tons of cargoes. In addition to transport services, DTL is able to provide you in all ports, both river's and the Black Sea (Constanta either Ukrainian port Reni/Izmail) all other related services such as transshipment, storage, forwarding, etc. As a company, which is specialized for service logistics and client support, DTL believes that the development of company is directed in a way of forming grain terminals, i.e. efficient minilogistic centers, like those ones that already exist in Hungary. DTL is also owner of concrete silo, which is located in the Prahovo, 861 km from the Danube, boarding Serbia, Romania and Bulgaria, with a capacity of 5.000t and is in a phase of reconstruction. There is also a mountable-demountable silo with a capacity of 4.000t, and can be installed in a desired location to suit clients' needs. DTL is available for its customers 24h a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. This company would surely do their best to find the best solution for you and to build a mutually beneficial professional cooperation in the future. ■ DUNAVSKA TRANSPORTNA LOGISTIKA Bulevar Mihaila Pupina 10A, 11070 Novi Beograd, Srbija tel/fax: (+381 11) 311 96 53; 311 92 41 E-mail: dtlbg@eunet.rs; Web site: www.dtltransport.net

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

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interview

Andrea Simoncelli, President and CEO of Delta Generali Osiguranje

Greater Awareness Will Bring Greater Success In my long experience I have seen how important the social role performed by our industry is. Families, industries and particularly small and middle-sized enterprises continue to run their activities after a tragic event thanks to appropriate insurance coverage. You know the story of ant and grasshopper: well, we must learn from ants!

O

ne of the major problems faced by the insurance industry in Serbia today is a lack of awareness of the benefits of insurance coverage. According to Andrea Simoncelli, President and CEO of Delta Generali Osiguranje, only a very small percentage of the population has basic car, life, or health insurance. This having been said, Mr. Simoncelli speaks with enthusiasm about the work done so far on the market and the prospects it holds for development. â–  When viewed by European standards, the insurance market in Serbia is a relatively new sector. In your opinion, how is the Serbian market fairing in terms of discovering

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the benefits that insurance provides, and do you think that Serbian citizens and companies are still sceptical about the necessity of having an insurance policy?

Health policies need a strong commitment from government authorities in order to spread a culture of self-coverage and not total reliance on public institutions - Insurance premiums represent less than 2% of Serbian GDP, and that explains very well the scepticism about insurance business in this country. Serbian citizens consider Motor Third Party Liability (MTPL) policies like an additional

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

tax for driving cars while life or other non-motor protections are below 1% of GDP. This is not only the consumer’s fault, but we have to wonder why insurance products are not so appealing. In this framework, insurers also have to work more in terms of transparency and simplicity to explain real value of an insurance product. ■ In Serbia, Delta Generali is the leader in the health insurance segment. Considering the economic problems that our country has been facing, which are particularly pronounced in the healthcare sector, how can health insurance in Serbia achieve sustainable development? - Health insurance is a good ex-


ample of citizens’ scepticism, since you request coverage only when you need it and by then it is often too late. Health policies need a strong commitment from government authorities in order to spread a culture of selfcoverage and not total reliance on public institutions. Fiscal incentives to employers who pay health coverage to their employees together with basic extension to their families are win-win suggestions to reduce the cost of healthcare in Serbia and increase citizen satisfaction. ■ Anywhere else in the world, insurance is an integral part of people’s lives and businesses. In which way can the state and insurance companies in Serbia cooperate? - We have some cooperation with state organizations. Our Association of Serbian Insurers (UOS) is always suggesting and advising the central government about relevant issue regarding road safety, agriculture, and health. But we can do more, such as improving coverage in housing in case of earthquake or natural catastrophes. ■ Do you think that the insurance industry should become a more important partner to the state and the economy on the whole? - Definitively yes, not only to improve citizen peace of mind but also to support the Serbian financial system. ■ When you were appointed to your current position, you were keen on introducing new insurance products. How many of these products have you launched, and what groups are they targeting? - We are mainly a retail insurer and therefore all our new products are answering customer require-

ments. Since my arrival two years, ago we launched over 20 new products. These include BonusMalus for MTPL, dinar products,

We are mainly a retail insurer and therefore all our new products are answering customer requirements. Since my arrival two years, ago we launched over 20 new products

Since my arrival two years, ago we launched over 20 new products. These include Bonus-Malus for MTPL, dinar products, critical illness and senior coverage for life critical illness and senior coverage for life, wider health coverage, legal assistance and a full protection for houses. ■ One of the ideas that you have been promoting is group insurance policies. What benefits would such policies bring to insurance clients and what for insurance companies? - Unfortunately group insurance policies cannot yet be sold in Serbia. The main benefits are to save money for customers since

group policies are cheaper and make a wider customer base for the insurer. ■ Speaking from your company’s experience, is there any difference between the Serbian and West Balkan insurance markets? - No big difference. Serbia is well regulated market very close to Europe and not far from Solvency 1 rules. The problem will come with

the introduction of Solvency 2, but there is still some time to go. ■ What could be done on raising awareness in citizens about the importance of insurance so that insurance not be viewed as an expense but rather an investment? - That is a very good question. It is exactly what I keep on saying to all my business partners. Insurance policies are a true investment and in my long experience I have seen how important the social role performed by our industry is. Families, industries and particularly small and middle-sized enterprises continue to run their activities after a tragic event thanks to appropriate insurance coverage. You know the story of ant and grasshopper: well, we must learn from ants! ■

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

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interview

Darko Jelić, Development Director at the Jedro Community Health Centre

Patients are Always Right The Jedro Community Health Centre is organized and equipped to provide all sorts of medical services in the segment of primary healthcare and diagnostics. The health centre has its own laboratory, paediatrics, gynaecology, ENT, gastroenterology, cardiology, neurology, general practice, dermatology, neuropsychiatry, neurophysiology, radiology and physical medicine departments

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he Jedro Health Centre spans across 1,500 square metres of a splitlevel building in the Belville residential quarter. The Centre provides comprehensive and high quality general and specialized medical services which is a great reference for companies that want to entrust the centre with caring for the health of their employees. The companies can purchase voluntary health insurance for their employees from Delta Generali. ■ The Jedro Community Health Centre is a very unique health institution in Serbia since it is owned by Delta Generali. Could you explain this concept to us? - Delta Generali is the leader in the private health insurance segment in Serbia. This generated the need for the company to set up an institution where our policyholders would feel at home and where they would receive treatment in line with the highest standards of the medical profession. The Jedro private health centre was opened in 2010 with this goal in mind. In a relatively short period of time, the centre has emerged as a high quality medical brand which provides all kinds of medical services with quality and a highly professional manner not only to health insurance policyholders, but to interested citizens too.

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■ How is the Jedro Community Health Centre organized and equipped and what services do you provide? - The Jedro Community Health Centre is organized and equipped to provide all sorts of medical services in the segment of primary healthcare and diagnostics. The health centre has its own laboratory, paediatrics, gynaecology, ENT, gastroenterology, cardiology, neurology, general practice, dermatology, neuropsychiatry, neurophysiology, radiology and physical medicine departments. As of recently, we have started to provide a brand new service – transport of patients, with or without medical escort, in Serbia and abroad, carried out by one of the most modern ambulance vehicles in Serbia. This is a very im-

As of recently, we have started to provide a brand new service – transport of patients, with or without medical escort, in Serbia and abroad which is carried out by one of the most modern ambulance vehicles in Serbia portant service for those patients who, due to the nature of their illness or injury, cannot be transported via conventional means or they have to be medically supervised at all times. ■ Jedro has a very unique quality policy. Could you elaborate?

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

- In short, our motto is “the patients are always right.” We try to accommodate our patients and their needs at all times. We can perform a check-up whenever and wherever a patient wants – be it in our health centre or at a patient’s home. We also provide ambulance transport services for our patients and they have an option of choosing a doctor they trust the most. All of this has helped us to adequately position ourselves on the market and become a recognizable brand. ■ Could you tell us something about your cooperation with the Republic Health Insurance Fund (RFZO) and other healthcare institutions? - Despite our desire to cooperate and the fact that every third patient in this country is treated by private practice doctors, collaboration with the Republic Health Insurance Fund is virtually non-existent. On the other hand, we do cooperate with many renowned healthcare institutions like the Clinical Centre of Serbia, the Military Medical Academy (VMA), the Bežanijska Kosa Medical Centre, the Zemun Medical Centre and others. Most of our doctors and consultants originate from these healthcare institutions, and if a patient’s medical state requires hospital treatment, we usually refer them to one of these institutions. ■


MEĐUNARODNO PUTNO OSIGURANJE

OVE GODINE PUTUJEŠ SIGURNO Bez razlike da li ste poslovan čovek, turista ili avanturista, da li ste na tom putu sami ili u društvu, putovaćete sigurno. Bićete zaštićeni vi i vaši saputnici, lica koja nehotice povredite, pa čak i vaš prtljag. Ako iznenada otkažete put zbog nepredviđenih okolnosti, biće vam vraćen novac uložen u aranžman.

U saradnji sa: ddor.rs

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021 480 2222


interview

Dr. Christian Otto Neu, General Director DDOR

Insuring the Future In the course of the last years, we have carried out nothing less than a revolution in DDOR. The company was formerly state-owned, it was heavily over-staffed and it had 24 quite independent branch outlets which were, so to speak, small insurance companies in their own right

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he global financial crisis, the abundance of competitors on the market, and the slump in consumer spending power have all been contributing factors to a general atmosphere of caution in the insurance market. DDOR, however, has braced itself for this. During this time, according to DDOR General Director Dr. Christian Otto Neu, DDOR has become leaner and more prepared for future growth. ■ In November 2012, DDOR Novi Sad became a member of Gruppo Assicurativo Unipol. Could you tell us about the new possibilities and the strategies that this has created? - The merger of our old shareholder Fondiaria-Sai with Unipol is extremely good news for DDOR Novi Sad. We are now part of a group with a turnover of approximately €18 billion, which is the biggest non-life insurer in Italy and one of the 10 biggest groups in Europe. The new group is currently fine-tuning its business strategy in Italy and abroad. The final result is not yet defined, and therefore I am unable to comment on any details. However, I can state that Unipol Group is keen to diversify its huge Italian business base also geographically. And, moreover, I can only say that our new shareholders are very ambitious and challenging.

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Because of the difficult macroeconomic environment, the worldwide financial crisis and the deep recession raging in this country, we have opted for a very cautious business policy already three years ago

■ How would you rate DDOR’s operations last year, and what are the biggest challenges for the company this year? - DDOR Novi Sad had another reasonably good year in a quite unreasonable market environment. We close the year with RSD 8.21 million of gross written premiums and a bottom line of RSD 264 million net of taxes. This comes on the back of a rock solid balance sheet. Our technical reserves are up to ultimate cost levels; we have set aside an equalization reserve of RSD 1.042 million which should equal approximately 33 % of the total of all equalization reserves of the Serbian market. The total assets of our balance sheet amount to RSD 15.539 million, our total investments are RSD 11.134 million, out of which RSD 8.482 million are interest bearing and RSD 7.191 million highly liquid, short term bonds, deposits, cash and cash-like instruments. All our receivables are impaired according to the strict NBS standards, and all our equity investments are valued according to IAS criteria. Our equity is up by 8.7% to RSD 4.081 million, and our solvency ratio stands at 297%. Moreover we easily cover our technical reserves with the standard admitted assets and do not have to ask the supervisory authority to allow for exceptional coverage with a higher percentage of undue receivables or non-investment real estate. Because of the difficult macroeconomic environment, the worldwide financial crisis and the deep recession raging in this country, we have opted

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

for a very cautious business policy already three years ago. This has cost us market share and in particular we have shed a good part of our motor third-party liability portfolio. We have deliberately chosen an approach here which is very different from widespread market behaviour. In the course of the last years, we have carried out nothing less than a revolution in DDOR. The company was formerly state-owned, it was heavily over-staffed and it had 24 quite independent branch outlets which were, so to speak, small insurance companies in their own right. This was probably not a bad organization in the old days when the market was much less competitive and almost all insurance business was good. In the current market environment, you need much more efficiency and transparency, much more control and centralization. All this required a total redesign of all structures and procedures, heavy investments in IT systems as well as a total change of our mindset. DDOR is now in good shape. The challenge now is moderately - I repeat: moderately - to grow the business. After a period of reorganisation, consolidation and portfolio cleaning, we do not intend to shrink the business any further because otherwise we would risk to run into a cost problem. However, we do not intend to abandon our technical underwriting standards. We remain convinced that most of the additional business one could certainly drum up with cut-throat rates and covenant light contract terms is already now under-


rated and quality-wise unattractive. Too little growth could mean a cost problem whereas too much growth would bring a claims problem in its wake. ■ What is the current situation on the insurance market, and what are its biggest challenges and problems? - The insurance market clearly remains very, very difficult. To a great extent this is due to the macroeconomic environment which, in the wake of the global financial crisis, remains - not only in Serbia but in the whole area - quite bleak. Many businesses are in deep trouble and they buy much less insurance cover than they should and normally would. Also, private consumers have seen for already a number of years a decrease of their disposal income. Unfortunately but understandably, insurance is one of the items high on their list when they have to cut their spending. For many families it has become quite hard to make ends meet and often there is simply no money left for reasonable insurance protection or even insurance-savings like a life or a pension fund policy. Moreover, the difficult situation of our insurance market is due to the fact that it is simply overcrowded. Far too many insurance companies have been set up in this country. Clearly everybody expected a very different macroeconomic scenario; everybody hoped for an economic boom in Serbia and the whole region, driven by a surge in foreign direct investment and quickly increasing private consumption. Because of the general financial crisis, all this did not happen and therefore we now have an insurance industry in this country which is quite far away from producing sound and risk-adequate returns for its shareholders.

corporate Dubravka Kosić, Partner and Founder of the Kosić Law Firm

Legal Protection for Better Business Our law firm has taken part in realizing investments made by large companies and banks, as well as by medium-sized enterprises operating in Italy

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s a leading law firm in Serbia in the area of commercial law, the Kosić Law Firm (AKK) has been expanding its network for over 70 years. “In our work we are focusing on establishing professional collaboration with international law firms which see Serbia as a target country,” says Dubravka Kosić. “Our biggest projects are implemented with the leading Italian law firms, especially STUDIO LEGALE Grande Stevens Torino and DLA Piper USA. Our firm is also a co-founder of the Serbian Legal Desk in Milan, whose goal is informing the Italian business community of safe investment opportunities in Serbia. AKK is also a member of international organizations and associations like Associazione Studio Legale Associate Italy, the International Bar Chamber, the Italian-Serbian Chamber of Commerce and others.”

The difficult situation of our insurance market is due to the fact that it is simply overcrowded. Far too many insurance companies have been set up in this country

■ What segments of the cooperation with Italy have benefitted the most from legal assistance? - Our law firm has taken part in realizing investments made by large companies and banks, as well as by medium-sized enterprises operating in Italy. I would like to single out our engagement in Fiat's investment projects in Serbia, where we had to facilitate

Realistically we cannot expect these problems to abate in the short run. However, I think that the political progress which has been made in the last weeks considerably enhances the prospects of entering the European Union, of attracting more foreign investment and of generating in the medium term an overall economic recovery. In the insurance sector, consolidation is inevitable and it will take place. Hence also here things - sooner or later - will fall into places, eventually the hard way.

The firm is a co-founder of the Serbian Legal Desk in Milan, whose goal is informing the Italian business community of safe investment opportunities in Serbia

■ How favourable or unfavourable is Serbian legislation and economic policy for insurance companies, and what can be done better in that respect? - Each industry when you ask it about legislation and policy will, of course, come up with requests for tax incentives and other subventions for its business. This is also true for our sector and indeed a reasonable tax incentivation in certain fields like private pension insurance should be considered. However, the main conundrum for our market is not so much the legislation, it is more its steady, equitable and reliable implementation and enforcement. ■

the viability of the project in an environment of insufficiently developed legal solutions. We established a practice that was considered very successful. Our biggest challenge was developing the project with the arrival of Magneti Marelli SpA to our country and a joint investment project with Johnson Controls SpA. ■ What other areas is your law firm active in? - AKK is the oldest and one of the most successful laws firm in the commercial law segment, especially in mergers and acquisitions, financial and banking law, and civil law and arbitration. Our network helps us with protecting our clients’ interests in other areas too with the view of providing the comprehensive protection of their businesses. ■ Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

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Interview

Romano and ENRICO Rossi, CEO Progetti, Belgrade

Making Strides in Investment More than customers, we consider them strategic partners, where work and production systems are integrated for the achievement of the best results possible efficiency. Those "dozvole" which for us, would be so important for carrying out our normal business activities. The issuing process is still dependant on knowing somebody personally in the department who will issue the permit to you, rather than have an automated electronic process, which is one of the primitive and worst aspects inherited from the previous system.

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oday, our quality level is completely satisfactory, and we are also planning to increase our production quantities in the near future. ■ Your company has been operating in Serbia since 2001. What could prompt foreign business owners to establish production in Serbia? How much has the business environment for company owners in Serbia changed since 2001? - The initial reasons for an investor to come to Serbia are primarily related to costs of production and also to a tax regime which is certainly advantageous. Also, in our specific case, a long and historical tradition of footwear production. These basic conditions have allowed us to establish our production for world renowned high-quality fashion brands. Over the years there have been radical changes in the business environment and improvements that have lead to important present day developments, such as clear and transparent rules on property laws, a banking and financial system that works efficiently , the introduction of the PDV, with reimbursements coming on time, and less bureaucracy. A very serious problem however, is still related to the issuing of transport permits. A company like ours for example, still has no access to what we specifically need to transport goods at maximum

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The location of the factories depends on which type of shoe we have to produce; we decided on this according to the environmental tradition of workmanship in each area

■ The clients for whom you produce footwear parts are some of the world’s best known names in the fashion business. Could you tell us something about your clients and their thoughts on the quality of goods that originate from Serbia? - The achievement of having such important customers is the result of our HR development strategy. This strategy includes investment in training and the implementation of local human capital, good working environments and leadership in management teams. More than customers, we consider them (and them to us) strategic partners, where work and production systems are integrated for the achievement of the best results possible. Today, our quality level is completely

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

satisfactory, and we are also planning to increase our production quantities in the near future. ■ How many production units do you have and what are their individual roles? - At the moment we are operating in three of our own factories, which in total employ 950 people. These are located in Vladimirci, Sombor and Vrsac. Our administrative and central office is in Belgrade and in addition to that, we have 22 independent satellite companies which work exclusively for us, giving us a total manufacturing production of 1.6 million pairs per year. The location of the factories depends on which type of shoe we have to produce; we decided on this according to the environmental tradition of workmanship in each area. Every factory is independently managed, which refer directly to our general manager, who then reports directly to us at senior management level. Our people are all employed exclusively from the local population, with the exception of our Production Director who is Italian. ■ What are your future plans in terms of investing and advancing production? - We have mid-term plans which should expand our activities by the end of 2014 which include an additional production unit located in southern Serbia, which is currently under study and evaluation. We expect our project manager to give us the final results before the end of summer 2013. As far as long term planning is concerned, we are thinking of some differentiation in our investments that could involve us in other fields of activity. ■


corporate

SlodesTrade

More than Just Business

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o you think that our companies do good business with the rest of the world? The answer depends on who is asking the question. In the case of SlodesTrade Company from Belgrade, collaboration with other companies goes further and far deeper than a standard business deal. SlodesTrade started its entrepreneurial journey back in 2001 by having great plans for the future. The company was founded following the merger of capital of two Italian and one Serbian company, with the Italians as majority owners. Italian company FL SELENIA became SlodesTrade’s partner in this enterprise. Soon after, the company came to grips with the market and found its own development trajectory. Selenia motor oils and lubricants are becoming increasingly popular on the Serbian market. Apart from motor oils for passenger vehicles and trucks like Selenia, Urania, Tutela and Paraflu, the company also sells lubricants for construction and agricultural machinery - Ambra, Arbor, Akros and Akcela. In addition

“We do hope that Fiat’s production facility in Kragujevac will have more and more clients in Serbia, which, in turn, means that Selenia motor oils and lubricants will have their market niche too,” says Director of SlodesTrade, Snežana Ivanović

to motor oils and lubricants, SolesTrade also imports and distributes Arexons Italian car care products. Parallel with the development of SolesTrade, the company’s foreign

Selenia motor oils and lubricants are becoming increasingly popular on the Serbian market partner has also been growing. In a short period, SlodesTrade became a big importer and distributer, while FL Selenia Company was acquired by Petronas. These long-term partners

are now planning business activities together, and SlodesTrade covers a great deal of Petronas’ market. “It is really not easy to be in a position where you are expected to do more every single time,” says SlodesTrade Director Snežana Ivanović. “Our market share has grown year-on-year and our foreign partner has given us bigger goals to accomplish. We do hope that Fiat’s production facility in Kragujevac will have more and more clients in Serbia, which, in turn, means that Selenia motor oils and lubricants will have their market niche too.” ■

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

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Interview

Teodora Deak, Director of TE-TO Sugar Refinery, Senta

Sweet Success Compared to previous seasons, we ended 2012 with good financial results despite difficulties in production. This year is not going to be standard either since we will face new challenges, so I think it is too early to give any prognosis as yet

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he TE-TO Sugar Refinery is engaged in processing sugar beets and producing white crystal sugar, molasses, dried sugar beet pulp and several sugar-based products. The sugar refinery in Senta was established in 1961 when the first production campaign was launched. The refinery’s processing capacity was 2,000 tons of sugar beet a day. Good business results and the need to up the production have made it necessary for the factory to undergo frequent overhauls in order to facilitate bigger production. Today, the refinery’s daily processing capacity is 8,500 tons. It has 186 employees. During the last five decades, the refinery has been one of the driving forces behind the development of the entire region. In 2002, Italian company SAIEST, which operates under SFIR and has its HQ in Cesena, became the majority owner of TE-TO. In September 2008, SAIEST merged with FSII which made Finanziaria Saccarifera Italo-Iberica S.P.A., the new refinery owner. ■ With the help of your company’s donations, the hospital in Senta now has the latest diagnostic equipment. In terms of social responsibility, what are your goals? - Early this year, our company joined the Battle for Babies campaign and donated an ultrasound to the paediatric unit of the Senta Hospital. Such campaigns are only one aspect of so-

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cial responsibility. We want to build a socially responsible company in the environmental and work health and safety segments too. In the past few years, our company's management has invested additional efforts in accomplishing results in this facet of our business operations too. ■ In 2011, TE-TO sugar refinery had record breaking profits compared to its competition. Could you describe in short your business results in 2012 and 2013?

I think that our sugar industry is strong and able to produce enough high quality sugar for consumer needs in Serbia, as well as for export to the EU - True, 2011 was the best year ever for the Senta sugar refinery. I would like to underline that the business conditions that year were absolutely perfect for us. I am referring to the macroeconomic, market and climate conditions, as well as the hard work and effort invested by our management and employees who have significantly contributed

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

to such good results. The positive trends continued in 2012. Compared to previous seasons, we ended last year with good financial results despite difficulties in production. This year is not going to be standard either since we will face new challenges, so I think it is too early to give any prognosis as yet. ■ What effects did the government’s decision on rescinding the regulation on duty-free import of sugar have had on your business? - I think that our sugar industry is strong and able to produce enough high quality sugar for consumer needs in Serbia, as well as for export to the EU. If you monitor closely the situation in the sugar industry in neighbouring countries, it becomes very clear that our state needs to protect this industry as long as that is possible, especially in this transition period, since the export quota of 180,000 tons and foreign income we get on the basis of that export are very important for our country. ■ What is the situation with sowing of sugar beets considering the weather conditions? - This year, the sowing was a month late. We do hope that the weather conditions in the upcoming period will be suitable and that, come autumn, we will have high quality rawmaterial. It is quite possible that this year’s campaign won’t start in late August, as usual, but rather a week or two later. For now, I can tell you that crops are in a very good condition. ■


Interview

Nebojša Janićijević, President of Intesa Leasing Executive Board

New Leasing Solutions Since it entered the market in 2006, Intesa Leasing has been pursuing a strategy of constant improvement of its offer and models of financing, as well as introduction of new financial products in the domestic leasing market quest approval are just some of the additional advantages of this leasing product.

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t is pretty clear that by following trends from developed countries, Serbia is accelerating towards a more significant use of these resources, and, in that sense, it is necessary to offer adequate forms of financing,” says Nebojša Janićijević, President of Intesa Leasing Executive Board for CorD. ■ Intesa Leasing recently started leasing real-estate. Tell us something about that? - Intesa Leasing is among the few leasing firms to have met all the conditions envisaged by the law on financing real-estate which enabled us to include this attractive product in our offer. The product is currently available to legal entities for financing business purpose purchases and its basic advantage lies in the fact that users become owners of the real-estate after the financing period expires. To be precise, instead of paying monthly costs of renting commercial space, businesses opting for this product pay a contract-defined leasing installment while the facility remains in their possession after the expiry of the repayment period. Also, flexibility in repayment, tax neutrality of the transactions enabled by the changes to the Law on VAT that took effect at the start of this year and a simple procedure of loan re-

■ Intesa Leasing has up to now been characterized by good adjustments to the fluctuations in the market. Did you keep such a trend this year? - Since it entered the market in 2006, Intesa Leasing has been pursuing a strategy of constant improvement of its offer and models of financing, as well as the introduction of new financial products in the domestic leasing market. Recognizing and accepting this strategy, a considerable number of clients placed their trust in us and enabled us to take the leading position in domestic leasing sector segments of financing that we are primarily targeting, production equipment and commercial vehicles. ■ Do you plan to create new financial products and secure special purpose funds to support projects of small and medium-

The business direction to which we have allocated a lot of attention is in creating financial solutions for purchasing equipment for producing energy from renewable sources sized enterprises? What are your plans for further growth, and on what will they focus? - Bearing in mind that our company holds the top position in the domestic leasing sector in the area of financing production equipment

as well as that maximum efforts are being put in providing support for production, the business direction to which we have allocated a lot of attention is in creating financial solutions for purchasing equipment for producing energy from renewable sources. It is pretty clear that by following trends from developed countries, Serbia is accelerating towards a more significant use of these resources, and, in that sense, it is necessary to offer adequate forms of financing, which will primarily enable the corporate sector to invest easier in the implementation of modern technologies. Thanks to the knowledge and experience of our parent leasing company, Intesa Leasing is currently in the final stages of preparing a financial support model for projects of this type, and the focus of our activities in first phase of financing will be on financing mini hydro-electric power plants and plants for the production of energy from biomass. Initial funding for supporting these projects has already been secured from the European Investment Bank, which enables us to offer our clients the financing models that exist in developed financial markets and which includes special financing periods and forms of payment, as well as grace periods in repayment. The favorable financing lines arranged with the Central European Bank and the European Investment Bank put us in a position to offer this product under very competitive terms. ■

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

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Interview

Giovanni Roncucci, Founding Partner and Chairman Roncucci & Partners Bologna

Supporting Change Today, with the new headquarters of Bologna, four offices abroad, and about 30 professionals, we support public and private enterprises, especially SMEs, in internationalization processes tion or enhancement of research and development, our methodology consists of analysis, design implementation, and verification. We believe that using our approach and methodology, business development results are guaranteed.

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oncucci & Partners is a business consulting company that invests in innovation in support of business development. With four international offices around the world, including Serbia, the consultancy assists companies in supporting the changes they need to make for growth and expansion. ■ What exactly does investing in innovation and supporting business development mean and how do you do that? - We combine management consulting, research and development and internationalisation in order

Whether we are engaged in corporate reorganization and remodelling, or issues of internationalization or enhancement of research and development, our methodology consists of analysis, design implementation, and verification to improve the skills and competencies of our client companies. We assist them in the identification, development and implemen-

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tation of growth projects in Italy and abroad. Today, with the new headquarters of Bologna, four offices abroad (Belgrade, Serbia; Chennai,

■ For how long have you been present in Serbia and what is your field of expertise here? - Roncucci&Partners Balkans doo,

Today, with the new headquarters of Bologna, four offices abroad (Belgrade, Serbia; Chennai, India; Sao Paulo, Brazil; and Tunis, Tunisia) and about 30 professionals, we support public and private enterprises, especially SMEs, in internationalization processes India; Sao Paulo, Brazil; and Tunis, Tunisia) and about 30 professionals, we support public and private enterprises, especially SMEs, in internationalization processes. We work alongside the Chambers of Commerce, Trade Associations and local authorities, who want to start or strengthen their placement in an international context. ■ What methodology do you use? - Based on our extensive international experience, Roncucci & Partners Group has created a flexible methodology to help businesses tackle all kinds of challenges. Whether we are engaged in corporate reorganization and remodelling, or issues of internationaliza-

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

a company incorporated in Serbia, was set up in May 2006, following a project realized on behalf of the International Finance Corporation, World Bank Group. Roncucci&Partners Balkans is focused on management consultancy and assistance to Italian and Serbian companies, active in all fields, setting out their internationalization process, paying special attention to the agri-food and mechanical sectors. The Serbian office operates directly coordinating its activity with the central headquarters in Bologna, and is represented by a team of highly skilled human resources with perfect knowledge of Italian, English and Serbian languages. ■


corporate Aleksandar Ostojić, Chief Development Consultant in Business Park Bački Petrovac

Business Home for Investors Doing business in the Business Park is much more affordable than in other locations in Serbia primarily because we provide more than 20 on-thespot business and technical services to investors

Electro Mecanical Service Company

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he Bački Petrovac Business Park was launched in 2010 with the aim of creating jobs for people in 30 or 40 SMEs, rather than in one big company, in order to diversify and cushion the effects of the recession on the municipal economy. Since its establishment, a dozen companies, which employ close to 200 people, have found their business home in the Business Park. The current investors are active in metal processing sector, medical equipment industry, agriculture, car industry, and energy. “So far, we have managed to attract investors from Italy, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Serbia, with the biggest tenant of our Business Park being an Italian medical company which plans to hire additional 50 people. At our disposal, we have over 20 hectares of construction plots and 30 facilities ready to host new investments,” says Aleksandar Ostojić, Chief Development Consultant in Business Park Bački Petrovac.

Business activity: servicing and repairing all kinds of electrical machinery (engines, generators, transformers, pumps) In 2005, ELEKTROREMONT A.D. was privatized and is now fully owned by an Italian company. It is the biggest company of its kind in Serbia and the regional leader in overhauling and repairing electrical machinery. Elektroremont A.D. Ivana Meštrovića 2 - 24000 Subotica - Srbija Centrala: +381 24/548-000; Fax: +381 24/547-848

So far, we have managed to attract investors from Italy, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Serbia ■ What is the meaning of the term 100% privately-owned industrial zone? - To be a 100% privately-owned industrial zone means to develop business and technical services which facilitate cost cuts, efficiency and focusing on the core business activity for our investors. The Business Park will take care of everything else. Also, private capital likes to work with private capital because of the simplicity of communication and simple business relations. ■ What benefits will investors have if they decide to operate from the Business Park? - Doing business in the Business Park is much more affordable than in other locations in Serbia, primarily because we provide more than 20 shared, on-the-spot services to investors. Also, the land and the facilities that we offer are privately owned, which makes purchasing and permanent stationing in Serbia much easier, as well as the mortgage financing. Finally, synergy of networking and vicinity to other businesses in the Business Park are huge advantage for our tenants. ■

Business Park D.O.O. Industrijska zona BB, Bački Petrovac, Srbija, Tel: +381 21 21 00 180 Mob: + 381 64 890 90 80; E-mail: info@bpbp.rs

www.italgranitigroup.com

Owen Owen d.o.o. 39/1 Kosovska Street, 11 000 Belgrade, Serbia Tel: +381 11 30 30 744, Fax: +381 11 33 47 032 Mob: +381 69 247 15 45 E-mail: office@owenowen.rs www.owenowen.rs Languages and Services Your Language Professional Il Vostro Professionista Linguistico Vaš Jezički Profesionalac

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

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Culture

Homeland of Many Civilizations Italy has been home to many civilizations, including the Etruscans, Greeks and the Romans. For more than 2000 years, Italy has experienced migrations, invasions and was divided into many independent states until 1861 when it became a nation-state. Due to this comparatively late unification, and the historical autonomy of the regions that comprise the Italian peninsula, many traditions and customs that are now recognized as distinctly Italian can be identified by their regions of origin

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taly is home to the greatest number of UNESCO World Heritage Sites (47) to date, and one estimate says that the country is home to half of the world's great art treasures. According to the Court of Auditors, Italy has 3,430 museums, 409 of which are in Tuscany, 380 in Emilia-Romagna, 346 in Lombardy and 302 in Lazio. Then there are 216 archaeological sites, 10,000 churches, 1,500 monasteries, 40,000 assorted castles, towers and fortresses, 30,000 stately homes, 4,000 gardens, 1,000 major historic town centres and much more besides. Architecture

Architectural ruins from antiquity throughout Italy testify to the greatness of cultures past. The history of architecture in Italy begins with the ancient styles of the Etruscans and Greeks, progressing to the classical Roman, then to the revival of the classical Roman era during the Renaissance and evolving into

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the Baroque era. The old St. Peter's Church (begun about 330 AD) was probably the first significant early Christian basilica, a style of church architecture that came to dominate the early Middle Ages. The old St. Peter's stood on the site of the present St. Peter's Basilica in Rome. The first significant buildings in the medieval Romanesque style were churches built

Italy is home to the greatest number of UNESCO World Heritage Sites (47) to date in Italy during the 800s. The greatest flowering of Italian architecture took place during the Renaissance. Filippo Brunelleschi made great contributions to architectural design with his dome for the Cathedral of Florence. Leon Battista Alberti was another early Renaissance architect whose theories and designs had an enormous influence on later architects. Perhaps the greatest achievement of Italian Renaissance archi-

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tecture was St. Peter's Basilica, originally designed by Donato Bramante in the early 1500s. The Baroque period produced several outstanding Italian architects in the 1600s especially known for their churches, such as Gian Lorenzo Bernini and Francesco Borromini. Numerous modern Italian architects, such as Renzo Piano, are famous worldwide. Literature

Italian literature began after the founding of Rome in 753 BC. Roman, or Latin literature, was and still is highly influential in the world, with numerous writers, poets, philosophers, and historians, such as Pliny the Elder, Pliny the Younger, Virgil, Horace, Propertius, Ovid and Livy. The basis of modern Italian Literature in the Italian language, strictly speaking, begins with the early years of the 1200s. The religious revival brought about by St. Francis of Assisi is considered the first "Italian voice" in literature.


It is believed that during the first half of the 1200s, Giacomo da Lentini have invented the sonnet form. Guido Guinizelli is considered the founder of the Dolce Stil Novo, a school that added a philosophical dimension to traditional love poetry. This new understanding of love influenced some Florentine poets, especially the young Dante Alighieri. Dante's The Divine Comedy is a masterpiece of world literature, and it helped create the Italian literary language. The two great writers of the 1300s, Petrarch and Boccaccio, sought out and imitated the works of antiquity and cultivated their own artistic personalities. Petrarch achieved fame through his collection of poems, the Canzoniere. Equally influential was Boccaccio's Decameron, one of the most popular collections of short stories ever written. Romanticism coincided with some ideas of the Risorgimento, the patriotic movement that brought Italy political unity and freedom from foreign domination. Italian writers embraced Romanticism in the early 19th century. The time of Italy's rebirth was heralded by the poets Vittorio Alfieri, Ugo Foscolo, and Giacomo Leopardi. In the late 1800s, a realistic literary movement called Verismo played a major role in Italian literature. Giovanni Verga was the leading author in this movement. A movement called Futurismo influenced Italian literature in the early 1900s. Filippo Tommaso Marinetti wrote the Futurist Manifesto. Among Italian literary figures of the early 20th century, Gabriele d'Annunzio, Luigi Pirandello, and Grazia Deledda achieved international renown. Leading writers of the postwar era are Ignazio Silone, Alberto Moravia, Italo Calvino, Umberto Eco, Dario Fo, and the poets Salvatore Quasimodo and Eugenio Montale. Music

Music writing began in Italy. Therefore Italian words are used to

tell us how music is played. Consequently all countries have adopted technical terms in their Italian form. Having given birth to opera, Italy provides many of the very foundations of the classical music tradition. Some of the instruments that are often associated with classical music, including the piano and violin were invented in Italy. Italian composers have played a major role in music since the Middle Ages. In the 1000s, Guido of Arezzo, an Italian monk,

Saint Francis of Assisi

The religious revival brought about by St. Francis of Assisi is considered the first "Italian voice" in literature

Antonio Vivaldi

developed a revolutionary system of notation and method of sightsinging. The Gregorian chant, troubadour song, and the madrigal were forms in early Italian music. During the Renaissance, Giovanni Palestrina composed mas-

terpieces of choral music for use in church services. The first operas were composed in Florence in the 1590s. Important composers of the late 1600s and early 1700s included Alessandro Scarlatti, his son Domenico, and Antonio Vivaldi. During the 1800s and early 1900s, popular operas were composed by Giuseppe Verdi, Giacomo Puccini, Vincenzo Bellini, Gaetano Donizetti, and Gioacchino Rossini. Famous contemporary Italian opera singers include Enrico Caruso, Luciano Pavarotti and Andrea Bocelli, to name a few. Musical life in Italy remains extremely active, but very Italian-centred and much less international. The only main international Italian pop-singers include 1970s pop-diva Mina, who sold 76 million records worldwide in her lifetime and singer Laura Pausini, who has sold 45 million albums. Sculpture

The art of sculpture in the Italian peninsula has its roots in ancient times, but a great development of this form was between the 6th century BC and 5th century AD, during the growth of the Roman Empire. During the Middle Ages, large sculpture was largely religious. In the late 1200s, Nicola Pisano and his son Giovanni began the revolutionary changes that led up to the Renaissance in Italian sculpture. Both are noted for their reliefs and ornamentation on pulpits. The Massacre of the Innocents by Giovanni Pisano is an example. The greatest sculptor of the early Renaissance was Donatello, who produced a bronze statue of David, which re-established the classical idea of beauty in the nude human body. It was the first major work of Renaissance sculpture. Among the other brilliant sculptors of the 1400s were Jacopo della Quercia, Michelozzo, Bernardo and Antonio Rossellino, and Agostino di Duccio.

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Michelangelo's great brooding sculptures, such as the figures of Night and Day in the Medici Chapel in Florence, dominated High Renaissance Italian sculpture. His David, is perhaps, the most famous sculpture in the world. It differs from previous representations of the subject in that David is depicted before his battle with Goliath and not after the giant's defeat. In the 1900s, futurist sculptors tried to show how space, movement, and time affected form. These artists portrayed objects in motion, rather than their appearance at any particular moment. An example is Umberto Boccioni's Unique Forms of Continuity in Space.

Visual art

Michelangelo's David, is perhaps, the most famous sculpture in the world

The Italian Renaissance produced many of the greatest painters in art history. They were all influenced by the work of Giotto di Bondone in the late 1200s. One of the most influential artists who ever lived, Giotto changed the course of Western art by painting in a new realistic style. Florence became the centre of early Renaissance art. The great Florentine masters of painting in-

Comics

Film

The early Italian film industry became internationally known for its historical spectacles. The renaissance of Italian filmmaking developed in the 1940s. At that time, a new generation of directors emerged. They included Vittorio De Sica, Roberto Rossellini, and Luchino Visconti. The impact of the war led several of these directors to make movies that focused on society and its problems. This impulse resulted in the emergence of the first important post-war European film movement, Neorealism. During the 1950s and 1960s, earthy comedies gained international success, due to the popularity of Italian movie stars Gina Lollobrigida, Sophia Loren, and Marcello Mastroianni. In the same years, Sergio Leone helped create a new film genre, ironically nicknamed the "Spaghetti Western." At the same time, a new group of directors won praise. The most significant were Michelangelo Antonioni and Federico Fellini. Vittorio De Sica, Roberto Rossellini, and Luchino Visconti also continued to film major works. In the late 20th century, the leading Italian directors included Roberto Benigni, Marco Bellocchio, Bernardo Bertolucci, and the brothers Paolo and Vittorio Taviani.

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naissance was dominated by Raphael and Michelangelo. In Venice, a number of artists were painting richly coloured works during the 1500s. The most famous Venetian masters included Giorgione, Titian, and Tintoretto. Italian painters dominated the Baroque period. Annibale Caracci and Caravaggio were the most important early Baroque painters. In the 1900s, many Italians played leading roles in the development of modern art. Giorgio de Chirico gained fame for his haunting paintings of empty city squares. Amedeo Modigliani won renown with a series of portraits.

The Sistine Chapel ceiling, painted by Michelangelo Buonarroti

Roberto Rossellini

The renaissance of Italian filmmaking developed in the 1940s with Vittorio De Sica, Roberto Rossellini, and Luchino Visconti cluded Masaccio, Fra Angelico, Andrea Mantegna, Sandro Botticelli, and Paolo Uccello. The greatest artist of the 1400s was probably Leonardo da Vinci. His portrait Mona Lisa and his religious scene The Last Supper are among the most famous paintings in history. The later Re-

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The official birth of Italian comics is December 27, 1908, when the first issue of the Corriere dei Piccoli hit the stands. Attilio Mussino has produced for this weekly, an astonishing range of characters, including a little black child, Bilbolbul, whose almost surrealist adventures took place in a fantastic Africa. In 1932, publisher Lotario Vecchi had already begun publication of Jumbo magazine, using exclusively North American authors. The magazine reached a circulation of 350,000 copies in Italy. In December 1932, the first Disney comic in Italy, Mickey Mouse, or “Topolino” in Italian, had been launched by the Florentine publisher Nerbini. In 1945, Hugo Pratt while attending the Venice Academy of Fine Arts, created, in collaboration with Mario Faustinelli and Alberto Ongaro, Asso di Picche. Their distinctive approach to the art form earned them the name of Venetian school of comics. In 1948 Gian Luigi Bonelli initiated a long and successful series of Western strips, starting with the popular Tex Willer. Some of the series that followed Tex Willer were Zagor (1961), Mister No (1975), and more recently, Martin Mystère (1982) and Dylan Dog (1986). The Bonelliani are to date the most popular form of comics in the country. ■


Interview

Milorad Matić, Director of Aero-East-Europe

Serbian Planes in World Skies For the first time in the history of the Serbian aviation, one company – Aero-East-Europetheir aircraft SILA 450C has been successfully certificated and registered by German DAeC on the 24th of April 2013 , one of EASA members, and its planes can now be used in flying schools all over Europe. France was the first EU country to issue one of our aircraft with TIP certificate and recognized us as a valid manufacturer. For the first time ever, our planes, as products of Serbian origin, are being used in civil pilot schools in Europe

A

ero-East-Europe Company from Kraljevo was founded in 2006 by Milorad Matić who first began assembling MXP planes in Italy. By 2007, a total of 30 planes had been assembled when Milorad Matić relocated the entire production to Kraljevo, leaving his steady job in Italy and Germany. In Serbia, he started to collaborate with professors from the Belgrade and Kraljevo Faculties of Mechanical Engineering on manufacturing planes. So far, the company has delivered over 100 planes while further developing new aircraft models from the SILA (Serbian Industry of Light Aircrafts) series. ■ In 2012, you manufactured a new model – SILA 450 C – which is specially adapted to suit the ultralight aircraft market. What are its main features and advantages over similar models manufactured by other companies? - The SILA 450C is an ultra-light aircraft which is produced in line with general aviation standards, mainly from certified aeronautical materials (aluminium and chrome molybdenum) while complying with German LTF-UL standards. The plane has also been tested to higher category standards – the LSA. So, we have met the highest production, testing and implementation criteria and have been certified by the German DAeC. We flew the SILA 450C to Germany several times to perform the tests required for obtaining the Musterzulassung certificate. We were issued with a temporary

flight permit on August 31, 2012. We have been recognized as good manufacturers and, as such, were granted a special flight permit with the purpose of flying and testing our aircraft.

To receive recognition for the size of our investment certainly means a lot, and we do hope that we will benefit from that in our work

■ Your planes will be delivered to German buyers soon. How did this cooperation come about and what are its terms? - Our marketing managers have been researching the market and our philosophy was to adhere to the deadlines and agreements, as well as to get thoroughly acquainted with the production process and relevant standards. If you take into consideration all that, you will have a successful collaboration, as we have, by delivering at least 27 planes over a three-year period on the condition that we have a German certificate which we have obtained in under ten months (for this category, certification process lasts at least two or three years).

■ Aero-East-Europe is this year’s recipient of the Aurea Award for the best investment. What does this award mean to you? - To receive recognition for the size of our investment certainly means a lot, and we do hope that we will benefit from that in our work. For the first time in the history of the Serbian aviation, one company – Aero-EastEurope- their aircraft SILA 450C has been successfully certificated and registered by German DAeC on the 24th of April 2013 , one of EASA members, and its planes can now be used in flying schools all over Europe. France was the first EU country to issue one of our aircraft with TIP certificate and recognized us as a valid manufacturer. For the first time ever, our planes, as products of Serbian origin, are being used in civil pilot schools in Europe, namely in Slovenia, France, and Italy. ■ To what other countries do you export your airplanes, and what are your future plans in this respect? - We sell our products to the republics of the former Yugoslavia – Slovenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Macedonia, as well as to Bulgaria, Romania, Italy, France and Spain. We are currently negotiating with Croatia, Montenegro, and several Benelux and Scandinavian countries. Our plan is to sell our products to Africa, Asia and America too, on top of increasing the production by next year, expanding our production facility and launching new models SILA 750 and SILA 950. ■

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Cuisine

Wonderful Mixture of Influences Italian cuisine is characterized by its extreme simplicity, with many dishes having only four to eight ingredients. Cheese and wine are a major part of the cuisine, with many variations and “Denominazione di Origine Controllata” (DOC, regulated appellation) laws. Coffee, specifically espresso, has become important in Italian cuisine

E

ach area in Italy has its own specialties, primarily at a regional level, but also at the provincial level. The differences can come from a bordering country (such as France or Austria), whether a region is close to the sea or the mountains, and economics. Friuli-Venezia Giulia

Friuli-Venezia Giulia has preserved, in its cuisine, its historical links with Austria-Hungary. Udine and Pordenone, in the western part of Friuli, are known for their traditional San Daniele del Friuli ham and Montasio and Frico cheeses. The majority of the eastern regional dishes are heavily influenced by Austrian, Hungarian, Slovene and Croatian cuisines. Venice and many surrounding parts of Veneto are known for risotto, with fish and seafood being added closer to the coast and pumpkin, asparagus, radicchio and frogs' legs appearing further away from the Adriatic. Polenta is a traditional, rural food typical of Veneto and most of Northern Italy. In some areas of Veneto, it can be also made of a particular variety of cornmeal, named biancoperla, so that the colour of polenta is white and not yellow.

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 rentino-Alto T Adige/South Tyrol

Piedmont is one of the Italian capitals of pastry and chocolate in particular, with products like Nutella

Before the Council of Trent in the middle of the 16th century, the region was known for the simplicity of its peasant cuisine. When the prelates of the Catholic Church were established there, they brought the art of fine cooking with them. Later, influence from Venice and the Austrian Habsburg Empire also came in. The Trentino sub-region produces various types of sausages, polenta, yogurt, cheese, potato cake, funnel cake and freshwater fish. In the South Tyrol sub-region, due to the majority German speaking population, strong Austrian and Slavic influences prevail. The most renowned local product is traditional speck juniper-flavored ham which, as Speck Alto Adige PGI, is regulated by the European Union under the protected geographical indication (PGI) status. Goulash, knödel, apple strudel, kaiserschmarrn, krapfen, rösti, spätzle and rye bread are regular dishes, along with potatoes, dumplings, homemade sauerkraut, and lard. The territory of Bolzano is also reputed for its Müller-Thurgau white wines. Lombardy

The regional cuisine of Lombardy is heavily based upon ingre-

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dients like maize, rice, beef, pork, butter, and lard. Rice dishes are very popular in this region, often found in soups as well as risotto. The best known version is risotto alla milanese, flavoured with saffron and typically served with many typical Milanese main courses, such as ossobuco alla milanese (cross-cut veal shanks braised with vegetables, white wine and broth) and cotoletta alla milanese (a fried cutlet similar to Wiener schnitzel, but cooked "bone-in"). Other regional specialities include cassoeula, Cremona's Mostarda (rich condiment made with candied fruit and a mustard flavoured syrup), Valtellina's Bresaola (air-dried salted beef) and Pizzoccheri. Piedmont

Nestled between the Alps and the Po valley, with a large number of different ecosystems, this region offers the most refined and varied cuisine of the Italian peninsula. Piedmont is the Italian region with the largest number of cheeses with Protected Geographical Status and DOC wines. Piedmont is a region where gathering nuts, funghi, cardoons and hunting and fishing takes place. Truffles, garlic, seasonal veg-


Florentine steak, come from the Chianina cattle breed of the Chiana Valley and the Maremmana from Maremma. Well-known regional wines include Brunello di Montalcino, Carmignano, Chianti, Morellino di Scansano, Parrina, Sassicaia, Vernaccia di San Gimignano.

etables, cheese and rice are all used. Wines from the Nebbiolo grape such as Barolo and Barbaresco are produced, as well as wines from the Barbera grape, fine sparkling wines, and the sweet, lightly sparkling, Moscato d'Asti. The region is also famous for its Vermouth and Ratafia production. Castelmagno is a prized cheese of the region. The most typical of the Piedmont tradition are its traditional agnolotti, Panissa, taglierini (thinner version of tagliatelle) and bagna cauda (sauce of garlic, anchovies, olive oil and butter). Piedmont is one of the Italian capitals of pastry and chocolate in particular, with products like Nutella, gianduiotto and marron glacĂŠ that are famous worldwide. Emilia-Romagna

Emilia-Romagna is known for its egg and filled pasta made with soft wheat flour. Romagna subregion is known as well for pasta dishes like cappelletti, garganelli, strozzapreti, spoglia lorda and tortelli alla lastra or very peculiar cheese like squaquerone, piada snacks are famous worldwide. Bologna is notable for pasta dishes like tortellini, lasagne, gramigna and tagliatelle which are found also in many other parts of the region in different declinations. The celebrated balsamic vinegar is made only in the Emilian cities of Modena and Reggio Emilia, following legally binding traditional procedures. Parmigiano Reggiano cheese is produced in Reggio Emilia, Parma, Modena and Bologna. Tuscany

Simplicity is central to the Tuscan cuisine. Legumes, bread, cheese, vegetables, mushrooms and fresh fruit are used. A regional Tuscan pasta known as pici resembles thick, grainy-surfaced spaghetti, and is often rolled by hand. White truffles from San Miniato appear in October and November. Highquality beef, used for the traditional

Campania

Campania is one of the largest producers and consumers of pasta in Italy, especially spaghetti. In the regional cuisine, pasta is prepared in various styles that can feature tomato sauce, cheese, clams and shellfish. Spaghetti alla puttanesca is a popular dish made with olives, tomatoes, anchovies, capers, chilli peppers and garlic. The region is well-known also for its mozzarella production. Originating in Neapolitan cuisine, pizza has become popular in many different parts of the world. Famous regional wines are Falanghina, Greco di Tufo and Taurasi. Sicily

Piedmont is the Italian region with the largest number of cheeses with Protected Geographical Status and DOC wines

Coffee, specifically espresso is important in Italian cuisine

Lazio

Pasta dishes based on the use of guanciale (unsmoked bacon prepared with pig's jowl or cheeks) are often found in Lazio, such as pasta alla carbonara, and pasta all'amatriciana. Another pasta dish of the region is arrabbiata, with spicy tomato sauce. The regional cuisine widely uses offal, resulting in dishes like the entrailbased rigatoni with pajata sauce and coda alla vaccinara. Iconic of Lazio are also cheese made from ewes' milk (Pecorino Romano), porchetta (savory, fatty, and moist boneless pork roast) and Frascati white wine.

Sicily shows traces of all the cultures which established themselves on the island over the last two millennia. Although its cuisine undoubtedly has a predominantly Italian base, Sicilian food also has Spanish, Greek and Arab influences. The ancient Romans introduced lavish dishes based on goose. The Byzantines favoured sweet and sour flavours and the Arabs brought, sugar, citrus, rice, and saffron. The Normans and Hohenstaufens had a fondness for meat dishes. Traditional specialties from Sicily include arancini (a form of deep-fried rice croquettes), pasta alla Norma, caponata, pani ca meusa, and a host of desserts and sweets such as cannoli, granita, and cassata. Typical of Sicily is Marsala, a red, fortified wine. Sardinia

Herbs such as mint and myrtle are widely used in the regional cuisine. Sardinia also has many special types of bread, made dry, which keeps longer than high-moisture breads. Those are baked as well, including carasau bread civraxiu, coccoi pinatus, a highly decorative bread and pistoccu made with flour and water only, originally meant for herders, but often served at home with tomatoes, basil, oregano, garlic and a strong cheese. Rock lobster, scampi, squid, tuna, sardines are the predominant seafood. â– 

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People

Land of Opposites

The great Romantic English poet, Lord Byron, described Italian as a language that sounds "as if it should be writ on satin." There are many differences between the North and the South of Italy which are not only about environment and climate, but also about the people and the way they think and behave

I

taly was a country of mass emigration from the late 19th century until the 1960s. Between 1898 and 1914, the peak years of Italian diaspora, approximately 750,000 Italians emigrated each year. The diaspora concerned more than 25 million Italians, and it is considered the biggest mass migration of contemporary times. As a result, today more than 4.1 million Italian-born people are living abroad, while at least 60 million

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people of full or partial Italian ancestry live outside of Italy, most notably in Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay, Ven-

More than 4.1 million Italian-born people are living abroad, while at least 60 million people of full or partial Italian ancestry live outside of Italy ezuela, the United States, Canada, Australia, and France. The postwar economic miracle,

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

ending many decades of poverty and emigration, induced big social changes such as lower birth rates, an aging population and thus a shrinking workforce. Under these circumstances, starting from the late 1970s, Italy began to attract increasing flows of foreign immigrants. The present-day figure of about 4.6 million foreign residents, making up some 7.5% of the total population, include more than half a million children born in Italy to foreign nationals—second generation immigrants, but exclude foreign nationals who have subsequently acquired Italian nationality; this applied to 53,696 people in 2008. Since the fall of the Berlin Wall and, more recently, the 2004 and


2007 enlargements of the European Union, the main waves of migration have originated from former socialist countries of Eastern Europe (especially Romania, Albania, Ukraine and Poland). The second most important area of immigration to Italy has always been the neighboring North Africa (in particular, Morocco, Egypt and Tunisia), with soaring arrivals as a consequence of the Arab Spring. Currently, about one million Romanians (around one tenth of them

being Roma) are officially registered as living in Italy, representing thus the most important individual country of origin, followed by Albanians and Moroccans with about 500,000 people each. The great Romantic English poet, Lord Byron, described Italian as a language that sounds "as if it should be writ on satin." Byron's description is not an isolated expression of poetic fancy but, in fact, a popular view of the Italian language across the world, often called the language of "love," "poetry," and "song." Italian, like English, belongs to the Indo-European family of languages. Like French and Spanish, it is a Romance language, one of the modern languages that developed from Latin. In particular, among

the Romance languages, Italian is considered to be the closest to Latin in terms of vocabulary. It is spoken by about 60 million people in Italy, 23,000 in the Republic of San Marino, 400,000 in Switzerland, another 1.3 million in other European countries, and approximately 6 million in the Americas. Standard Italian evolved from a dialect spoken in Tuscany, given that it was the first region to produce great writers as Dante, Petrarch and Boccaccio. Thanks to its

All of the popes from 1523 to 1978 were from what is now Italy. Italy is also home to the greatest number of cardinals in the world cultural prestige, this dialect was adopted first in the Italian states, and then by the Kingdom of Italy after the unification in 1861. It may be considered somewhat intermediate, linguistically and geographically, between the Italo-Dalmatian languages of the South and the Gallo-Italic languages of the North, and through Corsican varieties with Sardinian, becoming the center of a dialect continuum. Its development was also influenced by the other Italian dialects and by the Germanic language of post-Roman invaders.

There are only a few communities in Italy in which Italian is not spoken as the first language, but many speakers are native bilinguals of both standardized Italian and other regional languages. These include native communities of Indo-European languages like Albanian, Croatian and Greek in southern Italy, Slovene and German varieties in Northern Italy, and dozens of various Romance languages, like Arpitan, Friulan, Ladin, Lombard, Neapolitan, Oc-

citan, Sardinian, Sicilian, and many others. There are many differences between the North and South of Italy which are not only about environment and climate, but also about the people and the way they think and behave. This is due to historical and geographical reasons which are very interesting and unique in their own way. We can say that the North of Italy is richer than the South of Italy for a range of human and physical factors. The industrial triangle is located at the western end of Italy’s largest area of lowland, the North Italian Plain. The region is the richest area in Italy. The cities of Milan, Turin and Genoa are at the three corners of the triangle. In the last 50 years, industrial growth has been very rapid. Italy is now one

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of the seven richest nations in the world, and the industrial triangle is has become the wealthiest region in the whole country. The origins of the problem of these regional differences go back centuries, but the differences were increased as a result of policy choices made at the time of the unification of Italy in the 1860s.

cy was imposed. The consequence was a migration out of the South. The migration often took place in stages; first a migration from the rural areas of the South to the urban areas of the South, then a migration from the urban areas of the South to the urban areas of the North or to the Americas. The migration from other areas

cial public works projects over a ten year period in the Mezzogiorno, an area that included all of the South and some parts of central Italy. The special programs of Cassa were allocated $1.6 billion in grants and loans. A similar program with lower funding ($330 million) was created for depressed areas of central and northern Italy.

Galleria Emanuale Vittorio II in Milan

The North dominated the politics and economy of the new Italy, and the industrializing north wanted protection from competition from outside Italy. A system of high tariffs was imposed. There was a high tariff imposed upon imported wheat, one of the products of the South. The northern promoters of the tariff undoubtedly felt that their tariffs were protecting the economy of the South as well as that of the North. The higher wheat prices did benefit the farms of the South, but those farms had also been producing products that were sold in France. If France could not sell its products in Italy, then France could not buy the crops of the farmers of the South in Italy. Thus the already difficult problem of the South was made more severe by the economic policies promoted by the North. The living conditions in the South became unbearable only after 1887 when the high tariff poli-

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The industrial triangle is located at the western end of Italy’s largest area of lowland, the North Italian Plain of Italy was primarily (70%) to other areas Europe. Despite the net loss of population in the South, it remained poor compared to the North. After World War II, there was a political consensus that something needed to be done to promote economic development in the South but a reluctance to do anything that might constrain business growth in the North. There was land reform and the distribution of confiscated lands, but this was not carried out on the basis of economic criteria. As a result, often the parcels distributed were too small to make economically viable farms. An agency, called "Cassa," was created in 1950 to carry out spe-

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Cassa was allowed to provide funding to lending agencies were financing small and medium-sized industrial enterprises in the southern Italy and Sicily and Sardinia. By the late 1950s, it was generally clear that the measures directed to helping the South were not effective, and a new plan, called the Vanoni Plan, was proposed. The Vanoni Plan called for the allocation of 60 percent of new investment by public and semipublic enterprises to the Mezzogiorno. In addition, the Plan called for investment in infrastructure to promote industrial development and tourism; it also called for the funding of vocational school to train the labor force of the Mezzogiorno. The national economic plans which started in late 1960s called for active promotion of the development of the South by the Italian government. Cassa received funding of


$2.8 billion for the period between 1965-1970. All public agencies were to allocate 40 percent of their investment in the South while 30 percent of their contracts for goods and services were to go enterprises in the South. Despite this resolve, the problems of the South continued. Roman Catholicism is by far the largest religion in the country, although Catholicism is no longer officially the state religion. The proportion of Italians that identify themselves as Roman Catholic is 87.8%, although only about onethird of these described themselves as active members (36.8%). Most Italians believe in God, or a form of a spiritual life force. According to the Eurobarometer Poll 2005: 74% of Italian citizens responded

ceses in the Italian Catholic Church. Italy has a rich Roman Catholic culture, especially as numerous Catholic saints, martyrs and popes were Italian themselves. All of the popes from 1523 to 1978 were from what is now Italy. Italy is also home to the greatest number of cardinals in the world and is the country with the greatest number of Roman Catholic churches per capita. Minority Christian faiths in Italy include Waldensians and Eastern Orthodox as well as some

The national economic plans which started in late 1960s called for active promotion of the development of the South by the Italian governmen

Judaism. Jews have been present in Ancient Rome since before the birth of Christ. There have been many influential Italian Jews, such as Shabbethai Donnolo (died in 982), Prime Minister Luigi Luzzatti, who took office in 1910, and Ernesto Nathan, outstanding mayor of Rome from 1907 to 1913. During the Holocaust, Italy took in many Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany. However, with the creation of the Nazibacked puppet Italian Social Republic, about 15% of Italy's Jews were killed, despite the Fascist government's refusal to deport Jews to Nazi death camps. This, together with the emigration that preceded and followed the World War II, has left only a small community of around 45,000 Jews in Italy today.

The theater at Taormina, one of the best-and most beautiful!-ancient ruins in Sicily

that 'they believe there is a God', 16% answered that 'they believe there is some sort of spirit or life force' and 6% answered that 'they do not believe there is any sort of spirit, God, or life force'. The Italian Catholic Church is part of the global Roman Catholic Church, under the spiritual leadership of the Pope, curia in Rome, and the Conference of Italian Bishops. In addition to Italy, two other sovereign nations are included in Italian-based dioceses, the enclaves of San Marino and Vatican City. There are 225 dio-

Protestant churches. In the 20th century, Pentecostalism and nondenominational Evangelicalism, were the fastest-growing Protestant churches, as well as Jehovah's Witnesses and Mormonism. Starting from the 1980s, immigration from Sub-Saharan Africa increased the size of Baptist, Anglican, Pentecostal and Evangelical communities in Italy, while immigration from Eastern Europe has established large Eastern Orthodox communities. One of the longest-established minority religious faiths in Italy is

Rising immigration has been accompanied by an increase in nonChristian faiths. In 2009, there were one million Muslims in Italy, forming 1.6 percent of the population, although only 50,000 hold Italian citizenship. Independent estimates put the Islamic population in Italy anywhere from 800,000 to 1.5 million. There are more than 200,000 followers of faiths originating in the Indian subcontinent with some 70,000 Sikhs with 22 gurdwaras across the country, 70,000 Hindus, and 50,000 Buddhists. â– 

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Tourism

Culture and Civilization

I

taly is one of the world tourism leaders. Over 17 million foreign tourists visit its rare natural treasures, monuments of culture and resorts every year, which puts Italy ahead of any other country in the world. Most of the tourists come from the north, especially Germany. The most popular tourist towns are Florence, Venice, Rome, Naples, Trieste, Milan and Turin. VENICE

Venice (also called ‘The Queen of the Adriatic’, ‘The Bride of the Sea’, ‘The City of Bridges’ and ‘The City on Water’) is built on 118 small lagoon islands, with canals for streets, and myriad historically relevant churches and palaces which all make a one-of-a-kind urban composition. The city is intersected by 150 canals, which serve as streets, with a multitude of small bridges. Ships, boats and gondolas are used for transportation here. The biggest canal in Venice is called the Grand Canal, which splits the town in two. Ponte di Rialto (or the Rialto Bridge) is one of the four bridges spanning the Grand Canal. Piazza San Marco (St. Mark Square), the eponymous church and the Doge’s Palace are all located in the very heart of the town. Venice is connected to the mainland

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With 17 million tourists annually, amazing archaeological and natural rarities, the largest art collections in the world, a beautiful coast and a number of winter ski resorts, Italy is one of the world's firstclass tourist destinations by a 3,600 metre long bridge. This is where the two big boroughs have been developed – Maestre and Marghera. Millions and millions of tourists visit Venice each year. The town is also known for its film festival, glass, lace, and its products made of gold, silver and leather. FLORENCE

Florence is the capital city of Tuscany, an Italian region known for its beauty and also considered to be the world capital of art. This gem of the Italian Renaissance was ruled by the Medici family. The Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore or the Duomo Cathedral, as it is ordinarily called, is fa-

Venice is connected to the mainland by a 3,600 metre long bridge. This is where the two big boroughs have been developed – Maestre and Marghera mous for its glorious dome designed by Brunelleschi. Construction began in the 13th century and lasted for nearly 170 years. The Uffizi Gallery (located in Palazzo degli Uffizi) is one of the oldest and most renowned museums in the world. The Medici family kept their art treasures at the Gallery which was opened for visitors in 1765. Today, visitors some-

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

times queue for hours to get into the Gallery and enjoy the works of Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael or Titian. The Gallery is also the home to the famous Botticelli sculpture – ‘The Birth of Venus’. Ponte Vecchio or ‘The Old Bridge’ is a medieval stone closed-spandrel segmental arch bridge over the Arno River. Although the bridge, in its present form, dates back to the 14th century, the first records about it were made in the 10th century. Tuscany is famous for its exquisite wine and the county takes an immense pride in its Chianti. ROME

The capital city of Italy is rightly so called ‘caput mondi’ (the capital of the world) and ‘la città eterna’ (the eternal city). The Antique period, the Middle Ages, Baroque, Renaissance, and Neo-Classical fountains, over 200 churches and 900 basilicas, obelisks, statues which “speak” (‘statue parlanti), archaeological sites, beautiful parks, seven hills, galleries, museums, and villas. Of course, there is the famous she-wolf statue from the legend of Romulus and Remus, the symbol of the city. Teatro di Marcello is the only remaining ancient theatre in Rome with the Colosseum modelled after it. San Pi-


etro in Vincoli (St. Peter in chains) is the church that keeps the chains in which St. Peter and St. Paul were shackled and one of many Michelangelo’s masterpieces – ‘The Sculpture of Moses’. The Spanish Square with Fontana di Trevi is just one of the many must-see spots in Rome. THE VATICAN

The Vatican is located on the Vatican hill in the western part of Rome, on the right bank of the river Tiber. The Vatican is not only the epicentre of the Catholic faith but also the place where important historical records and priceless works of art have been stored for centuries. It is also a staple for the hordes of tourists from all parts of the world who are visiting the eternal city and its sights. The Creation of Adam (with the famous illustration of God breathing life into Adam) is arguably the most famous breathtaking section of Michelangelo's fresco at the Sistine Chapel. Even those who are not familiar with the fresco’s creator or its location are familiar with the illustration. The Last Judgment is another canonical fresco by Michelangelo, with over 300 figures including Jesus Christ, executed on the altar wall of the Sistine Chapel. Contrary to the Catholic tradition, the fresco is not located at the church’s exit. Also, there is the famous Vatican Museum that you enter from the Vatican Palace. The Palace has 1,400 rooms and is an important part of the Museum. The Pio Clementino and Chiaramonti musems contain the biggest collection of priceless antiques and artefacts. However, the biggest collection of the paintings by Italian and other European painters is kept in the 18 rooms of the Vatican Pinacoteca (Art Gallery). The Vatican Museums are adjacent to Raphael’s Rooms, the public part of the papal apartments. COMO

Established by Julius Caesar, as a resort, the town of Como was also the birth place of the Roman writer

and naturalist Gaius Plinius Secundus, better known as Pliny the Elder, who wrote his famous book Naturalis Historia here, inspired by the beauty of the place. Stendhal was Como’s guest and used its backdrop for his book “The Charterhouse of Parma”. Classical composer Giuseppe Verdi wrote ‘La Traviata’ and Bellini wrote his opera ‘Norma’ in Como. Lake Como was the favourite place of both Mozart and Liszt who compose his Dante-inspired sonnet – ‘Fragment after Dante’ – here. Novelists Gustav Flaubert and Ernest Hemingway were both

Ski resorts in Italy are located in its northernmost part - the Alpine area. There are a total of 1,220 kilometres of ski and snowboard slopes

St. Peter’s Basilica in Vatican

the admirers of Como, as were poets Wordsworth, Byron and Shelley who said that Lake Como “exceeds anything I ever beheld in beauty.” Leonardo da Vinci also sought inspiration on the shores of Lake Como, and Como’s creeks and waterfalls can be seen as a backdrop of his famous painting ‘Virgin of the Rocks’.

Lake Como is the third biggest lake in Italy and is of glacial origin. It is only 45 km from Milan, the capital city of Lombardy, and, thanks to its mild Mediterranean climate, attracts visitors from all over the world all year around. NAPLES

Naples is the capital of Campania. It is situated in the Gulf of Naples, on the shores of the Tiberian Sea. Due to its mild climate, natural attractions (Vesuvius, Capri, the Gulf of Naples) and many cultural and historical sites, Naples is often frequented by a considerable number of tourists. The city is known for Castel Nuovo, Palazzo Reale, Castel dell'Ovo, many churches, cathedrals, and archaeological sites from ancient Rome. The Naples University was founded in 1224. The town also has many science institutes and a zoo with an aquarium. Its National Library was founded in 1734, while the Naples National Museum is one of the most prolific museums in the world. Naples is also an industrial centre and its port is a hub of commercial activity. WINTER TOURISM

Italy has many ski resorts which, coupled with experiencing dolce vita, give special charm to winter holidays. Ski resorts in Italy are located in its northernmost part - the Alpine area. There are a total of 1,220 kilometres of ski and snowboard slopes on the biggest mountain chain in the Italian Alps - the Dolomites Superski. Ski resorts are well equipped and have mountain huts and restaurants. Turin and Cortina d'Ampezzo were the hosts of the 2006 and 1956 Winter Olympics respectively. Apart from many ski slopes on the Dolomites, there is Bormio - the location of the 1985 and 2005 World Ski Championships. Additionally, there is Livigno which is situated in a duty free zone in Trentino, better known as Madonna di Campiglio. ■

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company register ACTUS MAGICUS DOO Guidetti Paolo Roberto, Director Kralja Petra, 58/6 11000 Beograd Tel: 38111 291 08 55 info@actusmagicus.com ADVOKATSKA KANCELARIJA KOSIĆ Dubravka Kosić, Advokat Desanke Maksimović 6 11000 Beograd Tel: 381 11 3345 152 kosiclaw@eunet.rs www.kosiclaw.co.rs ADVOKAT BRANISLAV NIKOLIĆ Branislav Nikolić; Miroslav Minja Nikolić 27. MARTA 11/I 11000 Beograd Tel: 381 64 10 15001 adv.branislavnikolic@gmail. com ADVOKAT VLATKO SEKULOVIĆ Vlatko Sekulović, Jelena Škorić Vladimira Popovica 6 11070 Beograd Tel: 381 11 311 6985 jelena.skoric@sekulovic-law.r ADVOKATSKA KANCELARIJA CVJETIČANIN Nenad Cvjetičanin Omladinskih brigada 36/12 11070 Beograd Tel: 381 11311 36 32 office@cvjeticaninlegal.com ADVOKATSKA KANCELARIJA KARANOVIĆ & NIKOLIĆ Dragan Karanović, Milos Vučković Resavska 23 11000 Beograd Tel: 381 11 3955 430 info@karanovic-nikolic.com AGECO SRL Giovanni Agoglia, Director AREA INDUSTRIALE TITO SNC 85050Tito(PZ) ITALIA Tel:0039 0971 485858 AGECO@AGECOWEB.IT AGROGRNJA DOO Dragan Jović, Director Marsala Tita 95 21469 Pivnice Tel: 381 21 2100180 Fax: +381 21 2100 190

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dragan@agrogrnja.co.rs www.agrogrnja.co.rs ALESSANDRO BONNESI Alessandro Bonnesi, Director Kikindska5/20 26000 Pancevo Tel: 38160 6088896 a.bonnesi@gmail.com ALIQUO CONSULTING DOO Stefano Capriol Maksima Gorkog 34 21000 Novi Sad Tel: 38121 6616566 serbia@aliquoconsulting.com s.caprioli@aliquoconsulting. com www.aliquoconsulting.com ALL DATA EE DOO Chiara Di Baldassarre, Director C.Zore Perello Godina 2 6000 Koper SLOVENIA Tel: +386 5 907 26 06 Fax: +381 5 907 26 01 Mob: +386 41 64 64 23 chiara.dibaldassarre@alldata.it info@alldataee-doo.com www.alldataee-doo.com AXA OSIGURANJE ADO Antonio Marchitelli, Director Bul. Mihaila Pupina 6 11070 Beograd Tel: 381 11 22 00 419 annamaria.blell@axa.rs; www.axa.rs ADIGE BITUMI IMPRESA d.o.o. Stefano Bordin, Director Oslobođenja 52­57 11000 Beograd Tel: +381 11 232 26 86 Fax:+381 11 232 26 84 kijevo@gmail.com amministrazione@adigebitumiimpresa.com www.adige-bitumi-impresa. ls.rs AGRIROMAGNA Atila Tot, Director Glavna ulica 49 24321 Mali Iđoš Tel: +381 24 730 074 Fax: +381 24 730 024 agriromagna@neobee.net www.agriromagna.co.rs AERO-EAST-EUROPE d.o.o. Matić Milorad,General Manager Dimitrija Tucovića 2, 36000 Kraljevo

Tel: +381 11 36 317370 aeroeasteurope@gmail.com www.aeroeast.net AG Nielsen Audience Measurement Darko Broćić, Director Gavrila Principa 8, 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 3284510 Fax: +381 11 3288205 darko.brocic@agbnielsen.net www.agbnielsen.net AGROMEHANIKA AC d.o.o Ljiljana Mlinarić Miroslava Prodanovića –Micka 4 21000 Novi Sad Tel: +381 21 419151 Fax: +381 21 6410400 Mob: +381 63 542 305 agromeac@nadlanu.com www.agromehanika-ac.co.rs AGROPRESTIGE d.o.o. Luigi Grenzi, Director Put Kamaraški 14 , 24410 Horgoš, Kanjiža Tel: +381 24 792 000 Fax: +381 24 792 130 www.agroprestige.ls.rs AL ITALIA COMPAGNIA AEREA ITALIANA S.P.A.PREDSTAVNIŠTVO Branislava Nešić, Director Kneza Mihaila 30 11000 Beograd Tel: +381 113245 000 Fax:+381 11 3282 696 groups.beg@alitalia.it www.alitalia.com AL-IDEA doo Aleksandar Prvulj ,Director Matije Gupca 7, 26232 Starcevo Tel: +381 13 633079 Fax: +381 13 630960 info@al-idea.co.rs www.al-idea.co.rs ALLOMETAL d.o.o Ottavio Castellani, Director Prhovacka bb, 22310 Simanovci Tel: +381 22 480391 allometal.simanovci@gmail. com www.allometal.co.rs ANSA Brace Jugovica 5, 11000 Belgrado Tel: +381 11 3281232

Fax: +381 11 3281609 ansa.belgrado@ansa.it www.ansa.it APICASE HONEY DOO Lucio Ragazzini, Director Lomina 5, 14246 Belanovica Tel: +381 14 89123 Mob: +381 63 404-015 apicase.honey@gmail.com www.apicase-honey.ls.rs ARHITEKTONSKI STUDIO ASKET Vedran Latinčić, Director Davidovačka 15a 11211 Borča, Beograd Tel: +38165 86 44 275 arhikod@gmail.com www.asket.ls.rs ARHITEMA D.O.O Sašsa Veselinović, Director Ibarska 18, 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 64 1394754 a.ljusic@arhitema.com office@arhitema.com www.arhitema.ls.rs ASKA DUO d.o.o. Gloriano Marmilla, Director Vrbaški Put 1, 25230 Kula Tel: +381 25 723731, 723633 Fax: +381 25 723741 aska.kula@gmail.com www.aska-duo.ls.rs ATEKS d.o.o. Marko Ćulibrk, Director Milorada Jovanovica 9, 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 3051110 Fax: +381 11 3051118 mculibrk@ateksbg.com www.ateks.rs ATTICA MEDIA SRB Danijela Jovanovic, General Manager Vladete Kovacevica 2a, 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 26 48 436, 26 48 432 Fax: +381 11 26 48 457 office@atticamedia.rs www.atticamedia.co.rs BALTHOR d.o.o. Ivan Bulatović, Director Makedonska 19, 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 3373712 Fax: +381 11 3373749

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

balthor@eunet.rs www.balthor.ls.rs BANCA INTESA Marco Capellini, Zamenik predsednika IO Milentija Popovica7b 11070 Beograd Tel: +381 11 3108888 Fax: +381 11 310 88 55 kontakt@bancaintesa.rs www.bancaintesa.rs BDO Business Advisory doo Milovan Popović Knez Mihajlova 10 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 3281399 Fax: +381 11 3281 808 bdo@bdo.co.rs www.bdo.co.rs BENETTON SERBIA DOO Flavio Simonetti, Director Pantelejska 58 18000 Niš Tel: +381 18 415 6012 flavio.simonetti@benetton.net www.benettongroup.com BENVENTO-UMS Dubravka Petković, zamenik direktora Dragise Mišovića 199, 32000 Čačak Tel: +38132375300 duca.benevento@gmail.com www.benevento.rs BENVENTO-color d.o.o Draško Vučetić, Director Dragise Misovica 199, 32000 Čačak Tel: +381 32 375110 benevento@open.telekom.rs www.benevento.rs BEOCOLOR – CHEMCO d.o.o. Gilberto Plahuta, Direktor Knez Mihajlova 2/6, 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 3284 035 Fax: +381 2621-525 office@beocolor.rs www.beocolor-chemco.ls.rs Beohemija d.o.o. Željko Žunić, Direktor Kumodraška 290 11000 Beograd Tel: +381 3042-100, 3042-102 Fax: + 381 11 3042-101; 3042-120 office@beohemija.com www.beohemija.com

BEOSANUS d.o.o. Osmana Djikica 1, 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 2087 540, Faks: +381 11 208 9673 office@beosanus.co.rs www.beosanus.co.rs BEOTUBI d.o.o. Vlada Kovacevic, Director Milutina Milankovica 34, 11070 NewBelgrade Tel: +381 11 2120012 Fax: +381 11 6133752 beotubi@gmail.coms vkkovlado@gmail.com www.beotubi.co.rs B.I.C. Building Investment Constructiond.o.o. Stefano BUONO, Director Romano Farrocco Svetozara Militica 30/A 21102 Novi Sad Tel: +381 63 83 48 255 info@bicltd.eu www.bicltd.eu BINS TRADE DOO Lasto Todorovik, Director Antifašističke borbe 25/15 11000 Beograd Tel: +38111 311 9942 bibstrade@eunet.rs BIOPTIK DI C.BIASOTTO &C SRL Claudio Biasotto, Director VIA PRESE 1 30029S. Stino Di Livenza (VE) ITALIA Tel: 0039 0421 460323 info@bioptik.it BIS MANUFAKTURA d.o.o. Nebojša Stanivuk Slobodana Bajića 1, 11185 Zemun Tel: +381 11 3756719 Fax: +381 11 3756813 manyu@eunet.rs www.bis-manufaktura.ls.rs BR MANAGMENT & CONSULTING DOO Branka Čupić, Director Južni Bul. 144/303 A 11118 Beograd Tel: +381 11 283 3911 branka.cupi@br-consulting.net office@br-consulting.net www.br-consulting.rs ButanGas International d.o.o. Goran Đurđević, Director


Bul. Avnoja 65/III/9 11070 Novi Beograd Tel/Fax: +381 11 31 13 664 office@butangas.co.rs www.corporate.butangas.com CERRONI SRL Barbato Martiniello, Director Via Termine snc 82030Lumatola (BN) ITALIA Tel: 0039 0823 484148 cerroni.imballaggi@libero.it CESLA IB INVEST ZA TRGOVINU, GRADJEVINARSTVO I USLUGE Božidar Ivković, Director Radnička 28 21000 Novi Sad Tel: +38121 52 6159 cesla@nspoint.net office@ceslainvest.com www.ceslainvest.rs CHAMPICOMP doo Valentino Sartor, Director Kralja Petra I 2a, 26229 Pločica, Kovin Tel: +381 13 757 012 Fax: +381 13 757430 champicomp@yahoo.com www.champicomp.com CLARITER SRL Michele Fanelli, Director VIA DELLA BUFALOTTA 374 139Roma ITALIA Tel: 003906 99336290 operations@clariter.it CONCEPT INVEST doo Biljana Knežević, Director Imotska 1, 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 3956851 Fax: +381 11 39 56 888 Mob: +381 63 266 894 office@osigurajse.com www.osigurajse.com CONFINDUSTRIA UDINE Marco Bruseschi, Alberto Toffolutti; Alessandro Tonetti Largo Carlo Melzi 2 33100Udine ITALIA Tel:0039 043 2276 223 tonetti@confindustria.ud.it COOPSERVICE BMK Bogdan Mamuzić, Director Svetosavska 9, 22300 Stara Pazova Tel: +381 22 310344

Fax:+381 22 310342 PREDSTAVNISTVO U BELGRADE Koste Glavinica 2, 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 265-9364 mail@coopservicebmk.com www.coopservicebmk.com CRE INTERNATIONAL DOO Rajko Ivanović, Director Bul. Mihajla Pupina 6 11070 Beograd Tel: +381 11 220 13 33 Fax: + 381 11 220 13 40 office@creinternational.com www.creinternational.com DABAR DOO Nebojša Milosević, Director Vihorska 17 35000 Jagodina Tel: +381 35 234 003 Fax: +381 35 234 004 dabardoo@open.telekom.rs www.dabar.rs DAFAR Branislav Sigeti, Director Ecanski drum 3, 23100 Zrenjanin Tel: +381 23 544635 dafarzr@gmail.com DAL DEGAN­MORAVA Antonio Dal Degan, Director Kralja Aleksandra Obrenovića bb 12370 Aleksandrovac ­Zabari Tel: +381 12 254 507 Fax: +381 12 254 508 info@daldeganmorava.com www.daldeganmorava.com Deama sb d.o.o Raffaele Romolo, Director Oraška 60,Industrijska zona 11320 Velika Plana Tel: +381 26 515-340 Mob: +381 65 515-3400 zivomir.novakovic@deamasb.rs DAMM MANAGEMENT & MARKETING doo Franco Delneri, Director Reljina 4/3, 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 2687107 Fax:+381 11 3626273 franco.delneri@damm.rs DAMIBA TRADE DOO Vladimir Babic Bul. Kralja Aleksandra 249 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 243 99 82 info@damiba.rs

DB Design & Art DOO Dragan Bulatović, Director Karađorđeva 21 11080 Beograd dbdesignart@gmail.com Projektni Biro Mihajla Pupina 10v, VI sprat - 620 11070 Beograd Tel: +381 11 313 20 82 Fax: +381 11 313 20 83 office@dbdesignart.rs DDOR Novi Sad Christian Otto Neu, General Manager Bul. Mihajla Pupina 8, 21000 Novi Sad Tel: +381 21 4886000 ddor@ddor.co.rs www.ddor.co.rs DEKOTRA INZENJERING Vasko Atanasievski Makenzijeva 53/IV, 11000 Belgrade Tel: + 381 11 2040300 office@decotra.co.rs www.decotra.co.rs Delta Agrar Milan Grgurević, Director Milentija Popovića 7 b 11070 Beograd Tel: +381 11 201 23 00 Fax: +381 11 201 23 17 www.deltaagrar.rs DELTA GENERALI OSIGURANJE Andrea Simoncelli Milentija Popovica 7b, 11070 Belgrade Tel: + 381 11 2012750 Fax: +381 11 3114381 kontakt@deltagenerali.rs www.deltagenerali.rs DELTA HOLDING Jelena Krstović, Director Milentija Popovića 7b 11070 Beograd Tel: +381 11 201 11 04 jelena.krstovic@deltaholding.rs www.deltaholding.rs DE MARE SRL Fausto De Mare, Director VIA MARIO PAGANO 1 85050 Moliterno ITALIA Tel: 00 390 975 6400364455 info@demre.it DIREKCIJA ZA IZGRADNJU I RAZVOJ KOLUBARSKOG OKRUGA

Milena Popović, V.D. Director Dr.Pantića 114, 14000 Valjevo Tel: +381 14 23-55-60; 23-8536; 23-13-56 dirko@nadlanu.com www.regijakolubara.com DIVA DIVANI DOO Graziano Sgarbossa, Director Juznomoravskih brigada bb 17452 Vranjska Banja Tel: +381 17 545 233 divadivani@divadivani.it www.divadivani.it DUNAV AD Stefano De Sabata, Director Trg Oslobodjenja 9 25260 Apatin Tel: +381 25 773-522 Fax: +381 25772-181 office@dunav-apatin.co.rs dunav@crabo.it stefano.dunav@crabo.it www.dunav-apatin.co.rs DUNAVSKA TRANSPORTNA LOGISTIKA DOO Milan Maslac, Diredctor Bul. Mihaila Pupina 10/a 11070 Beograd Tel: +381 11 311 9241 dtlbg@eunet.rs E.Q.I. SRL Giordano Paris, Director Via G. Ceresani 1 60044 Fabriano ITALIA Tel: 0039 0731 202064 gparis@eqi.it EAT FRIULI SRL Franco Morgante, Director Via Licinio 15 33100 Udine ITALIA Tel: 0039 347 1009890 info@eatfriuli.com EBC doo Federico Rubini Gospodar Jovanova 44/I, 11000 Beograd Tel: +381 11 32 88 316 Fax: +381 11 32 88 274 balkans@roncucciandpartners. com ECOAGRI SERBIA A.D. Mladjan Ljubic, Director Sonje Marinkovic bb, 26340 Bela Crkva Tel: + 381 13 851211 Fax: + 381 13 851041 office@ecoagri.rs

www.ecoagri.rs EDIL NOVA DOO Negovan Blagojević, Director Kozaračka 14 11213 Vrčin Tel: +381 64 4380670 edilnovadoo@gmail.com ELEKTROREMONT a.d. Carmine Tarallo, President Ivana Mestrovica 2, 24000 Subotica Tel: + 381 24 548000 Fax: + 381 24 547848 kontakt@elektroremont.co.rs www.elektroremont.co.rs ENERGO SAS Danilo Franchi, Director Via Vallarsa 20139 Milano ITALIA Tel: 0039 02 87388 121 info@energogroup.com ERNST&YOUNG DOO Stephen Fish, Director Španskih boraca 3 11070 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 2095 800 Fax: +381 11 2095 890 marko.nikolic@yu.ey.com www.ey.com EURO – COOD Galasso Domenico, Director Knez Milosev venac 18 12000 Pozarevac Tel: + 381 12 514270 EUROEDIL d.o.o. Milorad Matic, Director Dimitrija Tucovića 2 L4­L5 36000 Kraljevo Tel: +381 36 317 370 Fax: +381 36 317 371 euroedil@ptt.rs EUROIN Antonio Cagiano, Director XXV Nova 73, 11080 Zemun Tel: + 381 11 8408392 EVRO GIUNTI Novica Jevtic, Director Dimitrija Tucovica 41, 11000 Belgrade Tel: + 381 11 3446 618 office@evro-giunti.com www.evro-giunti.com FAEBER LIGHTING SYSTEM doo Vladimir Pavlovic, Director Majora Gavrilovica 1 11420 Smederevska Palanka Tel: + 381 26 341050

Fax: + 381 26 341055 faeber@nadlanu.com FANTINI SCIANATICO BALKAN doo Fabrizio Fantini, Director Canio Scianatico, Director Bul. Mihajla Pupina 10a/12, 11070 NewBelgrade Tel: +381 11 3110240 info@fantiniscianatico.co.rs www.fantiniscianatico.co.rs FARMAN doo Miodrag Zivkovic, vlasnik Takovska 45, 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 3292046 Fax: +381 11 3292048 farman@sbb.rs FARMAN SAPORI doo Radosav Ristic, Director Serdar Jola 17a, 11000 Belgrade Tel: + 381 11 2666665 Fax: +381 11 2668983 office@farmansapori.co.rs www.farmansapori.co.rs F.DIVELLA SPA Vincenzo Divella, Director Largo Domenico Divella 1 70018 Rutigliano ITALIA Tel: 0039 0804 76 1870 vincenzo.divella@divella.it FERRARIPLAST Srdjan Bulutic, Director Industrijska zona, blok 103, 25100 Sombor Tel: +381 25 480333 www.ferrariplast.ls.rs FERROLI POLAND SP. ZOO Renzo Giorgi, Director Ul. Gwarkow 1 44240 Zory POLONIA Tel: 0048 32-2630564 renzo_giorgi@ferroli.com.pl FIAT AUTOMOBILI SRBIJA Antonio Cesare Ferrara Kosovska 4, 34000 Kragujevac Tel: +381 34 502620 Fax: +381 34 502622 www.fiatsrbija.rs FILM '87 Piero Amati, Director Petra Mrkonjica 2, 11000 Beograd Kneza Viseslava 88, 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 3549149

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production@film87.com www.film87.com FIM Luciano Mazzer, Director Slobodan Tomic, Director Put narodnih heroja 12, 24420 Kanjiza Tel: +381 24 874700 Fax: +381 24 874165 office@fim.co.rs kado.livia@fim.co.rs www.fim.co.rs FIN BETON Zani Luigi, Director Veljka Milićevića 4, 11000 Beograd Tel:+381 11 405 13 35 info©finbeton.eu www.finbeton.eu FINDOMESTIC Banka a.d. Angelo Scatigna, Chairman of the Executive Board Bul. Mihajla Pupina 115a, 11070 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 3336000 office@findomestic.rs www.findomestic.rs FIORANO doo Francesco Ruffoli, Director Staparski put bb, 25000 Sombor Tel: +381 25 467500 FALC EAST d.o.o. Antonio Verdini - Direktor Lole Ribara 26 19350 Knjazevac Tel: +381 19 737 900 Fax: +381 19 737-919 office@falceast.com davor.velickovic@falc.biz FORLI DOO Marina Šošić, Director Kablovska bb 35000 Jagodina Tel: +381 35 228 390 Fax: +381 35 243-909 giorgio.ja@eunet.rs FRACCANO d.o.o. Roberto Cangi, Director Aleksandra Petrovića 32, 11080 Zemun Accademia del Lusso d.o.o. Bul. Despota Stefana, 68c 11000 Beograd Tel +381 11 655 75 03 beograd@accademiadellusso. com FRAMES NETWORK SRL Giacomo Grandi, Director VIA ROMA 125/F

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61032 Fano ITALIA Tel: 0039 0721 829100 info@framesnetwork.com FULGAR EAST doo Garosi Marino, Director Železnička bb 23000 Zrenjanin Tel: +381 23 515 686 Fax: +381 23 515 794 info.fulgar@fulgareast.rs www.fulgar.com GE.OR.A.DUE D.O.O. Renato Morando, Director Kneza Milosa 54, Beograd. Tel: +381 11 264 62 62 Fax: +381 11 362 97 63 office@georadue.rs www.georadue.rs GI-DI ENGINEERING DOO Roberto Gazzurelli, Director Njegoševa 6 23000 Zrenjanin Tel: +381 23 562 533 gidiengineering@gmail.com GIRAMONDO doo Slađana Dugonjic Del Castilo Nemanjina 11, Kneginje Zorke 40 11000 Beograd Tel +381 11 3440260 Fax +381 11 3440165 office@giramondo.rs www.giramondo.rs GIURIATO DOO Giuseppe Giuriato, član Slađana Bogić, Direktor Ljubičevska- naselje bb 12000 Požarevac Tel: +381 62 313 283 office@giuriato.rs www.giuriato.rs GRUPPO FIORENTINO doo Fiorentino Nutricato, Director Orasacki put bb, 16210 Vlasotince Tel: +381 16 876015 Tel/Fax: +381 16 876018 gfiorentino@ptt.rs GRADAC FAVRO a.d. Constantin Cioplea Claudiu Djerdapski put bb 19320 Kladovo Tel: +381 19 801 424 Fax: +381 19 801-425 albertobrugnola@virgilio.it Gfp d.o.o. Magnolija 27 Kancelarija: Kneza Milosa 82 11000 Beograd

Tel: +381 787 22 60, 787 22 61 Mob:+381 63 814 99 97 Fax: +381 11 787 22 63 office@gfp.co.rs www.gfp.rs GRADINA DOO Đuro Đurđević, Director Masarikov trg 8 11080 Zemun Tel:+381 11 219 27 23, 219 27 21 Fax: +381 11 316 37 23 office@gradinazemun.rs GRUBIN EXPORT-IMPORT Dušan Grubin, Director Tajovskog 4, 22300 Stara Pazova, Tel: +381 22 310 273, 312 596 Fax. +381 22 313 273 office@grubin.rs www.grubin.rs HIV AD Rade Novkovic, Director Omladinskih Brigada 11, 17500 Vranje Tel: +381 17 421 585 rade.novkovic@tsbest.net HOME FURNITURE CASA ITALIA Dejan Nikolic, Director Slobodna Zona bb, 21400 Backa Palanka Tel: +381 21 754 185 casa-italia@nspoint.net HYDROTEK d.o.o. Lela Ružić, director Kneza Višeslava 3 11000 Beograd Tel: +381 11 25 43 768 kontakt@hidrotek.rs www.hidrotek.rs www.hytekintl.com KIJEVO doo Stefano Bordin,President Oslobodjenja 52-57, 11090 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 2322-686, 2322684 Fax: +381 11 2322-984 kijevo@gmail.com www.kijevo.com IC&PARTNERS Belgrade Roberto Corciulo, Director Bul. despota Stefana 12, 11000 Belgrade Tel:+381 11 3348448 Fax: +381 11 3348453 belgrado@icpartnersgroup.net www.icpartnersgroup.net IMACON DOO Giuseppe Venturini, Director

Župana Stracimira 12/5 32000 Čačak Tel: +381 32 346800 info.imacon@gmail.com INDUSTRIAL SOLUTIONS doo Vladislav llić, Director Cvijićeva 129 11000 Beograd Tel: +381 11 329 0432 vladislav.ilic@industrial.rs www.industrial.rs INDUSTRIJSKI MEDICINSKI GASOVI IMG DOO Aleksandar Čadikovski, Director Industrijska zona bb 22330 Nova Pazova Tel: +381 22 328 000 O.Radakovic@imgsol.rs INESCO SRL Nicola Zaccaria, Director Via A. Volta 55 35030 Vicenza ITALIA Tel: 0039 049 9004142 n.zaccaria@inesco.it INTERSTONES d.o.o. Zorica Miletic Topalovic, Director Karadjordjeva bb, 34000 Kragujevac Krcevacki Put B.B. - 34300 Arandelovac Tel: +381 34 705025 Fax: +381 34 705026 interstones@open.telekom.rs www.interstones.eu INTESA LEASING DOO Nebojša Janjićijević, Predsednik IO Cara Uroša 54 11000 Beograd Tel: +381 11 2025400 info@intesaleasingbeograd. com www.intesaleasing.rs Italijanski institut za spoljnu trgovinu Kneza Milosa 56 Tel: +381 11 3629939 Fax: +381 11 3672458 belgrado.belgrado@ice.it www.ice.gov.it/estero2/ belgrado/ Italiana Salotti- TP "TRGOSISTEM" doo Željko Mohun, Director Bul. Mihajla Pupina 10v/L-3 11070 Beograd Tel: +381 11 3132-526 Mob: +381 64 1102-636

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

trgosistem@sezampro.rs info@italianasalotti.rs www.italianasalotti.rs ITAL INTER MEDIA DOO Giuseppe Zaccaria, Director Dositejeva 11 11000 Beograd Tel: +381 11 3287459 italintermedia@hotmail.com ITALAPPALTI d.o.o. Tiberio Marcacci, Director Bul. Mihaila Pupina 10/a 11070 Beograd Tel: +381 11 3018 752 office@italappalti-srb.com www.italappalti.ls.rs ITALIAN CLEANING MANUFACTURERS TEAM Nicola Negro, Director Via dell'Industria 25 35010 Borgoricco PD ITALIA Tel: 0039 049 9336771 nicola.negro@italiancleaning. com ITALTEX­INTIMO Baratti Corrado, Director Novobečejski put bb 23273 Novo Miloševo Tel: +381 23 786 806 Fax: +381 23 786 810 www.italtrade.com ITALTES Gianfranco Sestili, Director Radnička 147, 11000 Beograd Tel: +381 1184 42 181 fax: +381 11 84 42 058 marketing@italtes.com www.italtes.com ITS BALKAN Stanko Maksimovic, Director Pančevački put 77/1, 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 331 9971 itsbalkan@eunet.rs www.itsbalkan.rs JAGODINSKA VINARIJA 1897 d.o.o. Dušan Stojanović, Director Bagrdanska bb 35000 Jagodina Tel: +381 35 234 343 Fax: +381 35 82 33 434 info@jagodinskavinarija.rs www.jagodinskavinarija.rs JCMM Automotive d.o.o. Kragujevac Mauro Magarelli, Director Kosovska 4/I A

34000 Kragujevac Tel: +381 34 308 200 JCMM AUTOMOTIVE d.o.o. Beograd Roswitha Kappeller, Director Francuska 27 11000 Beograd JOHNSON CONTROLS AUTOMOTIVE d.o.o. Saša Vodovar, Director Kosovska 4 34000 Kragujevac Tel: +381 34 308 228 sasa.vodovar@jci.com Kinstellar d.o.o Patrick Sebastian Lynch, Director Branislav Marić Takovska 23-25 11000 Beograd Tel: +381 11 3210 200 Fax: +381 11 3210 222 branislav.maric@kinstellar.com www.kinstellar.com “Koinè-Adriatica” d.o.o. Trg Republike 18 – zgrada 1, 5 sprat 21000 Novi Sad Tel: +381 64 47 20081 miacovazzi@libero.it ilarialista@yahoo.com office@koine-adriatica.com koine-adriatica.com KORIUM d.o.o. Stanko Marković, Director Prešernova 17 11000 Beograd Tel: +381 11 3982 836 www.korium.ls.rs KUVIŽIĆ & TADIĆ Law office Željko Kuvižić Maksima Gorkog 6/6, 1st floor 2100 Novi Sad Tel: +381 21 521 815 Mob: +381 65 642 7350 info@serbian-lawyers.com www.serbian-lawyers.com LABFIELD DOO Momčilo Lavrnić, Director Šilerova 74 11080 Zemun Tel: +381 11 316 2332 momcilolavrnic@yahoo.com LAVINA BGD DOO Željko Milošević, Director Đorđa Stanojevića 9v, lokal br. 1 11070 Beograd Tel: +381 11 6302 112 lavinarestoran@gmail.com LEDI OBUĆARSKE RADNJE


Tomislav Tomić, Director Andrije Vojinovića 86 15356 Uzveće Tel: +381 15 449 062 Fax: +381 15 448 400 office@lediklompe.rs ledi@gromnet.net www.lediklompe.rs LEGNO PIU' doo Nenad Miljković, Director Studenička 17 18000 Niš Tel: +381 18 214 677 nenad@legnopiutrento.com LEGNO CASA d.o.o. Draževac bb 18220 Aleksinac Tel: +381 18 618 000 Fax: +381 18 618 000 Mob: +381 65 447 5003 info@legnocasa.rs www.legnocasa.rs LEONARDO doo Andrea Brotini, Director Jovana Mikića 56 24000 Subotica Tel: +381 24 687 380 Fax: +381 24687-380 leonardo.pakerson@gmail.com LASER BALKAN Fraron Lino, Director Dunavac 1, 12208 Kostolac Tel: +381 12 241954 Fax: +381 12 241437 info@laserbalkan.co.rs www.laserbalkan.co.rs LE PARETI ITALIA doo Vesna Stojanović, Director Pozeska 58/7, 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 3660060 office@lepareti.com www.lepareti.com LYNX SRL Gennaro Tornincasa, Director Via Trieste 16 67039 Sulmona ITALIA Tel: 0039 0864568568 amministrazione@territoriosociale.it MA.GI.CA. SRL Giuseppe Perniola, Director Via Tenente Casale 27 70122 Bari ITALIA Tel: 0039 080 561 36 38 pinoperniola@fastwebnet.it Magneti Marelli d.o.o.

Bruno Bertello, Director Kosovska 4 34000 Kragujevac Tel: +381 34301 145 www.magnetimarelli.com MAGNETI MARELLI AUTOMOTIVE D.O.O. Gianpaolo Luigi Accossato, Director Kosovska 4 34000 Kragujevac Tel: +381 34301 145 www.magnetimarelli.com MARTINI GRADNJA D.O.O. Antonio Zanetti, Director Vojvode Putnika bb 22320 Inđija Tel: +381 62 587 153, 62 298 173 info@martinigradnja.rs M.C.D. d.o.o. Obala Kralja Petra I 121 12220 Veliko Gradište Tel: +381 12 766-2262 mcdserbia@yahoo.com MASTROTTO & CO Murat Spahić, Director Kruzni put BB, 11309 Lestane Tel: +381 11 8035110 sales@mastrotto.com MECCANICA ADDA FER S.R.L. Antonio Pensotti, Director VIA BOSCHETTI 1 20121 Milano ITALIA Tel: +381 63 81 80 484 info@addafer.it Metalfer Steel Mill Alexander Blohm, Director Rumski Put 27 22000 Sremska Mitrovica Srbija Tel: +381 22 62 16 36 Fax: +381 22 62 27 38 info@metalfer.net www.metalfer.net MIB SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT Barbara Sepic, Director LARGO CADUTI DI NASIRIYA 1 34142 Trieste ITALIA Tel: 0039 040 9188111 nanut@mib.edu barbara.sepic@mib.edu MIDLAND SC Roberto Nardi, Director Via San Moro 16 33043 Cividale del Friuli

ITALIA Tel: 0039 0432 996202 midland.coop@gmail.com MILADJO DOO Đorđe Milosavljević, Director Kablovska bb 35000 JAGODINA Tel: +381 35 221 260 miladjo.ja@eunet.rs Milšped AML d.o.o Nenad Zdravković Branko Velicković Savski nasip 7 11 070 Novi Beograd Tel: +381 11 20 15 100 Fax: +381 11 20 15 133 office@milsped.com MIROGLIO FASHION SER Oriana Bollano, Director Jurija Gagarina 16, 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 3129 731 MODITAL d.o.o. Gianni Babini, Director Branka Nanac, Commercial Director Bagljas aerodrom bb, 23000 Zrenjanin Tel: +381 23 559010 Fax: +381 23 559005 pompeaserb@pompea.com www.pompea.com Mokint S Petar Cvijić, Director Knez Mihajlova 2, 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 2621289 Fax: +381 11 3284035 mokints@mokints.co.rs www.mokarabia.com Montagna SM Milan Lalošević, Director Simina 21/II, 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 3034122 office@montagna.rs MORAVA AD Biljana Peković, Director Kneza Miloša bb 35000 Jagodina Tel: +381 35 241 797 morava.ad@gmail.com MORAVČEVIĆ, VOJNOVIĆ & PARTNERS Matija Vojnović, Partner Francuska 27 11000 Beograd Tel: +381 11 320 26 00 Fax: +381 11 320 26 10 m.vojnovic@schoenherr.rs www.schoenherr.rs

MOVEM&Co. d.o.o. Njegoslav Trifković, Director Milentija Popovića 9 11070 Beograd Tel: +381 11 3111 437 office@movem.co.rs www.movem.rs MUBB PRODUCT DOO Slobodan Balać, Director Uroš Balać, Komercijalni direktor Majora Zorana Radosavljevića 327 11273 Batajnica Tel: +381 11 748 10 79 info@mubb.co.rs www.mubb.co.rs www.mubb.rs www.mubb-pu.com MULTICATERING BALKAN DOO Francesco Giangrandi, Director Zmaj Jove Jovanovića 2/4 26000 PANČEVO Tel: +381 13 355 342 multicateringbalkan@yahoo. com www.multicatering.it MULTIPARTNER SISTEM d.o.o Željko Jović, Director Industrijska zona bb Nova Pazova Tel: +381 22 323 991 Milentija Popovica 5V/II/8 11070 Beograd Tel: +381 11 6149183 office@multipartnersistem. com www.multipartnersistem.com NDP AUDIT&CONSULTING DOO Vladimir Dabić, Director Topličin venac 3/IV 11000 Beograd Tel:+381 11 262 75 61, 328 42 51 Fax: +381 11 328 44 49 office@ndp-audit.rs www.ndp-audit.rs Obuća MARKO doo Milorad Babić, Director Batajnički put 23 11080 Zemun, Srbija Tel: +381 11 30-70-324, 6192-636 Fax: +381 11 61-96-900 info@obucamarko.co.rs www.obucamarko.co.rs Obuća PAVLE d.o.o.

Srđan Pavlović, Director Naselje Novo Selo bb 18310 Bela Palanka Tel. : +381 18 856 015 Fax.: +381 18 856 016 info@obucapavle.rs www.obucapavle.rs OMNIAPACK Michele Bellotto, Director Industrijska zona bb, 23272 Novi Becej Tel: +381 23 771098 Fax: +381 23 775045 omniapack@yahoo.com OWEN OWEN d.o.o James Owen, Director Kosovska 39/I, 11000 Beograd Tel: +381 11 30 30 744 Fax: +381 1133 47 032 Mobilni: + 381 69 24 71 545 office@owenowen.rs www.owenowen.rs PANGEA RE Thomas Weis, Director Pariske komune 11/13, 11070 Beograd PETRUZALEK doo Miodrag Maric, Director Dario Pertot, Director Majora Zorana Radosavljevica 313a 11273 Batajnica Tel: +381 11 8480271 Fax: +381 11 8481342 office@petruzalek.rs www.petruzalek.rs POMETON TIR d.o.o Cedomir Dumitraskovic, Director Djordja Vajferta 20-22, 19210 Bor Tel: +381 30 427476 Fax: +381 30 427475 POTIS a.d. Marija Savić Pahor Cede Vasovica 39, 12000 Pozarevac Tel: +381 12 555189 Fax: +381 12 555348 potispoz@ptt.rs PricewaterhouseCoopers Consulting d.o.o. Marie Joseph Emmanuel Koeing, Director Omladinskih brigada 88a, Airport City Belgrade 11070 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 3302 100 Fax: +381 11 3202 101

office@rs.pwc.rs www.pwc.com PRODUKTNA BERZA Žarko Galetin, Director Bul. oslobođenja 5 21000 Novi Sad Tel: +381 21 443 413, 442-935 nsberza@eunet.rs www.proberza.co.rs PROGETTI Romano Rossi, Director Vladimirački put bb, 15225 Vladimirci Tel: +381 15 513 166 Fax: +381 15 513 385 reception@eastwest.it www.eastwest.it PROLETER a.d. Katarina Mandic, Director Milinka Kusica 108, 32250 Ivanjica Tel: +381 32 662 518 proleter@neobee.net PROMEK d.o.o. Luca Nanetti, Director Oraska 60, 11 320 Velika Plana Tel: +381 26 515340 Fax: +381 26 515 180 PROMODA d.o.o. Vlado Đerić, Director Milentija Popovića 9 11070 Beograd Tel: +381 11 3111158 Fax: +381 11 31129 96 office@promoda.co.rs www.promoda.co.rs Prospering Foreign Investments d.o.o. Zoran Jovanović, Director Nikolaja Gogolja 10 11030 Beograd Tel : +381 11 3572912 Mob: +381 69 2251864 Međunarodni pozivi: +43 (0)664 1033116 office@prospering-serbia.com www.prospering-serbia.com RE SOURCING doo Lorenzo Bartolini, Director Kralja Petra 58/6, 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 2910855 Fax: +381 11 2910756 office@resourcingdoo.com www.resourcingdoo.com R.V. FOOTWEAR d.o.o. Radisav Vasić, Direktor Mehmeda Sokolovića 36 11050 Beograd

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Zrenjaninski put 196, 11000 Beograd Tel: +381 11 3320 352 Fax:+381 11 3328 744 rvobuca@beotel.net www.rvobuca.com RONCUCCI & PARTNERS BALKANS Federico Rubini, Director Gospodar Jovanova 44 11000 Beograd Tel:+381 11 328 8316 Fax: +381 11 3288-274 balkans@roncucciandpartners. com www.roncucciandpartners.com SAMER & CO. DUNAV AGENCIES Svetislav Jurisic, Director Bul. Mihaila Pupina 10E, 11070 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 2120 749 mail@samerdunav.com www.samer.com/belgrado SEACOOP Roberto Gianoglio, Director Corso Palestro 9 10122 Torino ITALIA Tel: +381 11 3290001 gianoglio@seacoop.com www.seacoop.com Secut d.o.o. Miroslava Jocić, Director Bul. Mihajla Pupina 6, PC Ušće 11070 Beograd Telefon: +381 11 30 10 901, 22 00 036 Fax: +381 11 30 10 819 office@secut.rs www.secut.rs SIGAS d.o.o. Enrico Altran, Director Nikole Pasica 2, 31210 Pozega Tel: +381 11 2626464 office@strategicpoint.rs SIGIT d.o.o. Davor Velickovski, Director Kneza Miloša 5/1 – 21 34000 Kragujevac Tel: +381 63 405386 davor.velickovski@sigit.it www.sigit.it SIL SRL Matteo Ghiotto, Director VIA C.BORSOI 14 30023 Concordia Sagittaria (VE) ITALIA

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Tel: 0039 0421 275969 cristina@silsrl.eu SIM Industry Service doo Guido Caporale, Director Pop Lukina 10 15000 Šabac Tel: +381 15 345 677 Fax: +381 15 345 755 sis@simspa.net www.simspa.net SISTEMA RINOVA DOO Milan Koković, Director Bul. Zorana Djindjica 35/3 11070 Beograd Tel: +381 11 311 5618 sistemarinovadoo@gmail.com SLODESTRADE Snezana Ivanovic, Director Borska 92 F, Rakovica 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 3591358 Fax: +381 11 3593372 office@slodes.co.rs www.slodes.co.rs S.N.T DIZAJN d.o.o. Nada Sebiški Todorović, Director Antifašističke borbe 21/13 11070 Beograd Tel: +381 11 311 9942 sntdizajn@eunet.rs SO.GE doo Belgrade Sanja Zani, Director Veljka Milićevića 4, 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 203 00 00 Fax: +381 11 203 00 01 info@so-ge.com www.so-ge.com SOLARIA SRL Sergio Sari, Director VIA SAN MARTINO 13 55014 Marlia-Lucca ITALIA Tel: 0039 0583 30711 solaria@solariaspa.com SPECIALMANGIMI GALTIERI SPA Antonio Galtieri, Director S.P. 231 KM 0.600 70026 Modugno – Bari ITALIA Tel: 0039 0805 327000 antonio.galtieri @galtieri.it ŠPIK IVERICA AD Milic Spasojevic, Director Venijamina Marinkovica 139 32250 Ivanjica Tel.: +381 32 66 11 66 Fax: +381 32 66 33

m.spasojevic@iverica.rs info@iverica.rs www.iverica.rs STEAM SOLUTION doo Gianluca Calace, Director Kralja Petra 58/6, 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 2910758 Fax: +381 11 2910756 info@steam.it STONES D.O.O. Gojko Glumac, Director Paolo Massi Profesora Vasića 100, 11 351 Vinca Tel: +381 11 80 66 569 stonesbg@eunet.rs ŠPEDEKS DOO Nebojsa Kostić, Director Knez Milošev venac 5, 12000 POŽAREVAC Tel: +381 12 213 913 spedex@sbb.rs STRATEGIC POINT DOO Marija Koprivica, Director Kneginje Ljubice 15 11000 Beograd Tel: +381 11 2180 673, 3288 152 Fax: +381 11 262 64 64 office@strategicpoint.rs www.strategicpoint.rs STRUCTURAMA EAST DOO Fulvio Beretta, Director Baje Pivljanina 9/I/2 11000 Beograd Tel: +381 64 3393801 info@structurama.it; janicijevic.81@gmail.com SUOLO E SALUTE BALKAN Tamara Adamovic, Director Bul. Kralja Aleksandra 98, 11000 Beograd Tel: +381 11 2451377 office@suoloesalute.rs www.suoloesalute.rs SZOR ALEKSANDAR Zoran Stamenković, Director Beogradska bb 35230 Ćuprija Tel: 381 35 477 505 Fax: +381 35 84 70 244 office@aleksandarshoes.com SZR ARA-Arandjelovici Živojin Arandjelović, Director Trifuna Pesica 22c, Lestane 11309 Tel: +381 11 80 30 460, 80 31 040 Fax: +381 11 80 31 039 s.ara011@yahoo.com

www.ara-proizvodnja.rs 2BLOGISTICS DOO Jovan Mutavdzic, Director Mihajla Pupina 6/16 PC Usce 11070 Beograd Tel: 381 606060381 jovan.m@2blogistics.net TEHNO RENT DOO Tiberio Marcacci, Director Ugrinovačka bb, 11272 Dobanovci Tel: +381 62 278 592 Fax: +381 11 780 8661 info@tehnorent.rs www.tehnorent.rs TEMER GROUP Zani Luigi, Director Novosadska 348, 21235 Temerin Mob: +381 62 8283815 info@temergroup.com www.temergroup.com TE-TO Teodora Deak, Director Zlatne grede 6, 24400 Senta Karadjordjeva bb, 24400 Senta Tel: +381 24 646100 Fax: +381 24 646132 office@sugarfactory-senta. co.rs www.secerana-senta.com TONON&C SRL Matteo Tonon, Director VIA DIAZ 22, 33044 Manzano (UD) ITALIA Tel: 0039 0432 748811 matteo.tonon@tononitalia.it UMA STADION DOO Andra Mitić, Director Bul. Despota Stefana 62 11000 Beograd Tel: +381 64 6100847 mitic.andra@gmail.com www.uma-stadion.ls.rs UNICREDIT BANK SRBIJA Claudio Cesario, President of Management Board Rajiceva 27-29, 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 3204500 Fax: +381 11 3342200 office@unicreditbank.rs www.unicreditbank.rs UNICREDIT LEASING d.o.o. Joachim Ahrer, Chairman of the Board Tresnjinog cveta 1,

Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

11070 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 3093500 Fax: +381 11 3093501 office@unicreditleasing.rs www.unicreditleasing.rs UNIONTRANSIT SRL SOCIETA A SOCIO UNICO Tony Savli, Director VIA ONTE HERMADA 6 34170 Gorizia ITALIA Tel: 0039 0481 528922 tony@uniontransit.it VALY d.o.o. Carlo Mariotti , Chairman of the Board Belosevac bb, 14000 Valjevo Tel: +381 14 295000 Fax: +381 14 295032 gpvaly@goldenlady.it VECAR VILJUSKARI Doo Dragan Srdic, Director Svetozara Papica 2, 11180 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 3169712 Fax: +381 11 3077465 office@vecarviljuskari.com www.vecarviljuskari.com VERSIL LEGNO d.o.o. Nebojša Kaljević, Director Dragomira Mike Milovanovića 63 11460 Beograd Tel: +381 11 136 882 Fax: +381 11 214 57 58 versil@beocity.net www.versillegno.co.rs VIJANA HOME DOO Rasko Jorović, Director Novogradska 13, 11080 Zemun Tel: +381 11 3750 211, 3750 340 Fax: +381 11 3750 509 office@vijanahome.com www.vijanahome.com VISTA DOO Miodrag Tuvić, Director Stara pruga 62, Konjevići 32000 Čačak Tel: +381 32 225632 doovista@gmail.com VUKOVIĆ I PARTNERI AOD Dejan Vuković, Director Bul. Vojvode Putnika 24 11000 Beograd Tel: +381 11 3690 316 vukovic@vp.rs; vp@vp.rs

YUGOTUB doo Andrea Cavallo, Director Kralja Petra I Karadjordjevica 156 22330 Nova Pazova Tel: +381 22 328241 Fax: +381 22 328841 info@yugotub.com www.yugotub.com ZANNINI EAST doo Pera Todorovic, Director Beogradski put bb, 26300 Vrsac Tel: +381 13 833405 Fax: +381 13 821076 aleksandra.cvetkovic@zannini.it ZASTAVA KAMIONI-U RESTRUKTURIRANJU Djordje Nestorovic, Director Kosovska 4, 34000 Kragujevac Tel: +381 34 335355 Fax: +381 34 334658 office@zastava-kamioni.co.rs www.zastava-kamioni.co.rs ZANELLA MARMI SRL Piero Zanella, Director Viale dell'Industria 3 37038 Verona ITALIA Tel: 0039 045 761 02 30 piero@zanellamarmi.it ZELENA DRINA doo Roberto Lovato, zastupnik CASA CALDA d.o.o Milana ObreNewca bb, 31250 Bajina Basta Tel: +381 31 3865044 grionefederico@crabo.it ZEMLJA I SUNCE SISTEMI Franco Benati, Director Kablarska 26A, Mataruska Banja Tel: +381 36 5411778 Fax: +381 36 5412-284 milinko.baltic@gmail.com zis.sistemi@gmail.com www.zemljaisuncesistemi.rs Zlatibor-mermer a.d. Dragan Milojević, Direktor Pekarska b.b. 31000 Užice Tel:+381 31 565-493, 563844; Fax: +381 563788, Mob: +381 60 4433002, 61 8207634 mermerue@gmail.com zlatibormermer.com


Italy and Serbia excellent Relations for Future Development

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