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Your City at Work Annual Budget Fiscal Year 2013


The City of Coral Springs

Annual B udget Fiscal Year 2013

Recipient of the 2007 Malcolm Baldrige Na onal Quality Award

To be the na on’s premier community in which to live, work, and raise a family.

City A orney John Hearn, Commissioner Vince Boccard, Commissioner Larry Vignola, Mayor Roy Gold, Commissioner Claude e Bruck, Vice Mayor Tom Powers, City Manager Erdal Dönmez Erdal Dönmez, City Manager Susan Grant, Deputy City Manager Roberto Hernandez, Deputy City Manager Robert Goehrig, Director of Budget, Strategy, and Communica on Rita Radziwon, Senior Financial Analyst Chelsea Stahl, Senior Financial Analyst Forrest Lehman, Senior Financial Analyst Liliana Alvarez, Senior Financial Analyst Sherri Toops, Grant Writer Linda Kuhlman, Budget Analyst

Adopted September 18, 2012

Cover design by Chris ne Parkinson Jahrsdoerfer


How To Use This Book We’ve made every effort to make this book as easy as possible to read, but we understand just how difficult it can be to find what you’re looking for in such a complex document. To make your search easier, we’ve provided a number of tools to help you get what you need.

Organiza on of This Book The City of Coral Springs’ Annual Budget is made up of three separate books: The Annual Budget (this book), the Capital Improvement Program, and the Business Plan. This Annual Budget volume is divided into five sec ons: IntroducƟon—This sec on contains the City Manager’s Le er, Mission, Strategic Priori es, Core Values, Citywide Organiza on Chart, and a few brief sta s cs about the City and its history. Pages i-14.

Key Tools Mission, Strategic Priorities, and Values ............... 3-6 Coral Springs Organization Chart ............................. 7 Budget Highlights.................................................. 21 Fund Structure Overview................................... 24-25 Combined Budget Summary.................................. 26 Summary Net Budget........................................28-29 Fund Summaries & Descriptions........................30-59 Major Capital Projects ............................................ 72 Five-Year Forecast .................................................. 77 Composite Index ........................................... 130-132 Fiscal Year 2012 KIO Summary ............................. 133 Department Impact on KIOs ................................. 134 Performance Measurements .........................135-137 Fiscal Year 2012 Initiative Update.................. 138-146 Fiscal Year 2013 Initiative Summary.............. 147-148 Budget Process Map ..................................... 150-151 Departments’ Performance Levels................. 154-221

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Budget Overview—This sec on contains the Budget Process Overview, Budget Highlights, Fund Structure Overview, Fund Summaries and Descrip ons, Debt Management, Capital Improvement Program, and long-range planning tools. Pages 15-78. Business Plan—This sec on contains the current Market Environment, Service and Opera ons Strategy including ongoing and new ini a ves, Financial Strategy, and results showing how well the City has performed in achieving strategic and departmental goals. Pages 79-148.

Performance Budget—Contains a descrip on of each department’s mission, core processes and outputs, new ini a ves, organiza on chart, revenue and expenditure summary, performance measures, and capital improvement projects. Pages 149-238. Appendix—This sec on includes the City’s Budget Resolu on, Budget Ordinance, Financial Policies, Fund Balance, Debt Service Maturity Schedules, and staffing informa on. Pages 239-304.

Tables of Contents A comprehensive Table of Contents is provided (pages iv-v) to help the reader locate informa on in this document. In addi on, each subsequent sec on contains a table of contents directly behind the tab page to iden fy specific informa on about that sec on. Following the main Table of Contents is a list of Tables and Illustra ons to highlight charts and graphs that contain essen al informa on.

Abbrevia ons and Acronyms A useful list of abbrevia ons and acronyms used in the book.

Glossary A concise descrip on of the terminology used in this document that is either technical in nature or unique to the City of Coral Springs. Each term is given a short entry that clearly defines it within the context that we use the term.

Index In the back of the book (pages 298-304) we are providing a useful index with pointers to important terms. Headings and subheadings with corresponding page locators are listed to help the reader quickly search and easily access informa on throughout this book. This tool can be used to search by specific topic, by alphabet, and by cross reference.

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


The Government Finance OďŹƒcers Associa on of the United States and Canada (GFOA) presented an Award for Dis nguished Budget Presenta on to the City of Coral Springs, Florida for its annual budget for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2011. In order to receive this award, a governmental unit must publish a budget document that meets program criteria as a policy document, as an opera ons guide, as a financial plan, and as a communica ons device. The award is valid for a period of one year only. We believe our current budget con nues to conform to program requirements, and we are submi ng it to GFOA to determine its eligibility for another year.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

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Table of Contents Introduc on ...................................................................................................................................ii How To Use This Book .............................................................................................................ii City Manager’s Le er ..............................................................................................................1 Mission ....................................................................................................................................3 Strategic Priori es ...................................................................................................................4 Core Values .............................................................................................................................6 City of Coral Springs Organiza on Chart .................................................................................7 Coral Springs at a Glance.........................................................................................................8 Service Sta s cs ......................................................................................................................9 History of Coral Springs .........................................................................................................10 Management and Budget Office ...........................................................................................14 Budget Overview .........................................................................................................................15 Budget Process Overview......................................................................................................16 Budget Highlights ..................................................................................................................21 Fund Structure Overview ......................................................................................................24 Combined Budget Summary .................................................................................................26 Fund Budget Overviews ........................................................................................................30 Capital Improvement Program ..............................................................................................64 Revenue Trends .....................................................................................................................75 Five-Year Forecast .................................................................................................................77 Business Plan ................................................................................................................................79 Introduc on ..........................................................................................................................80 Market Environment .............................................................................................................81 Service and Opera ons Strategy ...........................................................................................91 Customer-Involved Government ....................................................................................92 Neighborhood and Environmental Sustainability ..........................................................95 Financial Health and Economic Development .............................................................103 Traffic, Mobility and Connec vity ................................................................................106 Youth Development and Family Values ........................................................................110 Strength in Diversity .....................................................................................................113 Excellence in Educa on ................................................................................................117 Financial Strategy ................................................................................................................119 Measuring Results ...............................................................................................................127

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Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Table of Contents (continued) Performance Budget .................................................................................................................149 Performance Budget Overview ...........................................................................................152 Sample Performance Budget Page ......................................................................................153 Department Performance Levels ........................................................................................154 City Commission ..........................................................................................................155 City Manager’s Office ...................................................................................................157 Human Resources ........................................................................................................162 Financial Services .........................................................................................................167 Informa on Services ....................................................................................................171 City A orney ................................................................................................................175 Development Services .................................................................................................177 Police............................................................................................................................184 Economic Development ...............................................................................................189 Fire/EMS ......................................................................................................................190 Public Works ................................................................................................................195 Sportsplex/Tennis.........................................................................................................204 Parks and Recrea on ...................................................................................................208 Aqua cs .......................................................................................................................214 Coral Springs Center for the Arts .................................................................................218 Coral Springs Charter School ........................................................................................220 Customer Requirements Analysis .......................................................................................222 Benchmarking .....................................................................................................................227 Florida Ci es Comparison ...................................................................................................231 Process Improvement Teams ..............................................................................................232 Awards and Special Recogni ons ........................................................................................236 Appendix ....................................................................................................................................239 Budget Resolu on ...............................................................................................................240 Budget Ordinance ...............................................................................................................242 Financial Policies .................................................................................................................247 Fund Balance Overview.......................................................................................................256 Staffing ................................................................................................................................271 Abbrevia ons and Acronyms ..............................................................................................289 Glossary of Terms ................................................................................................................290 Index ...................................................................................................................................298

City of Coral Springs, Florida

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Tables and Illustrations Introduc on ...................................................................................................................................ii Key Tools .................................................................................................................................ii City of Coral Springs Organiza on Chart .................................................................................7 Coral Springs at a Glance.........................................................................................................8 Service Sta s cs ......................................................................................................................9 MBO Staff ..............................................................................................................................14 Budget Overview .........................................................................................................................15 Budget Calendar....................................................................................................................20 Opera ng millage rate ..........................................................................................................21 Voter-approved debt service millage rate .............................................................................21 Tax rate Fiscal Year 2013 .......................................................................................................21 Opera ng millage rate comparison Fiscal Year 2013 ............................................................22 Full- me posi ons added in Fiscal Year 2013 .......................................................................22 Annual net opera ng budget and capital..............................................................................23 Major Funds ..........................................................................................................................24 Fund structure overview .......................................................................................................25 Appropriated Funds Budget—Fiscal Year 2013 .....................................................................26 Where the money goes by type of program (all funds) ........................................................27 Where the money comes from by source (all funds) ............................................................27 Where the money goes by category (General Fund only).....................................................27 Summary of net budgeted revenues—Fiscal Year 2013........................................................28 Summary of net budgeted expenditures—Fiscal Year 2013 .................................................29 General Fund total revenues—$98,814,282 .........................................................................33 Millage rates..........................................................................................................................33 Franchise fees .......................................................................................................................34 U lity service taxes ...............................................................................................................34 General Fund revenue and expenditure summary ...............................................................35 General Fund total expenditures—$98,814,282 ...................................................................36 Non-departmental opera ng detail .....................................................................................38 Fire Assessment rate schedule .............................................................................................40 Fire Fund total revenues—$17,327,884 ................................................................................40 Fire Fund revenue and expenditure summary .....................................................................41 Fire Fund total expenditures—$17,327,884 .........................................................................41 Fire Assessment rate comparison Fiscal Year 2013 ...............................................................42 Water and Sewer Fund revenue and expense summary.......................................................44 Water and Sewer Fund total revenues —$22,713,254 .........................................................44 Water bill for average single-family residence ......................................................................45 Water and Sewer Fund total expenses —$22,713,254 .........................................................45 Health Fund revenue and expense summary........................................................................47 General Insurance Fund revenue and expense summary .....................................................49 Equipment Services Fund revenue and expense summary ...................................................53 Revenue bond debt principal and interest payments for Fiscal Year 2013 ...........................58 Debt Service Fund revenue and expenditure summary ........................................................59 Debt forecas ng assump ons ...............................................................................................59 Net outstanding and planned FY 2013 debt issues ...............................................................60 Debt service as a percentage of General Fund total expenditures .......................................61

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Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Tables and Illustrations (continued) General obliga on debt outstanding balance as a percentage of total taxable value ..........62 Remaining percentage of general obliga on debt capacity of City’s self-imposed 5% limit .63 Debt Forecas ng Assump ons ..............................................................................................63 Fleet Replacement Program contribu ons and expenses ....................................................65 Computer Replacement Program contribu ons and expenses ............................................65 CIP funding sources— Fiscal Year 2013 .................................................................................66 CIP impact on the opera ng budget Fiscal Year 2013 ...........................................................67 Fleet replacement cost Fiscal Years 2013—2023 ..................................................................68 FY 2013 Capital projects financed via grants.........................................................................69 Building permit revenues ......................................................................................................75 State shared revenues ...........................................................................................................75 Half-cent sales tax revenues..................................................................................................75 Electric u lity service tax revenues .......................................................................................76 Communica ons services tax revenues ................................................................................76 Electric u lity franchise fee revenues ...................................................................................76 Five-Year Forecast: General Fund .........................................................................................77 General Fund Five-Year Forecast Summary Schedule ...........................................................78 Business Plan ................................................................................................................................79 Locally Real GDP approaching the na onal average .............................................................82 Unemployment rate lowest since February 2009 ................................................................82 Fla ening of the yield curve signals reduced borrowing costs for long-term debt...............83 Percent change in CPI............................................................................................................83 FPL proposed change in residen al electric bill for typical 1,000 kwh user .........................84 Foreclosures in Coral Springs have declined ........................................................................85 Occupancy Rates ...................................................................................................................86 Demographic Trends .............................................................................................................87 City of Coral Springs’ Business Model ...................................................................................91 Long-Range Transporta on Improvement Plan ..................................................................108 2012-2014 Short-Range Transporta on Improvement Plan ...............................................109 Use of reserves decreases as economy rebounds...............................................................120 Financing plan for General Fund capital..............................................................................123 improvements—FY 2013 .....................................................................................................123 Wastewater treatment costs con nue to soar....................................................................123 Water and Sewer Debt service will peak in FY 2013 ...........................................................124 Sa sfac on with items that influence percep ons of Coral Springs ...................................128 Sustainability Index 2008-2012 ...........................................................................................129 Composite Index .................................................................................................................130 Department Impact of Key Intended Outcomes for Fiscal Years 2012 • 2013 ...................134 Performance Budget .................................................................................................................149 Budget Process Map ...........................................................................................................150 Department Revenue, Expenditure and Posi on Summary for Fiscal Year 2013 ................154 Organiza on Charts—By Department .................................................................................155 Revenues and Expenditures by Program/Category—By Department .................................156 Performance Measures—By Department ...........................................................................159 Financing plan for Water and Sewer Fund capital improvements—FY 2013 ......................202 Summary of Fleet budget by department/fund ..................................................................203

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Tables and Illustrations (continued) Residents’ value ra ngs ......................................................................................................222 Business sa sfac on ra ngs ...............................................................................................223 ICMA comparison ci es.......................................................................................................227 ICMA comparison: FTEs per 1,000 popula on ....................................................................227 ICMA comparison: Safety ra ng in neighborhood during the day ......................................228 ICMA comparison: Safety ra ng in business areas during the day .....................................228 ICMA comparison: Fleet ra ng for quality of services ........................................................228 ICMA comparison: Youth programs as percent of all recrea on programs .......................229 ICMA comparison: Parks and recrea on revenue per capita .............................................229 ICMA comparison: Code Enforcement FTEs .......................................................................229 ICMA comparison: Employee turnover rate ........................................................................230 ICMA comparison: Sick leave used per 1,000 hours of scheduled work hours ...................230 Property tax per capita........................................................................................................231 Total common expense per capita ......................................................................................231 General public debt per capita ............................................................................................231 Average basic service wages per employee ($ 000’s)..........................................................231 Appendix ....................................................................................................................................239 Posi on Counts for all Departments and Divisions .............................................................272 Net full- me posi on changes per fiscal year .....................................................................288

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Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


City Manager’s Letter I am pleased to present to you the adopted budget for Fiscal Year 2013, which is the final budget suppor ng the 2012-2013 Strategic Plan. This budget outlines numerous efforts and ini a ves that will help posi on the City to meet our community’s needs despite a slow, but steady, economic recovery. Despite the media’s steady drumbeat of dire economic predic ons, there is posi ve news to report. For example, in our community, efforts to mi gate foreclosures have helped cut the total number of residences in some stage of the process to 1,941 as of June 2012 from a high of nearly 5,500 in May 2010. The City of Coral Springs’ unemployment rate has fallen to 6.9%, well below Florida’s rate of 8.5% as of May 2012. And, in a posi ve comparison to surrounding communi es in Broward County, the City saw a 1.56% increase in taxable values over the past year. This is the first increase in taxable assessed values since Fiscal Year 2008.

Mee ng our Community’s Service Needs Even more importantly, despite all the economic turmoil, the City has maintained or increased service levels throughout our community. Our residents agree that we are succeeding. Our recent residen al (2011) and business (2012) surveys show that the City of Coral Springs is se ng the standard with regard to the overall quality of City services. The City of Coral Springs ranked at or above the U.S. and Florida averages in all 47 areas that were assessed on the survey. Seventy-nine percent (79%) of the residents surveyed in the City of Coral Springs were sa sfied (ra ngs of 4 or 5 on a 5-point scale) with the overall quality of City services compared to a na onal average of just 56% and a Florida average of 60%. Going forward, we will con nue to deliver for our community, and the following Business Plan provides a sound blueprint for focusing on the four key areas our residents have told us are most important: • • • •

Community aesthe cs Public safety Educa onal excellence Local business vitality

Impact of Increasing Millage Rate in 2013 We are adop ng a balanced budget for Fiscal Year 2013 using a millage rate of $4.5697, using $1.75 million in reserves and no increase in user fees. Adop ng the rolled-back rate was not a realis c op on given that it would have resulted in $480,000 less revenue than the current rate. This reduc on in revenue would have seriously hampered our ability to meet our residents’ most important needs. The adopted millage rate of $4.5697 is 4% higher than the current millage rate of $4.3939. This increase will allow investment in our community’s appearance, safety, and infrastructure. The addi onal tax revenue will be allocated toward such projects as restoring the financial reserve, hiring three addi onal police officers, star ng the design work for a new Safety Town, and renova ng Sartory Hall. The impact to the average single-family homeowner would be $42.62 per year in addi onal property taxes to the City.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

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The adopted budget includes numerous ini a ves designed to enhance our community’s quality of life. A key ini a ve in the Fiscal Year 2012 Business Plan was pension reform. We are pleased to report mutual resolu on with the City’s Police union will result in savings of over $3 million in the Fiscal Year 2013 and future budgets. Also in Fiscal Year 2012, the City’s finances were reviewed by the three major ra ng agencies. Though these reviews contained sugges ons to improve our financial posi on, we were able to maintain our AAA ra ngs.

Key Ini a ves for the Coming Year While the Business Plan includes economic data as well as the City’s budget process and methodology, most essen ally it includes staff ’s proposals for ini a ves geared toward addressing our residents’ needs and enhancing our community’s look, feel and overall appeal. These ini a ves will serve as the guiding force behind the City’s Fiscal Year 2013 ac vi es. Highlights of the 32 new ini a ves, as well as 32 ongoing ini a ves, contained within the Business Plan include: •

Con nuing to invest in our vital informa on technology infrastructure, which was cri cally behind industry standards.

Encouraging business development and redevelopment by redesigning the Economic Development Founda on (EDF) web site, create an economic development strategic plan, and establish an economic incen ve account. We will also con nue to work closely with the EDF , Community Redevelopment Agency, Chamber of Commerce, and the Retail Coali on to diversify the tax base and absorb vacant commercial space.

Con nuing to support educa onal excellence by fostering our alliance with Broward College and ensuring the Charter School remains highly rated.

Con nuing to address the aesthe c appeal of our neighborhoods under the “Community Pride” umbrella. This ini a ve will enhance the appearance of our medians, rights-of-way and public buildings and will also invest heavily in our parks. Enhancing the City’s tree canopy will con nue this year with fer lizing and tree trimming, as well as with plan ng more trees throughout the parks and around public buildings.

Enhancing the efficiency and effec veness of the code enforcement process by automa ng a number of outdated and manual systems.

Revitalizing key elements of our community’s infrastructure, in part by u lizing proceeds from the lowinterest Economic Recovery Zone Redevelopment Bond. Projects include improving the appearance, safety, and ease of movement in Mullins Park, and also replacing and/or renova ng the tackle football, flag football and soccer buildings. Addi onally, infrastructure improvements slated as part of the downtown development plan—including burying power lines, installing turn lanes, erec ng mast arms, and installing sidewalks—will also begin. Once these infrastructure improvements are completed, downtown Coral Springs will become more economically viable for investors as the economy begins to improve.

Maintaining a safe community will remain a top priority. Not only will the high-visibility “Make a Call, Make a Difference” campaign con nue, but we will make every effort to involve concerned ci zens in the safety of their neighborhoods by crea ng web-based repor ng mechanisms. We will invest in the latest technology to ensure our officers have the best tools for enhancing neighborhood safety.

Finally, we will celebrate the City’s 50th anniversary with events throughout the year.

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Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Honoring our Partnership We know that maintaining our premier community requires a joint effort and strong partnership between the City and our residents and businesses. While the following Business Plan is our “community contract” for the coming fiscal year, we consider it the means to an ongoing dialogue with our residents and we offer numerous channels for feedback and sugges ons. We also know that it is our employees who make all of these accomplishments possible, and we would not have emerged from the recent recession were it not for the herculean efforts of our dedicated and crea ve work force. We thank them and express the deepest debt of gra tude for their loyalty and ingenuity. On their behalf, we all look forward to a produc ve and successful 2013 as we con nue to forge the best path for our Community of Excellence.

Erdal Dönmez City Manager

Mission To be the na on’s premier community in which to live, work, and raise a family.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

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Strategic Priorities Customer-Involved Government Develop innova ve ways to make par cipa on in local government ac vi es possible for all residents and foster a sense of engagement among the ci zenry by effec vely communica ng a common iden ty, ac vely seeking insight into the needs of the community, aligning City services with customer expecta ons, and con nuing to strive for excellence.

Neighborhood and Environmental Sustainability Provide support to neighborhood groups and individual homeowners and business owners in maintaining and improving property values, aesthe cs and safety throughout the City. Lead by example in the stewardship of natural resources by preserving exis ng Environmentally Sensi ve Land sites, promo ng the replenishment of the City’s tree canopy, encouraging na ve landscaping, and planning for the conserva on of resources.

Financial Health and Economic Development Con nue to enhance the high level of service, quality, and financial stability that the City has become known for by encouraging redevelopment, diversifying tax and revenue sources, ensuring the long-term viability of financial strategies, and implemen ng “new urbanism” techniques.

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Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Traffic, Mobility and Connec vity Promote best prac ces and effec ve technology to improve safe mobility and encourage convenient and accessible modes of transporta on.

Youth Development and Family Values Promote and increase opportuni es for youth to become engaged in the world, while providing support in addressing the profusion of issues facing them. Empower families to create strong es, pass on values and tradi ons, strive for economic security, increase health and safety, and join in crea ng a shared community vision.

Strength in Diversity Capitalize on the strength of diversity in our community through ongoing dialogue and gathering together to communicate, understand, and celebrate our differences and similari es.

Excellence in Educa on Maintain effec ve partnerships with the Broward County School Board and individual local public and private schools within Coral Springs to address overcrowding, promote safety, increase parental par cipa on, elevate student achievement, and expand educa onal opportuni es. City of Coral Springs, Florida

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Core Values Customer Focus • Demonstrate a passion for customer service. • Care about employees, so they will be more likely to care about customers. • Measure organiza onal and employee successes based on customer sa sfac on. • Solicit and listen intently to customer requirements and expecta ons. • Maximize the posi ve impact of customers’ first impression and “moments of truth.” • Collect customer feedback con nuously and use it to improve quality. • Achieve customer sa sfac on by assessing the specific needs and expecta ons of each individual customer.

Empowered Employees • Empower the people closest to the customer, working individually or in teams, to con nuously improve the organiza on’s quality and services.

• Remove “red tape” to achieve the organiza on’s mission. • Prac ce a “can do” a tude. • Solicit and listen intently to employees’ requirements and expecta ons. • Recognize and reward quality and customer service ini a ves. • Recognize change as a given, not government as usual.

Con nuous Improvement • Commit “every day, in every way, to ge ng be er and be er.” • Plan for quality. • Make quality a never-ending effort. • Have customers define quality. • Let customer feedback drive quality improvements. • Focus on process improvements to increase quality.

• Commit the en re organiza on to achieving total customer sa sfac on.

• Create a culture in which the right things are done the first me and every me.

• Empower employees to make decisions based on their experience, skill, training and capability, rather than their posi on.

Sustainability

• Share decision-making and allow employees to take authority and responsibility for the organiza on’s mission. • Encourage use of individual judgment; do what needs to be done. • Empower employees to contribute to customer sa sfac on regardless of organiza onal level.

Leadership • Establish an inspiring vision that creates a government that works be er and costs less. • Create an atmosphere of innova on, risk-taking and tolerance for mistakes.

• Work toward efficient and cost-effec ve solu ons to protect and conserve natural resources, maintain economic viability, and ensure a healthy and safe quality of life for current and future genera ons. • Commit to increasing green awareness in the community and reducing our own carbon footprint. • Balance environmental, economic, and social factors in decision making. • Promote and role-model prac ces that improve our environment by reducing energy usage, water consump on, and waste stream. • Promote prac ces that improve our environment while crea ng greater economic opportunity.

• Recognize failure as the price paid for improvement.

• Promote the concepts of “green” development, sustainable business prac ces, and renewable energy in our community.

• Lead by example, by involvement and demonstrate commitment to quality, service and customers—“walk the talk.”

• Contribute to economic development through the support and promo on of a market for environmentally friendly and energy-efficient products.

• Create a system of guidelines, not rules.

• Consider the impact of your ac ons on the environment and aesthe cs of the City.

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Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


City of Coral Springs Organization Chart Citizens/ Customers

Citizens Advisory Committees and Boards

City Commission City Attorney John J. Hearn jhearn@coralsprings.org

City Manager Erdal Dönmez edonmez@coralsprings.org

Deputy City Manager

Deputy City Manager

Susan Grant sgrant@coralsprings.org

Roberto Hernandez rhernandez@coralsprings.org

*City Clerk’s Office

*Budget & Communications

City Clerk Josephine Chavez jchavez@coralsprings.org

Dir. Budget/Strategy/Communications Robert Goehrig rgoehrig@coralsprings.org

*Community Redevelopment Agency

Human Resources

Financial Services

Information Services

Development Services

Director of Human Resources Dale Pazdra dpazdra@coralsprings.org

Director of Financial Services Melissa Heller mheller@coralsprings.org

Director of Information Services Curlie Matthews cmatthews@coralsprings.org

Interim Director of Development Services Susan Hess shess@coralsprings.org

Community Development

Police

Fire/EMS

Public Works

Director of Community Development Susan Hess shess@coralsprings.org

Chief of Police Anthony Pustizzi apustizzi@coralsprings.org

Fire Chief Mark Curran mcurran@coralsprings.org

Director of Public Works Rich Michaud rmichaud@coralsprings.org

Sportsplex/Tennis

Parks & Recreation

Aquatics

Executive Director of Sportsplex Tom Messenheimer tmessenheimer@coralsprings.org

Director of Parks & Recreation Rick Engle rengle@coralsprings.org

Director of Aquatics Mike McGoun mmcgoun@coralsprings.org

Charter Offices

City of Coral Springs, Florida

*Divisions of the City Manager’s Office

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Coral Springs at a Glance    

Incorporated July 10, 1963 Commission - City Manager Form of Government Five-member City Commission, nonpar san, elected at large City Manager appointed by the City Commission

Demographics Popula on (As of April 1 of each year from Bureau of Economic and Business Research -BEBR. Years 1980, 1990, 2000 and 2010 —U.S. Census Bureau)

1980 1990 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 Median age

37,349 78,864 88,944 90,586 93,439 98,553 102,916 107,156 111,724 117,549 120,085

2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

122,687 124,000 126,711 126,852 129,615 129,766 128,930 127,198 121,096 121,651 122,681

Number of households   Median household income (2010 ACS est.) Racial composi on (may be more than one race)  White  Black or African American  Asian  Some other race American Indian, Alaskan Na ve  Pacific Islander <0.1%  Two or more races Hispanic or La no (of any race)

23.93 sq. miles

Land use: Residen al Traffic circula on Waterways Commercial Recrea on/open space Community facili es/schools/hospitals Industrial

% of Total

49% 18% 10% 8% 8% 4% 3% 100% 1.0%

Developed Undeveloped

99.0% 1.0% 100.0%

Source: 2010 Community Development Land Data Record System and GIS.

36.5 41,814 $65,348

69.17% 17.94% 5.10% 4.19% 0.24%

3.31% 23.49%

Economics Office space Retail space Industrial space Assessed Taxable Property Valua on

2.6 million sq. feet 5.7 million sq. feet 3.0 million sq. feet $7,469,991,547

(2012 Tax Year) % of Total Assessed Value

Principal taxpayers: Coral-CS/LTD Associates Florida Power & Light JPI Coral Springs LP Spa the Grove LLC Knickerbocker Proper es Inc Wal-Mart Stores East LP ERP Opera ng LP City Na onal Bank of Florida Target Corpora on ProLogis

1.30% 0.69% 0.63% 0.62% 0.55% 0.43% 0.41% 0.40% 0.37% 0.37%

Source: City of Coral Springs Fiscal Year 2011 CAFR.

Educa on For School Year 2011-2012

28 12 4 4 8 30,525

(Includes public schools, charter schools, and out-of-city limits Stoneman Douglas High School.

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Land area

Downtown LAC

Source: 2010 U.S. Bureau of the Census.

Number of public/charter schools  Elementary  Middle  High school (including Douglas) Charter (all grades) Number of students

Land Use

Property tax millage rate (Fiscal Year 2013):  General opera ng  Voter-approved debt  Total Bond ra ngs:  Moody’s Investors Service  Standard and Poor’s  Fitch Ra ngs Per capita debt (Fiscal Year 2011):  General Obliga on debt per capita

$4.5697 $ 0.2906 $4.8603 Aaa AAA AAA $154.95

Fiscal Year 2013 Net Adopted Budget: Fiscal Year 2013 Adopted Capital Budget:

$151,766,237 $23,841,975

Fire Assessment (single-family residence) Solid Waste Assessment

$138.10 $227.16

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Service Statistics Police Police officers Number of service calls Number of 911 calls Average emergency response me

Center For The Arts/Theater/Museum 205 185,706 72,983 4:45 min.

Fire/EMS Uniform strength (career and cer fied firefighters):  Coral Springs 127  Parkland 33 Number of fire sta ons:  Coral Springs 5  Parkland 3 Number of service calls (for Coral Springs):  Fire 209  EMS 9,141  Other 2,696 Average response mes (for Coral Springs):  Fire 4:50 min.  EMS 5:16 min.

Theater size Capacity Mee ngs hosted Theater a endance Museum size Museum a endance Museum events Museum classes

67,000 sq. . 1,471 seats 56 100,000 13,500 sq. . 35,000 105 190

Parks and Recrea on Number of parks Number of acres Number of park patrons Number of sports teams Number of tennis patrons Number of Aqua c Complex visitors Number of swim classes Number of swim class par cipants

49 765 4,250,000 900 115,000 550,000 32,000 4,000

Public Works Tons of waste recycled Streets / miles maintained City vehicles and equipment maintained Bike path / sidewalks

5,568 tons 222 miles 1,299 91 miles

U lity District Size Popula on served Customer accounts Miles of water lines Fire hydrants Number of wells Average daily water demand Daily water treatment capacity Permi ed maximum day withdrawal Sewer lines / force mains Average daily sewer treatment Sewer reserve capacity

11.5 sq. miles 63,824 12,895 161 1,147 19 6.97 mgd 16 mgd 11.37 mgd 124/23 miles 6.36 mgd 9.79 mgd

Total City Staff Coral Springs Charter School Number of students (2012 School Year) Number of classrooms Number of teachers Grades

City of Coral Springs, Florida

1,640 84 99 6 - 12

Full- me (excludes city of Parkland fire staff) Part- me Subtotal Temporary (excludes Summer Recrea on) Total

767 1 768 226 994

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History of Coral Springs Known as “the City in the Country,” Coral Springs has become a premier South Florida community, known for its abundant parks, quality schools, numerous athle c programs, and a rac ve neighborhoods. Prior to its incorpora on as a city in July 1963, the area that was to become Coral Springs was part of a huge tract of land acquired by Henry “Bud” Lyons between 1911 and 1939 that totaled over 20,000 acres of marshy wilderness in western Broward County. Clearing and draining the land himself, with the help of workers from the Bahamas, most of the land was used to grow beans, earning him the nickname “Titan of the Bean Patch.” Lyons died in 1952, leaving his vast land holdings to his family, who converted the land to be used for ranching, bringing in 5,000 head of ca le. A er a series of wet hurricanes had flooded much of the southern por ons of the state in 1947, Florida created the Central and Southern Florida Flood Control District (now the South Florida Water Management District) that built a network of canals and levees throughout South Florida. The canals helped to further drain the land that would become Coral Springs. Similar to the land rush of the 1920s, a er World War II there was another real estate

boom in South Florida. Coral Ridge Proper es, a land development firm, was started by James Hunt, Joseph Taravella, and Stephen Calder to develop communi es in Broward County. By the late 1950s, they were running out of land to develop in the Fort Lauderdale area and were seeking opportuni es further west. Although s ll somewhat swampy, land in the northwest corner of Broward County, now owned by Lena Lyons, perfectly suited Hunt’s vision for a master-planned community. On December 14, 1961, Coral Ridge Proper es purchased 3,860 acres for $1 million. They moved three wooden shacks onto the land, along with five Coral Ridge Proper es employees, which made the land eligible to incorporate as a city under Florida law. The City of Coral Springs was chartered on July 10, 1963. Other names that were considered included “Curran Village,” “Pompano Springs,” and “Quartermore.” Addi onal land purchases from the Lyons family brought the total land in the City up to 5,000 acres. By 1964, a master plan was developed that projected a popula on of more than 50,000 residents living in small neighborhoods throughout the community. On July 22, 1964, the first land sale was held in Ft. Lauderdale’s Galt Ocean Mile Hotel, selling 536 building lots for $1.6 million. Looking to give the new town a country flair, Hunt ordered the construc on of the Covered Bridge that same year. It is now a Florida Heritage site. Coral Ridge Property employees staffed the City administra on, with Werner Buntemeyer holding the posi on of city manager from 1964 to 1974. In 1965, Coral Ridge Proper es acquired an addi onal 5,000 acres from Lena Lyons, increasing the area within the City to 16 square miles.

The Covered Bridge built in 1964, spanning the canal on Northwest 59th Avenue just south of Wiles Road, was the City’s first structure and is a Florida Heritage Site. The Covered Bridge was renovated in 2007, and local ar st Val Tascon repainted the artwork to match the original design.

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From the very beginning, Coral Ridge Proper es enacted strict landscaping and sign laws designed to create a beau ful and natural looking town. In May 1965, a second land sale was held, this me in Coral Springs, with television celebrity Johnny Carson on

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


hand to help draw buyers. Johnny himself bought almost 55 acres of land. This me 1,100 lots were sold. Then the first residents began moving in, including Wilfred Neale II and Robert Fuller in The Hills in early 1965. Both became early city commissioners. Also in 1965, the City’s first employee was hired, Police Chief Richard Vedilago, who was assisted by a German Shepherd named “Sergeant Satan.” According to Stuart McIver, in 1966 Wes nghouse Electric Corpora on acquired Coral Ridge Proper es so it could use the new City as an “urban laboratory to evaluate new products, such as a home u lity center, home sewage disposal systems, an infrared hea ng system, full electric kitchens, and central aircondi oning and hea ng systems.” In 1967, the City had several hundred residents and held its first elec on. Lewie Mullins was elected mayor and Robert Fuller vice-mayor. The remaining commissioners were Wilfred Neale, Peter Giordano, and Richard Hunt. The census of 1970 set Coral Springs’ popula on at 1,489, although the City Manager believed the actual number was closer to 3,750. In January 1970, the Broward County School Board voted to build the City’s first elementary school. Wes nghouse opened its “Electra Center” designed to showcase state-of-the-art home systems. Some of these modern conveniences were built into model homes in the Electra Lab to allow visitors to experience mo on-detec ng lights, electric kitchens, and home security systems first hand. The volunteer Fire Department was also started in 1970. Early in 1971, the last large increase in property came with the purchase of the Remsberg Ranch on the north side of the City. The City was now 13,400 acres. In 1974, O. Benjamin Geiger was elected Mayor and began the task of making Coral Springs independent. This included establishing the City’s first ad valorem property tax, which at $4.0000 mils, was a huge increase to residents’ tax bills. He also led the commission in hiring Phillip Kelley as the new City Manager, comple ng the break from Coral Ridge Proper es. It was during this transi on that the City’s codes and ordinances were created and the charter was modified to reflect the new vision for the City. The Commission wanted a professionally run City, so they chose a strong city manager form of government.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Coral Springs’ first police officers were Vic Vedilago and Sergeant Satan, hired on November 1, 1965 when the official popula on was 10. They patrolled mostly barren landscape coming across more snakes and alligators than people.

Pony Express: Before door-to-door delivery began, residents picked up their mail at the Coral Ridge Proper es Administra on Building, which is now City Hall. Local delivery didn’t begin un l 1970.

Village Green, the City’s first shopping center, built in 1967 at the southwest corner of University Drive and Sample Road, included a barbershop, restaurant, pharmacy and market, leased by Publix. Before that, all shopping had to be done in Margate via Wiles Road as Sample Road did not run to 441 un l 1970.

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The City grew at an incredible pace. Ten new public schools, a regional mall, shopping centers, and parks sprang up around the City during the 1970s. By 1980, the popula on had swelled to more than 37,000 people. During the 1980s, growth con nued to be the City’s greatest concern. By 1985, the popula on had passed 50,000 and

transporta on centers in Broward County. The City was becoming more and more a rac ve to corporate reloca ons and retailers. The 1990s turned out to be a cri cal decade in the life of the City. Only thirty years old, the City was nonetheless facing a staggering growth rate—which created a huge demand for City services aimed at enhancing quality of life. Between 1990 and 2000, the City’s popula on grew from 78,864 to 117,549 and the taxable value from $2.8 billion to $4.7 billion.

By 1994, it became apparent that there was a need for be er recrea onal and cultural programming for City residents, so several exis ng facili es were improved and new City Hall was originally the Administra on Building for the corporate headquarters of Coral Ridge Proper es. ones opened to serve the growing popula on. The Coral Springs City Centre was schools were overcrowded throughout the renovated to add an art museum and renamed community as young families poured into the the Coral Springs Center for the Arts, where neighborhoods. The reali es of development arts and community programming for all ages were beginning to have an effect by increasing is offered. The Aqua c Complex was expanded traffic and crowding, providing a series of and improved, with a new fitness center and challenges for the City’s planning office. be er diving pools. The Sportsplex and Tennis Center were created to provide addi onal The Honda Classic golf tournament moved recrea on ac vi es. to Eagle Trace Country Club in 1984 bringing na onal a en on to the City. At the same me, City residents passed a $7.5 million bond referendum to purchase The total property value had passed the environmentally sensi ve lands with the goal $1 billion mark in 1983 and the City began of purchasing and preserving the few wetlands planning bond referendums for community le within the City of Coral Springs. These parks, a public safety facility, fire sta ons, and parks, including Red Lichen and Sandy Ridge, a community center. Recognizing the strength provide educa onal and aesthe c treasures to of the City’s financial posi on, Moody’s the City’s park system. Investors Service increased the City’s bond ra ng from ‘Baa’ to ‘A-1,’ and Standard and The biggest change to affect the City began in Poor’s from ‘BBB+’ to ‘A+’. 1993 when City management implemented a total quality management program, designed Coral Springs was rapidly filling up with singleto completely overhaul opera ons and service family homes and apartment complexes, delivery by becoming customer-focused and earning it a reputa on as a “yuppie” bedroom quality-oriented. The central feature of the community. That began to change a er program was a new business model that 1986 when the Sawgrass Expressway was would take us from “government as usual” to constructed, linking the City to the major

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Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


a high-performance municipal corpora on. The strategic and business planning system we use today—alloca ng resources strategically through data-driven decision making—was ins tuted in 1995. It didn’t take long for the new model to prove itself. In 1997, Coral Springs was awarded the Florida Governor’s Sterling Award, making it the first municipality to be awarded a statesanc oned, Baldrige-based quality award, and again in 2003, receiving the government Sterling Award for a second me valida ng our sustained commitment to delivering the highest quality of customer service to our community. In 1998, our “Time=Life Team,” a process improvement team that created the City’s outstanding Emergency Medical Services division, won the Florida Sterling Quality Conference Team Showcase Award and went on to place fourth at the na onal conference. Soon a er, the Forest Hills Resident Associa on, one of our older neighborhoods, was awarded the Neighborhood of the Year Award from Neighborhoods, USA. Recogni on wasn’t the only posi ve outcome of the City’s business model. When 95% of our residen al property was developed in the late 1990s, we reached “build-out,” a me when growth-related revenues dropped precipitously. We were able to make the transi on smoothly, without any change to our current opera ng millage rates.

The new millennium has brought even more exci ng news. We are the first state or local government to receive the pres gious Malcolm Baldrige Na onal Quality Award for performance excellence and innova on, a presiden al honor. In presen ng the award at a na onal conference in Washington, DC, Secretary of Commerce Carlos Gu errez commended recipients for developing an innova ve approach to performance excellence that benefits their organiza on, their community, and our na on. Coral Springs is also among an elite group of only 34 ci es na onwide to have bonds rated ‘AAA’ by all three ra ng agencies on Wall Street. ‘AAA’ is the highest credit ra ng afforded to municipali es for superior financial performance management. All three ra ng agencies praised the City’s solid overall financial posi on, effec ve long-range planning, and prudent management policies.

Sources: City of Coral Springs; 1994-95 Guide to Program and Facility Sponsorships; 1994. City of Coral Springs; Economic Development Brochure; 1988. City of Coral Springs; Sta s cal Guide for Economic Development; Coral Ridge Proper es, Coral Springs, FL; 1989. Greater Coral Springs Chamber of Commerce; Guide to Greater Coral Springs Florida; 1994. McIver, Stuart; Coral Springs: the First Twenty-Five Years; The Donning Company, Norfolk, VA; 1988. Wangberg, Wendy and Kevin Knutson; Images of America: Coral Springs; Arcadia Publishing; 2003. Various City documents and memoranda.

Historical Advisory Commi ee Mission Statement The principal mission of the City of Coral Springs Historical Advisory Commi ee is to ac vely collect, preserve and showcase memorabilia rela ng to all aspects of the City’s history. Furthermore, the City of Coral Springs Historical Advisory Commi ee shall work in conjunc on with City staff to foster a sense of community spirit and to encourage ci zen involvement and pride in the City’s heritage.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

13


Management and Budget Office MBO Staff Robert Goehrig Director of Budget, Strategy, and Communica ons (954) 344-5920 rgoehrig@coralsprings.org

Forrest Lehman Senior Financial Analyst (954) 344-5902 flehman@coralsprings.org

Rita Radziwon Senior Financial Analyst (954) 344-5938 rlanning@coralsprings.org

Chelsea Stahl Senior Financial Analyst (954) 344-5914 cstahl@coralsprings.org

Liliana Alvarez Senior Financial Analyst (954) 344-1133 lalvarez@coralsprings.org

Sherri Toops Grant Writer (954) 346-1723 stoops@coralsprings.org

Linda Kuhlman Budget Analyst (954) 344-1093 lkuhlman@coralsprings.org

City of Coral Springs 9551 West Sample Road Coral Springs, FL 33065 www.coralsprings.org Fax: (954) 344-1198

We are pleased to present this na onally recognized planning and budge ng document as one of the many services we provide to the City of Coral Springs. The Management and Budget Office (MBO) is a division of the City Manager’s Office and is responsible for managing and implemen ng several cross-func onal processes within the City, including: Strategic Plan Business Plan Performance Measurement System Annual Budget Capital Improvement Program Performance Improvement Projects Grants Business SWAT Team Projects Program Analysis Financial Analysis Performance Benchmarking Opera onal Audi ng Technical Assistance for Departments Our budge ng system meets all of the best prac ce recommenda ons of the Na onal Advisory Council on State and Local Budge ng, as well as previous recommenda ons by the Government Finance Officers Associa on (GFOA). We have had the good fortune to receive the Government Finance Officers Associa on Dis nguished Budget Presenta on Award for twenty consecu ve years. In past years, our Annual Budget has received “Special Performance Measures Recogni on” from GFOA as well as “Outstanding as a Policy Document and Opera ons Guide.”

Our Performance Measurement system was selected as a “Best Prac ce” by the American Quality and Produc vity Center. We also received the Interna onal City/County Managers Associa on Center for Performance Measurement Cer ficate of Dis nc on. Our strategic planning, performance measurement, and budge ng efforts also contributed to the receipt of the 2007 Malcolm Baldrige Na onal Quality Award. We are the first state or local government to receive the Baldrige Award. In addi on, we also received the Florida Governor’s Sterling Award for Organiza onal Performance Excellence in 1997 and again in 2003. We are the first organiza on to win the Governor’s Sterling Award for the second me. For more informa on, please visit our web site, www.coralsprings.org, to download copies of our Strategic Plan, Business Plan, Annual Budget, Capital Improvement Plan, and other related documents and presenta ons.

Thank You! Thanks to the City Manager’s Office, the department heads and their staff for helping us make this budget successful! We’d also like to acknowledge the invaluable assistance of Chris ne Parkinson Jahrsdoerfer in developing the cover design of this budget document.

In addi on, our performance measurement and budge ng system has been cited as a “Best Prac ce” by the Na onal Partnership for Reinven ng Government. The Fitch Ra ng Agency uses our planning system as a model for ci es interested in achieving the dis nc on of an ‘AAA’ bond ra ng. Pictured from le : Chelsea Stahl, Linda Kuhlman, Forrest Lehman, Sherri Toops, Bob Goehrig, Liliana Alvarez, and Rita Radziwon.

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Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Budget Overview Contents Budget Process Overview ....................................................................................................................16 Budget Highlights ................................................................................................................................21 Fund Structure Overview ....................................................................................................................24 Combined Budget Summary................................................................................................................26 Fund Budget Overviews.......................................................................................................................30 General Fund Summary................................................................................................................30 General Fund Descrip on ............................................................................................................33 Fire Fund Summary Descrip on ...................................................................................................39 Fire Fund Descrip on ...................................................................................................................40 Water and Sewer Fund Summary.................................................................................................43 Water and Sewer Fund Descrip on..............................................................................................44 Health Fund Summary..................................................................................................................46 Health Fund Descrip on...............................................................................................................47 General Insurance Fund Summary ..............................................................................................48 General Insurance Fund Descrip on ...........................................................................................49 Coral Springs Charter School Fund Summary ..............................................................................50 Coral Springs Charter School Fund Descrip on ............................................................................50 Public Art Fund Summary.............................................................................................................51 Public Art Fund Descrip on ........................................................................................................51 Equipment Services Fund Summary .............................................................................................52 Equipment Services Fund Descrip on..........................................................................................53 Pension Fund Summary................................................................................................................55 Pension Fund Descrip on.............................................................................................................56 Debt Service Fund Summary ........................................................................................................57 Debt Service Fund Descrip on .....................................................................................................58 Debt Management .......................................................................................................................60 Capital Improvement Program ............................................................................................................64 Impact of CIP on the City’s Opera ng Budget ..............................................................................67 Capital Improvement Summary by Fund......................................................................................70 CIP Budget by Funding Source—All Funds ...................................................................................71 Major Capital Projects by Department .........................................................................................72 Major Capital Projects by Loca on...............................................................................................73 General Fund CIP Summary by Funding Source ...........................................................................74 Revenue Trends ...................................................................................................................................75 Five-Year Forecast ................................................................................................................................77

City of Coral Springs, Florida

15


Budget Process Overview The Budget Environment

How the Budget Was Created

Due to the challenges posed by property tax reform and the lingering economic malaise, budge ng for Fiscal Year 2013 has been like no other. While the rising cost of health care and public safety pensions has made controlling costs difficult, the recent property tax relief measures imposed by the state legislature coupled with the mortgage debacle have caused ad valorem revenues to drop nearly 13%, or $4.5 million, since 2007! Due to interest paid on idle balances hovering at record lows, the City’s interest income has plummeted by $1.1 million, or 78%, since 2007. In addi on, the slow economic recovery has caused demand-driven revenues, such as sales and fuel taxes, to decline. For example, between Fiscal Year 2007 and Fiscal Year 2011, half-cent sales tax revenue has plunged by $1 million or nearly 13%; state shared revenue (which is based, in part, on the sale of fuel) has dropped by $500,000 or 14%; and revenue from building permits has fallen by half or about $2 million. Further, the reduc on in the fuel surcharge has caused the electric franchise fee revenue to drop by $1 million, or 13%, since 2007.

The first year of the 2012-2013 Strategic Plan began with the City’s mission, strategic priori es, and Key Intended Outcomes developed in year one. Reviewed and updated biennially, the plan creates a shared vision for the future of the community.

Economists are predic ng 2 to 3% economic growth during the coming year. While this growth rate would be considered respectable during normal mes, it is not enough to hasten the slow economic recovery. We have, therefore, adopted a moderate growth philosophy for Fiscal Year 2013 revenue es mates. To hedge against being too op mis c, we will maintain a larger than normal con ngency to counterbalance this risk. To encourage growth, the City will take a leadership role in crea ng its future by inves ng in the community. In partnership with the Economic Development Founda on, Community Redevelopment Agency, the Chamber of Commerce, and other stakeholders, the City will proac vely prime the engine of economic growth by assis ng our exis ng business community, devo ng resources to encourage the redevelopment of the City’s commercial areas such as the Corporate Park, and inves ng in educa on. In addi on, the City will work to a ract businesses and increase property values by inves ng in the appearance and the safety of our community.

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Strategic Priori es Beginning in 1997, the City Commission began a process of strategic planning designed to iden fy the issues that must be addressed to achieve our mission and that will persist over the life me of the Strategic Plan. These long-range policy issues developed by the City Commission in Fiscal Year 2012, emphasize the values of our customers: •

Customer-Involved Government

Neighborhood and Environmental Sustainability

Financial Health and Economic Development

Traffic, Mobility, and Connec vity

Youth Development and Family Values

Strength in Diversity

Excellence in Educa on

For each priority, an ac on plan is developed for implemen ng policy and opera ng measures. Through this process, the Business Plan was developed: • Commission Priority: Iden fy the vital issues. • Key Intended Outcomes (KIO): Iden fy desired results. • Ini a ves: Allocate ac vi es, resources, personnel, investment and me planned for the year to achieve each KIO. • Performance Measures: Specific and measurable data indica ng the effec veness in mee ng the KIOs. • By se ng quality targets (Key Intended Outcomes) we are able to determine the resources necessary to meet them. The Business Plan sec on includes a matrix lis ng the KIOs and the departments that impact each.

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Business Plan Just as in previous years, once the priori es and indicators are established, the opera ons of the City are reviewed and resources aligned to bring the strategic vision to life. Specific ac ons, programs, capital purchases, staffing requirements and funding levels are developed in response to the needs iden fied in the strategic plan. The Business Plan is an outgrowth of the strategic priori es, capturing the City’s vision in a quan fiable form, improving decisionmaking and resource alloca on. Despite the reduc on in revenues, ini a ves in this year’s plan focus on economic development, as well as improving the look of the City. A guiding principle we’ve used to focus our analysis is to con nue to offer our customers the highest quality services possible. A benefit of using a business plan is the direct link between costs, ac vi es, and key drivers. We use this model to monitor our performance by: • Performing variance analysis using cost drivers. • Mapping the process that links budget items to ac vi es. • Iden fying value-added and non-value-added ac vi es. In developing the Fiscal Year 2013 opera ng budget, departments analyze both exis ng and poten al services in light of the strategic priori es. The Business Plan iden fies added and removed services, which are then quan fied in the line item budget. They reflect not only the strategic priori es as set by the City Commission, but also incorporate feedback from customer surveys and policy ini a ves that contribute to the long-term financial health of the City. Departments set goals to meet the needs iden fied by the strategic priori es. To meet these goals, programs within the departments have specific objec ves that are measured through process indicators. Staff ’s individual objec ves and performance measures are then linked to the program objec ves. Each employee knows what the end result should be and how it contributes to the strategic plan. In this way, the budget becomes a tool for monitoring, rather than controlling, opera ng performance. The performance measures table included with each department’s summary is designed to show how the program objec ves support the strategic priori es. Each performance measure is explicitly related to the Key Intended Outcome it supports and the strategic priori es it addresses. Our policy deployment model follows the illustrated path. It’s significant we view the process in this fashion, so we combine top-down and bo om-up input, ghtly linking targets to the strategic plan.

City Mission

Strategic Priori es

Key Intended Outcomes Department Performance Measures

Budget Methodology The budget for the City of Coral Springs is a performancebased budge ng system. This type of budge ng system iden fies a par cular level of service performance for each type of service (program) and the resources needed to operate it, as well as describes the structure of the departments and the programs into which they are divided. The department’s budget is separated into the following components: Mission Statement—the statement iden fies the specific purpose for the department and how it relates to the City’s overall mission. Core Processes and Outputs—a lis ng of the fundamental processes and the outputs for the department. New Ini a ves—new services or the removal of exis ng services as they relate to the strategic plan. Objec ves and Performance Measures—the objec ves focus on par cular program accomplishments that will be a ained within the current year. All objec ves are measurable by the performance indicators supplied. Each performance measure includes explicit links showing how program objec ves and their indicators are directly related to KIOs and the strategic priori es they support. Organiza on Charts—outline of program structure within the department. Program/Expenditure Summary—the budget for the department, summarized by program, if applicable, and by major category of expenditure: • Personal Services—salaries, over me and other pay including vaca on payment incen ve, holiday pay, temporary wages. • Benefits—FICA, re rement contribu ons, health and other benefits. • Other Expenses—supplies, repairs, u li es, services and other costs. • Opera ng Capital—departmental machinery and equipment under $5,000.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

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Approach To The Budget Review Process Start-Up We begin by reviewing all current services in light of the Strategic Plan. Are current services sufficient or necessary? What are our customers’ needs and desires? Through ci zen and business surveys, SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportuni es, threats) analysis, Slice of the Springs mee ngs, our customers’ input is a cri cal piece of the budget process. What new ini a ves should be undertaken to meet cons tuent requirements or a changing market environment? We then develop a list of recommended changes arising out of this analysis, forming the basis for the Business Plan. Beginning with each department’s mission statement, which is a driving force behind the department’s budget and should set the direc on of the department, we develop a projected budget based on the previous year’s budget with any new ini a ves appended, and any discon nued services removed. From there, goals and objec ves are developed that relate to each other and to the department’s mission and the City’s Key Intended Outcomes as outlined in the Strategic Plan. Goals and objec ves should be realis c, quan fiable, and include improvements to the efficiency and effec veness of the department. Current goals and objec ves may be used to establish a star ng point for the future. In the spring, the Management and Budget Office (MBO) distributes to departments a target budget for the coming year, which is based on projec ons of current year expenditures, as well as the two prior years’ actual expenditures. Included in this target budget are budgeted line items for salaries and benefits (for example, pension and health plan alloca ons). Also included are the current year’s goals and objec ves for the department. At the same me, Capital Replacement Program, Capital Improvement Program and physical inventory worksheets are distributed for department input. Verifica on of all numbers and assump ons made in these categories is carried out by departmental staff. Personnel changes such as re rements, projected salary increases or changes in hours worked are submi ed to the Management and Budget Office. Methodology

Second, CMO asked departments to iden fy cost savings and/or revenue enhancements resul ng from service refinements. The service refinement exercise was not necessarily about cu ng service, but about finding a different way of providing that service. Investments were considered if they would lead to enhanced produc vity or reduced expenditures. While indiscriminate, across-the-board cuts are easy to implement and have the pretense of equity and fairness, these cuts do not consider customer (that is, residents and businesses) needs and expecta ons. The City of Coral Springs’ business model, by contrast, has customerdriven excellence as its founda on. Our customer-driven excellence philosophy enables the City to address poten al challenges strategically. It involves awareness of current and emerging customer needs, expecta ons and trends, which, in turn, leads to increasing levels of customer trust, value, and sa sfac on. Opera ng Expenses The target budget will also contain opera ng expenses based on projec ons of the current year’s expenditures. The actual users of the supplies and services review their prac ces and habits involving daily expenditures for possible efficiencies. Departments review the line item account codes for accuracy of descrip on and determine if they reflect the actual types of expenditures. Lastly, they provide jus fica on for any changes from the target budget with the use of informa on from current year expenditures or informa on obtained from other sources, such as trends in next year’s contracts or service costs provided by the Purchasing Division. Capital Expenses Departments also evaluate all exis ng equipment, facili es, and other capital items, to determine if useful life has been exceeded, or will be exceeded, in the coming budget year. They then iden fy all recommended capital expenditures from this evalua on of equipment. Vehicle life expectancy informa on is provided by the Public Works DepartmentEquipment Services Division. Other capital expenses, such as office equipment, are es mated with help from the Purchasing Division. Each department maintains a six-year Capital Improvement Program plan for its equipment needs and submits same to MBO for review, summariza on and presenta on to the City Commission for approval.

Given the slow economic recovery, the budget process proceeded in two steps. First, MBO asked departments to develop a budget with the expecta on of no new money.

18

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Business Plan Taking into account the market environment, customer expecta ons and emerging issues, the changes to service structure (discon nued services, new ini a ves, etc.) are outlined and cross-referenced to the Strategic Plan. Citywide financial strategies are iden fied to address the long-term needs of the City in rela on to emerging issues that have been iden fied through the strategic planning process.

Approving The Budget During the summer months, recommended opera ng and capital improvement program budget documents are prepared and presented to the City Manager and forwarded to the City Commission for review during budget workshops which are open to the public. The City Commission either approves or makes changes to the recommended budget(s) and returns to staff for further study.

An cipated results are iden fied and linked to Key Intended Outcomes for inclusion in the City’s performance measurement system.

Public hearings and final adop on of the budget occur in mid-September.

Based on the recommended projects and services, a preliminary budget is presented at the Business Plan workshop.

Monitoring The Budget

Budget Format A municipal budget document should provide sufficient, meaningful and useful informa on to elected officials, City staff, and to the public. To that end, we have developed a budget document that serves four primary func ons: • Policy document • Financial plan

The Budget staff is authorized to transfer funds within individual departments. Revisions that alter the total expenditures of any department within a fund must be approved by the City Manager. Actual expenditures and opera ng transfers out may not exceed budget appropria ons at the individual fund level. Appropria ons which are neither expended, encumbered, nor specifically designated to be carried over lapse at the end of the fiscal year.

• Opera ons guide • Communica on device.

Amending The Budget

Together, these budget elements define what the City of Coral Springs has done, what it plans to do, and how it will accomplish its objec ves.

If, during the course of the fiscal year, it becomes evident that a par cular fund is unable to provide the required level of services to the community due to unexpected higher costs of providing the service, the budget may be amended.

The budget is a program- and performance-based plan that links prescribed organiza onal goals and objec ves with the financial resources necessary to achieve them. Each of the budget’s programs represent a “product” of the City. Contained within each program are objec ves and achievements. The program/performance budget is integrated with line item financial informa on to ensure op mal budget control. This program/performance budget enables the City Commission and the public to analyze the budget by priori es based on program goals and performance objec ves rather than line item costs. In addi on, this format provides informa on so that the City Commission and the public will have a be er understanding of the alloca on of resources among programs and the measurable work that each department will accomplish.

The Director of Budget and Strategic Planning submits a request to amend the budget to the City Commission. The request contains a wri en explana on from the director(s) of the department(s) needing addi onal funds. The request also includes a proposal for financing the addi onal expenditures, such as by appropria ng from the fund balance/retained earnings or by submi ng evidence of expected surplus from current year revenues. City Commission approval is required for budget amendments which alter the total adopted budget amount of any fund.

The Fiscal Year 2013 budget includes the following sec ons: IntroducƟon, Budget Overview, Business Plan, Performance Budget, and Appendix.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

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Budget Calendar 04/3/2012

BudgetKickoff/DepartmentalBudgetPackagesdistributed







04/3/2012 04/4/2012

BudgetTrainingSession BudgetTrainingSession



05/04/2012 DepartmentalBudgetPackageduetoMBO 

05/10/2012 CommissionStrategicPlanUpdate* 





05/09Ͳ05/20 DepartmentMeetingswithCMO 

06/05/2012 CommissionBusinessPlanPreviewWorkshop* 





06/13/2012 DepartmentDirectors’BusinessPlanMiniͲRetreat 





07/10/2012 CommissionBusinessPlanWorkshopI* 

07/24/2012 CommissionBusinessPlanWorkshopII*   (TRIMNotificationpreparedandsubmittedtoCityCommission)   (AdoptPreliminaryAssessmentResolutions) 

08/30/2012 MBOprovidesdraftofOperatingandCapitalImprovementBudgetstoCMO 

09/05/2012 CMOreviewofproposedOperatingandCapitalImprovementBudgets 

09/07/2012 ProposedOperatingandCapitalImprovementBudgetssubmittedtoCommission andpostedonlineforpublicreview 

09/12/2012 FirstPublicHearing* 

09/18/2012 SecondPublicHearing—OperatingandCapitalImprovementBudgetsAdopted*  *AllCommissionmeetingsandworkshopsopentopublic  AbbreviationsUsed CMO—CityManager’sOffice MBO—Management&BudgetOffice TRIM—TruthinMillage 

20

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Budget Highlights Introduc on

Tax rate Fiscal Year 2013

The Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget, which was adopted on September 18, 2012, is a numerical reflec on of the Fiscal Year 2013 Business Plan. By alloca ng our resources through a balanced alignment with the City Commission’s seven strategic priori es and departmental performance indicators, we believe this budget will successfully meet the challenges we have before us and set the stage for our con nued success in the future.

General Opera ng Millage

$4.5697

Debt Service Millage

$0.2906

Combined City Millage Rate

$4.8603

Budget in Brief The adopted opera ng net budget for Fiscal Year 2013 for all funds totals $151,766,237. This represents a decrease of $386,661 or 0.3% less than the Fiscal Year 2012 net budget. The Fiscal Year 2013 budget is balanced, prudent and responsive to community needs as iden fied in the Fiscal Years 2012 - 2013 Strategic Plan. Some features of the Fiscal Year 2013 budget that deserve special a en on are: • The adopted opera ng millage rate will increase from $4.3939 to $4.5697, an increase of $0.1758 or 4%. This increase will allow the City to collect approximately $1,729,000 addi onal property tax revenue than last year. • The voter-approved debt service millage rate will decrease from $0.2915 to $0.2906, a decrease of $0.0009 or 0.3%. • The combined general opera ng and debt service millage rate is $4.8603 per $1,000 of assessed value, an increase of $0.1749 or 3.7%. • An increase of $9.33 per single family residence for Fire Special Assessment fees. • A Water and Sewer fee increase of approximately $1.82 per month for an average single family residence.

Opera ng millage rate $8.0000 $7.0000 $6.0000 $5.0000 $4.0000

• General Fund debt service for franchise and capital revenue bonds, as a percentage of total

City of Coral Springs, Florida

$3.8715 $3.3651 $3.3651

$3.8866

$4.3559 $4.3939 $4.5697

$3.0000 $2.0000 $1.0000 $0.0000 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013

The adopted opera ng millage rate will increase from $4.3939 to $4.5697 or 4% in Fiscal Year 2013. This property tax rate will generate approximately $1,729,000 more than last year. A 13% decrease in Fiscal Year 2008 was in response to property tax legisla on.

Voter-approved debt service millage rate $1.0000 $0.8000 $0.6000

$0.5228 $0.4131

$0.4000

$0.3924 $0.2510

$0.2000

• Solid Waste Special Assessment will decrease $6.48 for a single family residence.

$3.8715 $3.8715 $3.8715 $3.8715

$0.2915 $0.2906 $0.2134 $0.1774 $0.1763 $0.1763 $0.1763

$0.0000 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013

The debt millage rate will decrease from $0.2915 to $0.2906 or 0.3% in Fiscal Year 2013. This debt millage rate will reflect the actual debt service approved by voter referendum. In prior years, fund balance was used to subsidize the annual debt service payment.

21


budget, will equal 3.6% in Fiscal Year 2013 as compared to 2.4% in the current year, well within its General Fund debt service policy limita on of 12.5% of total General Fund expenditures.

Full- me posi ons added in Fiscal Year 2013 General Fund: Addi ons: Law Enforcement Officer Parks Technician Parks Maintenance Worker

• With a General Obliga on bond indebtedness of 0.25% of total taxable assessed value, the City is well below its debt policy limit of 5%.

3 3 1

Staffing Changes

Code Enforcement

2

• Total adopted full- me posi ons in all funds for Fiscal Year 2013 is 767 (excludes the Fire/EMS services contract staff).

Sub-Total

9

• Added thirteen full- me posi ons, nine in the General Fund and four in the Fire Fund. General Fund added three Law Enforcement Officers in Police Patrol, three Parks’ Technicians and one Parks Maintenance Worker, and two Code Enforcement posi ons. The Fire Fund added three Firefighter/Paramedics to the Suppression Division and one Senior Office Assistant to the Training Division. Capital Improvements • The City will invest $23,841,975 in Fiscal Year 2013 to address its capital needs. For more on capital, refer to Capital Improvement Program included in this document. These changes reflect our con nued emphasis to maximize customer sa sfac on by providing the same quality service levels as last year to the City’s businesses, residents, and employees during difficult economic mes.

Opera ng millage rate comparison Fiscal $8.0000

$7.4479

Fire Fund: Addi ons: Firefighter/Paramedic

3

Senior Office Assistant Training Center

1

Sub-Total

4

Net New Posi ons

13

Financial Condi on Despite four years of downward pressure on revenues due to residen al build-out, tax relief legisla on, and the economic recession, Coral Springs con nues to lead the na on in fiscal management and stability. Bond Ra ngs

We are proud of achieving the highest financial honor bestowed on any municipality—earning a ‘AAA’ from Standard and Poors, ‘Aaa’ ra ng from Moody’s Investors Service, and ‘AAA’ ra ng from Fitch Ra ngs. Such ra ngs mean the City’s general obliga on bonds are considered to be of excellent investment quality, which translates into lower interest rates and corresponding lower interest Year 2013 payments. Revenue

$7.2899

$7.0000

$6.4654

$6.1142

$6.0000

CoralSprings

$6.0543 $5.6368 $5.1856

$5.0000

$4.9700 $4.8122 $4.5697

$4.1193

$4.0000 $3.0000 $2.0000 $1.0000

Da vi e Co ra lS pr in gs Ft .L au de rd al e

Su nr Pe ise m br ok e Pi ne De s er fie ld B ea Po ch m pa no B ea ch

ar Pl an ta ti o n

ira m M

Ta m ar ac

Ho lly

w oo d

$0.0000

When comparing Broward County ci es with popula ons greater than 55,000, Coral Springs’ opera ng millage rate is one of the lowest of the 11 municipali es.

22

To ensure its long-term financial success, the City will adopt an ad valorem millage rate that is 5.63 percent higher than the rolledback millage rate of $4.3260 in Fiscal Year 2013. This higher millage rate translates to $1.729 million in addi onal revenue the City will use to renovate Sartory Hall, design a permanent Safety Town building, and hire three addi onal police officers. Intergovernmental Revenue Most economists are expec ng the economy to grow at a modest rate during the coming year. However, rather than growth returning to

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


normal levels quickly, the economy will move slowly but steadily upward. We have, therefore, adopted a moderate growth philosophy for Fiscal Year 2013 revenue es mates. To hedge against being too op mis c, we have adopted a con ngency that is higher than we otherwise would simply to counterbalance this risk.

commercial areas such as the Corporate Park, and inves ng in educa on. In addi on, the City will work to a ract businesses and increase property values by inves ng in the appearance and the safety of our community.

For many years, fund balances improved as a result of growth-related revenues, improved produc vity, and prudent financial management policies. Those fund balances have been leveraged to avoid future debt service by equity financing capital purchases for Fiscal Year 2012. For further informa on on our fund balances, refer to the Appendix sec on of this document.

The City has adopted a targeted-industries approach which will replace the old model of economic development that was essen ally driven by land developers. We will proac vely target the industries that are projected to have the highest growth in our area: health care, medical devices, medical informa on technology, global informa on technology, and distribu on. Our biggest challenge, however, is to fill exis ng vacant industrial and office space. Once absorp on occurs we can set our sights on new development and expansion.

Major Policy Considera ons Although we expect the economic recovery to hold center stage, the City’s strategy to invest in its community, as well as a number of other issues will also be part of the conversa on. Inves ng in the Community During the depths of the recession, the City adopted a three-pronged financial strategy. While this was an appropriate strategy for the me, a new financial strategy is necessary to place the City in the most advantageous posi on to embrace the economic recovery.

Economic Development Strategy

Upgrade Technology Infrastructure The City will con nue to invest in tools that allow its employees to achieve high levels of produc vity as well as provide customer service that is second to none. A state of the art technology infrastructure is a crucial element in allowing the City to meet its service delivery goals now and in the future. This objec ve must be balanced against the need to protect ci zen confiden ality, integrity, and availability of informa on and at the same me control costs. It is also important that all City departments par cipate in the efforts to u lize technology in an efficient and effec ve manner.

Although the recession has officially ended, the return to pre-recession economic growth rates is not on the horizon. Since the fuel that powered the City’s economic engine (popula on growth and new construc on) will not return to previous levels quickly, if at all, we must expect and plan for a new normal. For example, having Annual net opera reached build-out the City can no longer count on development of vacant parcels to spur economic NetOperatingBudget growth. The City Commission has set the stage for this vision by incorpora ng language in the 2012-2013 Strategic Plan direc ng the City to take a leadership role in crea ng its future by inves ng in our community. In partnership with the Economic Development Founda on, Community Redevelopment Agency, the Chamber of Commerce, and other stakeholders, the City will proac vely prime the engine of economic growth by assis ng our exis ng business community, devo ng resources to encourage the redevelopment of the City’s

City of Coral Springs, Florida

ng budget and capital

CapitalImprovements(CIP) TotalFinancialProgram

 NetOperatingBudget GeneralFund SpecialRevenueFunds FireFund C.S.CharterSchoolFund PublicArtFund EnterpriseFunds WaterandSewerFund InternalServiceFunds HealthFund/Gen.Ins.Fund EquipmentServicesFund PensionFund DebtServiceFund TotalNetOperatingBudget

FY2012 FY2013 Budget Budget $152,152,898 $151,766,237 26,951,988 23,841,975 $179,104,886 $175,608,212

FY2012 Budget $64,888,412

FY2013 Budget $66,913,902

10,852,069 10,483,260 76,500

11,098,592 10,046,480 86,500

17,626,865

19,176,769

15,120,020 15,888,674 10,794,794 8,671,101 16,425,088 13,859,067 5,885,890 6,025,152 $152,152,898 $151,766,237

$ % Change Change ($386,661) Ͳ0.3% (3,110,013) Ͳ11.5% ($3,496,674) Ͳ2.0%

$ % Change Change $2,025,490 3.1% 246,523 (436,780) 10,000 1,549,904

2.3% Ͳ4.2% 13.1% 8.8%

768,654 5.1% (2,123,693) Ͳ19.7% (2,566,021) Ͳ15.6% 139,262 2.4% ($386,661) Ͳ0.3%

23


Fund Structure Overview

325

FY 2013 Total Net Budget $175,608,212

FY 2013 Net Opera ng Budget $151,766,237

General Fund $66,913,902

Special Revenue Funds $21,231,572

Enterprise Funds $19,176,769

Internal Services Funds $24,559,775

Fire $11,098,592 Charter School $10,046,480 Public Art $86,500

Water and Sewer $19,176,769

Insurance Funds $15,888,674 Equipment Services $8,671,101

Trust and Agency Funds $13,859,067 Pension $13,859,067

Capital Projects Funds $6,025,152 Debt Service $6,025,152

Major Funds Fund Name

Fund Type

General Fund*

City Opera ng Fund

Fire Fund*

Special Revenue Fund

Water and Sewer Fund*

Enterprise Fund

Health and General Insurance Funds* Internal Service Funds

Fund Descrip on Accounts for police, code enforcement, parks and recrea on, public works, building, emergency medical services, and administra on services Covers the fire department and subsequent divisions, including administra on, suppression, inspec on, training, and communica ons Provides water and wastewater services to approximately 51% of Coral Springs residents Contribute to the City’s insured general liability, property, workers’ compensa on, life and employee medical benefits Includes the revenues and expenses incurred in the opera on of the Coral Springs Charter School Accounts for the costs of maintaining the City’s fleet Includes the Public Art fee receipts collected during the permi ng process for new construc on and renova ons of exis ng structures

Coral Springs Charter School Fund*

Special Revenue Fund

Equipment Services Fund*

Internal Service Fund

Public Art Fund*

Special Revenue Fund

Pension Fund

Trust and Agency Fund

Accounts for the accumula on of resources to be used for re rement benefit payments to the City’s employees

Debt Service Fund*

Debt Service Fund

Covers the revenues and payment of voter approved long-term general obliga on debt and revenue bond debt

*Indicates appropriated funds in accordance with the Budget Ordinance. Refer to the Appendix sec on of this document.

24

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


FY 2013 Capital Budget $23,841,975

General Fund $11,121,865

Enterprise Funds $7,961,000

Water and Sewer $7,961,000

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Special Revenue Funds $1,596,953

Internal Services Funds $3,162,157

Fire $389,800 Charter School $645,653 Public Art $86,500 Tree Trust $475,000

Equipment Services $3,162,157

25


Combined Budget Summary Appropriated Funds Budget—Fiscal Year 2013 

Debt Service Fund

General Fund CASHBALANCE BROUGHTFORWARD

$1,750,000

Capital Projects Fund $0

Public Art Fund

$189,000

Waterand Sewer Fund $0

Fire Fund

$3,190,000

$0

Charter School Fund

FY2013 Total Budget

$1,086,035

$6,215,035

RevenuesByType: Taxes: MillagePer$1,000 AdValoremTaxes $4.5697 AdValoremTaxes $0.2906(VOTEDDEBT) SolidWasteAssessment FireFundSpecialAssessment SalesandUseTaxes FranchiseFees UtilityServiceTaxes LicensesandPermits IntergovernmentalRevenue ChargesforServices FinesandForfeitures MiscellaneousRevenues OtherFinancingSources

32,428,839 2,062,241 1,864,900 9,728,904 7,230,104 9,614,259 10,162,079 3,661,531 12,358,624 12,658,085 1,979,940 4,088,628 1,017,293

3,248 3,959,663

10,128,940

86,500

97,064,282

6,025,152

10,128,940

86,500

GrandTotalRevenuesandBalances

$98,814,282

$6,025,152

$10,317,940

$86,500

ExpendituresByType: GeneralGovernmentalServices Education PublicSafety PhysicalEnvironment EconomicEnvironment CultureandRecreation DebtService CapitalImprovementProgram (ExcludingOpeatingCIP) OtherFinancingSources(Uses)

$13,636,165 566,942 55,137,496 6,784,449 250,000 14,341,495 3,596,864 0 4,500,871

TotalRevenuesand OtherFinancingSources

TotalExpendituresand OtherFinancingUses Reserves TotalAppropriatedExpendituresand Reserves

5,324,469 2,023,073 53,000 172,500 25,938

10,380,445

19,523,254

17,327,884

10,380,445

$22,713,254

$17,327,884

19,453,254 70,000

14,803,729 16,633,049 281,840 86,500 4,311,338

232,860

1,487,027

2,291,295

160,536,457

$11,466,480 $166,751,492

11,466,480

6,025,152

32,428,839 2,062,241 1,864,900 9,728,904 7,230,104 9,614,259 10,162,079 3,661,531 28,063,538 34,134,412 2,032,940 4,334,376 15,218,334

10,317,940

$13,636,165 12,033,422 69,941,225 23,417,498 531,840 14,427,995 14,166,214 10,317,940 8,279,193

98,814,282

6,025,152

10,317,940

86,500

22,713,254

17,327,884

11,466,480

166,751,492

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

$98,814,282

$6,025,152

$10,317,940

$86,500

$22,713,254

$17,327,884

$11,466,480 $166,751,492

Note: Revenues (sources) and Expenses (uses) for Equipment Services, Health, and General Insurance funds are incorporated within all other appropriated funds included in this summary and thus, not listed separately.

Note: In accordance with standard budge ng prac ce, the main difference between the “Summary of Net Budgeted Revenues/Expenditures” on pages 28 and 29 and the “Fiscal Year 2013 Combined Budget Summary” on this page is that the la er does not include internal service funds to avoid double-coun ng interfund transfers (movement of money from one fund to another).

26

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Where the money comes from by source (all funds) CapitalProjects 6.1%

Reserves 3.7%

Fines&Forfeitures 1.2%

LicensesandPermits 2.2%

AdValoremTaxesand Assessments 27.6%

Intergovernmental 16.8% UtilitiesServiceTaxes 6.1% Other 5.7%

ChargesforServices 20.5%

FranchiseFees 5.8%

SalesandUseTaxes 4.3%

Where the money goes by type of program (all funds) CapitalProjects 6.2% DebtService 8.5%

GeneralGovernment 8.2% OtherFinancingSources 5.0%

CultureandRecreation 8.6%

Education 7.2%

PhysicalandEconomical Environment 14.4%

PublicSafety 41.9%

Where the money goes by category (General Fund only) DebtService 3.6%

Supplies/Services 24.5%

PersonalServices/Benefits 71.9%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

27


Summary of net budgeted revenues—Fiscal Year 2013 FY2012 Adopted NetBudget

GeneralFund

$93,317,942

Percent of Total

61.3%

FY2013 Adopted NetBudget

Percent of Total

$93,968,623

Dollar Change

Percent Change

61.9%

$650,681

0.7%

FireFund

15,515,483

10.2%

16,208,294

10.7%

692,811

4.5%

WaterandSewerFund

21,013,612

13.8%

22,713,254

15.0%

1,699,642

8.1%

1,245,000

0.8%

1,610,000

1.0%

365,000

29.3%

11,903,260

7.8%

11,466,480

7.6%

(436,780)

Ͳ3.7%

76,500

0.1%

86,500

0.1%

10,000

13.1%

EquipmentServicesFund

5,775,147

3.8%

3,517,657

2.3% (2,257,490)

Ͳ39.1%

DebtServiceFund

3,305,954

2.2%

2,195,429

1.4% (1,110,525)

Ͳ33.6%

HealthandGeneralInsuranceFunds C.S.CharterSchoolFund PublicArtFund

Total

$152,152,898

100.0% $151,766,237

100.0%

($386,661)

Ͳ0.3%

Note: The total net budgeted revenues and expenditures/expenses are equal. However, the total by fund for revenue and expenditure/expenses are different because of the interfund transfers.

FiscalYear2013NetBudget—AllFunds—Revenues $151,766,237 EquipmentServicesFund 2.3% WaterandSewerFund 15.0%

CharterSchoolFund 7.6% Other 1.1% GeneralFund 61.9% FireFund 10.7% DebtServiceFund 1.4%

28

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Summary of net budgeted expenditures—Fiscal Year 2013 FY2012 Adopted NetBudget

GeneralFund

Percent of Total

$64,888,412

FY2013 Adopted NetBudget

42.6%

$66,913,902

Percent of Total

Dollar Change

Percent Change

44.1% $2,025,490

3.1%

FireFund

10,852,069

7.1%

11,098,592

7.3%

246,523

2.3%

WaterandSewerFund

17,626,865

11.6%

19,176,769

12.6%

1,549,904

8.8%

HealthandGeneralInsuranceFunds

15,120,020

9.9%

15,888,674

10.5%

768,654

5.1%

C.S.CharterSchoolFund

10,483,260

6.9%

10,046,480

6.6%

(436,780)

Ͳ4.2%

76,500

0.1%

86,500

0.1%

10,000

13.1%

EquipmentServicesFund

10,794,794

7.1%

8,671,101

5.7% (2,123,693)

Ͳ19.7%

PensionFund

16,425,088

10.8%

13,859,067

9.1% (2,566,021)

Ͳ15.6%

5,885,890

3.9%

6,025,152

4.0%

100.0% $151,766,237

100.1%

PublicArtFund

DebtServiceFund Total

$152,152,898

139,262

2.4%

($386,661)

Ͳ0.3%

Note: The total net budgeted revenues and expenditures/expenses are equal. However, the total by fund for revenue and expenditure/expenses are different because of interfund transfers.

FiscalYear2013NetBudget—AllFunds—Expenditures $151,766,237

InsuranceFunds 10.5%

PensionFund 9.1%

DebtServiceFund andPublicArtFund 4.1% CharterSchoolFund 6.6% FireFund 7.3%

GeneralFund 44.1%

WaterandSewerFund 12.6% EquipmentServicesFund 5.7%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

29


Fund Budget Overviews General Fund Summary

FY2010 Actual Revenues GeneralOperating AdValoremTaxes SolidWasteAssessment

FY2011 Actual

FY2012 Adopted Budget

FY2012 Estimated Actual

FY2013 Adopted Budget

$31,378,077 $31,512,835 $30,899,061 $31,133,669 $32,428,839 983,711 994,502 1,438,000 1,432,712 1,864,900

$ % ChangeFrom ChangeFrom FY12Budget FY12Budget

$1,529,778 426,900

4.95% 29.69%

FranchiseFees: Electricity SolidWaste SolidWaste(RFPReimbursement) Towing/Other SubtotalͲFranchiseFees

7,165,627 1,483,569 0 89,412 8,738,608

7,050,212 1,491,104 0 92,566 8,633,882

7,297,500 1,673,000 0 100,535 9,071,035

6,738,441 1,726,826 0 90,026 8,555,293

7,080,475 1,929,730 500,000 104,054 9,614,259

(217,025) 256,730 500,000 3,519 543,224

Ͳ2.97% 15.35% n/a 3.50% 5.99%

UtilityServiceTaxes: Electricity Water Propane/NaturalGas SubtotalͲUtilityTaxes

7,690,082 1,639,697 144,841 9,474,620

7,589,037 1,794,541 167,833 9,551,411

7,639,800 1,841,627 167,749 9,649,176

7,731,838 1,819,102 175,792 9,726,732

8,050,000 1,878,459 173,620 10,102,079

410,200 36,832 5,871 452,903

5.37% 2.00% 3.50% 4.69%

StateIntergovernmentalRevenues: CommunicationsServicesTax PEGRevenues SharedRevenues AlcoholicBeverages SalesTax OtherRevenue/MunicipalRebate SubtotalStateIntergovernmental

6,119,035 69,769 3,007,201 46,632 6,519,259 163,194 15,925,090

5,673,513 76,750 3,158,028 53,662 6,713,258 43,658 15,718,869

5,800,000 38,760 3,353,900 117,682 7,102,540 43,031 16,455,913

5,439,445 78,203 3,249,073 107,219 6,684,505 52,091 15,610,536

5,700,000 60,000 3,471,595 125,346 7,230,104 44,322 16,631,367

(100,000) 21,240 117,695 7,664 127,564 1,291 175,454

Ͳ1.72% 54.80% 3.51% 6.51% 1.80% 3.00% 1.07%

OtherIntergovernmentalRevenues: Miscellaneous CommunityBusProgramRevenues FirstLocalOptionFuelTax SecondLocalOptionFuelTax PublicSafetyE911 RecyclingMaterialRevenue ResourceRecoveryDistribution SubtotalOtherIntergovernmental SubtotalIntergovernmental

0 124,853 1,298,132 940,025 269,672 301,291 354,205 3,288,178 19,213,268

40,000 124,913 1,293,370 936,579 294,424 300,692 0 2,989,978 18,708,847

40,000 125,199 1,331,612 964,270 350,000 313,500 0 3,124,581 19,580,494

40,000 125,270 1,207,219 873,300 332,446 333,843 0 2,912,078 18,522,614

40,000 124,954 1,331,612 964,271 220,124 336,400 0 3,017,361 19,648,728

0 (245) 0 1 (129,876) 22,900 0 (107,220) 68,234

0.00% Ͳ0.20% 0.00% 0.00% Ͳ37.11% 7.30% n/a Ͳ3.43% 0.35%

PermitsandBusinessTax: BuildingPermits NotRelatedStateSurcharge RebillableOvertime OtherPermits(WasteHauling) SubtotalPermits

2,348,776 0 1,183 12,476 2,362,435

2,118,582 243,547 0 0 2,362,129

2,610,000 243,346 53,000 7,500 2,913,846

2,017,050 113,358 0 0 2,130,408

2,300,000 145,779 53,530 7,500 2,506,809

(310,000) (97,567) 530 0 (407,037)

Ͳ11.88% Ͳ40.09% 1.00% 0.00% Ͳ13.97%

BusinessTax SubtotalPermitsandBusinessTax

1,175,110 3,537,545

1,151,648 3,513,777

1,230,120 4,143,966

1,160,986 3,291,394

1,154,722 3,661,531

(75,398) (482,435)

Ͳ6.13% Ͳ11.64%

103,630 270,389 38,374 82,807

109,658 312,452 37,266 114,312

89,268 265,765 40,013 84,487

104,890 291,840 39,211 96,488

110,000 273,735 41,211 87,019

20,732 7,970 1,198 2,532

23.22% 3.00% 2.99% 3.00%

ChargesForServices: ParksandRecreation Parks CypressPark MullinsPark NorthCommunityPark(Park31/35) NeighborhoodParks

30

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


General Fund Summary (continued) FY2010 Actual Recreation ActivityCenter RecreationServices SummerRecreation Transportation Gymnasium Aquatics CypressPool MullinsPool AquaticsComplex Sportsplex Tennis TennisCenter CypressTennis SubtotalParksandRecreation

FY2011 Actual

FY2012 Adopted Budget

FY2012 Estimated Actual

FY2013 Adopted Budget

$ % ChangeFrom ChangeFrom FY12Budget FY12Budget (1,211) 593 (30,415) 4,342 (6,964)

Ͳ2.03% 2.99% Ͳ4.66% 9.70% Ͳ1.69%

147,640 69,091 1,471,586 288,359

8,640 4,341 71,586 3,649

6.22% 6.70% 5.11% 1.28%

329,432 120,917 4,149,745

398,840 148,180 4,191,125

14,000 (3,820) 97,173

3.64% Ͳ2.51% 2.37%

1,802,824 1,432,545 3,235,369

1,802,824 1,432,545 3,235,369

1,921,487 1,504,172 3,425,659

118,663 71,627 190,290

6.58% 5.00% 5.88%

555,310 584,165 1,046,634 1,980,848 47,071 4,214,028 11,352,145

676,469 626,954 1,062,494 1,900,000 79,568 4,345,485 11,674,806

758,848 586,751 1,136,280 2,578,547 102,646 5,164,823 12,549,937

637,993 628,515 1,192,838 2,500,000 81,955 5,041,301 12,658,085

(38,476) 1,561 130,344 600,000 2,387 695,816 983,279

Ͳ5.69% 0.25% 12.27% 31.58% 3.00% 16.01% 8.42%

684,565 120,480 0 710,137 105,130 1,620,312

619,178 100,309 0 657,846 113,677 1,491,010

700,000 129,340 50,000 675,000 308,885 1,863,225

514,754 71,392 3,175 654,696 294,775 1,538,792

650,000 118,500 50,000 702,000 459,440 1,979,940

(50,000) (10,840) 0 27,000 150,555 116,715

Ͳ7.14% Ͳ8.38% 0.00% 4.00% 48.74% 6.26%

480,561 1,055,509 0 369,595 1,420,000

306,074 1,538,664 0 0 1,420,000

650,000 1,450,000 0 122,436 1,420,000

265,554 1,204,766 0 0 1,420,000

575,000 1,472,500 100,000 119,960 1,420,000

(75,000) 22,500 100,000 (2,476) 0

Ͳ11.54% 1.55% n/a Ͳ2.02% 0.00%

OtherIncome: Auction HurricaneAdjustment ConferenceCenter OtherMiscellaneous Subtotal

7,906 20,984 0 618,004 646,894

9,927 0 0 59,444 69,371

17,575 0 150,000 181,578 349,153

5,086 0 124,645 139,125 268,856

17,926 0 150,000 233,242 401,168

351 0 0 51,664 52,015

2.00% n/a 0.00% 28.45% 14.90%

TotalGeneralOperating

89,098,049

89,092,518

92,311,352

89,910,319

96,046,989

4,536,980

4.91%

310,523 0

0 97,798 1,000,000 0 2,550,000 3,647,798

0 111,959 500,000 1,500,000 3,550,000 5,661,959

0 0 500,000 0 2,822,013 3,322,013

0 117,293 0 900,000 1,750,000 2,767,293

0 5,334 (500,000) (600,000) (1,800,000) (2,894,666)

50,772 17,555 626,858 42,074 407,044

35,928 18,966 611,434 45,567 394,906

59,718 19,817 652,863 44,757 411,964

45,736 21,489 612,155 52,087 414,760

58,507 20,410 622,448 49,099 405,000

152,844 75,185 1,444,917 264,462

158,997 68,873 1,456,014 248,231

139,000 64,750 1,400,000 284,710

153,307 66,662 1,506,121 294,650

367,631 137,211 4,081,753

357,346 146,600 4,116,550

384,840 152,000 4,093,952

ChargesforServiceͲOtherFunds: Water&SewerFund FireFund SubtotalͲChg/SvcͲOtherFunds

1,578,298 755,693 2,333,991

1,649,617 1,371,950 3,021,567

ChargesforServiceͲOther: GeneralGovernment CityHallintheMall PublicSafety EMSTransportFees EMSInterfacilityTransportation SubtotalͲChg/SvcͲOther SubtotalͲChargesForServices

97,907 644,305 948,982 1,967,232 105,179 3,763,605 10,179,349

FinesandForfeitures CourtFines OtherPoliceFines RedLightCameras CodeEnforcementCitations&Liens OtherMiscellaneous Subtotal Interest Rents&Royalties 50thAnniversary CRAContribution CharterSchoolLease

Other TransferfromFireFund(ParklandIndirectcost) TransferfromCDBGFund TransferfromLibraryFund ForfeitureͲSRO's AppropriatedFundBalance TotalOther GrandTotalͲRevenues

City of Coral Springs, Florida

0 1,645,459 1,955,982

$91,054,031 $92,740,316 $97,973,311 $93,232,332 $98,814,282

$840,971

n/a 4.76% Ͳ100.00% Ͳ40.00% Ͳ50.70% Ͳ51.12% 0.86%

31


General Fund Summary (continued) FY2010 Actual

FY2011 Actual

FY2012 Adopted Budget

FY2012 Estimated Actual

FY2013 Adopted Budget

$291,513 2,615,304 1,328,275 2,517,893 2,590,506 941,866 467,366 1,094,437 43,535,519 1,595,348 8,142,187 2,472,266 3,874,439 8,020,401 2,435,304 1,571,354 83,493,977

$255,208 2,846,202 1,340,856 2,412,679 2,533,073 781,555 443,837 1,115,883 45,223,489 1,614,964 8,111,165 2,511,262 4,002,779 8,424,523 2,424,544 1,594,429 85,636,448

$298,557 2,798,851 1,331,306 2,648,151 2,670,743 845,120 462,169 1,361,025 46,823,819 1,783,438 8,732,233 2,587,960 4,139,665 9,403,387 2,382,255 1,668,046 89,936,725

$277,535 2,686,193 1,326,880 2,547,849 2,687,018 826,566 434,100 1,096,995 43,833,358 1,731,908 8,939,341 2,478,614 4,012,555 9,074,064 2,389,616 1,594,475 85,937,067

$323,618 2,935,995 1,362,884 2,528,838 2,995,514 839,014 564,048 1,456,254 44,411,871 1,805,460 8,875,165 2,550,192 4,234,257 9,860,570 2,373,105 1,662,820 88,779,605

NonͲDepartmental C.I.P. C.I.P.ConferenceCenterEquipment NonͲDepartmentalOperating Contingency EconomicDevelopmentIncentive MarketAdjustment OtherPostͲEmploymentBenefits(OPEB) CRASpecialAssessment TuitionReimbursement InsuranceAllocation(LTDͲHealthͲLIͲWC) InventoryOver/Shortage CharterSchool(LeaseExpense) CenterfortheArts AttritionOffset InternalAuditor PDCommSys&EqtImprovementStudy 50thAnniversary MicrosoftOfficeLicense SQLDatabaseLicense Property/Casualty FireFundGovt.Assessment SubtotalͲNonͲDepartmental

0 0 677,349 0 4,494 124,895 450,000 221,636 0 387,092 (31,814) 553,810 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 954,718 134,172 3,476,352

0 0 767,733 0 17,774 21,938 0 203,248 0 (13,486) 499,419 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 972,457 141,132 2,610,215

50,000 50,000 793,143 421,050 400,000 75,000 830,000 160,000 81,414 0 0 566,610 445,000 (250,000) 100,000 0 25,000 0 0 887,823 156,715 4,791,755

25,878 50,000 727,531 0 0 135,735 830,000 159,115 46,419 0 10,717 472,111 440,016 0 100,029 0 8,342 0 0 887,823 156,715 4,050,433

InterfundTransfers: FireFundNonprofitSubsidyChurches/Schools CenterforthePerformingArtsFund SubtotalͲInterfundTransfers

841,157 395,000 1,236,157

859,337 395,000 1,254,337

897,755 0 897,755

1,629,946 1,577,338 0 3,207,284

1,628,346 1,574,713 0 3,203,059

375,696 1,565,863 405,517 2,347,076

Expenditures: Departmental CityCommission CityManager(MBO,C&M,Clerk) HumanResources FinancialServices InformationServices CityAttorney DevelopmentServices/Engineering CommunityDevelopment Police CodeEnforcement EmergencyMedicalServices Building PublicWorks Parks&Recreation Aquatics Sportsplex&Tennis TotalDepartmental

$ % ChangeFrom ChangeFrom FY12Budget FY12Budget

$25,061 137,144 31,578 (119,313) 324,771 (6,106) 101,879 95,229 (2,411,948) 22,022 142,932 (37,768) 94,592 457,183 (9,150) (5,226) (1,157,120)

8.39% 4.90% 2.37% Ͳ4.51% 12.16% Ͳ0.72% 22.04% 7.00% Ͳ5.15% 1.23% 1.64% Ͳ1.46% 2.29% 4.86% Ͳ0.38% Ͳ0.31% Ͳ1.29%

803,925 0 659,981 427,265 250,000 222,000 0 137,413 90,707 0 0 566,942 445,000 (150,000) 100,000 45,000 150,000 270,000 360,000 939,990 159,915 5,478,138

753,925 (50,000) (133,162) 6,215 (150,000) 147,000 (830,000) (22,587) 9,293 0 0 332 0 100,000 0 45,000 125,000 270,000 360,000 52,167 3,200 686,383

1507.85% Ͳ100.00% Ͳ16.79% 1.48% Ͳ37.50% 196.00% Ͳ100.00% Ͳ14.12% 11.41% n/a n/a 0.06% 0.00% Ͳ40.00% 0.00% n/a 500.00% n/a n/a 5.88% 2.04% 14.32%

897,755 0 897,755

959,675 0 959,675

61,920 0 61,920

6.90% n/a 6.90%

375,696 1,565,863 405,517 2,347,076

1,625,384 1,565,963 405,517 3,596,864

1,249,688 100 0 1,249,788

332.63% 0.01% 0.00% 53.25%

DebtService: RevenueBond RevBondsͲ'04(Refunding) RevBondsͲ'08 RecoveryZoneBond2010ͲSample&University SubtotalͲRevenueBond TotalDebtService

3,207,284

3,203,059

2,347,076

2,347,076

3,596,864

1,249,788

53.25%

TotalNonͲDepartmental

7,919,793

7,067,611

8,036,586

7,295,264

10,034,677

1,998,091

24.86%

$91,413,770 $92,704,059 $97,973,311 $93,232,331 $98,814,282

$840,971

0.86%

GrandTotalͲExpenditures RevenuesinExcessofExpenditures Positions

32

($359,739) 629.66

$36,257 627.91

$0 631.91

$0 631.91

$0 640.41

$0 8.50

n/a 1.35%

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


General F und Description The General Fund is the general opera ng fund of the City. It provides for a broad spectrum of services such as police, code enforcement, parks and recrea on, public works, building, emergency medical services, and administra ve services. Resources are, in the majority, provided by taxes.

Millage rates General Fund Voter-Approved

Adopted Adopted Adopted Adopted Percent FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 Change $3.8866 $4.3559 $4.3939 $4.5697 4.0% $0.1763 $0.1763 $0.2915 $0.2906 -0.3%

The General Fund is budgeted at $98,814,282 for Total Millage $4.0629 $4.5322 $4.6854 $4.8603 3.7% Fiscal Year 2013. This represents an increase of $840,971 or 0.9% from the Fiscal Year 2012 budget. 2012. This is well below the state-imposed ten mill cap. The This budget is adequate to finance the General Fund ad valorem revenue generated by the Fiscal Year 2013 tax expenses and a por on of the Coral Springs Center for the millage rate is based on the July 1, 2012, assessed value Arts, Insurance, Debt Service, Equipment Services, and provided by the Broward County Property Appraiser’s Pension fund expenses rela ve to the General Fund. Office. Tax year 2012 gross taxable property value increased from $7,402,382,359 to $7,469,991,547 or 0.9%. New addi ons, annexa ons, and construc on added $6,301,450 or 0.08% to the tax roll. Exis ng taxable property value increased $108,729,250 or 1.5%.

Revenues A summary of the Fiscal Year 2013 General Fund revenue by source is provided in the chart below. Major revenue sources for the General Fund Fiscal Year 2013 budget include: Ad valorem taxes: (32.8% of total revenues)

The voter-approved debt service millage rate is $0.2906 per $1,000 of taxable assessed value levied on real and personal property. This represents a decrease of $0.0009 or 0.3% in Fiscal Year 2013.

$32,428,839

Ad valorem taxes represent a levy on the assessed value of real and personal property. In Fiscal Year 2013, ad valorem taxes will account for 32.8% of total General Fund revenues.

There is no legal debt millage limit established by the State of Florida for its municipali es, coun es, or independent taxing districts. City policy does, however, limit annual General Fund debt service expense to 12.5% of the total General Fund budget. At almost 3.6%, the City is well within its General Fund debt service limita on policy.

The general opera ng tax millage rate is $4.5697, represen ng a $0.1758 or 4% increase from Fiscal Year

The combined general opera ng and debt service millage rates of $4.5697 and $0.2906, General Fund total revenues—$98,814,282 respec vely, total $4.8603 per $1,000 of assessed property value. Misc.Revenue The Fiscal Year 2013 combined 4.1% SalesTax Intergovernmental millage rate represents a 3.7% 7.3% 12.6% increase from the Fiscal Year 2012 combined millage rate of $4.6854. FinesandForfeitures UtilityTaxes 10.3%

2.0% ChargesforServices 12.8% Permitsand BusinessTax 3.7% Other 2.8%

AdValoremTaxes 32.8%

“Other” includes Other Financing Sources and Appropriated Fund Balance.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

FranchiseFees/Solid WasteAssessment 11.6%

Solid Waste Assessment: $1,864,900 (1.9% of total revenues) The City assesses single-family homes for solid waste services. An cipated revenue is $426,900 or 30% more than Fiscal Year 2012 as savings for lower pping fees (disposal fees) are passed along to the customer. Solid waste shi ed from charging a percentage to a flat fee.

33


Franchise fees: (9.7% of total revenues)

Franchise fees

$9,614,259

Franchise fees are charges to service providers for the right to operate within the municipal boundaries of the City. The current franchise fee rates, projected Fiscal Year 2013 revenues, and percent change from the adopted Fiscal Year 2012 budget are shown on the chart to the right.

Type (% of Gross)

Fiscal Year 2013 total franchise fees represent 9.7% of the total General Fund revenues, an increase of 6%. (Refer to Revenue Trends in this sec on of the document for more informa on)

Towing/Other

U lity service taxes: $10,102,079 (10.2% of total revenues)

Electricity (6%) Solid Waste

FY 2011 Budgeted Receipts $7,500,000

FY 2012 Budgeted Receipts $7,297,500

1,376,343

1,673,000

1,929,730

15.35%

0

0

500,000

n/a

Solid Waste (RFP Reimbursement)

Total

FY 2013 Percent Budgeted Change Receipts $7,080,475 -2.97%

97,135

100,525

104,054

3.50%

$8,973,478

$9,071,035

$9,614,259

5.99%

FY 2012 Budgeted Receipts $7,639,800

FY 2013 Percent Budgeted Change Receipts $8,050,000 5.37%

U lity service taxes Type (% of Gross)

FY 2011 Budgeted Receipts $7,490,000

Electricity (10%) The City charges a 10% u lity service tax on all Water (10%) 1,612,335 1,841,627 1,878,459 2.00% u lity payments made in the City. As shown in the “U li es service taxes” chart to the right, Propane (10%) 162,076 167,749 173,620 3.50% Fiscal Year 2013 u lity service tax revenues are Total $9,264,411, $9,649,176, $10,102,079 4.69% projected to increase by 4.7% or $452,903 from Fiscal Year 2012 budgeted revenue. (Refer to Revenue Trends in this sec on of the document for more municipal-wide property tax or u lity tax relief, or principal informa on) and interest payments on capital projects only. Sales tax revenue is expected to increase 1.8% or $127,564 in Fiscal Intergovernmental revenue sharing: $12,418,624 Year 2013. (12.6 % of total revenues) Intergovernmental revenue sharing is provided to local municipali es by the state using a predetermined alloca on methodology based, in part, on popula on. An cipated revenues to be received in Fiscal Year 2013 are as follows: Communica ons service tax

$5,700,000

State shared revenue

$3,471,595

First local op on fuel tax

$1,331,612

Second local op on fuel tax

$964,271

Recycling material revenue

$336,400

Public safety E911

$220,124

Alcoholic beverage license

$125,346

Municipal rebate

$44,322

Communica ons service tax funds and public safety E911 revenues are expected to decrease $100,000 and $129,876 respec vely, whereas state revenue sharing funds are expected to increase 3.5% or $117,695 in Fiscal Year 2013. Sales tax: (7.3% of total revenues)

$7,230,104

Also considered an intergovernmental revenue, halfcent sales tax may be used for municipal-wide programs,

34

Permits and business tax: (3.7% of total revenues)

$3,661,531

Building permit revenues are expected to equal $2,300,000, a decrease of $310,000 or 11.9% from Fiscal Year 2012. They include charges for permit and inspec on services related to any construc on, altera on, repair, or other ac vity required by the City Code and South Florida Building Code. We have seen a steep decline in the number of building permit applica ons during Fiscal Years 2008 through 2012 with the majority of permits issued for homeowner renova ons. (Refer to Revenue Trends in this sec on for more informa on on building permits). Building permit revenues represent 3.7% of total General Fund revenue. Business tax revenues are expected at $1,154,722, a decrease of $75,398 or 6.1% in Fiscal Year 2013. Formerly known as an “occupa onal license,” local governments are authorized to charge an annual “business tax” to businesses, professionals, and other for-profit enterprises for the privilege of opera ng a business within the City boundaries. Business tax revenues represent 1.2% of total revenues. Revenues received from rebillable over me for building services and waste hauling permits are also included in this revenue category and account for another 0.1% of total revenues.

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Charges for services—Parks & Recrea on: (4.2% of total revenues)

$4,191,125

Parks and Recrea on revenues are generated from user fees at the City’s parks, pools, and athle c facili es. Fiscal Year 2013 revenues are projected to increase 2.4% or $97,173. This increase is driven primarily by increased usage of Cypress Park, Aqua c Complex, and the Tennis Center. Charges for services—other funds: (3.5% of total revenues)

$3,425,659

The transfer from the Water and Sewer Fund to the General Fund is increasing by $118,663 or 6.6%. The transfer from the Fire Fund to the General Fund is increasing by $71,627, or 5%, in Fiscal Year 2013. This increase will more fully cover the actual cost of administra ve services. Charges for services—other: (5% of total revenues)

$5,041,301

Charges for services rendered represent a fair method of recovering the cost of providing a service to an individual or group, not the community at large. These user fees are primarily related to planning, EMS, and general governmental services. Fiscal Year 2013 revenues are projected to increase 16% or $695,816 from the adopted Fiscal Year 2012 budget. EMS transport fee revenue is expected to increase by 31.6% or $600,000 from Fiscal Year 2012, mainly due to a higher collec on rate with implementa on of Phase 2 and 3 by a new provider. Public safety revenues increased $130,344 or 12.3% due to a contract agreement increase with Broward County for school resource officers. Fines and forfeitures: (2% of total revenues) Fines and forfeitures are revenues generated by enforcement and prosecu on of municipal ordinances and state statutes. Fiscal Year 2013 revenues are projected to increase $116,715 or 6.3% from Fiscal Year 2012, mainly due to collec ng outstanding fines and lien inquiries.

$1,979,940

Miscellaneous revenues: (4.1% of total revenues)

$4,088,628

The majority of the miscellaneous revenues include the Coral Springs Charter School lease, rents and royal es, interest and 50th anniversary sponsorship. The Coral Springs Charter School lease revenue is $1,420,000, or 1.5% of total General Fund revenues. There is no change from the prior year. Rents and royal es include telecommunica on tower leases and facility rentals. Fiscal Year 2013 revenues are expected to be $1,472,500, $22,500 or 1.6% more than Fiscal Year 2012. Interest earnings are expected to be $575,000, a decrease of $75,000 or 11.5%. They are generated by investment earnings on that por on of cash reserve investments a ributable to the General Fund. Interest earnings represent less than 1% of total General Fund revenues. The City’s 50th Anniversary prepara on is underway. Sponsorships obtained by the City’s consultant expected at $100,000 will help offset the cost of this celebra on. Other financing sources: (1% of total revenues)

$1,017,293

These revenues include CDBG grant funding and forfeiture funding to offset the cost of school resource officers. Appropriated fund balance: (1.8% of total revenues)

$1,750,000

The financial strategy for using fund balance is discussed in “Fund Balance Overview” in the Appendix sec on of this document.

General Fund revenue and expenditure summary Sources Revenues: AdValoremTaxes SolidWasteAssessment SalesandUseTaxes FranchiseFees UtilityServiceTaxes LicensesandPermits Intergovernmental ChargesforServices FinesandForfeitures MiscellaneousRevenues OtherFinancingSources AppropriatedFundBalance TotalRevenues

FY2010 Actual

FY2011 Actual

FY2012 Budget

FY2012 Est.Actual

$31,378,077 983,711 6,519,259 8,738,609 9,474,621 3,537,544 12,694,009 10,179,349 1,620,312 3,972,558 310,523 1,645,459 $91,054,031

$31,512,835 994,502 6,713,258 8,633,882 9,551,411 3,513,777 11,995,589 11,352,145 1,491,010 3,334,109 1,097,798 2,550,000 $92,740,316

$30,899,061 1,438,000 7,102,540 9,071,035 9,649,176 4,143,966 12,477,954 11,674,806 1,863,225 3,991,589 2,111,959 3,550,000 $97,973,311

$31,133,669 1,432,712 6,684,505 8,555,293 9,726,732 3,291,395 11,838,112 12,672,832 1,538,793 3,036,278 0 3,322,013 $93,232,332

$32,428,839 1,864,900 7,230,104 9,614,259 10,102,079 3,661,531 12,418,624 12,658,085 1,979,940 4,088,628 1,017,293 1,750,000 $98,814,282

$1,529,778 426,900 127,564 543,224 452,903 (482,435) (59,330) 983,279 116,715 97,039 (1,094,666) (1,800,000) $840,971

5.0% 29.7% 1.8% 6.0% 4.7% Ͳ11.6% Ͳ0.5% 8.4% 6.3% 2.4% Ͳ51.8% Ͳ50.7% 0.9%

Uses Expenditures: PersonalServices Benefits OtherOperating OperatingCapital NonͲDepartmental InterfundTransfers DebtService TotalExpenditures

$42,446,430 25,133,655 15,830,726 83,166 3,476,352 1,236,157 3,207,284 $91,413,770

$42,870,054 27,239,927 15,486,662 39,784 2,610,231 1,254,337 3,203,059 $92,704,054

$45,359,914 28,056,308 16,500,053 120,450 4,691,755 897,755 2,347,076 $97,973,311

$43,099,482 26,910,324 15,876,171 126,967 3,974,556 897,755 2,347,076 $93,232,331

$45,465,836 25,498,684 17,777,242 841,768 4,674,213 959,675 3,596,864 $98,814,282

$105,922 (2,557,624) 1,277,189 721,318 (17,542) 61,920 1,249,788 $840,971

0.2% Ͳ9.1% 7.7% 598.9% Ͳ0.4% 6.9% 53.2% 0.9%

($359,739) 629.66

$36,262 627.91

$0 631.91

$0 631.91

$0 640.41

Rev.inExcessofExp. TotalPositions

City of Coral Springs, Florida

FY2013 $Changefrom %Changefrom Budget FY12Budget FY12Budget

$0 8.50

n/a 1.3%

35


Expenditures

General Fund total expenditures—$98,814,282

The Fiscal Year 2013 General Fund budgeted expenditures are $98,814,282. The Fiscal Year 2013 budget represents an increase of $840,971 or 0.9% from the Fiscal Year 2012 budget of $97,973,311. The chart shows a summary of the Fiscal Year 2013 General Fund expenditures by func on.

InformationServices 3.0%

HR/CAO 2.2%

PublicWorks 4.3%

DevelopmentServices 6.4% Police 44.9%

EmergencyMedicalSvcs. 9.0%

City Commission: $323,618 (0.3% of total expenditures)

FinancialServices 2.6%

The City Commission’s budget increased $25,061 or 8.4% from Fiscal Year 2012. The increase is primarily due to the addi on of a new part- me clerical assistant.

“Development Services” includes Administra on and Engineering, Community Development, Building, and Code Enforcement. “Parks and Recrea on” includes Parks and Recrea on, Aqua cs, Sportsplex and Tennis.

$2,935,995

The City Manager’s Office includes the Management and Budget Office, Communica ons and Marke ng, City Clerk, and the Community Redevelopment Agency. The overall department increased by $137,144 or 4.9% in Fiscal Year 2013 mostly a ributed to an addi onal $50,000 to implement the City’s branding strategic ac on plan and another $20,000 for the purchase of media tracking so ware. An increase to the health plan costs also contributed to the overall increase. Human Resources: (1.4% of total expenditures)

ParksandRecreation 14.1%

NonͲDepartmental 10.2%

A recap of department expenditures in the General Fund Budget includes the following:

City Manager: (3% of total expenditures)

CMO/Commission 3.3%

$1,362,884

addi on of an Applica ons Analyst posi on split with U li es Division cos ng $39,000 for salary and benefits, and an increase to temporary salaries of $32,000 all contributed to this increase. City A orney: (0.8% of total expenditures)

$839,014

The City A orney’s budget decreased by $6,106 or 0.7%. A slight decrease to legal services caused this reduc on. Development Services—Administra on and Engineering: $564,048 (0.6% of total expenditures)

Human Resources’ budget increased $31,578 or 2.4% mainly due to reposi oning the $25,000 instant employee recogni on budget from non-departmental and a $5,400 increase to the health plan alloca on cost.

Development Services includes the Administra on Division and the Engineering Division. The budget increased by $101,879 or 22%. The primary cause for the increase was the transfer of the Development Services Administrator posi on from the Building Division.

Financial Services: (2.6% of total expenditures)

Community Development: (1.5% of total expenditures)

$2,528,838

Financial Services’ budget decreased $119,313 or 4.5%. mainly due to the transfer of the Museum Director posi on to Community Development, decreasing salaries and benefits by $97,000. Informa on Services: (3% of total expenditures)

$2,995,514

Informa on Services’ budget increased by $324,771 or 12.2%. An increase of $269,000 to service contracts for repair and maintenance of hardware and so ware, the

36

$1,456,254

Community Development’s budget increased by $95,229 or 7%. The transfer of the Museum Director posi on from the Financial Services Department was the major cause for the increase. Community Development will oversee several Fiscal Year 2013 business ini a ves. Revenues for pe on fees and grand opening signs are expected to increase by almost $20,000. (Refer to “New Ini a ves”—in the Business Plan sec on of this document.)

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Building: (2.6% of total expenditures)

$2,550,192

Building Division’s budget decreased $37,768 or 1.5%. The Building Division is implemen ng two new programs to enhance customer service. One is to educate homeowners who make building improvements to their own homes, and the second is a survey of building inspec on customers. Staff is also being reposi oned to be er fit the City’s needs. An Inspector is being transferred from Code Enforcement and a Development Services Administrator from Building to the Administra ve Division. Building permit revenues are expected to decrease $310,000 or 11.9% from Fiscal Year 2012. (Refer to “New Ini a ves”—in the Business Plan sec on of this document.) Code Enforcement: (1.8% of total expenditures)

$1,805,460

Code Enforcement’s budget increased by $22,022 or 1.2%. Code will oversee several ini a ves aimed at improving aesthe cs. As such, two new full- me Code posi ons have been added to assist with increased workload. One Inspector has been reassigned back to the Building Department to be er u lize resources. The cost for health plan alloca on increased and part- me staff salaries were adjusted. Revenues are expected to increase by approximately $180,294 primarily due to the collec on of outstanding fines and liens and charges for lien requests. (Refer to “New Ini a ves”—in the Business Plan sec on of this document.) Police: (44.8% of total expenditures)

$44,411,871

The Police Department’s budget decreased by $2,411,948 or 5.2%. The City’s contribu on for pension plan costs decreased by $2.8 million due to pension reform and a change in methodology. During Fiscal Year 2012, a Burglary Enforcement and Reduc on (BEAR) Unit was formed to address the rising burglary rate. Seven exis ng posi ons were reassigned to this unit. In Fiscal Year 2013, three Law Enforcement Officers are to be hired to fill the void this created in the Opera ons Division giving the City a total of 205 uniformed officers. Slight increases to service contracts, contractual services, uniform supplies and training also impact the Police Department budget. Court fine revenues are expected to decline by $50,000. Overall, Police Department revenues are decreasing by almost $56,000. Emergency Medical Services: (9% of total expenditures)

$8,875,165

The EMS budget increased $142,932 or 1.6%. Increases to salaries, health plan alloca on, fuel, maintenance, and vehicle deprecia on are primary contributors. Transport fee revenues es mated to be $2.5 million for Fiscal Year 2013, a $600,000 or 31.6% increase from Fiscal Year 2012 due to the addi on of Phase II and III to the Lifequest collec on plan.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Public Works: (4.3% of total expenditures)

$4,234,257

The Public Works budget increased by $94,592 or 2.3%, mainly due to an addi onal $50,000 for a consultant and legal review in the prepara on of a request for proposal for a solid waste and recycling contract, and $25,000 for street light repair and maintenance. Recycling material revenues paid by Broward County increased by $22,900. Parks and Recrea on: (10% of total expenditures)

$9,860,570

Parks and Recrea on’s budget increased by $457,183 or 4.9%. The increase is directly related to the mul year Community Pride ini a ve to revitalize city facili es, rights-of-way, parks, and other projects in prepara on for the City’s 50th anniversary. This department’s budget includes adding a facili es maintenance crew of four new posi ons to address plumbing and electrical related issues occurring in City parks to ensure the parks are safe and well maintained. This crew will also work with exis ng parks staff and seasonal maintenance workers to provide upkeep and maintenance, tree trimming, pressure cleaning, pain ng, fer lizing, mulching and overall beau fica on. (Refer to Neighborhood and Environmental Sustainability, “New Ini a ves—Community Pride (Phase IV) and Parks Facili es Maintenance Crew” in the Business Plan sec on of this document.) Cuts were made to other areas of the budget, such as reducing vehicle fuel, maintenance and deprecia on. This was offset by an increase to health plan alloca on, other contractual services for mowing contract, building and material supplies. Overall, revenues decreased by $1,468 primarily in summer recrea on due to reduced par cipa on and the elimina on of gym parking fee offset by increase in facility rentals. Aqua cs: $2,373,105 (2.4% of total expenditures) Aqua cs’ budget decreased by $9,150 or 0.4%. Increases to the health plan alloca on and vehicle deprecia on were slightly offset by a reduc on to wages and longevity costs from staff transfer. Aqua c Complex revenues are expected to increase by $84,567 primarily due to addi onal division programs, sports clinics, sports groups, and Pro Shop sales. Sportsplex and Tennis: $1,662,820 (1.7% of total expenditures) The Sportsplex and Tennis budget decreased by $5,226 or 0.3%. This decrease is primarily due to reduc on in tennis instructors’ cost, electricity, repair and maintenance to grounds, and supplies. An increase to the health plan alloca on, chemical supplies and vehicle deprecia on offset a por on of this decrease. Sportsplex revenues are expected to increase by $15,639 due to concession contract agreements. Tennis revenues are expected to decline slightly.

37


Non-departmental opera ng detail Unemployment *FormerCommissionClosedPensionFund Financial *FinancialServicesAdvisor *ArmoredCar *BankCharges CreditCardCharges *Accounting&Auditing InvestmentManagementFees CustodianFees QualityProgram Resident/BusinessSurvey VisioningExercise *InstantEmployeeRecognition Benchmarking MiscellaneousCrossͲDepartmentalExpenses OtherContractualServices ElectionExpense FestivaloftheArts Lobbyist CenterfortheArtsRentals HurricanePreparedness(Safety) SpecialEventBannerPrinting SpecialProjects BusinessDevelopment/EDF AIRProgram Boards&AdvisoryCommittees Boards&CommissionsExpense AccessibilityIssues(Disability) HistoricalAdvisoryCommittee MultiͲCulturalEvents MartinLutherKing,Jr.DayCelebration Grants Youth&FamilyGrants CodeComplianceMicroͲgrants(Pilot) SpecialEventsGrants SportsEventGrants CommunityChest SchoolNurse Events HolidayParade HalfͲMarathon 4thofJuly

FY2010 Actual $28,306 0

FY2012 Estimated Actual $32,797 18,229

FY2013 Adopted Budget $40,000 0

$ % Change Change 0 0.00% (18,229) Ͳ100.00% Ͳ100.00% n/a Ͳ100.00% 31.58% Ͳ100.00% Ͳ100.00% Ͳ100.00%

15,000 0 35,214 38,704 56,488 54,857 22,608

15,000 0 21,118 52,577 54,236 51,298 20,655

15,000 0 25,000 38,000 56,364 60,000 21,000

14,463 7,050 6,242 40,854 51,896 45,946 16,819

0 0 0 50,000 0 0 0

(15,000) 0 (25,000) 12,000 (56,364) (60,000) (21,000)

0 0 22,524 11,475

22,000 0 23,475 14,334

25,000 0 22,500 10,550

22,100 11,333 29,726 11,207

25,000 0 0 10,550

0 0.00% 0 n/a (22,500) Ͳ100.00% 0 0.00%

62,426 0 10,000 32,250 5,455 4,835 9,847

116,659 0 10,000 32,250 5,605 5,135 8,508

100,000 0 12,500 42,500 10,000 6,500 50,000

128,851 0 12,500 36,000 8,668 1,317 28,944

111,407 35,524 15,000 36,000 10,000 6,500 50,000

11,407 11.41% 35,524 n/a 2,500 20.00% (6,500) Ͳ15.29% 0 0.00% 0 0.00% 0 0.00%

20,000 475

24,390 0

20,000 0

7 0

20,000 0

0 0

0.00% n/a

18,407 1,650 14,856 33,600 10,394

10,842 1,800 14,976 34,497 11,941

17,500 2,500 15,000 35,000 15,000

15,052 1,800 12,513 34,927 10,880

17,500 2,500 15,000 35,000 15,000

0 0 0 0 0

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

42,244 0 16,442 20,000 50,000 12,000

20,723 0 14,603 19,500 50,000 0

0 0 0 25,000 50,000 0

2,431 0 0 25,000 50,000 0

0 5,000 0 35,000 50,000 0

0 5,000 0 10,000 0 0

n/a n/a n/a 40.00% 0.00% n/a

17,516 20,000 0 0 33,740 40,000 $767,733 $793,143

18,539 0 31,440 $727,531

18,555 0 8,737 $677,349 *MovedtodepartmentoperatingbudgetsinFY2013

Non-departmental: $5,478,138 (5.6% of total expenditures) The overall non-departmental budget increased by $686,383 or 14.3%, mainly due to an increase in opera ng capital by almost $754,000. The overall non-departmental opera ng budget, shown in the table above, increased by $26,934. Some of these increases are for elec on costs planned in Fiscal Year 2013, two new sports event grants—USA Hockey and Na onal Diving, the Half-Marathon and 5K run event, and credit card charges as a result of more payments made to the City by individuals using credit cards. Most of these increases are offset by a decrease in other contractual services. The City con nues to prepare for its 50th anniversary celebra on in

38

FY2012 FY2011 Adopted Actual Budget $42,126 $40,000 18,229 18,229

20,000 0 0.00% 15,000 15,000 n/a 40,000 0 0.00% $659,981 (133,162) Ͳ16.79%

Fiscal Year 2013 by adding $125,000 to cover special events, ac vi es and promo onal efforts with an offset in sponsorship revenues of $100,000. Licenses for technology upgrades in 2012, including Microso Office and SQL database, will cost $630,000 in Fiscal Year 2013. Public Safety communica ons system and equipment upgrade study to be conducted will cost $45,000. Property and casualty insurance is increasing by $52,167. These increases were par ally offset by a decrease in other post-employment benefits (OPEB) of $830,000 and CRA special assessment of $22,587. Several items were transferred from the non-departmental budget to the responsible department’s opera ng budget for Fiscal Year 2013. For instance, banking charges, investment

manager fees, custodian fees, and accoun ng and audi ng services moved to Financial Services. Internal fund transfers: (1% of total expenditures)

$959,675

The interfund transfer budget increased by $61,920 or 6.9%. This is due to the General Fund increasing its subsidy for churches and schools to the Fire Fund opera ons. Debt service: $3,596,864 (3.6% of total expenditures) Debt service consists of capital and franchise revenue bonds and a new Recovery Zone Bond issued in December 2010. An increase of $1,249,788 or 53.3% is mainly due to the Debt Service Fund reserves paying a por on of the Franchise Revenue Bond in Fiscal Year 2012.

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Fire Fund Summary Description Revenues: NonAdValoremSpecialAssessmentFees NonͲAdValoremSpecialAssessmentFee GovernmentAssessment NonprofitSubsidy(Churches&Schools) SubͲTotalNonAdValoremSpecialAssesmentFee PartialYearAssessment Intergovernmental BaseContract(Parkland) BaseContract(BrowardCounty) SubͲTotalIntergovernmental ChargesforServices: FireInspectionServices FireReͲInspectionFees TrainingTuitionFees TrainingMiscellaneousFees StateEducationIncentiveFund SpecialOvertime OffDutyFireRescueService PlanReviewFees SubͲTotalChargesforServices FinesandForfeitures: FireInspectionFines FalseAlarmRecovery SubͲTotalFinesandForfeitures Other: InterestIncome MiscellaneousRevenue DoubtfulAccounts SaferGrant UnappropriatedFundBalance SubͲTotalOther GrandTotalͲRevenues Expenditures: Departmental Administration CommunicationService Suppression Training Inspection TotalDepartmental NonͲDepartmental C.I.P. RateConsultant Contingency AssessmentCollectionCosts IndirectCosts EconomicConditions ComputerReplacementProgram SubͲTotalͲNonͲDepartmental InterfundTransfers: Capital(BudgetAmendment) PropertyCasualtyTransfer SubͲTotalͲInterfundTransfers BondDebtService: RevenueBondͲ'04(Refunding) RevenueBondͲ'08 SubͲTotalͲDebtService TotalNonͲDepartmental GrandTotalͲExpenditures RevenuesinExcessofExpenditures Positions

City of Coral Springs, Florida

FY2010 Actual

FY2011 Actual

FY2012 Adopted Budget

FY2012 Estimated Actual

FY2013 Adopted Budget

$ % ChangeFrom ChangeFrom FY12Budget FY12Budget

$7,472,520 134,172 841,157 8,447,849 8,241

$7,806,592 141,132 859,337 8,807,061 5,746

$8,067,436 156,715 897,755 9,121,906 25,938

$8,265,442 156,715 897,755 9,319,912 13,034

$8,609,314 159,915 959,675 9,728,904 25,938

$541,878 3,200 61,920 606,998 0

6.72% 2.04% 6.90% 6.65% 0.00%

4,002,500 12,124 4,014,624

4,915,476 12,124 4,927,600

5,123,352 12,866 5,136,218

5,123,352 12,124 5,135,476

5,311,217 13,252 5,324,469

187,865 386 188,251

3.67% 3.00% 3.67%

735,041 29,597 962,596 126,516 46,467 38,020 24,814 106,546 2,069,597

739,928 23,784 819,937 110,185 46,600 0 34,323 124,438 1,899,195

810,000 30,000 971,463 157,225 47,000 0 40,203 100,000 2,155,891

814,070 40,859 748,414 92,187 50,510 0 26,444 126,389 1,898,873

818,100 30,600 826,000 150,230 47,940 0 40,203 110,000 2,023,073

8,100 600 (145,463) (6,995) 940 0 0 10,000 (132,818)

1.00% 2.00% Ͳ14.97% Ͳ4.45% 2.00% n/a 0.00% 10.00% Ͳ6.16%

37,083 3,100 40,183

33,138 1,000 34,138

50,000 3,000 53,000

68,395 2,150 70,545

50,000 3,000 53,000

0 0 0

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

73,746 5,233 (742) 0 500,000 578,237 $15,158,731

43,936 533 350 0 0 44,819 $15,718,559

65,000 12,000 0 0 0 77,000 $16,569,953

61,686 975 (15,041) 0 0 47,620 $16,485,460

65,000 12,000 0 95,500 0 172,500 $17,327,884

0 0 0

0.00% 0.00% n/a

0 95,500 $757,931

n/a 124.03% 4.57%

$393,643 103,131 10,688,820 1,083,618 939,040 13,208,252

$407,371 113,086 10,319,319 1,051,909 1,035,197 12,926,882

$569,027 121,398 11,256,620 1,133,259 1,155,572 14,235,876

$538,977 120,233 11,216,600 1,018,693 1,153,375 14,047,878

$565,704 122,652 11,794,044 1,141,198 1,180,131 14,803,729

($3,323) 1,254 537,424 7,939 24,559 567,853

Ͳ0.58% 1.03% 4.77% 0.70% 2.13% 3.99%

43,725 0 0 19,607 755,693 13,477 4,826 837,328

294,378 19,999 0 19,614 1,371,950 0 65,505 1,771,446

252,079 0 114,371 22,932 1,432,545 108,718 16,344 1,946,989

229,407 0 16,857 19,607 1,432,545 84,769 10,315 1,793,500

389,800 0 100,000 22,932 1,504,172 100,000 11,100 2,128,004

137,721 0 (14,371) 0 71,627 (8,718) (5,244) 181,015

54.63% n/a Ͳ12.57% 0.00% 5.00% Ͳ8.02% Ͳ32.09% 9.30%

700,000 165,806 865,806

130,082 168,931 299,013

0 154,228 154,228

0 154,228 154,228

0 163,291 163,291

0 9,063 9,063

n/a 5.88% 5.88%

132,860 100,000 232,860 1,935,994

132,860 100,000 232,860 2,303,319

132,860 100,000 232,860 2,334,077

132,860 100,000 232,860 2,180,588

132,860 100,000 232,860 2,524,155

0 0 0 190,078

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 8.14%

$15,144,246

$15,230,201

$16,569,953

$16,228,466

$17,327,884

$757,931

4.57%

$14,485 103.84

$488,358 103.84

$0 103.84

$256,995 103.84

$0 107.84

$0 4.0

n/a 3.85%

39


Fire Fund Description The Fire Fund is a special revenue fund to provide fire protec ve services to the ci zens of Coral Springs. The City of Coral Springs also has a contractual agreement with the city of Parkland, Florida, to provide fire/rescue services. Along with revenue from this contract, the Fire Department is funded by a special tax assessment explained below. The Emergency Medical Services (EMS) por on of the Fire Department is funded in the General Fund (refer to the General Fund revenues and expenditures for informa on on the EMS budget). The Fire Fund budget is $17,327,884 in Fiscal Year 2013. This represents an increase of $757,931 or 4.6% over the Fiscal Year 2012 adopted budget.

Revenues Major revenue sources for the Fire Fund for Fiscal Year 2013 budget include: Special Assessment: (56.1% of total revenues)

$9,728,904

The primary revenue source for the Fire Fund is a non-ad valorem special assessment which makes up 56.1% of total revenues. The assessment increased $606,998 or 6.7% from Fiscal Year 2012. A por on of this fire assessment fee is subsidized by the General Fund for churches and schools that are exempt from this assessment. The General Fund also covers the fire assessment fee for government proper es. The table below shows fire assessment fees are based on the type of property, not the value of that property.

Intergovernmental: (30.7% of total revenues)

$5,324,469

Intergovernmental revenues increased by $188,251 or 3.7% primarily due to an increase in our contract with the city of Parkland, Florida for fire/rescue services. This partnership began in March 2004. In April 2007, both ci es partnered together to cover areas in northwest Coral Springs and west Parkland by adding a suppression unit and a rescue unit. These units are based in Parkland, but service both ci es. In February of Fiscal Year 2010, the city of Parkland, Florida renego ated and adopted a new five-year contract with the City of Coral Springs which began October 1, 2010. Charges for services: (11.7% of total revenues)

$2,023,073

Charges for services, also known as user fees, are fees charged for a city service that are provided to an individual or group, not the community at large, such as training, inspec ons, and plan reviews. Charges for services revenue decreased by $132,818 or 6.2%.

Fire Fund total revenuesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;$17,327,884 ChargesforServices 11.7% Other 1.5%

Special Assessment 56.1%

Intergovernmental 30.7%

Fire Assessment rate schedule Property Use: Residen al (per unit)

Adopted Adopted Adopted Adopted $ % FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 Change Change

Single-Family

$109.13

$114.84

$128.77 $138.10

Mul -Family

$137.82

$138.55

$143.94 $160.59

$17.17

$17.19

$17.65

$2.55

$2.25

$2.45

$2.58

$21.45

$20.21

$22.33

$22.95

Commercial (per 100 sq. ., up to 400,000 sq. .) Warehouse/Industrial (per 100 sq. ., up to

$9.33

7.24%

$16.65 11.57%

$17.61 ($0.04) -0.23% $0.13 5.30%

400,000 sq. .)

Ins tu onal/Governmental (per 100 sq. ., up

$0.62

2.78%

to 400,000 sq. .)

40

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Training tui on, including miscellaneous fees, decreased by $152,458 or 13.5% due to a decline in student enrollment. This revenue is generated through firefighter training and cer fica on programs offered at the Fire Training Academy to other ci es and agencies in our area.

Fire Fund total expenditures—$17,327,884 Administration 3.3% NonͲDepartmental 12.3%

CommunicationService 0.7%

Revenue from fire inspec on services and plan review fees both increased slightly. Fire inspec ons are mandated by InterfundTransfer the municipal code and the county for all commercial and 0.9% mul family proper es in the City. A fee is levied on each Inspection dwelling based on classifica on of the structure. 6.8%

Expenditures The Fire Fund expenditures increased by $757,931, or 4.6%, over the Fiscal Year 2012 budget. The increase is primarily a ributable to four addi onal staff, three firefighter/paramedics in the Suppression Division and one administra ve posi on in the Training Division. Health plan costs, opera ng capital, indirect costs, vehicle fuel/ maintenance/deprecia on costs are also on the rise. A significant reduc on in instructor salaries for training classes offset these increases.

Suppression 68.1%

Training 6.6%

DebtService 1.3%

The graph at right is a summary of the Fiscal Year 2013 Fire Fund expenditures by func on. Major expenditures for the Fire Fund budget include:

This partnership has improved emergency response mes and has benefi ed both ci es. The overall suppression budget has increased $537,424 or 4.8% from Fiscal Year 2012 primarily due to the addi on of three new firefighter/ paramedics and increased health plan costs. Rise in vehicle fuel, maintenance, and deprecia on also contributed to this increase.

Suppression: (68.1% of total expenditures)

Training: (6.6% of total expenditures)

$11,794,044

The Fire Suppression Division responds to all fire calls and other emergency situa ons. The Suppression Division is comprised of Assistant Fire Chiefs, Ba alion Chiefs, Captains, Rescue Lieutenants and Firefighter/Paramedics. These units not only provide fire service for the City of Coral Springs, but also for the neighboring city of Parkland.

$1,141,198

The Fire Training Division is responsible for the cer fica on of fire and emergency rescue personnel. The Training Division’s budget increased $7,939 or 0.7% in Fiscal Year 2013. An ini a ve to promote the Fire Academy and a ract students interested in basic fire service cer fica on is underway. The Academy has also started the accredita on

Fire Fund revenue and expenditure summary Sources Revenues: FireFundSpecialAssessment IntergovernmentalRevenue ChargesforServices Misc.Revenue/InterestIncome FinesandForfeitures DoubtfulAccounts OtherFinancingSources UnappropriatedFundBalance TotalRevenues

FY2010 Actual

$8,447,849 $8,807,061 4,014,624 4,927,600 1,899,195 2,069,597 78,979 44,469 40,183 34,138 (742) 350 8,241 5,746 500,000 0 $15,158,731 $15,718,559

Uses Expenditures: PersonalServices $7,637,208 Benefits 3,485,843 OtherOperating 1,001,585 OperatingCapital 43,725 TrainingDivision 1,083,616 700,000 CapitalReserveͲBudgetAmendment NonͲDepartmental 793,604 InterfundTransfers 165,806 DebtService 232,860 TotalExpenditures $15,144,247 Rev.inExcessofExp. Positions

FY2011 Actual

$14,484 103.84

City of Coral Springs, Florida

FY2012 Budget

FY2012 Est.Actual

FY2013 $Changefrom %Changefrom Budget FY12Budget FY12Budget

$9,121,906 5,136,218 2,155,891 77,000 53,000 0 25,938 0 $16,569,953

$9,319,912 $9,728,904 5,135,476 5,324,469 1,898,874 2,023,073 62,661 172,500 70,545 53,000 (15,042) 0 13,034 25,938 0 0 $16,485,460 $17,327,884

$606,998 188,251 (132,818) 95,500 0 0 0 0 $757,931

6.7% 3.7% Ͳ6.2% 124.0% 0.0% n/a 0.0% n/a 4.6%

$7,910,495 2,980,383 984,096 294,378 1,051,909 130,082 1,477,068 168,931 232,860 $15,230,201

$8,179,624 3,785,777 1,137,216 252,079 1,133,259 0 1,694,910 154,228 232,860 $16,569,953

$8,188,277 3,816,302 1,024,605 229,407 1,018,693 0 1,564,093 154,228 232,860 $16,228,465

$8,286,067 4,103,496 1,272,968 389,800 1,141,198 0 1,738,204 163,291 232,860 $17,327,884

$106,443 317,719 135,752 137,721 7,939 0 43,294 9,063 0 $757,931

1.3% 8.4% 11.9% 54.6% 0.7% n/a 2.6% 5.9% 0.0% 4.6%

$488,358 103.84

$0 103.84

$256,995 103.84

$0 107.84

$0 4.0

n/a 3.9%

41


process which will enhance our ability to accept pre-paid college funds, Federal financial aid and scholarships, along with having our courses accredited for college credit transfers. A full- me administra ve staff is being added to assist with the accredita on process. A decline in training revenues is offset with a reduc on in instructors’ salaries.

Non-departmental: (12.3% of total expenditures)

$2,128,004

Inspec on: (6.8% of total expenditures)

The major Fiscal Year 2013 Fire non-departmental expenditures include the following:

Non-departmental expenses increased by $181,015 or 9.3%. This increase is due primarily to addi onal opera ng capital equipment needs and higher indirect costs.

$1,180,131

Fire Department personnel conduct annual inspec ons of every business and mul -unit dwelling in the City as a preven ve measure to iden fy fire hazards. Fire Inspec on’s budget increased $24,559 or 2.1% from Fiscal Year 2012. This is due primarily to increase in salary and health plan benefits along with vehicle fuel and maintenance costs.

• $1,504,172 to cover indirect costs associated with various City departments

Administra on: (3.3% of total expenditures)

• $100,000 each dedicated to economic condi ons and financial policy con ngency funds

• $389,800 for capital purchases consis ng of fire sta on improvements, tac cal rescue training equipment, traffic pre-emp on, portable radios, thermal imagers, generator connec on, security fence, training so ware, and compressor rebuild

$565,704

Fire’s Administra on budget decreased $3,323 or 0.6%. This is due mainly to staff re rement and reclassifica on offset by increased health plan costs.

• $11,100 for computer replacement

Communica on Services: 0.7% of total expenditures)

Interfund transfer: (0.9% of total expenditures)

• $22,932 for assessment collec on costs

$122,652

$163,291

The cost of property/casualty insurance premiums increased $9,063 or 5.9% from Fiscal Year 2012.

The Communica on Services Division consists of telecommunicators and emergency call takers. The cost of communica on and dispatch is split between the Fire Fund (23%) and EMS (77%) in the General Fund. Expenses in this area increased $1,254 or 1.0% from Fiscal Year 2012.

Debt service: (1.3% of total expenditures)

$232,860

There is no change to debt service in Fiscal Year 2013.

Fire Assessment rate comparison Fiscal Year 2013 $350

$304.90

$300

$265.00 CoralSprings

$235.44

$250

$189.00

$200

$169.50 $138.10

$150

$135.00

$135.00

$130.00

$100 $50 $0

M

ira

ar m

ac ar m Ta P

i P ke o br em

ne

s Ho

oo w lly

d

nr Su

ise Co

ra

gs rin p l S

da er d u L a Ft

le e De

e rfi

l

ch ea B d

v Da

ie

Note: Chart shows adopted Single-Family Fire Assessment rates for Broward County ci es with popula ons greater than 70,000. Coral Springs’ rate is lower than most comparably-sized ci es in the area.

42

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Water and Sewer Fund Summary FY2010 Actual

FY2011 Actual

FY2012 Adopted Budget

FY2012 Estimated Actual

FY2013 Adopted Budget

Revenues OperatingRevenues Water Wastewater PrivateFireLineFee MeterSales DoubtfulAccounts/WriteͲOffs BackflowRecertificationAdm.Fee MiscellaneousIncome ChargesforService

$7,705,877 8,987,838 22,026 10,615 (19,513) 0 0 89,727

$8,167,917 10,226,080 18,508 8,699 (23,915) 0 4,120 112,007

$8,188,500 10,300,000 22,200 12,000 0 0 9,000 193,512

$8,158,708 10,350,718 20,282 14,736 (56,176) 19,550 16,389 184,224

$8,490,805 10,701,700 22,755 14,000 0 16,000 12,500 195,494

$302,305 401,700 555 2,000 0 16,000 3,500 1,982

3.69% 3.90% 2.50% 16.67% n/a n/a 38.89% 1.02%

TotalOperatingRevenue

16,796,570

18,513,415

18,725,212

18,708,432

19,453,254

728,042

3.89%

NonͲOperatingRevenues InterestIncomeͲOperating CapitalizationfromPriorYearCIP AppropriatedFundBalance

87,417 0 0

46,052 430,217 0

80,400 0 2,208,000

52,239 0 1,940,000

70,000 0 3,190,000

(10,400) 0 982,000

Ͳ12.94% n/a 44.47%

TotalNonͲOperatingRevenue

87,417

476,269

2,288,400

1,992,239

3,260,000

971,600

42.46%

GrandͲTotalRevenues

$16,883,987

$18,989,684

$21,013,612

$20,700,671

$22,713,254

$1,699,642

8.09%

Expenses Departmental Administration WaterDistribution WastewaterCollection WaterTreatment

$453,472 794,802 1,008,096 2,248,678

477,263 829,474 1,030,928 2,467,023

$578,626 883,699 1,131,592 2,689,407

$537,639 870,944 1,103,487 2,337,574

$651,985 903,577 1,099,189 2,745,257

$73,359 19,878 (32,403) 55,850

12.68% 2.25% Ͳ2.86% 2.08%

TotalDepartmental

4,505,048

4,804,688

5,283,324

4,849,644

5,400,008

116,684

2.21%

NonͲOperating WastewaterTreatment Capital NonͲDepartmental TransferToRenewalandReplacement BusinessDevelopment Property/Casualty ComputerReplacement RevenueBondͲSeries2010 RevenueBondͲSeries2012 SRFLoan—W&SWells SRFLoan—LiftStationsRehab SRFLoan—WaterTreatmentPlantImprovements SRFLoan—Transmission,Dist,Interconnect SRFLoan—SourceandTreatment SRFLoan—ForestHillsWellfield

5,893,627 318,571 1,799,148 560,000 200,000 488,213 3,798 2,680,440 0 0 14,297 0 0 0 0

5,279,144 338,156 1,813,438 578,717 225,953 497,125 3,440 2,922,550 0 0 24,060 0 0 0 0

6,213,417 3,017,000 2,148,237 666,500 271,000 453,859 6,300 2,775,867 0 143,255 34,853 0 0 0 0

5,492,397 727,548 2,001,744 2,778,488 258,680 453,859 0 2,717,842 0 143,937 14,406 0 0 0 0

6,422,686 1,006,500 2,248,255 2,554,500 281,840 480,527 7,600 2,761,666 545,534 143,255 34,926 407,066 147,015 120,046 151,830

209,269 (2,010,500) 100,018 1,888,000 10,840 26,668 1,300 (14,201) 545,534 0 73 407,066 147,015 120,046 151,830

3.37% Ͳ66.64% 4.66% 283.27% 4.00% 5.88% 20.63% Ͳ0.51% n/a n/a 0.21% n/a n/a n/a n/a

11,958,094

11,682,583

15,730,288

14,588,901

17,313,246

1,582,958

10.06%

$16,463,142

$16,487,271

$21,013,612

$19,438,545

$22,713,254

$1,699,642

8.09%

$420,845

$2,502,413

$0

$1,262,125

$0

$0

n/a

35.50

35.50

35.50

35.50

35.00

TotalNonͲOperating GrandTotalͲExpenses RevenuesinExcessofExpenses Positions

City of Coral Springs, Florida

$ % ChangeFrom ChangeFrom FY12Budget FY12Budget

(0.50)

Ͳ1.41%

43


Water and Sewer Fund Description The Water and Sewer Fund, as an enterprise fund, must be self-suppor ng through user fees charged for services. The purpose of the Water and Sewer Fund is to provide clean water to City residents and to safely dispose of wastewater. The Fiscal Year 2013 Water and Sewer Fund budget is $22,713,254. This amount represents an increase of $1,699,642 or 8.1% from Fiscal Year 2012. This increase is primarily due to debt service expenses for repayment of SRF loans and interfund transfers to the Renewal and Replacement Fund to con nue funding capital improvements in order to maintain the City’s water and sewer infrastructure.

Water and Sewer Fund total revenues —$22,713,254 Reserves 14.0%

Water 37.4% Wastewater 47.1% Other 1.5%

Revenues In order to achieve the appropriate alloca on of cost recovery from water and sewer rates, the City is proposing a 3% water and wastewater rate adjustment for Fiscal Year 2013. This increase, effec ve October 1, 2012, was recommended in the study conducted in Fiscal Year 2008 to allow the City to generate sufficient revenues to sa sfy the U lity’s requirements and maintain its water system. As a result, a typical single family residence in Coral Springs (consump on of 6,000 gallons per month) will no ce an addi onal $1.82 on the water bill. Major revenues for the Water and Sewer Fund include: Water: (37.4% of total revenues)

$8,490,805

Revenue from the sale of water is es mated to increase by $302,305, or 3.7% over Fiscal Year 2012 budget.

Wastewater: (47.1% of total revenues)

The wastewater revenue consists of a base charge to the customer for sewerage disposal and a volume-based charge based on the monthly water consump on. For Fiscal Year 2013, the rate to calculate the volumetric charge will be $2.95 per 1,000 gallons of water use. This 3% rate adjustment will generate $401,700, or 3.9% more wastewater revenues compared to last year’s budget. This revenue source is used to fund increased opera onal expenses of the water facility. Appropriated fund balance (14% of total revenues) $3,190,000 This revenue is an alloca on of surplus or fund balance designated to finance specific capital projects.

Water and Sewer Fund revenue and expense summary FY2010 Actual

FY2011 Actual

FY2012 Budget

FY2012 Est.Actual

FY2013 $Changefrom %Changefrom Budget FY12Budget FY12Budget

Sources Revenues: Water Wastewater ChargesforServices MeterSales InterestIncome CapitalizationͲPriorYearCIP AppropriatedFundBalance Other TotalRevenues

$7,705,877 $8,167,917 $8,188,500 8,987,838 10,226,080 10,300,000 224,712 111,753 134,920 10,615 8,699 12,000 87,417 46,052 80,400 0 0 430,217 0 0 2,208,000 (19,513) (24,201) 0 $16,883,987 $18,989,685 $21,013,612

$8,158,708 10,350,718 184,269 14,736 52,239 0 1,940,000 0 $20,700,670

$8,490,805 10,701,700 246,749 14,000 70,000 0 3,190,000 0 $22,713,254

$302,305 401,700 22,037 2,000 (10,400) 0 982,000 0 $1,699,642

3.7% 3.9% 9.8% 16.7% Ͳ12.9% n/a 44.5% n/a 8.1%

Uses Expenses: PersonalServices Benefits OtherOperating OperatingCapital DebtService RenewalandReplacement Insurance OtherNonͲOperating TotalExpenses

$1,645,980 689,906 8,062,789 318,571 2,694,737 560,000 488,213 2,002,946 $16,463,142

$1,667,838 741,669 7,668,231 344,251 2,946,610 578,717 497,125 2,042,831 $16,487,272

$1,800,791 834,489 8,844,338 3,034,123 2,953,975 666,500 453,859 2,425,537 $21,013,612

$1,783,057 828,300 7,717,410 740,823 2,876,185 2,778,488 453,859 2,260,423 $19,438,545

$1,826,319 845,256 9,133,483 1,024,136 4,311,340 2,554,500 480,527 2,537,693 $22,713,254

$25,528 10,767 289,145 (2,009,987) 1,357,365 1,888,000 26,668 112,156 $1,699,642

1.4% 1.3% 3.3% Ͳ66.2% 46.0% 283.3% 5.9% 4.6% 8.1%

$420,845 35.5

$2,502,413 35.5

$0 35.5

$1,262,125 35.5

$0 35

$0 (0.5)

Rev.inExcessofExp. Positions

44

$10,701,700

Other: (1.5% of total revenues)$330,749 Other miscellaneous revenues include meter sales, private fire line fee, administra ve fee for blackflow cer fica on, and interest income from fund balance. The City is projec ng a $10,400 reduc on in the amount of interest earnings from fund balance when comparing to last year’s budget.

n/a Ͳ1.4%

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Expenses The City has an aggressive plan to mi gate wastewater system inflow and infiltra on problems, has acquired addi onal wastewater treatment reserve capacity, and has implemented measures to reduce opera onal costs. In Fiscal Year 2013 we will con nue our efforts to control expenses and improve service to our customers. Major expenses in the Water and Sewer Fund include: Administra on: (2.9% of total expenses)

Water distribu on: (4% of total expenses)

$903,577

The overall Water Distribu on division is projected to increase by $19,878 or 2.3%. This small increase is due to rou ne opera onal costs. Wastewater treatment: (28.3% of total expenses)

$6,422,686

Broward County Wastewater Treatment facility charges the City to process its wastewater. This expense is expected to increase by $209,269, or 3.4%, from Fiscal Year 2012. This increase in mainly due to an amendment to the County’s schedule of charges to large users, for debt service for treatment, transmission, and disposal services. Wastewater Collec on: (4.8% of total expenses)

$1,099,189

The budget in this division decreased by $32,403 or 2.9%. This reduc on is primarily due to transferring one half of a full- me posi on from the Wastewater collec on to the Administra ve division. Water Treatment: (12.1% of total expenses)

$2,745,257

Water treatment expenses increased by $55,850 or 2.1%. Main drivers of this cost increase are higher electricity costs at this facility and a projected increase in contractual services.

Water bill for average single-family residence 2012 2013 $ Increase % Increase Average Average (Decrease) (Decrease) Bill Bill $25.62 $26.39 $0.77 3.0% $34.94 $35.99 $1.05 3.0% $60.56

Capital 4.4%

WaterTreatment 12.1% WaterDistribution 4.0% Administration 2.9%

$651,985

Administra on costs increased by $73,359, or 12.7%, from the previous year’s budget. This is mainly due to an increase in health and life insurance and the transfer of 50% of one posi on from division 6005 to division 6001. This change also presents increases in benefit cost for the administra on division.

Water Wastewater Total Monthly Bill

Water and Sewer Fund total expenses —$22,713,254

$62.38

$1.82

3.0%

Note: Rates are calculated using an average consump on of 6,000 gallons for a single family residence (including 10% u lity tax on water). Rate increase will be in effect October 1, 2012.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

NonͲOperating 43.5% Wastewater Treatment 28.3%

Capital outlay: (4.4% of total expenses)

Wastewater Collection 4.8%

$1,006,500

This funding will be used to replace fire hydrants, con nue preven ve maintenance of various components of the sanitary system, enhance security at the Water Treatment Plant, and conduct a water rate study to evaluate the current rate structure and determine future rate adjustments. For more detail, refer to the “Opera ng Capital” sec on under “Impact of the CIP on the Opera ng Budget.” Non-opera ng: (43.5% of total expenses)

$9,884,060

Non-opera ng expenses increased by $3,384,189 or 52.1% mainly due to an addi onal $1.3M in debt service repayments and an increase of $1.9M in the transfer to the Renewal and Replacement Fund to finance the following capital projects: • $1M to con nue repairs of sanitary sewer lines in order to prevent ground water from entering into the sewer system. • $850,000 for replacement of galvanized water pipes throughout the City’s u lity service area. This ongoing replacement plan seeks to minimize service interrup ons due to water line breaks. • $250,000 for the design of the rehabilita on of raw water supply wells and wellheads. • $100,000 to con nue scheduled replacement and maintenance of pumps and other equipment at li sta ons to ensure con nued and efficient opera ons. The non-departmental budget is es mated at $2,248,255, This budget represents an increase of $100,018 or 4.7% from the Fiscal Year 2012 budget. Addi onal funding is primarily due to a cost increase in administra ve services paid to the General Fund.

45


Health Fund Summary FY2010 Actual

FY2011 Actual

FY2012 Adopted Budget

$7,402,434 395,764 1,226,508 17,864 178,640 9,221,210

$7,807,034 439,283 1,284,937 18,561 185,613 9,735,428

$9,109,254 510,225 1,492,446 21,696 216,961 11,350,582

$9,109,253 510,225 1,492,446 21,696 216,961 11,350,581

$9,225,015 519,646 1,615,953 23,364 219,597 11,603,575

$115,761 9,421 123,507 1,668 2,636 252,993

1.27% 1.85% 8.28% 7.69% 1.21% 2.23%

InterestIncome

48,717

22,189

60,000

30,032

45,000

(15,000)

Ͳ25.00%

Recoveries: Retirees COBRA Employees Other SubtotalRecoveries

500,890 28,296 485,907 24,793 1,039,886

522,377 11,540 481,740 20,783 1,036,440

545,000 20,000 485,000 0 1,050,000

565,281 38,159 497,021 144,288 1,244,749

572,000 20,000 538,000 0 1,130,000

27,000 0 53,000 0 80,000

4.95% 0.00% 10.93% n/a 7.62%

0

0

0

0

300,000

300,000

n/a

TotalRevenues

$10,309,813

$10,794,057

$12,460,582

$12,625,362

$13,078,575

$617,993

4.96%

Expenses HealthPlan LongTermDisability LifeInsurance

$10,808,885 212,848 161,085

$11,053,209 155,379 120,517

$12,190,022 144,500 126,060

$10,991,335 144,500 121,630

$12,808,015 144,500 126,060

$617,993 0 0

5.07% 0.00% 0.00%

TotalExpenses

$11,182,818

$11,329,105

$12,460,582

$11,257,465

$13,078,575

$617,993

4.96%

$0

$1,367,897

$0

$0

n/a

1.25

1.25

1.25

0.00

0.0%

Revenues Transfers: GeneralFund WaterandSewerFund FireFund GeneralInsuranceFund EquipmentServices SubtotalTransfers

AppropriatedRetainedEarnings

RevenuesinExcessofExpenses Positions

46

($873,005) 1.50

($535,048) 1.25

FY2012 Estimated Actual

FY2013 Adopted Budget

$ ChangeFrom FY12Budget

% ChangeFrom FY12Budget

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Health Fund Description The City provides insurance to employees in the areas of long-term disability, life insurance, and medical/dental insurance. The General, Water and Sewer, Fire, General Insurance, and Equipment Services funds are billed to cover premiums and claims, and to maintain an adequate reserve balance.

Appropriated Retained Earnings: (2.3% of total revenues)

Excess budget revenue from the previous year is reprogrammed to fund health cost increases. Interest income: (0.3% of total revenues)

Given the diversity of the Health Fund, the fund is categorized as health/dental, long-term disability, and life insurance to enhance accountability and budget control.

$45,000

Interest income decreased by $15,000 in Fiscal Year 2013. The amount reflects interest earnings generated from fund balance.

The Fiscal Year 2013 Health Fund budget is $13,078,575 and has increased $617,993 or 5% from the Fiscal Year 2012 adopted budget.

Expenses Group health/dental program: (97.9% of total expenses)

Revenues Interfund transfers: (88.7% of total revenues)

$300,000

$11,603,575

This represents health and dental insurance costs for the City, which is self-insured. This expense increased $617,993 or 5.1% from Fiscal Year 2012 primarily due to infla on in medical costs and rise in number of claims.

Interfund transfer revenue increased by $252,993 or 2.2%. This revenue consists of administra ve fees charged to other funds for the service of health, dental, life, and longterm disability insurance. This fee is based on the number of employees per fund. Recoveries: (8.6% of total revenues)

$12,808,015

Long-term disability: (1.1% of total expenses)

$144,500

This represents the cost to cover City employees for longterm disability. There is no change in long-term disability from Fiscal Year 2012. This program has enabled the City to cap sick leave accruals at 480 hours per employee, while providing employees long-term disability coverage.

$1,130,000

Recoveries are premiums and other charges to employees, terminated employees, and re rees for the service of health insurance. Recoveries revenue increased by $80,000 or 7.6%.

Life insurance: (1.0% of total expenses)

$126,060

No change in life insurance costs to cover City employees in Fiscal Year 2013.

Health Fund revenue and expense summary Sources Revenues: InterfundTransfers Recoveries InterestIncome AppropriatedRetainedEarnings TotalRevenues Uses Expenses: HealthͲDental LongͲTermDisability LifeInsurance TotalExpenses Rev.inExcessofExp. Positions

City of Coral Springs, Florida

FY2010 Actual

FY2011 Actual

FY2012 Budget

FY2012 Est.Actual

FY2013 $Changefrom %Changefrom Budget FY12Budget FY12Budget

$9,221,210 $9,735,428 1,039,886 1,036,440 48,717 22,189 0 0 $10,309,813 $10,794,057

$11,350,582 1,050,000 60,000 0 $12,460,582

$11,350,581 1,244,749 30,032 0 $12,625,362

$11,603,575 1,130,000 45,000 300,000 $13,078,575

$252,993 80,000 (15,000) 300,000 $617,993

2.2% 7.6% Ͳ25.0% n/a 5.0%

$10,808,885 212,848 161,085 $11,182,818

$11,053,208 155,379 120,517 $11,329,104

$12,190,022 144,500 126,060 $12,460,582

$10,991,335 144,500 121,630 $11,257,465

$12,808,015 144,500 126,060 $13,078,575

$617,993 0 0 $617,993

5.1% 0.0% 0.0% 5.0%

($873,005) 1.5

($535,047) 1.25

$0 1.25

$1,367,897 1.25

$0 1.25

$0 0.00

n/a 0.0%

47


General Insurance Fund Summary FY2010 Actual

FY2011 Actual

FY2012 Adopted Budget

$1,726,250 530,866 274,706 1,950 20,804 15,860 2,570,436

$1,824,940 544,956 308,836 1,631 20,210 0 2,700,573

$1,746,256 501,790 294,430 1,698 20,381 0 2,564,555

$1,746,255 501,790 294,430 1,698 20,381 0 2,564,554

$1,847,892 529,995 317,122 1,806 21,282 0 2,718,097

$101,637 28,205 22,691 108 901 0 153,542

5.82% 5.62% 7.71% 6.36% 4.42% n/a 5.99%

55,902

32,794

50,000

37,980

50,000

0

0.00%

36,969 29,369 486,346 552,684

43,570 24,730 232,494 300,794

50,000 25,000 10,000 85,000

81,672 29,953 39,445 151,070

50,000 25,000 10,000 85,000

0 0 0 0

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

TotalRevenues

$3,179,022

$3,034,161

$2,699,555

$2,753,604

$2,853,097

$153,542

5.69%

Expenses Workers'Compensation Property/MotorVehicleLiability Casualty/GeneralClaims

$1,945,497 1,323,995 (686,284)

$859,672 1,585,318 74,845

$1,099,000 1,438,055 162,500

$1,445,112 1,402,961 135,004

$1,164,700 1,541,397 147,000

$65,700 103,342 (15,500)

5.98% 7.19% Ͳ9.54%

TotalExpenses

$2,583,208

$2,519,835

$2,699,555

$2,983,077

$2,853,097

$153,542

5.69%

$595,814

$514,326

$0

$229,473

$0

$0

n/a

1.50

1.50

1.50

1.50

1.50

Revenues Transfers: GeneralFund WaterandSewerFund FireFund HealthFund EquipmentServices ParklandContractServices SubtotalTransfers InterestIncome Recoveries: MotorVehicle PropertyDamage Workers'Comp SubtotalRecoveries

RevenuesinExcessofExpenses Positions

48

FY2012 Estimated Actual

FY2013 Adopted Budget

$ ChangeFrom FY12Budget

0.00

% ChangeFrom FY12Budget

0.00%

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


General I nsurance Fund Description The City is insured in the areas of general liability, property and auto liability, and workers’ compensa on. The General, Water and Sewer, Health, Fire, and Equipment Services funds are billed to cover premiums, claims, and to maintain an adequate reserve balance. Given the diversity of the General Insurance Fund, the fund is categorized as workers’ compensa on, property/motor vehicle liability, and casualty/general claims to enhance accountability and budget control. The Fiscal Year 2013 General Insurance Fund budget is $2,853,097. This represents an increase of $153,542, or 5.7% from the Fiscal Year 2012 adopted budget.

Recoveries: (3.0% of total revenues)

$85,000

There is no change to projected recoveries revenue consis ng of motor vehicle, property, and workers’ compensa on recoveries. Interest Income: (1.8% of total revenues)

$50,000

No change to projected interest income in Fiscal Year 2013. The amount reflects interest earnings from fund balance.

Expenses Workers’ compensa on: (40.8% of total expenses)

Revenues Interfund Transfers: (95.3% of total revenues)

$2,718,097

Interfund transfer revenue consists of administra ve fees charged to other funds for the service of workers’ compensa on and property/casualty insurance. The fee for workers’ compensa on is based on the number of employees per fund. The charge for property/casualty is divided among the General Fund, Fire Fund, and Water and Sewer Fund. The increase is primarily a ributable to higher insurance premium costs in Fiscal Year 2013.

$1,164,700

Workers’ compensa on claims have increased slightly driving the Fiscal Year 2013 projec on to increase by $65,700 or 6%. Property/motor vehicle liability: (54% of total expenses)

$1,541,397

This represents a $103,342 or 7.2% increase for property/ motor vehicle liability due mainly to rise in property insurance premium costs. Casualty/general claims: (5.2% of total expenses)

$147,000

Casualty/general claims decreased $15,500, or 9.5% from Fiscal Year 2012.

General Insurance Fund revenue and expense summary Sources Revenues: InterfundTransfers Recoveries InterestIncome TotalRevenues Uses Expenses: Workers'Compensation Property/MotorVeh.Liability Casualty/GeneralClaims TotalExpenses Rev.inExcessofExp. Positions

City of Coral Springs, Florida

FY2010 Actual

FY2011 Actual

FY2012 Budget

$2,570,436 552,684 55,902 $3,179,022

$2,700,573 300,794 32,794 $3,034,161

$2,564,555 85,000 50,000 $2,699,555

$2,564,554 151,069 37,980 $2,753,603

$2,718,097 85,000 50,000 $2,853,097

$153,542 0 0 $153,542

6.0% 0.0% 0.0% 5.7%

$1,945,497 1,323,995 (686,284) $2,583,208

$859,672 1,585,318 74,845 $2,519,835

$1,099,000 1,438,055 162,500 $2,699,555

$1,445,112 1,402,961 135,004 $2,983,076

$1,164,700 1,541,397 147,000 $2,853,097

$65,700 103,342 (15,500) $153,542

6.0% 7.2% Ͳ9.5% 5.7%

$595,814 1.5

$514,326 1.5

$0 1.5

($229,474) 1.5

$0 1.5

FY2012 Est.Actual

FY2013 $Changefrom %Changefrom Budget FY12Budget FY12Budget

$0 0.0

n/a 0.0%

49


Coral Springs Charter School Fund Summary FY2010 Actual Revenues Intergovernmental OtherRevenue/Miscellaneous AppropriationofFundBalance  TotalRevenues Expenditures OperatingExpenses(CSUSA) TransfertoGeneralFundͲLease Capital TotalExpenditures RevenuesinExcessofExpenditures

FY2011 Actual

FY2012 Adopted Budget

FY2012 Estimated Actual

FY2013 Adopted Budget

$ ChangeFrom FY12Budget

% ChangeFrom FY12Budget

$11,529,837 116,924 350,000

$11,671,084 76,989 0

$10,561,772 80,000 1,261,488

$10,561,772 80,000 1,261,488

$10,285,445 95,000 1,086,035

($276,327) 15,000 (175,453)

Ͳ2.62% 18.75% Ͳ13.91%

$11,996,761

$11,748,073

$11,903,260

$11,903,260

$11,466,480

($436,780)

Ͳ3.67%

$9,872,811 1,420,000 686,251

$10,081,410 1,420,000 435,199

$9,586,495 1,420,000 896,765

$9,586,495 1,420,000 896,765

$9,198,327 1,420,000 848,153

($388,168) 0 (48,612)

Ͳ4.05% 0.00% Ͳ5.42%

$11,979,062

$11,936,609

$11,903,260

$11,903,260

$11,466,480

($436,780)

Ͳ3.67%

$17,699

($188,536)

$0

$0

$0

$0

n/a

Coral Springs Charter School Fund Description Charter Schools USA (CSUSA), a professional educa on management company, operates the school on the City’s behalf.

Expenditures

Revenues

This represents the funds needed to operate the Coral Springs Charter School. Total opera ng expenses decreased by $388,168 or 4%, most of which is due to the reduc ons in professional services, instruc onal expenses, and maintenance related expenses. Costs for compensa on and benefits increased by 1.2%. Student transporta on costs stayed the same and vendor services decreased slightly.

Intergovernmental: (89.7% of total revenues)

$10,285,445

This revenue represents funds received from Broward County for students a ending the Coral Springs Charter School. Based on the updated calcula on by the state for the new school year, revenues decreased $276,327 or 2.6% from Fiscal Year 2012. Other revenue: (0.8% of total revenues)

$95,000

A majority of this revenue represents funds received for food services. This revenue increased $15,000 or 18.8% from Fiscal Year 2012. Appropria on of fund balance: (9.5% of total revenues)

$1,086,035

A por on of the fund balance will be used to pay for a par al roof replacement, air condi oning replacement, and part of the materials for the new math program. A reduc on of $175,453 or 13.9% is projected for Fiscal Year 2013.

50

Opera ng expenditures CSUSA: (80.2% of total expenditures)

Transfer to General Fund: (12.4% of total expenditures)

$9,198,327

$1,420,000

This represents a lease expense to repay the General Fund for all school-related expenses necessary to operate the Charter School including debt service, telephone, electricity, cable/satellite, water and sewer, waste disposal, security, pest control, maintenance and cleaning supplies, building, and equipment repairs and maintenance. There is no change from the current year. Capital: (7.4% of total expenditures)

$848,153

The majority of capital expenditures will be used for par al roof replacement and air condi oning repairs.

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Public Art Fund Summary FY2010 Actual

FY2011 Actual

FY2012 Adopted Budget

FY2012 Estimated Actual

FY2013 Adopted Budget

$ ChangeFrom FY12Budget

% ChangeFrom FY12Budget

Revenues PublicArtFees TotalRevenues

$69,871 $69,871

$83,507 $83,507

$76,500 $76,500

$24,146 $24,146

$86,500 $86,500

$10,000 $10,000

13.07% 13.07%

Expenditures Capital TotalExpenditures

$14,867 $14,867

$37,720 $37,720

$76,500 $76,500

$90,744 $90,744

$86,500 $86,500

$10,000 $10,000

13.07% 13.07%

RevenuesinExcessofExpenditures

$55,004

$45,787

$0

($66,598)

$0

$0

n/a

Public Art F und Description The Public Art Fund is a special revenue fund u lized to account for the collec on of Public Art fees, as well as opera ng expenditures to maintain all sculptures. The Fiscal Year 2013 Public Art Fund budget is $86,500, an increase of $10,000 or 13.1% from Fiscal Year 2012.

Expenditures The cost of selec ng, purchasing, and maintaining public art are the main expenditures of the fund, along with consultants, materials, and supplies needed to support the Public Art Commi ee.

Revenues The only source of revenues for this fund is the Public Art fee receipts collected during the permi ng process for new construc on and renova ons of exis ng structures. The fee only applies to structures in excess of 12,500 square feet, except residences on less than one acre. Revenues are collected only from those developers who choose not to purchase and maintain public art on their own property.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

51


Equipment Services Fund Summary Revenues OperatingRevenues FuelandMaintenanceTransfers GeneralFund WaterandSewerFund FireFund VehicleChargeBackTransfers GeneralFund WaterandSewerFund FireFund MiscellaneousRevenues InterestIncome Auction ChargesforFleetServices CityofParkland CityofMargate CityofCoconutCreek FloridaAtlanticUniversity TotalOperatingRevenue

FY2011 Actual

FY2012 Adopted Budget

FY2012 Estimated Actual

FY2013 Adopted Budget

$ ChangeFrom FY12Budget

% ChangeFrom FY12Budget

$2,573,172 208,348 283,189

$2,348,060 194,488 312,715

$2,464,836 204,211 328,349

$2,464,836 204,211 328,349

$2,418,058 223,253 364,046

($46,778) 19,042 35,697

Ͳ1.90% 9.32% 10.87%

1,666,565 221,396 361,818

1,666,565 221,396 361,818

1,716,561 228,037 372,672

1,716,564 228,037 372,671

1,795,572 204,524 446,387

79,011 (23,513) 73,715

4.60% Ͳ10.31% 19.78%

215,798 151,653

116,107 65,300

150,000 75,007

109,075 138,054

140,000 100,000

(10,000) 24,993

Ͳ6.67% 33.32%

25,608 3,153 n/a 370 $5,711,070

125,267 2,574 1,860 592 $5,416,741

117,000 4,000 2,500 2,000 $5,665,173

84,088 3,495 2,839 0 $5,652,219

108,000 5,000 2,500 0 $5,807,340

(9,000) 1,000 0 (2,000) $142,167

Ͳ7.69% 25.00% 0.00% Ͳ100.00% 2.51%

0 3,162,157 $3,162,157

(3,213,989) 951,506 Ͳ$2,262,483

Ͳ100.00% 43.04% Ͳ41.71%

($2,120,316)

Ͳ19.12%

NonͲOperatingRevenues AppropriationsfromFundBalance FinancialStrategy EquipmentPurchases TotalNonͲOperatingRevenue  GrandTotalRevenues

0 1,505,214 $1,505,214

2,000,000 1,822,033 $3,822,033

3,213,989 2,210,651 $5,424,640

3,213,989 1,900,449 $5,114,438

$7,216,284

$9,238,774

$11,089,813

$10,766,657

Expenses OperatingExpenses Personal Benefits OtherExpenses ChargeBackExpense TotalOperatingExpenses

$681,809 304,108 1,611,082 2,249,779 $4,846,778

$701,322 312,084 1,982,794 2,249,779 $5,245,979

$802,686 356,072 2,189,145 2,317,270 $5,665,173

$731,638 347,366 2,097,296 2,317,272 $5,493,572

$803,086 359,356 2,198,415 2,446,483 $5,807,340

$400 3,284 9,270 129,213 $142,167

0.05% 0.92% 0.42% 5.58% 2.51%

NonͲOperatingExpenses TransfertoCapitalFund EquipmentPurchases ComputerReplacement TotalNonͲOperatingExpenses

0 1,505,214 11,745 $1,516,959

2,000,000 1,822,033 0 $3,822,033

3,213,989 2,210,651 0 $5,424,640

3,213,989 1,900,449 0 $5,114,438

0 3,162,157 0 $3,162,157

(3,213,989) 951,506 0 Ͳ$2,262,483

Ͳ100.00% 43.04% n/a Ͳ41.71%

GrandTotalExpenses

$6,363,737

$9,068,012

$11,089,813

$10,608,010

($2,120,316)

Ͳ19.12%

$852,547

$170,762

$0

$158,647

15.00

15.00

15.00

RevenuesinExcessofExpenses Positions

52

FY2010 Actual

15.00

$8,969,497

$8,969,497 $0 15.00

$0

n/a

0

0.0%

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Equipment Services Fund Description The City’s fleet inventory includes emergency vehicles (patrol units, rescues, fire trucks), buses for recrea on, trucks for building, code, and fire inspec ons, as well as vehicles for maintenance of streets and parks, and generators. In addi on, other small equipment is necessary to maintain courts, facili es, and sport fields in op mal condi on; such as workmans, mowers, ballpros, llers, paint machines, pressure cleaners, etc.

The Equipment Services Fund is an internal service fund used to account for the purchase, opera on, and maintenance costs of the City’s vehicles and other major equipment. The Fiscal Year 2013 Equipment Services Fund budget is $8,969,497. This represents a decrease of $2,120,316 or 19.1% from Fiscal Year 2012. As a self-sustaining fund, the Equipment Services Fund provides fleet services to all applicable departments in the City on a cost reimbursement basis. Cost recovery is performed for deprecia on, fuel, maintenance, and other expenses budgeted and paid from this fund, via monthly interfund transfers.

For Fiscal Years 2013-2023, the average annual vehicle replacement cost—based on the ten-year fleet replacement program—is $4.1 million.

Revenues

For example, deprecia on or chargeback, is a current opera ng expense to gradually pay for the use of all equipment assigned to each department. The amount of chargeback is calculated for each piece of equipment using a simple formula that takes the cost of the item divided by the expected life. The result is the amount to allocate to the user department annually for the number of years the item will be in service. (refer to interfund transfers for alloca on by fund). Budge ng deprecia on for capital assets allows the City to “pay-as-you-go” finance its vehicles, therefore avoiding debt.

Major revenues in the Equipment Services Fund include: Interfund transfers: (60.8% of total revenues)

$5,451,840

Departments are charged an annual administra ve fee plus a propor onal fuel, maintenance, and replacement cost of their assigned vehicles and their share to operate the Fleet division. The small increase of 2.6% from Fiscal Year 2012 is mainly due to increased price of vehicles. This addi onal cost is passed through to all departments propor onally, according with each department’s inventory and replacement cost.

Equipment Services Fund revenue and expense summary FY2010 Actual

FY2011 Actual

$5,314,488 25,608 3,153 0 370 215,798 151,653 0 1,505,214 $7,216,284

Uses Expenses: PersonalServices Benefits OtherOperating OperatingCapital VehicleChargeback InterfundTransfers EquipmentPurchases TotalExpenses Rev.inExcessofExp. Positions

Sources Revenues: InterfundTransfers ParklandMaintenanceFee MargateMaintenanceFee CoconutCrk.MaintenanceFee FAUMaintenanceFee Interest Other AppropFundBalance(Fin.Strategy) AppropFundBalance(EqtPurchases) TotalRevenues

FY2012 Budget

FY2012 Est.Actual

FY2013 $Changefrom %Changefrom Budget FY12Budget FY12Budget

$5,105,041 125,267 2,574 1,860 592 116,107 65,300 2,000,000 1,822,033 $9,238,774

$5,314,666 117,000 4,000 2,500 2,000 150,000 75,007 3,213,989 2,210,651 $11,089,813

$5,314,668 84,088 3,495 2,839 0 109,075 138,054 3,213,989 1,900,449 $10,766,657

$5,451,840 108,000 5,000 2,500 0 140,000 100,000 0 3,162,157 $8,969,497

$137,174 (9,000) 1,000 0 (2,000) (10,000) 24,993 (3,213,989) 951,506 ($2,120,316)

2.6% Ͳ7.7% 25.0% 0.0% Ͳ100.0% Ͳ6.7% 33.3% Ͳ100.0% 43.0% Ͳ19.1%

$681,809 304,108 1,611,082 11,745 2,249,779 0 1,505,214 $6,363,737

$701,322 312,084 1,982,794 0 2,249,779 2,000,000 1,822,033 $9,068,012

$802,686 356,072 2,189,145 0 2,317,270 3,213,989 2,210,651 $11,089,813

$731,637 347,366 2,097,297 0 2,317,272 3,213,989 1,900,449 $10,608,010

$803,086 359,356 2,198,415 0 2,446,483 0 3,162,157 $8,969,497

$400 3,284 9,270 0 129,213 (3,213,989) 951,506 ($2,120,316)

0.0% 0.9% 0.4% n/a 5.6% Ͳ100.0% 43.0% Ͳ19.1%

$852,547 15

$170,762 15

$0 15

$158,647 15

$0 15

City of Coral Springs, Florida

$0 0.0

n/a 0.0%

53


For Fiscal Year 2013, Interfund transfers into the Equipment Services Fund are allocated as follow:

Other opera ng expenses:(10.2% of total expenses) $917,715

• Chargeback: General Fund: $1,795,572; Fire Fund: $446,387; Water and Sewer Fund: $204,524.

Other expenses include automo ve parts, replacement res for vehicles, chemicals, supplies, hand tools, vehicle warran es, costs to refurbish small equipment, etc. This budget represents an increase of $70,023 or 8.3% from Fiscal Year 2012 budget.

• Fuel and maintenance transfers: General Fund: $2,418,058; Fire Fund $364,046; Water and Sewer Fund $223,253. Equipment purchases: (35.3% of total revenues) $3,162,157 This revenue is an ongoing accumula on of charges from user departments to replace and maintain the City’s fleet in top condi on. Refer to the end of this sec on for a list of fleet purchases and repairs scheduled for Fiscal Year 2013 with corresponding budgeted amounts. Miscellaneous income: (4% of total revenues)

Equipment purchases (35.3% of total expenses) $3,162,157 This represents an increase of $951,506 or 43% from the previous year. This increase is due to budge ng for the purchase of an addi onal bus for seniors ($175,000) and planning for replacement of 84 fleet items in Fiscal Year 2013 (compared to 68 in Fiscal Year 2012).

$355,500

This source of revenue includes: • Return of investment or interest earnings on fund balance during the fiscal year. The projected interest for Fiscal Year 2013 is budgeted at $140,000. A decrease of $10,000 or 6.7% from the previous year’s budget. • Auc on of vehicles is es mated at $100,000. This budget represents a 33.3% increase from the Fiscal Year 2012 budgeted amount. • Charges for fleet services to neighboring ci es are projected at $115,500. This includes maintenance of Public Works and Fire vehicles for the City of Parkland as well as motorcycles for the ci es of Margate and Coconut Creek.

Expenses Major expenses include: Personal and benefits: (13% of total expenses)

$1,162,442

This represents an increase of $3,684 or 0.3% from Fiscal Year 2012. Chargeback expense: (27.3% of total expenses) $2,446,483 The chargeback expense will increase by 5.6% or $129,213 from the previous year’s budget. Gasoline: (14.3% of total expenses)

$1,280,700

Fuel expenses are expected to decrease by $60,753 or 4.5% compared to the previous year’s budget. This is due to nego a ng a fixed per-gallon cost.

54

The City’s fleet inventory includes 11 motorcycles used by Police Officers to ensure safety in the community.

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Pension Fund Summary FY2010 Actual

FY2011 Actual

FY2012 Adopted Budget

FY2012 Estimated Actual

FY2013 Adopted Budget

$ ChangeFrom FY12Budget

% ChangeFrom FY12Budget

Revenues Transfers: GeneralFund FireFund WaterandSewerFund EquipmentServices HealthFund GeneralInsuranceFund

$14,068,464 1,585,848 126,485 52,336 15,406 6,340

$14,078,969 985,885 128,187 53,329 11,666 7,163

$14,646,446 1,564,582 139,660 57,677 9,540 7,183

$13,621,210 1,604,199 136,711 54,462 9,906 8,051

$11,897,390 1,748,752 137,580 57,517 10,114 7,714

($2,749,056) 184,170 (2,080) (160) 574 531

Ͳ18.77% 11.77% Ͳ1.49% Ͳ0.28% 6.02% 7.39%

TotalRevenues

$15,854,879

$15,265,199

$16,425,088

$15,434,539

$13,859,067

($2,566,021)

Ͳ15.62%

Expenses PolicePensionSworn EMS/FirePensionCertified ICMA(401)aͲGeneralEmployees ICMA(401)aͲManagement GeneralEmployeePension CityCommissionPension

$10,987,830 2,386,721 1,349,164 482,935 630,000 18,229

$11,310,445 1,536,214 1,377,296 523,015 500,000 18,229

$11,500,096 2,450,000 1,441,786 479,977 535,000 18,229

$10,503,449 2,513,786 1,399,255 499,817 500,003 18,229

$8,700,000 2,700,000 1,457,372 496,895 500,000 4,800

($2,800,096) 250,000 15,586 16,918 (35,000) (13,429)

Ͳ24.35% 10.20% 1.08% 3.52% Ͳ6.54% Ͳ73.67%

TotalExpenses

$15,854,879

$15,265,199

$16,425,088

$15,434,539

$13,859,067

($2,566,021)

Ͳ15.62%

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

RevenuesinExcessofExpenses

City of Coral Springs, Florida

$0

n/a

55


Pension Fund Description The Pension Fund accounts for the accumula on of resources to be used for re rement benefit payments to the City’s employees. The Fiscal Year 2013 Pension Fund budget is $13,859,067. This represents a decrease of $2,566,021 or 15.6% less than the Fiscal Year 2012 budget primarily due to a change in the Police pension plan methodology and reduc on in City’s future Annual Required Contribu on.

The $13,859,067 Pension Fund budget consists of the following funding sources: • $11,897,390 transfer from General Fund • $1,748,752 transfer from Fire Fund • $137,580 transfer from Water and Sewer Fund • $57,517 transfer from Equipment Services Fund • $10,114 transfer from Health Fund • $7,714 transfer from General Insurance Fund

Expenses $8,700,000

This represents a $2,800,096, or 24.4%, decrease from Fiscal Year 2012. Pension reform and change in methodology is major cause for decrease. Since this is a defined benefit plan, it is necessary to maintain the appropriate funding levels for the pension’s obliga on as determined by an actuary.

56

$2,700,000

This is a new defined benefit plan established in 2005 for firefighters and paramedics. This represents an increase of $250,000 or 10.2%. This is also a defined benefit plan, making it necessary to maintain the appropriate funding level for the pension’s obliga on as determined by an actuary. Employee (ICMA) expense: (10.5% of total expenses)

Revenues

Police pension expense: (62.8% of total expenses)

EMS/Fire pension expense: (19.5% of total expenses)

$1,457,372

This represents a $15,586 or 1.1% increase from Fiscal Year 2012. This is a defined contribu on plan available to general employees. Management (ICMA) expense: (3.6% of total expenses)

$496,895

This represents a $16,918 or 3.5% increase from Fiscal Year 2012. This is a defined contribu on plan, based on salary, available to managers and supervisors. General employee pension expense: (3.6% of total expenses)

$500,000

This is a single-employer defined benefit plan that was established in 1973 and was closed to new par cipants in 1988. This represents a $35,000 decrease or 6.5% from Fiscal Year 2012 as determined by an actuary. City Commission pension expense: (0.03% of total expenses)

$4,800

The City Commission pension decreased $13,429 or 73.7% from Fiscal Year 2012. This is a former Commission closed pension plan and has one remaining par cipant.

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Debt Service Fund Summary Revenues AdValoremTaxes TransferfromGeneralFund TransferfromFireFund AppropriatedFundBalance InterestRebateͲRevenueBondSeries2010 Other InterestIncome* TotalRevenues

FY2010 Actual

FY2011 Actual

FY2012 Adopted Budget

FY2012 Estimated Actual

FY2013 Adopted Budget

$ Changefrom FY12Budget

% Changefrom FY12Budget

$1,429,219 3,207,284 232,860 0 0 0 83,105 $4,952,468

$1,277,185 3,203,059 232,860 0 40,255 0 42,558 $4,795,917

$2,049,905 2,347,076 232,860 1,250,000 0 0 6,049 $5,885,890

$2,065,981 2,347,076 232,860 1,250,000 135,437 (13,243) 49,886 $6,067,997

$2,062,241 3,596,863 232,860 0 129,940 0 3,248 $6,025,152

$12,336 1,249,787 0 (1,250,000) 129,940 0 (2,801) $139,262

0.60% 53.25% 0.00% Ͳ100.00% n/a n/a Ͳ46.31% 2.37%

*Interestincomefluctuatesyearlybasedonhowmuchcashisreserved,includingthe10%debtcommitment.

Expenditures GeneralObligationBondͲ2003A(Refunding) GeneralObligationBondͲ2005A(Refunding) GeneralObligationBondͲ2005B(Refunding) GeneralObligationBondͲ2006ͲPublicSafety GeneralObligationBondͲOther TotalGeneralObligationBond

$353,340 606,563 522,191 551,438 1,250 2,034,782

$355,150 604,425 524,441 551,438 1,250 2,036,704

$355,400 610,413 532,704 551,438 4,000 2,053,954

$355,400 601,138 525,704 551,438 1,250 2,034,929

$355,534 616,685 538,624 551,397 1,250 2,063,489

$134 6,272 5,920 (41) (2,750) 9,535

0.04% 1.03% 1.11% Ͳ0.01% Ͳ68.75% 0.46%

FranchiseRevenueBondͲ2004(Refunding) CapitalRevenueBondͲ2008* CapitalImprovementRevenueBondSeries2010** TotalRevenueBonds

1,763,556 1,677,988 0 3,441,544

1,761,206 1,674,713 89,455 3,525,374

1,758,556 1,665,863 405,517 3,829,936

1,758,556 1,665,863 540,955 3,965,374

1,758,244 1,665,963 535,457 3,959,663

(312) 100 129,940 129,727

Ͳ0.02% 0.01% 32.04% 3.39%

0 0

1,400 1,400

2,000 2,000

1,400 1,400

2,000 2,000

0 0

0.00% 0.00%

$5,476,326

$5,563,478

$5,885,890

$6,001,703

$6,025,152

$139,262

2.37%

($523,858)

($767,561)

$0

$66,294

$0

$0

n/a

Other IssuanceCosts TotalOther TotalExpenditures RevenuesinExcessofExpenditures

*CapitalRevenueBondwasissuedinAugust2008torefinanceFIFCLoans2001A&2002B. **CapitalImprovementRevenueBondSeries2010(akaBuildAmericaBond)wasissuedinDecember2010

City of Coral Springs, Florida

57


Debt Service Fund Description The Debt Service Fund is used to account for the revenues and payment of voter-approved long-term general obliga on debt, franchise revenue bonds, and capital revenue bond debt.

Debt Service Fund revenues - $6,025,152 Other 2.2%

The Fiscal Year 2013 Debt Service Fund budget is $6,025,152. This represents an increase of $139,262 or 2.4% from the Fiscal Year 2012 budget. AdValoremTaxes 34.2%

Revenues Revenue sources for the Debt Service Fund Fiscal Year 2013 budget include: Ad valorem taxes: (34.2% of total revenues)

$2,062,241

Ad valorem taxes represent a levy of $0.2906 per $1,000 of taxable assessed value on real and personal property. General obliga on bonds are voter-approved for specific projects. The debt service millage rate is calculated separately from the opera ng millage rate. There is no legal debt millage limit established by the state of Florida for municipali es, coun es, or independent taxing districts. The City, however, complies with its self-imposed debt policy of limi ng its General Fund debt to 12.5% of the

Revenue bond debt principal and interest payments for Fiscal Year 2013 Alloca on of Revenue Bonds:

Principal/ Interest

2004 Franchise Revenue Refunding Bond General Fund Fire Fund Sub-total Revenue Bond 2004

Fire Fund Sub-total Revenue Bond 2008

$1,625,383 132,860 $1,758,243

$1,565,963 100,000 $1,665,963

2010 Capital Revenue Bond General Fund Total General Fund

$535,457 $3,727,803

Total Fire Fund

232,860

Total All Funds

$3,959,663

58

FireFund 3.9%

total General Fund budget and limi ng its total outstanding debt to 5% of the City’s total taxable assessed value. For more informa on, refer to Overview and Financial Policies—”Debt Management Policies” in this sec on of the budget document. Transfers from General Fund: (59.7% of total revenues)

$3,596,863

The transfers from the General Fund are the amounts the General Fund has accumulated in debt service payments (principal and interest) for outstanding franchise and capital revenue Bonds. Transfers from Fire Fund: (3.9% of total revenues)

2008 Capital Revenue Bond General Fund

GeneralFund 59.7%

$232,860

The transfers from the Fire Fund are the amounts the Fire Fund has accumulated in debt service payments (principal and interest) for the outstanding franchise and capital revenue bonds. Interest Rebate-Revenue Bond Series 2010: $129,940 (2.1% of total revenues) The City is eligible to receive interest subsidy payments with respect to the Recovery Zone Economic Development bonds by filing with the Internal Revenue Service. The US Treasury reimburses the City 45% of each semiannual interest payment. Interest income: (0.1% of total revenues)

$3,248

This amount is interest that is earned from available debt service fund balances each month. The amount fluctuates with the market.

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Expenditures The debt issues and their projected September 30, 2012 outstanding balances consist of: General obliga on bonds: (34.3% of total expenditures)

Debt Service Fund expenditures $6,025,152

$2,063,489

• $3,080,000 General Obliga on Refunding Bond Series 2003A issued May 1, 2003 to mature in Fiscal Year 2013. Debt service principal and interest payment for Fiscal Year 2013 is $355,534, and the outstanding balance is $345,000.

RevenueBonds 65.7%

GeneralObligation Bonds 34.3%

• $4,705,000 General Obliga on Refunding Bond Series 2005A issued July 6, 2005 to mature in Fiscal Year 2015. Debt service principal and interest payment for Fiscal Year 2013 is $616,685, and the outstanding balance is $1,725,000. • $5,855,000 General Obliga on Bond Refunding Series 2005B issued July 6, 2005 to mature in Fiscal Year 2019. Debt Service principal and interest payment for Fiscal Year 2013 is $538,624, and the outstanding balance is $3,280,000.

For more informa on regarding the City’s debt service program, refer to Debt Management on the following pages of this document.

• $13,500,000 General Obliga on Bond Series 2006 issued September 14,2006 to mature in Fiscal Year 2026. Debt service interest payment for Fiscal Year 2013 is $551,397, and the outstanding balance is $13,500,000. Revenue bonds: (65.7% of total expenditures)

Debt forecas ng assump ons Revenue Bond Debt—20 Years

$3,959,663

Series 2014 Series 2015 Series 2016 Series 2017 Series 2018 Series 2019

• $21,400,000 Franchise Revenue Refunding Bond Series 2004 issued October 28, 2004 to mature in Fiscal Year 2020. Debt service principal and interest payment for Fiscal Year 2012 is $1,758,244, and the outstanding balance is $12,025,000. • $16,830,000 Capital Revenue Bond Series 2008 issued August 14,2008 to mature in Fiscal Year 2021. Debt service principal and interest payment for Fiscal Year 2013 is $1,665,963, and the outstanding Debt Service Fund revenue and balance is FY2010 FY2011 $12,460,000. Sources Actual Actual • $5,913,000 Capital Revenue Bond Series 2010 issued December 14, 2010 to mature in Fiscal Year 2030. Debt service principal and interest payment for Fiscal Year 2013 is $535,457, and the outstanding balance is $5,913,000.

Revenues: AdValoremTaxes TransferGeneralFund TransferFireFund AppropriatedFundBalance InterestRebateͲRev.BondSeries2010 Other InterestIncome TotalRevenues

$1,429,219 3,207,284 232,860 0 0 0 83,105 $4,952,468

Uses Expenditures: GeneralObligationBonds RevenueBonds Other TotalExpenditures Rev.inExcessofExp.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

$1,277,185 3,203,059 232,860

4.50% 4.50% 4.50% 4.50% 4.50% 4.50%

expenditure summary FY2012 Budget

0 40,255 42,558 $4,795,917

$2,049,905 2,347,076 232,860 1,250,000 0 0 6,049 $5,885,890

$2,034,782 3,441,544 0 $5,476,326

$2,036,704 3,525,374 1,400 $5,563,478

($523,858)

($767,561)

FY2012 Est.Actual $2,065,981 2,347,076 232,860 1,250,000

FY2013 $Changefrom %Changefrom Budget FY12Budget FY12Budget

135,437 36,643 $6,067,997

$2,062,241 3,596,863 232,860 0 129,940 0 3,248 $6,025,152

$12,336 1,249,787 0 (1,250,000) 129,940 0 (2,801) $139,262

0.6% 53.2% 0.0% Ͳ100.0% n/a n/a Ͳ46.3% 2.4%

$2,053,954 3,829,936 2,000 $5,885,890

$2,034,930 3,966,774 0 $6,001,704

$2,063,489 3,959,663 2,000 $6,025,152

$9,535 129,727 0 $139,262

0.5% 3.4% 0.0% 2.4%

$0

$66,293

$0

$0

n/a

59


Debt Management The City of Coral Springs currently has a combined outstanding net debt of $63,345,000 as of September 30, 2012. This debt consists of the following. General Obliga on Bonds Franchise Revenue Bonds Capital Revenue Bonds/Notes Water/Sewer Revenue Bonds State Revolving Fund Loans (W&S)

Series 2008 and the Capital Revenue Note Series 2010 [Federally Taxable—Build America Bonds—Recovery Zone Economic Development Bonds —Direct Subsidy (RZED)].

$18,850,000 $12,025,000 $18,133,000 $2,620,000 $11,717,000

Second, the amount of City general obliga on debt is limited to a maximum of 5% ($373,499,577) of the City’s taxable assessed value ($7,469,991,547). The City’s current outstanding general obliga on debt of $18,850,000 represents only 0.25% of the City’s taxable assessed value with a 95.0% remaining percentage of debt capacity of the City’s self-imposed 5% limit.

With the issuance, refunding and re rement of debt, the City’s total combined debt at the end of the fiscal year, September 30, 2013 is an cipated to be $74,846,000. General Obliga on Bonds Franchise Revenue Bonds Capital Revenue Bonds/Notes/Loans Water/Sewer Revenue Bonds State Revolving Fund Loans (W&S)

General Obliga on Debt

$17,530,000 $10,695,000 $21,406,000 $8,700,000 $16,515,000

The City finances major capital equipment and facili es based on their expected economic lives. It is not prudent to spend opera ng cash on assets that have lives greater than five years. This is because long-lived capital items are paid for gradually over their useful lives by an annual deprecia on charge to the current accoun ng period. In addi on, current rela vely low interest rates make debt financing very economical and prudent compared to cash financing. The state of Florida has not imposed any legal debt limit on municipali es. The City, however, follows two self-imposed policies in rela on to debt management. First, annual General Fund debt service expense is limited to 12.5% of the total General Fund budget. The General Fund expenditures for Fiscal Year 2013 are $98,814,282. The budgeted annual debt service is $3,596,864 or 3.6% of the General Fund budget. This includes the debt service required for the Refunding Franchise Revenue Bonds— Series 2004 and the Capital Revenue Refunding Bonds—

Net outstanding and planned FY 2013 debt

General obliga on (GO) bonds allow municipali es to borrow money to fund capital improvements and infrastructure. Repayment of GO bonds is guaranteed by the “full faith and credit” of the City. Annual debt service to fully amor ze interest and the repayment of principal on GO bonds is paid for via a debt service millage. The City’s $18,850,000 outstanding general obliga on debt is secured by a voter-approved ad valorem tax millage. The current dedicated debt millage is $0.2906 per $1,000 of taxable assessed value. The Fiscal Year 2013 debt service requirement for the City’s outstanding GO debt is $2,062,354. Fitch Ra ngs, Moody’s Investors Service, and Standard and Poor’s rate the City’s GO bonds the “highest investment quality”: ‘AAA,’’ Aaa’, and ‘AAA,’ respec vely. The City’s Fiscal Year 2012 Net Direct Bonded Long-term Debt per Capita is $154 and its direct net debt per capita is $399 based on the Fiscal Year 2012 City official popula on census of 122,681. For comparison, Moody’s Investors Service reports that for ci es with popula ons 100,000 - 199,999 the median direct net debt per capita is $931 or 133% higher.

The 2003 GO Refunding Bond Series A, dated May 1, 2003, issued $3,080,000 of which $345,000 will be outstanding as of October 1, 2012 (2.5826% TIC). This bond was issued to refund $3,015,000 of the GO Bond Series issues 1994.

$100.00 $80.00

Millions

$60.00 $40.00 $20.00

$74.85

Outstandingasof10/1/12 $17.53

$10.70

PlannedFY2013

$21.41

$8.70

$3.28 $6.08

Refunded/Retired $16.51

$4.79

$11.50 $63.35

$18.85 $18.13 $12.03 $11.72 $2.62 Ͳ$1.320 Ͳ$1.330 Ͳ$20.00 ds ds an an ds /12 Lo on on on Lo 0/1 .B r B nd te/ 1 eB  e O o u f u . t N F G so wa ven ing d s/ ga ste Re on olv din ise Wa ev n eB / h R a r u  c n te te tst en Fra ev Sta Wa  Ou tal alR t o i T Cap $0.00

60

The combined refunding of the 2003 GO Refunding Bond Series A and the 2003 GO Refunding Bond Series B (fully redeemed in Fiscal Year 2006) produced an average annual debt service savings of $50,000 and a oneme savings of $382,000. The 2005 GO Refunding Bond Series A, dated July 6, 2005, issued $4,705,000 of which $1,725,000 will be outstanding as of October

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Community Park Renova ons $2,215,000 Be Stradling Park $2,100,000 Westside Maint. Complex–Phase II $980,000 North Community Park $800,000 City Centre Renova ons–Phase II $597,500 Boys & Girls Club $1,000,000

1, 2012 (3.2984% TIC). This bond was issued to refund $4,655,000 of the GO Bond Series 1998 A&B. The 2005 GO Refunding Bond Series B, dated July 6, 2005, issued $5,855,000 of which $3,280,000 will be outstanding as of October 1, 2012 (3.5803% TIC). This bond was issued to refund $6,195,000 of the GO Bond Series 1998 C&D.

The Series 1998 Franchise Revenue Refunding Bonds, refunded the Franchise Revenue Bond Series 1995, dated January 1, 1995, and par ally refunded $527,000 of the 1997 Sales Tax Revenue Bonds Series 1997.

The 1998 GO Refunding Bond Series A & B, was issued to refund $5,915,000 of the GO Bond Series 1995. The 1998 GO Bond Series C & D, funded the North Community Park and a gymnasium located at Mullins Park on Coral Springs Drive.

The Series 1999 Franchise Revenue Bonds, funded construc on of improvements for the Corporate Park, Sportsplex, Cypress Pool, and other projects throughout the City.

The 2006 GO Bonds, dated October 4, 2006, issued $13,500,000 and of which $13,500,000 will be outstanding as of October 1, 2012 (4.1957% TIC). This bond was issued to fund the Mullins Master Plan project. This project provides addi onal needed Public Safety Building space and a new fire sta on for the Police and Fire departments, respec vely, and upgrade improvements to provide addi onal parking and be er access to Mullins Park.

Capital Revenue Bonds/Notes/ Loans The 2008 Capital Revenue Refunding Bonds, dated August 14, 2008, issued $16,830,000 of which $12,460,000 will be outstanding October 1, 2012 (3.8856% TIC). This series was issued for the purpose of refunding the City’s two Florida Intergovernmental Financing Commission (FIFC) Capital Revenue Bond Issues. This refunding of the FIFC 2001 A and FIFC 2002 B issues produced a net present value savings of $221,060.

Revenue Bonds Revenue bonds are secured by the issuer pledging specific revenues either from the project(s) being financed and/or other dedicated revenue sources such as franchise fees, u lity service taxes, communica ons services taxes (CST), sales taxes, etc.

The City issued through the Florida Intergovernmental Financing Commission $38,545,000 (Series 2001A dated May 31, 2001) in Tax-Exempt Capital Revenue Bonds of which $38,545,000 were redeemed as of May 11, 2011. These defeased bonds in part refinanced the City’s three remaining Sunshine State Governmental Financing Commission Tax-Exempt Commercial Paper Revenue Notes totaling $28,315,000. Approximately $5,640,000 funded new capital projects such as the Corporate Park improvements—Phase II, fill for golf course, median improvements, Woodside Dr. roadway improvements, and many other smaller capital projects.

The Series 2004 Franchise Revenue Refunding Bonds, dated October 28, 2004, issued $21,400,000 of which $12,025,000 will be outstanding October 1, 2012 (3.5912% TIC). This series refunds the 1994, 1996, 1998, and the 1999 Series Franchise Revenue Bonds. This issue is expected to generate a present value savings of $1,432,218.76 equa ng to 6.9374% of par of the prior issues.

The Series 1994 Franchise Revenue Bonds were issued for the purpose of refunding the Franchise Revenue Bond An cipa on Notes, Series 1993 ($1,737,500) and to fund other projects that included: the Westside Public Works Facility, sports field ligh ng, parks and recrea on Debt service as a percentage of General Fund total equipment and improvements, Park of Industry expenditures (City’s debt policy limita on is 12.5%) infrastructure improvements, Public Safety Building improvements, and other sundry items. The Series 1996 Franchise Revenue Refunding Bonds, refunded $15,530,000 of the 1991 Franchise Revenue Bonds and provided $1,335,000 to par ally finance the City Conference Center and these other major projects.

15.00%

12.5% Cap 10.00%

9.31% 7.33%

5.00%

3.90% 3.91%

4.31% 4.10% 4.05% 3.66% 3.51%

3.37%

2.40%

3.90% 3.81% 3.99% 3.68% 3.53%

Actual

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Budget

6

7 201 FY

201 FY

FY 201 5

FY 201 4

FY 201 3

FY 201 2

FY 201 1

FY 201 0

FY 200 9

FY 200 8

FY 200 7

FY 200 6

FY 200 5

FY 200 4

FY 200 3

FY 200 2

0.00%

Forecast

61


The Sunshine Revenue Notes funded various projects i.e., Town Center, Corporate Park improvements, construc on/ renova on of four fire sta ons, canal paving project, Coral Springs Mall project, Charter School, Mullins Park maintenance center, firing range baffling, fire apparatus, Sportsplex Regional Park, street resurfacing, median improvements, and other projects and equipment of less significance with useful lives of up to 20 years.

the ability to reset the City’s interest rate based on current market condi ons. The reset is for the remaining approximate five years that the note will be outstanding. The net loan annual interest rate is 2.7995% (5.09% w/45% subsidy). The note may be prepaid in whole but not in part on any interest payment date, at the redemp on price equal to the principal amount prepaid plus interest accrued to the date of prepayment plus a premium of 3% of the principal amount prepaid on or before October 1, 2012; a premium of 2% of the principal amount prepaid on or a er April 1. 2013 and on or before October 1, 2014; and a premium of 1% of the principal amount prepaid on or a er April 1. 2015.

The City issued through FIFC 4.675% fixed rate Capital Revenue Bonds and then entered into an interest rate swap agreement with J.P. Morgan for a weekly variable interest rate (published TBMA Municipal Swap Index Rate plus 17.5 basis points). This agreement was called on April 28, 2008, by the underwriter as allowed for in the swap agreement. If not called the agreement would have remained in effect for ten years.

This note was issued to support the redevelopment of Downtown Coral Springs (the University Drive and Sample Road intersec on) and to replace three of the aging Mullins Park buildings. Debt service principal and interest payment for Fiscal Year 2013 is $405,517, and the outstanding balance is $5,673,017.

The average interest rate paid on the City’s Series 2001A Capital Revenue Bonds during Fiscal Year 2008 was 2.89% or 178.5 basis points less than the 4.675% fixed rate.

In Fiscal Year 2013, the City will issue a $4.7M loan to finance necessary capital enhancements and acquisi ons for the General Fund. Terms of this financing are expected to be between 15 and 20 years with repayments scheduled to begin in Fiscal Year 2014; therefore, debt service obliga ons associated with this loan will not affect this year’s budget. Principal and interest payments are programmed in the City’s five-year forecast for the General Fund.

The City entered into a second exempt Capital Revenue Bond issue through the FIFC (Series 2002B, dated December 11, 2002) in the amount of $8,875,000 of which $3,375,000 of these defeased bonds are outstanding on October 1, 2012. The loan term was 15 years with a final maturity date of September 1, 2017. Ini ally the City benefited from a variable interest rate (M-Star Rate) but also had a conversion privilege to convert to a fixed interest rate upon providing proper no ce. The average annual equivalent interest rate the City paid on this issue in Fiscal Year 2008 was 5.49%.

Future Debt Issues The City has the capacity to fund future debt. An analysis was performed to determine the City’s non-ad valorem governmental debt capacity. These non-ad valorem revenues consist of franchise fees, the u lity service taxes, the communica ons services taxes and the halfcent sales tax.

These bonds were used to finance new capital projects such as the Fire Training Facility, the JJJ (Coral Glades) High School improvements, ins tu onal network, the road resurfacing program, and many other smaller capital projects. The Capital Revenue Note Series 2010, aka Federally Taxable Build America Recovery Zone Bonds dated December 14, 2010 issued $5,913,000 to mature April 1, 2030, with a put op on at year 15 or April 1, 2025. At this me, Branch Banking and Trust Company will have

For Fiscal Year 2012, the primary bondable sources of non-ad valorem revenues of the City were as follows: Franchise fees $10,509,000 U lity service taxes $9,649,000 Communica ons services taxes $5,800,000 Half-cent sales tax $7,102,000

General obliga on debt outstanding balance as a percentage of total taxable assessed value

With the issuance of addi onal franchise revenue bonds, the City added the u lity service tax as a source of pledged revenue. With the 1.40x addi onal bonds test, the maximum debt service is $18,541,000 ($25,958,000/1.40x).

2.00%

By City policy, cannot exceed 5.00%

1.00%

0.70% 0.60%

0.50%

0.60%

0.53% 0.49%

0.41% 0.34%

0.29%

0.28% 0.27% 0.23% 0.18% 0.24% 0.23% 0.25% 0.13%

12

11

20 FY

FY

20

10

09

20

20 FY

FY

08

07

20 FY

06

20 FY

FY

20

05

04

20 FY

03

20 FY

02

20 FY

01

20 FY

20

20 FY

99 FY

98

19 FY

97

19 FY

96

19

19

FY

FY

62

00

0.00%

Assuming that a new franchise tax bond issue is “wrapped” around our exis ng debt service with a final maturity of 2032, the City’s bonding capacity is $267,131,000.

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


The City also has available the half-cent tax for bonding purposes. At current interest rate levels SRF Loan and assuming a 1.40x addi onal bonds test, the City’s addi onal revenue bond capacity is: 10 years $42,515,000 Water Treatment Plant Improvements 5 years $59,062,000 20 years* $73,096,000 Raw Water Supply Wells *These addi onal revenues provide a total twenty year bonding capacity of approximately $340,227,000. In Fiscal Years 2012-2017, the CIP iden fies revenue bonds to fund $8,000,000 (excluding Water and Sewer Fund) of future capital improvements.

Authorized Loan Amount

Outstanding at 9/30/12 Actual

Outstanding at 9/30/13 Es mate

$6,199,552

$5,620,449

$5,401,869

$2,184,439

$1,840,869

$1,768,047

Transmission, Distribu on, Interconnects

$4,471,600

$2,831,204

$3,572,617

Source and Treatment

$1,785,848

$504,655

$1,473,129

Forest Hills Wellfield

$2,378,183

$94,592

$2,257,445

Li Sta on 20A/20B Rehab

$536,159

$472,863

$450,649

$1,277,591

$352,846

$1,591,470

$18,833,372

$11,717,478

$16,515,225

Sewer Rehab Phase II

Water/Sewer Revenue Bonds

Total

As shown in the above table, the City has seven outstanding SRF loans. While the term for each of these loans is 20 years, the annual interest rate has varied from 2.50% to 3.06% depending on the market rate at the me the loan was executed. The interest rate formula is 60% of the market rate as established using the “Bond Buyer 20Bond General Obliga on Bond Index.” The loan funds are drawn as they are spent on approved capital improvement projects. Repayment dates are based on the es mated comple on dates of the projects. The Fiscal Year 2010 through Fiscal Year 2016 CIP includes $18.3 million in SRFfunded projects.

The Series 2010 Water and Sewer Revenue Refunding Bonds, dated April 14, 2010, issued $8,735,000 of which $2,620,000 will be outstanding October 1, 2012 (1.474727% TIC). This series refunds the 1998 Series Water and Sewer Revenue Refunding bonds. This issue is expected to generate a present value savings of $487,671. The Water and Sewer Refunding Bonds Series 1998 dated April 1, 1998, issued $9,675,000 of which all outstanding principal was current refunded by the Series 2010 Water and Sewer Revenue Refunding Bonds. The TIC on this issue was 4.8436%. This issue refunded the Water and Sewer Revenue Bonds Series 1992 of $8,915,000. These bonds were u lized to fund the first phase of water u lity improvements of the City’s Master Plan.

Debt Forecas ng Assump ons Water and Sewer Revenue Bond Debt—20 Years

Series 2012 2.26% A new $8,700,000 Water & Sewer Revenue Bond – Series 2013 2.26% Series 2013 is planned to fund $6.7 million for Phase 3 Series 2014 2.26% Water Treatment Plant Improvements. Of this amount Series 2015 2.26% $5.5 million was included in the Adopted 2012 CIP Series 2016 2.26% Budget, intended to be funded by the State Revolving Series 2017 2.26% Fund (described below). It has since been determined that it will be more economical Remaining percentage of general obliga on debt to fund this project with this new issue. The W&S Revenue Bonds – Series 2013 capacity of City’s self-imposed 5% limit will also fund a $2.0 million booster sta on rehabilita on project. 88.0% 89.5% 87.3% 89.4% 90.2% 91.8% 93.1% 94.3% 95.4% 96.5% 94.5% 95.2% 95.3% 94.9% 94.3% 100.0%

State Revolving Fund Loans

80.0%

The City has authorized nearly $19 million in low-interest loans from the Florida Department of Environmental Protec on State Revolving Fund (SRF). These loans finance the capital needs iden fied in the Water and Wastewater System Master Plan (August 2006).

40.0%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

94.6%

60.0%

20.0%

12

11 20

20 FY

FY

FY

20

10

09

08

20 FY

20 FY

FY

20

07

06

05

20 FY

20 FY

20

04

03 FY

FY

20

02

01

20 FY

FY

20

00

99

20 FY

19 FY

19 FY

FY

19

97

98

0.0%

63


Capital Improvement Program

Capital expenditure Fiscal Years 2013-2018 of $137,037,903

The Capital Improvement Program (CIP) is an economical and responsible financial plan to ensure quality public services today and in the future. The CIP is a separate budge ng process within the annual opera ng budget. Collec vely, the CIP and the Five-Year Forecast serve as a road map to intelligently plan for the City’s future.

*Other 1.8% EquipmentServices Fund18%

FireFund 1.3%

The capital expenditure for Fiscal Year 2013 is programmed at $23,841,975. This total breaks down as follows: General Fund Water and Sewer Fund Equipment Services Fund Charter School Fund Tree Trust Fund Fire Fund Public Art Fund

$11,121,865 $7,961,000 $3,162,157 $645,653 $475,000 $389,800 $86,500

The CIP procedure is used to plan, budget, and finance the purchase and/or construc on of large capital infrastructure, facili es, equipment, and other fixed assets. The City uses this process to ensure these expensive, long-lived projects are aligned with its strategic direc on and that the money is prudently spent. The capital item to be undertaken or purchased, the year in which it will be started, the an cipated capital outlay each year, the es mated impact on the opera ng budget, and the method of financing the project are all listed in the CIP summaries that follow this descrip on.

WaterandSewer Fund27.1% GeneralFund 50.9%

*includes capital projects funded by the Public Art Fund and the Tree Trust Fund

The six-year Capital Improvement Program includes Fiscal Year 2013 budget and expenditure projec ons for the next five years. The total capital request for Fiscal Years 2013 through 2018 is $137,037,903.

Capital expenditure Fiscal Year 2013 of $23,841,975 *Other 2.4% EquipmentServices Fund13.3%

CIP SelecƟon Process The Capital Improvement Program provides detailed informa on for all CIP projects with capital outlays greater than $5,000 that the City plans to construct, improve, or purchase during Fiscal Years 2013 through 2018. Each department submi ng a capital acquisi on request completes a Project Descrip on Form. The request includes the following informa on: project tle, department/division, linkage to strategic priority or ini a ves, expected life of equipment (when applicable), addi onal opera ng cost, addi onal revenue or income, con ngencies, project descrip on, update, alterna ves, impact on other departments, and a jus fica on.

The CIP is updated annually to make adjustments for changing capital needs, changes in availability and cost of funds, and to add a year of programming to replace the year just completed. The CIP process begins in early FireFund January with a review of the process to determine if 1.6% there are any changes that will make the process more user-friendly, efficient, or effec ve. Next, departments conduct a fixed assets inventory including an inventory WaterandSewer of vehicles, computers, and printers.

CharterSchool Fund2.7%

Fund33.4% GeneralFund 46.6%

*includes capital projects funded by the Public Art Fund and the Tree Trust Fund

64

CharterSchool Fund0.9%

One of the key improvements to the process has been to link the Capital Improvement Program to the Strategic Plan. In the spring, capital requirements flowing from the adopted Strategic Plan and Business Plan are iden fied. Each project recommended for inclusion in the Fiscal Year 2013 capital budget is linked to the Strategic Plan as it relates to the City Commission’s seven priori es.

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Fleet Replacement Program contribu ons and expenses Fiscal Year 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023

Contributed Estimated Expenses Depreciation Interest $3,162,157 $2,446,483 $131,227 $5,672,821 $2,593,272 $119,538 $4,988,217 $2,748,868 $60,338 $3,272,210 $2,913,800 $16,757 $3,858,831 $3,088,628 $9,924 $3,669,590 $3,273,946 $0 $4,271,391 $3,470,383 $0 $3,477,643 $3,678,606 $0 $6,044,198 $3,899,322 $0 $4,217,634 $4,133,282 $0 $3,037,381 $4,381,278 $0

YearͲEnd Balance $5,976,890 $3,016,879 $837,867 $496,215 ($264,063) ($659,707) ($1,460,715) ($1,259,752) ($3,404,628) ($3,488,980) ($2,145,083)

The CIP also takes into considera on department needs, the Comprehensive Plan Capital Improvement element, and the Water and Wastewater 2007 Master Plan Update. The following policy guidelines are used to define a capital expenditure and steer the management of the process: • A capital expenditure is defined as a major construc on, expansion, purchase, or major repair/replacement of buildings, u lity systems, streets, or other physical structures or property which has an es mated total cost of $5,000 or more and generally has an expected life of at least five years. • Capital items under $5,000 are generally included in the various Fiscal Year 2013 funds’ opera ng budgets. • Capital improvements are programmed and scheduled based on the City’s projected financial ability to purchase and maintain the capital project. All projects are priori zed and ranked based on criteria including the strength of the linkage between the capital expenditure and the City’s strategic priori es. • General Fund debt service expenditures will not exceed 12.5% of the total annual General Fund budget. • Voter-approved general obliga on debt will not exceed 5.0% of the City’s total taxable assessed valua on. CIP Project Categories: Capital projects are divided into one of three primary categories: Capital improvement projects: The purchase, replacement, maintenance, and repair of infrastructure and fixed assets is budgeted and accomplished through the Capital Improvement Program Fleet replacement: The en re inventory of vehicles and equipment is evaluated annually in order to priori ze replacement and repairs needed in the upcoming year, based on age, condi on, maintenance cost, and expected life of each equipment.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

The Equipment Services Fund provides for the purchase, replacement, and maintenance of the City’s fleet and other large equipment (such as generators or llers). This is an internal service fund in which departments are charged for the usage or deprecia on of the equipment. This recurring source of money makes the fund selfsufficient. Exis ng assets are replaced on a life cycle replacement schedule. New equipment can be added through a new ini a ve if it can be shown to support the Strategic Plan. The table on the le shows the annual replacement cost of the City’s fleet inventory with the corresponding contribu ons required to make “pay-as-you-go” fleet purchases, thereby elimina ng the need to borrow. In Fiscal Year 2013, the City will invest nearly $3.2M to replace vehicles and equipment that otherwise would be more costly to maintain. Computer replacement: The Computer Replacement Program is used to purchase and maintain computer hardware (including scanners, laptops, and desktops) and so ware. This is also a self-sufficient, internal service fund. Exis ng computer technologies are replaced on a standardized replacement schedule that considers legacy as well as usage. The table below shows the annual investment cost to perform technology upgrades and replace the exis ng inventory of computers. Funding for Capital Projects can be obtained from any of the following sources: Current General Fund, Fire Fund, and Water and Sewer Fund opera ng revenues—these appropriated revenues will generally be used to purchase modest, rou ne opera ng capital items. Franchise revenue bonds and capital revenue bonds—this consists of debt that is secured through the pledge of City General Fund franchise revenues and other non-ad valorem revenues.

Computer Replacement Program contribu ons and expenses Fiscal Contributed Estimated Year Expenditures Depreciation YearͲendbalance 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022

$381,700 $41,550 $188,100 $1,272,650 $506,400 $179,000 $137,900 $165,900 $1,331,300 $335,350

$319,000 $344,520 $361,746 $379,833 $398,825 $418,766 $439,705 $461,690 $484,774 $509,013

$581,568 $884,538 $1,058,184 $165,367 $57,792 $297,558 $599,363 $895,153 $48,627 $222,290

65


Water and Sewer revenue bonds—the Water and Sewer Fund is an enterprise fund supported by fees for service rather than by taxes. Revenue bonds are repaid with revenues generated from this fund, not by contribu ons from the General Fund. Revenue bonds are obtained to increase plant capacity and modernize the U lity system. General obliga on bonds—this funding source requires voter approval and is used to finance major capital projects with an expected life of 15 to 30 years. Debt re rement is achieved through a special ad valorem debt millage separate from the General Fund ad valorem opera ng millage.

CIP funding sources— Fiscal Year 2013 Funding Source Opera ng—General Fund

$803,925

Opera ng—Fire Fund

$389,800

Opera ng—Equipment Repl. Fund

$3,162,157

Opera ng—Water and Sewer Fund

$1,006,500

Debt Service Fund Reserve

$1,000,000

Facili es Reserve

$1,139,304

Equity Financing Charter School Fund

Equity financing—this is generally known as “pay-as-yougo” financing and involves dedica ng budget surpluses that are generated in previous years to capital purchases. When the City equity finances some of its CIP, it reduces the amount of debt that needs to be issued.

Impact Fees (W&S)

Grant funding—this program refers to giving of funds for a specific purpose. Funds may be granted from federal, state, or local sources, such as Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), Urban Area Security Ini a ve (UASI), Federal Emergency Management Administra on (FEMA), Florida Department of Transporta on, Florida Department of Environmental Protec on, Energy Efficiency and Conserva on Block Grant (EECBG), Resource Recovery Board, Florida Department of Health, etc. Tax Incremental Financing (TIF)—this captures the future taxes of real estate improvements in a designated area to pay the present cost of these improvements. All fleet requests are accompanied by a Fleet Replacement Form iden fying the vehicle type, quan ty, replacement cost, vehicle iden fica on numbers, model type, and specialty items necessary to put the vehicle in service. In addi on, current status and condi on of each vehicle is required as part of the jus fica on submi ed for review (e.g. mileage, life-to-date repair cost, etc). Prior to being included in the six-year Capital Improvement Program, each poten al project is analyzed to determine its financial impact on opera ons, opera ng expenditures, and revenues. The total cost of each recommended project

66

$189,000

Grants

Variable-rate debt bonds and loans—this funding source will be used to purchase capital items through the Florida Intergovernmental Financing Commission (FIFC) or other financial ins tu on with a contractual obliga on specifying payment terms, including principal and interest to be paid over a period of me.

Florida Department of Environmental Protec on (DEP) loan—this program provides low-interest loans for planning, designing, and construc ng drinking water and wastewater projects. This program is also known as a State Revolving Fund (SRF) Loan.

Budget

$2,536,404 $645,653

Public Art Fund

$86,500

Tree Trust Fund

$475,000

Renewal and Replacement Fund Road Impact Fund

$2,554,500 $63,700 $1,200,000

Public Safety Bond Fund Balance

$753,000

Loan

$4,636,532

Revenue Bond (W&S)

$3,200,000

Total FY 2013 CIP

$23,841,975

is iden fied as part of the capital budge ng process and associated opera ng expenses are included in the opera ng budget. In the CIP, the Project Descrip on Form for each project iden fies expected debt service costs, including interest rate and life expectancy assump ons, and opera ng and maintenance costs for new equipment. The CIP Review Commi ee—made up of the City Manager, the department reques ng the capital, and staff from the Budget office—discuss all capital requests with further jus fica on, research, and analysis during the mee ngs. If the need proves to be valid and the capital is part of the City’s overall strategic plan, the project is recommended for approval. The Senior Management Team reviews the en re list of proposed capital projects along with the funding sources and restraints. A final list of projects is recommended to the City Commission by this team for inclusion in the capital budget. In summary, the six-year CIP provides the necessary components of a sound Capital Improvement Program. The table above describes sources of financing the capital budget in Fiscal Year 2013. It is important to note that $11.5M or 48.3% of the capital expenditure in Fiscal Year 2013 will be funded by reserves, opera ng capital or equity and $2.5M or 10.6% will be funded via grants, thereby reducing the need for new debt obliga ons.

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Impact of CIP on the City’s Operating Budget Addi onal Opera ng Expenses Addi onal opera ng expenses include all addi onal cost associated with a capital project, including any non-rou ne expenditure (addi onal maintenance costs, u lity cost, personnel costs, etc.) offset by an cipated savings or new revenues generated by that project. For example, the addi on of fleet items—such as five patrol vehicles and three pick up trucks for Parks—will have an impact on the City’s opera ng budget. The es mated fuel and maintenance cost for each equipment type is described in the Fleet Assets sec on on the following page.

CIP impact on the opera ng budget Fiscal Year 2013

Operating Budget $151,766,237

CIP Impact $5,362,382

Capital Improvement Budget $23,841,975

Opera ng Capital Opera ng capital is a funding source for capital requests, vehicles, and equipment that are rela vely modest in cost, have a short life expectancy and/or are purchased annually or fairly regularly. Each fund allocates money to make appropriate purchases or capital enhancements, financed through recurring revenues. The total impact of capital in the Fiscal Year 2013 opera ng budget is $5,362,382.

Projects funded via General Fund operating capital FY2013 Project Budget TimingSystemReplacement $10,000 PatioFurnitureReplacement(Aquatics) $16,500 PatioFurnitureReplacement(Mullins) $15,000 FunbrellasReplacement(Cypress) $7,000 WindScreenReplacement $6,000 EntrancePlaza $40,000 AquaticsͲMullins DeckStaining $8,750 CenterForTheArts ReplaceDoorsatTheater $4,000 CityManager ContingencyforCommunityPride/50thanniversary $25,000 ReplaceAgendaModule $18,450 HistoricalMuseumRepairsandMaintenance $5,150 DigitalEditingandStorageEquipment $20,000 DevelopmentServices TrafficCalming $10,000 DowntownPlanning $15,000 ParksandRecreation NeighborhoodParksRenovations $50,000 SartoryHallImprovements $100,000 SafetyTownBuilding(Architectural&Engdesign) $50,000 Police AVLSecurityDisplayReplacement $12,500 Weapons $6,000 GranTex $12,000 SafetyTownImprovements $5,000 CEMPPlannerSoftware $6,300 KͲ9TacticalVests $6,225 BEARUnitEquipment $80,000 Patrolvehiclesfor3(addstostaff)officers $107,700 PublicWorks MullinsParkDrainage $25,000 $15,000 Study/StormHardeningofWestside DrainageSystemPermitRenewal $10,000 WilesRoadWestEndTerminusBeautificationStudy $25,000 Sportsplex/Tennis ReplaceBackstopNetting $8,000 Fencing—TennisCourts $5,000 Transportation BridgeRepairs $7,500 SawgrassSignsFeasibility $12,000 WestchesterDrainageStudyandMasterPlan $50,000 HumanResources EͲLearningPlatform $9,850 Total $803,925

Department AquaticComplex

City of Coral Springs, Florida

General Fund This year’s capital will impact the City’s general opera ng fund by $803,925, as described in the “General Fund opera ng capital” table. Fire Fund The Fire Fund’s opera ng capital totals $389,800. This budget will be used for necessary improvements and upkeep of fire sta ons, replacement of portable radios for firefighters, purchase of thermal imaging cameras for search and rescue opera ons, and con nued installa on of traffic light controllers at major intersec ons allowing emergency vehicles to arrive safely and quickly at emergency scenes. Water and Sewer Fund The Water and Sewer Fund’s opera ng capital of $1,006,500 will finance the following projects: ongoing replacement of fire hydrants, to ensure standard requirements are met while providing adequate fire protec on; con nued inspec on, repair, and maintenance of water and wastewater valves ensuring all components of the sanitary system will perform as needed during mes of emergencies; security improvements at the Water Treatment Plant; and replacement of six water service lines on NW 100th Avenue to improve water quality distribu on in this sec on of the City. Addi onally, opera ng funds will be used to conduct a water rate study which includes the evalua on of the current rate structure and a complete analysis of revenues required to sustain opera ng expenses and meet capital investments in order to maintain the infrastructure. The report will recommend rate adjustments for the forecasted period, in order to generate sufficient income to ensure long-term financial health for the water and sewer u lity fund.

67


Impact of CIP on the City’s Operating Budget (continued) Equipment Services Fund In Fiscal Year 2013 the City is projec ng a $3,162,157 opera ng capital expense in the Equipment Services Fund to replace vehicles and equipment that have exceeded their useful life (refer to Fleet Assets for more informa on).

Debt Service Debt service refers to the amount of interest and principal the City will pay on its outstanding debt during a fiscal year. In Fiscal Year 2013, the City will borrow $4.7M to finance capital improvements for the General Fund. Repayment of this loan is programmed for Fiscal Year 2014; therefore, this new debt has no effect in the City’s Fiscal Year 2013 opera ng budget. Repayment of a $536,000 loan secured to fund improvements at two li sta ons will con nue this year. The total annual principal and interest payment for this loan is $34,926. The City has secured long-term financing from the Florida Department of Environmental Protec on State Revolving Fund (SRF) loan program for improvements at the Water Treatment Plant as well as throughout the en re water and sewer system. The interest rate for this financing is 60% of the market rate, resul ng in low-cost financing for these improvements over a term of 20 years. Nearly $19 million in financing has been obtained and many projects have been completed (i.e. replacement of exis ng wells, construc on of new raw water supply wells, and installa on of wellheads and transmission lines). The SRF loan program requires payment to begin six months a er comple on of capital projects financed through these loans. The total debt service in Fiscal Year 2013 for repayment of SRF loans is budgeted at $1,004,138. In addi on, the City will borrow $8.7M to con nue rehabilita on of booster sta ons and perform other improvements on the water and sewer system.

Fleet Assets Replacement of vehicles and equipment is funded by opera ng capital through the Equipment Services Fund. This internal services fund provides for the opera ng and maintenance costs of the City’s vehicles and major equipment. Fuel, maintenance, and deprecia on expenses are determined on a fullrecovery basis for each fleet asset type. The allocated amount for each department in the City is calculated based on the expected life of the

68

vehicle/equipment, the type of equipment, fuel and maintenance costs, and purchase price. The addi onal fleet items requested for funding in Fiscal Year 2013 are es mated to increase fuel and maintenance costs as follows: five patrol cars: $36,500 and four pick up trucks: $10,545. Vehicles used by Code Rangers (volunteers trained to conduct inspec ons in neighborhoods) also increase gasoline and repair cost. These addi onal expenses will be offset by cost avoidance resulted from purchasing energy saving air condi oning units, more efficient motors for City pools, and hybrid vehicles. The City’s inventory of vehicles is inspected annually to priori ze replacement and repairs based on age, condi on, maintenance cost, and life expectancy. This analysis helps to determine which vehicles can be repaired (instead of replaced) thereby extending their useful life. This opera onal efficiency results in annual cost savings in vehicle replacement. These cost savings have a posi ve impact on the opera ng budget by reducing the chargeback alloca on to all funds. For example, In Fiscal Year 2010 and 2011, the City purchased 10 hybrid vehicles using funds from the Energy Efficiency and Conserva on Block Grant (EECBG). This grant allowed for savings of approximately $125,000 to the City’s Fleet Replacement Fund, reducing the amount allocated to other funds for vehicle’s replacement. In Fiscal Year 2012, le over balances from other energy efficiency projects were reallocated towards the purchase of two more hybrid vehicles. These new vehicles replaced two exis ng cars scheduled for purchase during that year, providing cost savings to the Equipment Services Fund. Chargeback is a term used to describe the method to reimburse the Equipment Services Fund for the usage of an asset over its expected useful life (also known as funded deprecia on) rather than borrowing money to buy the asset at the beginning of its useful life. Deprecia on fees collected from departments are held in the Fleet

Fleet replacement cost Fiscal Years 2013—2023 $7.0 $6.0

$6.1

$5.7 $5.0 $4.0

$3.2 $2.0

$3.9

$5.0

$3.0

$3.3

$4.3 $3.7

$3.5

$4.2 $3.1

$1.0 $0.0

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Impact of CIP on the City’s Operating Budget (continued) Replacement Fund un l the money is needed to purchase fleet items. The total chargeback alloca on for Fiscal Year 2013 is $2,446,483 of which $1,795,572 impacts the General Fund, $204,524 is allocated to the Water and Sewer Fund, and $446,387 is paid by the Fire Fund. The table on the previous page shows projected annual investment cost to replace the City’s fleet assets for the next 10 years. Vehicles maintenance expenses and gasoline cost are also funded by the Equipment Replacement Fund. This expense is also collected from all applicable departments via interfund transfers. The fuel and maintenance budget for Fiscal Year 2013 totals $3,005,357. The impact to the City’s general opera ng fund is $2,418,058, the Fire Fund’s alloca on is $364,046, and the Water and Sewer Fund’s por on is $223,253. Replacing cars with hybrid vehicles, which provide be er gas mileage than standard automobiles, has resulted in fuel cost savings Citywide. The annual gasoline savings is es mated to be $300 per vehicle due to increased fuel efficiency and enhanced performance. These savings are reflected in the opera ng budget by reducing the fuel and maintenance charges allocated to user departments.

Grants The City of Coral Springs is con nually seeking grant opportuni es to help finance projects that support its seven strategic priori es and link to Business Plan Coral Springs has been ini a ves. Grants from Federal, Local, and State granted funds from sources are researched the Resource Recovery and applied for with the Board (RRB), Community ul mate goal of funding Development Block Grant specific projects that (CDBG), Justice Assistance meet our customers’ Grant (JAG), Federal needs, while lowering departmental opera ng Emergency Management costs. Agency-Assistance to

Firefighters Grant (FEMA For Fiscal Year 2013, the AFG), and Florida Department City has been awarded $2,536,404 to assist with of Health (Fla. DOH). funding of necessary capital projects. A breakdown of projects financed via grants, with their corresponding alloca on, is presented in the table below. These granted funds impact the City’s budget by supplemen ng 10.7% of the total capital expenditure for Fiscal Year 2013.

FY 2013 Capital projects financed via grants Source of grant RRB

CDBG

JAG FEMA (AFG) Fla. DOH

Project Single stream recycling program

Alloca on $1,539,861

Commercial facade

$80,000

Recreac onal and therapeu cal ac vi es for seniors

$40,970

NW 38th Drive sidewalks

$250,000

Youth scholarships

$47,000

Playground replacement

$51,205

Replace handguns and tasers

$19,057

Driving simulator

$289,036

No Smoke system

$140,000

Chest compression devices

$36,675

Glidescopes

$42,600

The Broward Solid Waste Disposal District has authorized funding to the City to s mulate recycling. The City will procure 96 gallon carts for mul family proper es and 64 gallon carts for single-family units as part of the Single Stream Recycling program.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

69


Capital Improvement Summary by Fund Fund

FY2012

Name

Budget

GeneralFund Water&Sewer EquipmentServices CharterSchool TreeTrust Fire PublicArt TotalCIP(allfunds)

$8,357,932 $14,954,500 $2,210,651 $574,215 $526,111 $252,079 $76,500 $26,951,988

FY2013 Budget $11,121,865 $7,961,000 $3,162,157 $645,653 $475,000 $389,800 $86,500 $23,841,975

FY2014 Plan $23,138,325 $6,291,500 $5,672,821 $516,092 $470,000 $507,390 $128,500 $36,724,628

FY2015 Plan $15,418,531 $6,471,500 $4,988,217 $30,000 $270,000 $275,899 $175,500 $27,629,647

FY2016 Plan $8,349,141 $5,535,000 $3,272,210 $30,000 $220,000 $162,640 $153,500 $17,722,491

FY2017 Plan $6,210,705 $5,575,000 $3,858,831 $20,000 $120,000 $200,214 $200,500 $16,185,250

FY2018

TotalCost

Plan

FY2013Ͳ2018

$5,602,245 $5,285,000 $3,669,590 $0 $0 $223,577 $153,500 $14,933,912

$69,840,812 $37,119,000 $24,623,826 $1,241,745 $1,555,000 $1,759,520 $898,000 $137,037,903

Beau fica on efforts will con nue at Mullins Park in Fiscal Year 2013, including the construc on of three new mul -purpose buildings.

70

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


CIP Budget by Funding Source—All Funds FundingSource Operating GeneralFund FireFund W&SFund EquipmentServicesFund TotalOperating

FY2012 Budget

FY2013 Budget

FY2014 Plan

FY2015 Plan

FY2016 Plan

FY2017 Plan

FY2018 Plan

$100,000 $252,079 $809,000 $2,210,651 $3,371,730

$803,925 $389,800 $1,006,500 $3,162,157 $5,362,382

$943,432 $507,390 $691,500 $5,672,821 $7,815,143

$73,382 $275,899 $961,500 $4,988,217 $6,298,998

$85,763 $162,640 $435,000 $3,272,210 $3,955,613

$119,204 $200,214 $565,000 $3,858,831 $4,743,249

$86,145 $223,577 $435,000 $3,669,590 $4,414,312

$2,111,851 $1,759,520 $4,094,500 $24,623,826 $32,589,697

EquityFinancing TotalEquityFinancing

$5,126,852 $5,126,852

$189,000 $189,000

$741,000 $741,000

$191,000 $191,000

$122,000 $122,000

$127,000 $127,000

$137,000 $137,000

$1,507,000 $1,507,000

Reserves GFͲFacilitiesReserves DebtServiceFundReserves CapitalReserves(W&S) TotalReserves

$916,000 $0 $2,208,000 $3,124,000

$1,139,304 $1,000,000

$156,600 $500,000

$133,000 $500,000

$63,000 $500,000

$63,000 $500,000

$43,000 $500,000

$1,597,904 $3,500,000

$2,139,304

$656,600

$633,000

$563,000

$563,000

$543,000

$5,097,904

$469,175 $19,057 $1,539,861 $429,036 $79,275 $0 $2,536,404

$1,065,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $1,065,000

$475,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $475,000

$430,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $430,000

$430,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $430,000

$415,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $415,000

$3,284,175 $19,057 $1,539,861 $429,036 $79,275 $0 $5,351,404

ForfeitureFunds GeneralFund TotalForfeitureFunds

TotalCost FY2013ͲFY2018

78,300 78,300

Grants CDBGGrant JusticeAssistanceGrant ResourceRecoveryBoardGrant FEMAAFGGrant FloridaDOHGrant UASI TotalGrants

$651,277 $23,590 $100,000 $120,068 $24,000 $217,845 $1,136,780

Loan/grantdependent GeneralFund WaterandSewerFund TotalLoan/grantdependent

$1,000,000 $5,771,000 $6,771,000

CharterSchoolFund TotalCharterSchoolFund

$574,215 $574,215

$645,653 $645,653

$516,092 $516,092

$30,000 $30,000

$30,000 $30,000

$20,000 $20,000

$0 $0

$1,241,745 $1,241,745

Loan(GeneralFund) TotalLoan(GeneralFund)

$0 $0

$4,636,532 $4,636,532

$16,732,293 $16,732,293

$11,046,149 $11,046,149

$7,148,378 $7,148,378

$4,971,501 $4,971,501

$4,421,100 $4,421,100

$48,955,953 $48,955,953

$76,500 $76,500

$86,500 $86,500

$128,500 $128,500

$175,500 $175,500

$153,500 $153,500

$200,500 $200,500

$153,500 $153,500

$898,000 $898,000

$0 $0

$753,000 $753,000

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$753,000 $753,000

$666,500 $666,500

$2,554,500 $2,554,500

$2,350,000 $2,350,000

$2,350,000 $2,350,000

$1,850,000 $1,850,000

$1,850,000 $1,850,000

$1,850,000 $1,850,000

$12,804,500 $12,804,500

$5,500,000 $5,500,000

$3,200,000 $3,200,000

$3,250,000 $3,250,000

$3,160,000 $3,160,000

$3,250,000 $3,250,000

$3,160,000 $3,160,000

$3,000,000 $3,000,000

$19,020,000 $19,020,000

$0 $0

$63,700 $63,700

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$63,700 $63,700

$526,111 $526,111

$475,000 $475,000

$470,000 $470,000

$270,000 $270,000

$220,000 $220,000

$120,000 $120,000

$0 $0

$1,555,000 $1,555,000

ImpactFees(W&S) TotalImpactFees(W&S)

$0 $0

$1,200,000 $1,200,000

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$1,200,000 $1,200,000

GeneralObligationBond TotalGeneralObligationBond

$0 $0

$0 $0

$3,000,000 $3,000,000

$3,000,000 $3,000,000

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$6,000,000 $6,000,000

$26,951,988

$23,841,975

$36,724,628

$27,629,647

$17,722,491

$16,185,250

$14,933,912

$137,037,903

PublicArtFund TotalPublicArtFund PublicSafetyBondfundbalance TotalP.SafetyBondFundBalance R&RFund(W&S) TotalRenewal&ReplacementFund RevenueBond(W&S) TotalRevenueBond RoadImpactFund TotalRoadImpactFund TreeTrustFund TotalTreeTrustFund

TotalCIP

City of Coral Springs, Florida

71


Major Capital Projects by Department Department/Fund DevelopmentServices EmergencyMedical Services

CapitalProject

ParksandRecreation

Police

RoyalPalmEntryway

$330,291

TreeTrustFund($175k);Loan($155,291)

$361,295

FEMAgrant(80%);City'smatch20%(Loan)

$175,000

FEMAgrant(80%);City'smatch20%(Loan)

NoSmokeSystem

Transportation

FireFund

WaterandSewerFund

CharterSchoolFund

72

$1,000,000

DebtServiceFundReserves

CityDataBackͲupandRecovery

$245,707

Loan

RemoteAccessSystemUpgrade

$240,000

Loan

CJISSecurityCompliance

$150,000

Loan

MullinsParkRenovations

$200,000

Loan Loan

MullinsParkRevitalization

$200,000

15ͲyearPlaygroundReplacement

$181,205

CDBG($51,205);Loan($130k)

NeighborhoodParksRenovations

$200,000

Loan($150k);GeneralFundOp.Capital($50k)

MediansLandscapeUpgradesPhaseI

$150,000

TreeTrustFund

PickupTrucks

$106,500

Loan Loan

NorthCommunityParkRenovations

$100,000

SartoryHallImprovements

$100,000

GeneralFundOperatingCapital

CypressParkRenovations

$100,000

Loan

SurveillanceEquipment

$204,000

Loan

GunRangeRoofandStuccoWaterproofing

$150,000

FacilitiesReserves

PatrolVehiclesfor3additionalofficers

$107,700

GeneralFundOperatingCapital

SingleStreamRecyclingProgram

PublicWorks

FundingSource

DrivingSimulator PhoneSystemReplacement

InformationServices

FY2013 Budget

$1,539,861

ResourceRecoveryBoardGrant

EmergencyPowerforPublicSafetyBldg

$743,000

PublicSafetyG.O.BondFundBalance FacilitiesReserves

AirConditioningMaintenance/Replacement

$352,640

RoofReplacementandRepair

$225,000

FacilitiesReserves

CityHallLightingandFrontEntranceModifications

$205,000

Loan

CityHallRoofReplacement

$175,000

FacilitiesReserves

A/CImp.atPolice'sCommunicationsCenter

$100,000

Loan

WaterConservingPlumbingUpgrades

$100,000

FacilitiesReserves

RoadResurfacingProgram

$906,000

Loan

NW38thDr.Sidewalk,Curb,Gutter&Drainage

$339,000

CDBG($250k);Loan($89k)

MasterParkingLotRefurbishing

$248,000

Loan

ResurfaceandRestripeParkingLots

$193,000

Loan

FireStationsPaintingandImprovements

$147,000

FireFundOperatingCapital

BoosterStationRehab

$2,000,000

W&SRevenueBond

DowntownWater&SewerImprovements

$1,200,000

W&SImpactFees

WaterTreatmentPlantImprovements

$1,200,000

W&SRevenueBond

Infiltration/InflowCorrectionProgram

$1,000,000

W&SRenewalandReplacementFund

GalvanizedWaterServiceReplacement

$850,000

W&SRenewalandReplacementFund

SecurityImprovements

$300,000

W&SOperatingCapital

GIS/AssetManagementTool

$340,000

W&SOperatingCapital

RawWaterSupplyWells,WellheadsandTransm

$250,000

W&SRenewalandReplacementFund

PotableWaterInterconnectWithCoconutCreek

$154,500

W&SRenewalandReplacementFund

ValveRepairandReplacement

$150,000

W&SOperatingCapital

ForceMainandLiftStationIsolationValves

$150,000

W&SRenewalandReplacementFund

FireHydrantReplacementProgram

$100,000

W&SOperatingCapital

SparePumpsandReplacementPumps

$100,000

W&SRenewalandReplacementFund

RoofReplacement

$445,653

CharterSchoolFund

AirConditioningRepairandReplacement

$130,000

CharterSchoolFund

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Major Capital Projects by Location Capital Projects Citywide Infiltration/Inflo correction program Galvanized water service replacement Roof replacement and repair Remote Access System upgrade Surveillance equipment No Smoke System Single Stream recycling program CJIS security compliance Valve reapir and replacement Driving Simulator Force main & lift station isolation valves Fire hydrant replacement program Water conserving plumbing upgrades Phone System replacement Raw water supply wells, wellheads, and transmission Coral Springs Drive Medians landscape upgrades phase 1

GIS Asset management tool City data back-up and recovery Neighborhood parks renovations Air Conditioning maintenance/replacement Potable water interconnect with Coconut Creek Spare pumps and replacement pumps Patrol vehicles for 3 additional officers

North Community Park

Water Treatment Plant

Roof repair; playground replacement; vehicles (3); renovations; Resurface and restripe parking lots

Phase 3 Improvements Security Improvements

Firing/Gun Range

NW 38th Drive

Roof and stucco waterproofing

Sidewalk (curb, gutter, and drainage) Creekside Drive

Future Downtown

Road resurfacing

Water and Sewer Improvements

City Hall North Lighting and front entrance modifications; roof repairs and replacement

Tennis Center Resurface/restripe parking lots

Coral Springs Charter School Roof and air conditioning replacements

Center for the Arts Resurface/restripe parking lots

Riverside Drive Master parking lot refurbishing

Lakeview Park Playground replacement

Royal Palm Boulevard Entryway

Coral Ridge Drive City Hall South

Medians landscape upgrades phase 1

Roof repairs and replacements Public Safety Building

Cypress Park

Mullins Park

Facility

A/C improvements at Communications Center; Emergency power

Renovations

Booster station rehab, park revitalization, roof repairs, park renovations, and improvements to Sartory Hall

Street name

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Capital project

73


General Fund CIP Summary by Funding Source FundingSource/Department OperatingGeneralFund AquaticComplex AquaticsͲMullins CenterForTheArts CityManager DevelopmentServices ParksandRecreation Police PublicWorks Sportsplex/Tennis Transportation HumanResources OperatingGeneralFundTotal

FY21013 Budget

FY2014 Plan

FY2015 Plan

FY2016 Plan

FY2017 Plan

FY2018 Plan

TotalCost FY2013ͲFY2018

$94,500 $8,750 $4,000 $68,600 $25,000 $200,000 $235,725 $75,000 $13,000 $69,500 $9,850 $803,925

$85,500 $0 $0 $0 $16,882 $800,000 $11,500 $14,700 $5,000 $0 $9,850 $943,432

$20,000 $0 $0 $0 $16,882 $0 $24,000 $0 $5,000 $7,500 $0 $73,382

$45,500 $0 $0 $0 $23,763 $0 $11,500 $0 $5,000 $0 $0 $85,763

$53,500 $0 $0 $0 $27,204 $0 $26,000 $0 $5,000 $7,500 $0 $119,204

$0 $0 $0 $0 $30,645 $0 $40,000 $10,500 $5,000 $0 $0 $86,145

$299,000 $8,750 $4,000 $68,600 $140,376 $1,000,000 $348,725 $100,200 $38,000 $84,500 $19,700 $2,111,851

EquityFinancing DevelopmentServices ParksandRecreation PublicWorks Transportation EquityFinancingTotal

$69,000 $20,000 $20,000 $80,000 $189,000

$69,000 $25,000 $30,000 $617,000 $741,000

$69,000 $25,000 $30,000 $67,000 $191,000

$0 $25,000 $30,000 $67,000 $122,000

$0 $30,000 $30,000 $67,000 $127,000

$0 $40,000 $30,000 $67,000 $137,000

$207,000 $165,000 $170,000 $965,000 $1,507,000

FacilitiesReserves CenterForTheArts ParksandRecreation Police PublicWorks Sportsplex/Tennis FacilitiesReservesTotal

$0 $30,000 $150,000 $959,304 $0 $1,139,304

$68,600 $10,000 $0 $66,000 $0 $144,600

$0 $20,000 $0 $113,000 $0 $133,000

$0 $0 $0 $63,000 $0 $63,000

$0 $0 $0 $63,000 $0 $63,000

$0 $0 $0 $43,000 $0 $43,000

$68,600 $60,000 $150,000 $1,307,304 $0 $1,585,904

RoadImpactFund Transportation RoadImpactFundTotal

$63,700 $63,700

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$63,700 $63,700

CDBGGrant AquaticsͲCypressPool DevelopmentServices ParksandRecreation Transportation CDBGGrantTotal

$30,970 $80,000 $108,205 $250,000 $469,175

$45,000 $955,000 $65,000 $0 $1,065,000

$45,000 $365,000 $65,000 $0 $475,000

$0 $365,000 $65,000 $0 $430,000

$0 $365,000 $65,000 $0 $430,000

$0 $350,000 $65,000 $0 $415,000

$120,970 $2,480,000 $433,205 $250,000 $3,284,175

$19,057 $19,057

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$19,057 $19,057

$1,539,861 $1,539,861

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$1,539,861 $1,539,861

FEMAAFGGrant EmergencyMedicalServices FEMAAFGGrantTotal

$429,036 $429,036

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$429,036 $429,036

FloridaDOHGrant EmergencyMedicalServices FloridaDOHGrantTotal

$79,275 $79,275

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$79,275 $79,275

GeneralObligationBond Police GeneralObligationBondTotal

$0 $0

$3,000,000 $3,000,000

$3,000,000 $3,000,000

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$6,000,000 $6,000,000

Loan AquaticComplex AquaticsͲCypressPool AquaticsͲMullins CenterForTheArts CityManager DevelopmentServices EmergencyMedicalServices InformationServices ParksandRecreation Police PublicWorks Sportsplex/Tennis Transportation HumanResources LoanTotal

$247,750 $6,500 $0 $0 $75,000 $155,291 $163,084 $635,707 $1,125,100 $462,100 $305,000 $0 $1,461,000 $0 $4,636,532

$1,024,500 $205,000 $63,500 $737,950 $0 $0 $134,440 $753,153 $6,665,000 $260,100 $1,053,650 $1,114,000 $4,733,000 $0 $16,744,293

$364,500 $39,500 $0 $496,500 $0 $0 $110,024 $164,000 $5,805,000 $414,800 $768,000 $62,825 $2,671,000 $150,000 $11,046,149

$51,500 $25,500 $34,000 $106,900 $0 $0 $125,000 $335,428 $3,261,000 $283,000 $682,600 $37,000 $2,206,450 $0 $7,148,378

$40,000 $7,500 $7,000 $44,900 $0 $0 $105,000 $50,000 $1,355,000 $585,200 $674,400 $45,000 $2,057,500 $0 $4,971,500

$0 $12,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $90,000 $0 $1,285,000 $394,000 $477,000 $10,000 $2,153,100 $0 $4,421,100

$1,728,250 $296,000 $104,500 $1,386,250 $75,000 $155,291 $727,548 $1,938,288 $19,496,100 $2,399,200 $3,960,650 $1,268,825 $15,282,050 $150,000 $48,967,952

DebtServiceFundReserves InformationServices DebtServiceFundReservesTotal

$1,000,000 $1,000,000

$500,000 $500,000

$500,000 $500,000

$500,000 $500,000

$500,000 $500,000

$500,000 $500,000

$3,500,000 $3,500,000

$753,000 $753,000

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$753,000 $753,000

$11,121,865

$23,138,325

$15,418,531

$8,349,141

$6,210,704

$5,602,245

$69,840,811

JusticeAssistanceGrant Police JusticeAssistanceGrantTotal ResourceRecoveryBoardGrant PublicWorks ResourceRecoveryBoardGrantTotal

PublicSafetyBondfundbalance Police PublicSafetyBondfundbalanceTotal TotalGeneralFundCIP

74

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Revenue Trends As part of the Five-Year Forecast, we have made several assump ons about future revenue growth that have a major impact on the resources that we can plan to use. The next two pages explain some of the analysis of major revenue sources.

Building permit revenues

Building permit revenues grew rapidly in the late 1990s and early 2000s due to the accelerated development prior to build-out that was fueled by both posi ve economic condi ons and popula on growth. When 95% residen al build-out was reached in 2001,as expected and forecast, revenues dropped precipitously. Growth in building permit revenues picked up again in 2006 and 2007 following Hurricane Wilma. With hurricane-related repairs completed, we do not expect the strong growth in building permit revenues from the past two years to con nue. We do, however, expect some growth in building permit revenues as residents begin to renovate older homes.

$4.5 Millions

$4.0 $3.5 $3.0 $2.5

YearͲEndEstimate

$1.5

BuildͲOut

$1.0

HurricaneRelated Repairs

$0.5

BudgetEstimate

Projected

$2.0

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

$0.0

BuildingPermitRevenue

Half-cent sales tax revenues $10.0

Revenue from the half-cent sales tax have been declining in recent years due to the impact of the economic recession. In fact, the state of Florida urges cau on, predic ng slow growth in sales tax. Further, for the first me in its history, the popula on of the City has declined, which could affect the distribu on formula for this revenue source. Therefore, we believe conserva ve projec ons of 5% annual growth are warranted.

Millions

$9.0 $8.0 Projected

Budget Estimate

$4.0

2013

$5.0

YearͲEndEstimate

$6.0

2012

$7.0

$3.0

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

$2.0

1/2CentSalesTax

State shared revenues $5.0 Millions

$4.5

The state shared revenues are comprised of revenues from the state sales tax (73.4%), the municipal fuel tax (26.6%), and the alterna ve fuel user decal fee (0.01%). The economic downturn has had a devasta ng impact on this revenue source in recent years. However, we have experienced an increase in local travel so we predict this revenue source will begin to slowly recover in 2013.

$4.0 $3.5 BudgetEstimate

2013

$2.0

YearͲEndEstimate

$2.5

2012

Projected

$3.0

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

$1.5

StateSharedRevenues

City of Coral Springs, Florida

75


Revenue Trends (continued) Communica ons services tax revenues $8.0

In Fiscal Year 2001 the state mandated a transi on to the communica ons services tax. Since then there has been li le growth in these revenues because of increased compe on and the state taking an increasing share of these revenues. We are projec ng this revenue will decline in FY 2013 then remain steady throughout the remainder of the five-year period. The spike in this revenue in FY 2009 was the result of a one- me audit adjustment.

Millions

$7.5 $7.0 $6.5 $6.0

BudgetEstimate

$4.0

2013

$4.5

YearͲEndEstimate

$5.0

2012

$5.5

Projected

$3.5 2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

$3.0

CommunicationServiceTax

Electric u lity service tax revenues $10.0 Millions

$9.0 Projected BudgetEstimate

$5.0

YearͲEndEstimate

$6.0

2013

$7.0

2012

$8.0

This tax is based on consump on of electricity. For that reason actual revenue has been declining the past few years as consumers reduced usage during the recessionary period. We expect moderate growth in the consump on of electricity as vacant residen al and commercial proper es become absorbed and normal ac vity begins again.

$4.0 $3.0 2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

$2.0

ElectricUtilityServiceTax

76

Electric u lity franchise fee revenues $11.0 Millions

$10.0 $9.0 $8.0

Projected BudgetEstimate

$4.0

2013

$5.0

YearͲEndEstimate

$6.0

2012

$7.0

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

$3.0 2001

This franchise fee is based on the total electric bill. The base rate accounts for only half of the typical customer’s electric bill with the remainder made up of the fuel surcharge, the conserva on and environmental recovery charge, and an equipment deprecia on charge. Florida Power & Light (FPL) has not increased the base rate since early in 2011. FPL has pe oned the Public Service Commission for a 16% rate increase over the next two years. The base rate increase will be par ally offset by a decrease in the fuel surcharge. Although we do expect the en re request to be granted, it is likely that a por on of the request will be approved thereby increasing the total electric bill which in turn translates to increased franchise fee revenue. In addi on, the Department of Energy expects the consump on of electricity to grow by 2% over the coming year.

ElectricFranchiseFee

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Five-Year Forecast opera ng strategies, we use the model to determine the poten al impact of decisions. Using this tool helps keep us focused on long-term solu ons rather than short-term â&#x20AC;&#x153;fixes,â&#x20AC;? which could lead to nega ve financial impacts in future years.

Our success to date has been largely dependent upon planning ahead for the financial reali es we project in coming years. We do so by u lizing our Five-Year Forecas ng model. This tool allows us to peer into the near future to iden fy the deficits that might await us if we were to take no further ac on.

As shown in the Five-Year Forecast chart, the City will present a balanced budget in Fiscal Year 2013. The recent agreement to revise the police pension produced short term savings. Moreover, the benefits of this strategy will con nue into the remainder of the five-year forecast period, bringing the projected deficit in the future to a much more manageable figure.

The Five-Year Forecast is an integral part of planning the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future financial strategy. It is a strategy we use to determine the level of risk we face over the next few years, and our ability to pay for the services we provide if we take no ac on to increase revenues or decrease expenditures. Revenues are projected at conserva ve levels over the period and are compared to cost increase es mates in payroll, opera ng expenditures, and capital outlay. Since many of our expenditure increases are fixed and predictable, the main variables are the rate of increase in exis ng revenues and new programs or projects planned over the forecast period. Typically, future years show a deficit of revenues over expenditures. The purpose of this financial exercise is to conserva vely quan fy our financial outlook so we can adequately prepare in advance to meet these challenges. As we map out our financial and

Five-Year Forecast: General Fund $0.0

$0.0

-$2.0

-$3.1

$ Millions

-$4.0 -$5.7

-$6.0

-$7.0

-$7.7

-$8.0

-$8.8

-$10.0 -$12.0 FY 2013

FY 2014

FY 2015

FY 2016

FY 2017

FY 2018

Remaining Deficit

This chart is for planning purposes and illustrates the poten al shor alls the General Fund could face if no posi ve ac on is taken. By Florida law, the proposed budget is balanced. Financial strategies will be formulated to address future year shor alls and are included in the Fiscal Year 2013 Business Plan.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

77


78

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Surplus/(Deficit)

TotalExpenditures

Expenditures CityCommission CityManager'sOffice HumanResources FinancialServices InformationServices CityAttorney'sOffice PoliceDepartment EmergencyMedicalServices DevelopmentServices PublicWorks ParksandRecreation Aquatics Sportsplex NonͲDepartmental InterfundTransfers CapitalFinancing Miscellaneous

TotalRevenues

AdValoremTaxes SolidWasteSpecialAssessment UtilityFranchiseFees UtilityServiceTaxes IntergovernmentalRevenues LicensesandPermits ChargesforServices FinesandForfeitures Miscellaneous InterfundTransfers

Revenues

y

36,257

$92,704,059

$255,208 2,846,202 1,340,856 2,412,679 2,533,073 781,555 45,223,489 8,111,165 5,685,946 4,002,779 8,424,523 2,424,544 1,594,429 2,366,445 1,254,337 3,203,058 243,771

$92,740,317

$31,512,835 994,502 8,633,882 9,551,411 18,632,097 3,554,469 11,259,429 1,475,329 3,478,564 3,647,798

Actual FiscalYear 2011

$0

$93,232,331

$277,534 2,686,193 1,326,873 2,547,851 2,687,017 826,566 43,833,365 8,939,338 5,741,622 4,012,553 9,074,064 2,389,616 1,594,475 2,244,180 897,755 2,372,954 1,780,373

$93,232,332

$31,133,669 1,432,712 8,555,293 9,726,732 18,444,412 3,291,394 12,549,937 1,538,792 3,237,378 3,322,013

Est.Actual FiscalYear 2012

$0

$98,814,284

$323,618 2,935,995 1,362,884 2,528,838 2,995,514 839,014 44,411,871 8,875,165 6,375,954 4,234,257 9,860,570 2,373,105 1,662,820 2,754,093 959,675 4,400,788 1,920,122

$98,814,284

$32,428,839 1,864,900 9,614,259 10,102,079 19,588,728 3,661,531 12,658,085 1,979,940 4,148,629 2,767,293

Budget FiscalYear 2013

0.9%

8.4% 4.9% 2.4% Ͳ4.5% 12.2% Ͳ0.7% Ͳ5.2% 1.6% 2.9% 2.3% 4.9% Ͳ0.4% Ͳ0.3% Ͳ2.5% 6.9% 83.6% 0.2%

0.9%

4.2% 29.7% 6.0% 4.7% 0.2% Ͳ11.6% 8.4% 6.3% 2.9% Ͳ51.1%

% '

($3,118,243)

$102,742,548

$337,640 3,021,553 1,404,870 2,606,234 3,080,953 862,340 46,545,970 9,186,307 6,717,150 4,354,209 10,162,050 2,441,514 1,707,735 2,867,526 998,062 4,363,338 2,085,098

$99,624,305

$33,239,560 1,883,549 9,491,222 10,806,725 19,889,205 3,809,091 13,184,800 2,028,768 4,074,092 1,217,293

Projected FiscalYear 2014

4.0%

4.3% 2.9% 3.1% 3.1% 2.9% 2.8% 4.8% 3.5% 5.4% 2.8% 3.1% 2.9% 2.7% 4.1% 4.0% Ͳ0.9% 8.6%

0.8%

2.5% 1.0% Ͳ1.3% 7.0% 1.5% 4.0% 4.2% 2.5% Ͳ1.8% Ͳ56.0%

% '

($5,386,988)

$106,526,592

$352,725 3,122,105 1,454,200 2,695,013 3,179,236 889,723 48,462,447 9,545,692 6,968,714 4,488,335 10,502,628 2,519,242 1,758,450 2,986,032 1,037,984 4,528,305 2,035,762

$101,139,604

$34,236,747 1,977,726 9,886,207 11,025,555 20,458,867 3,963,861 13,871,212 2,099,001 3,403,134 217,293

Projected FiscalYear 2015

$35,435,033 2,076,613 10,300,104 11,248,856 21,545,377 4,125,663 14,597,350 2,171,800 3,462,506 117,293

Projected FiscalYear 2016

$369,174 3,265,729 1,524,215 2,816,419 3,313,126 928,936 50,968,245 10,033,451 7,317,016 4,658,556 10,942,452 2,621,845 1,824,849 3,109,849 1,079,504 4,533,980 2,412,145

($6,638,894)

3.7% $111,719,490

4.5% 3.3% 3.5% 3.4% 3.2% 3.2% 4.1% 3.9% 3.7% 3.1% 3.4% 3.2% 3.0% 4.1% 4.0% 3.8% Ͳ2.4%

1.5% $105,080,596

3.0% 5.0% 4.2% 2.0% 2.9% 4.1% 5.2% 3.5% Ͳ16.5% Ͳ82.1%

% '

Actual annual budgets will always be balanced, as required by State law. Projected deficits in this model should not be construed as actual shor alls.

Note: This forecast is for planning purposes only and shows poten al deficits if no posi ve ac on is taken, given known opera onal and capital needs and conserva ve projec ons of revenue.

$0

$97,973,311

$298,557 2,798,851 1,331,306 2,648,151 2,670,743 845,120 46,823,819 8,732,233 6,194,592 4,139,665 9,403,387 2,382,255 1,668,046 2,825,341 897,755 2,397,076 1,916,414

$97,973,311

$30,899,061 1,438,000 9,071,035 9,649,175 19,541,735 4,143,966 11,674,805 1,863,225 4,030,349 5,661,959

Budget FiscalYear 2012

General Fund Five-Year Forecast Summary Schedule

$36,852,434 2,180,443 10,733,851 11,476,720 22,175,395 4,294,834 15,365,716 2,247,261 3,522,680 117,293

Projected FiscalYear 2017

$386,819 3,417,650 1,598,454 2,943,909 3,454,560 970,324 53,630,068 10,551,380 7,686,923 4,838,204 11,408,564 2,730,260 1,894,775 3,239,227 1,122,684 4,534,530 1,889,282

($7,330,983)

4.9% $116,297,612

4.7% 4.6% 4.8% 4.5% 4.2% 4.4% 5.2% 5.1% 5.0% 3.8% 4.2% 4.1% 3.8% 4.1% 4.0% 0.1% 18.5%

3.9% $108,966,629

3.5% 5.0% 4.2% 2.0% 5.3% 4.1% 5.2% 3.5% 1.7% Ͳ46.0%

% '

$38,510,794 2,289,466 11,188,429 11,709,243 22,836,615 4,471,729 16,178,984 2,325,484 3,585,402 117,293

Projected FiscalYear 2018

$405,771 3,578,470 1,677,234 3,077,809 3,604,091 1,014,041 56,459,255 11,101,709 8,082,129 5,027,996 11,903,033 2,844,925 1,968,482 3,374,428 1,167,591 4,531,155 1,907,207

($8,511,889)

4.1% $121,725,326

4.8% 4.7% 4.9% 4.5% 4.3% 4.5% 5.2% 5.2% 5.1% 3.9% 4.3% 4.1% 3.8% 4.2% 4.0% 0.0% Ͳ21.7%

3.7% $113,213,438

4.0% 5.0% 4.2% 2.0% 2.9% 4.1% 5.3% 3.5% 1.7% 0.0%

% '

4.7%

4.9% 4.7% 4.9% 4.5% 4.3% 4.5% 5.3% 5.2% 5.1% 3.9% 4.3% 4.2% 3.9% 4.2% 4.0% Ͳ0.1% 0.9%

3.9%

4.5% 5.0% 4.2% 2.0% 3.0% 4.1% 5.3% 3.5% 1.8% 0.0%

% '


Business Plan Contents Introduc on.........................................................................................................................................80 Market Environment ...........................................................................................................................81 Overview ......................................................................................................................................81 Economic Analysis ........................................................................................................................82 Real Estate Trends ........................................................................................................................84 Economic Development ...............................................................................................................85 Downtown Coral Springs ..............................................................................................................86 Demographics ..............................................................................................................................87 Technology ...................................................................................................................................88 Legisla ve Issues ..........................................................................................................................90 Service and Opera ons Strategy .........................................................................................................91 A Word About Exis ng Services and Ongoing Ini a ves ..............................................................91 Our New Ini a ves.......................................................................................................................91 Financial Strategy ..............................................................................................................................119 Inves ng in the Future of Our Community ................................................................................119 Revenue Outlook ........................................................................................................................120 Long-Term Financial Management .............................................................................................120 Solid Waste .................................................................................................................................121 Fiscal Year 2013 Capital Improvement Program.........................................................................122 Water and Sewer ........................................................................................................................123 Pension Status ...........................................................................................................................125 Fire Fund ....................................................................................................................................126 Measuring Results .............................................................................................................................127 Quarterly Performance Review ..................................................................................................127 Key Intended Outcome Analysis and Current Ini a ve Update .................................................127 Supplier and Partner Performance Data ....................................................................................129 Sustainability Index ....................................................................................................................129 Composite Index ........................................................................................................................130 Fiscal Year 2012 KIO Summary ...................................................................................................133 Department Performance Measurements .................................................................................135 Fiscal Year 2012 Ini a ve Update ..............................................................................................138 Fiscal Year 2013 Ini a ve Summary ...........................................................................................147

City of Coral Springs, Florida

79


Introduction The Strategy Behind the Plan

Reading the Business Plan

The Business Plan outlines how City resources will be applied within our seven priority areas to achieve the objec ves determined by the Strategic Plan. This Business Plan represents the second year in the current strategic planning process. Our strategic planning results in a mission and a set of strategic priori es that provide vision and direc on for the City. While it has evolved over the years, true to the spirit of con nuous improvement, it is s ll the linchpin in linking our day-to-day ac vi es with the mission that we aspire to achieve. We o en say the Business Plan gives “feet” to our priori es, direc onal statements, and Key Intended Outcomes, as well as establishes a structure for resource alloca on.

The Market Environment sec on is the result of an environmental scan performed prior to the strategic planning process and is updated annually. It is presented in its complete form in the Strategic Planning Workbook each year and then updated and summarized here in the Business Plan. We look at local demographic and economic market forces to iden fy emerging issues and items of concern to our residents. Direct customer feedback is solicited through surveys, focus groups, and town mee ngs, which becomes the basis for the Commission’s strategic planning.

With the strategic priori es set—and appropriate outcomes iden fied—the opera ons of the City are reviewed and redeployed to bring the strategic vision to life. Specific ini a ves are developed in response to the priori es iden fied in the Strategic Plan. This Business Plan is an outgrowth of the strategic priori es, capturing the City’s vision in a specific, directed, and quan fiable form.

80

Our Service and Opera ons Strategy is organized by strategic priority to document the steps we are taking to achieve the intended outcomes for each of the priority areas. Key Intended Outcomes, set by the Commission, are the measurable results we intend to achieve. To monitor the success of the Business Plan, we use a number of measurements, as detailed in the Measuring Results sec on. The most important measure is the Composite Index, a carefully balanced indicator of the City’s overall success rela ve to past performance.

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Market Environment Overview The Environmental Scan is the basis for the City’s short- and longrange planning efforts. The Scan iden fies poten al blind spots through the forward-looking analysis and comprehensive review of data from many sources including the economy, demographic pa erns, land development trends, service demand generators, technology changes, and legisla ve challenges. Its value lies in not only iden fying current constraints on the budget but future needs and opportuni es as well. Careful a en on to the Environmental Scan is indica ve of the organiza onal commitment to data-driven decisionmaking. It completes the ul mate feedback loop, where organiza onal direc on from the City Commission is not set un l market informa on, customer input, performance data, and all other inputs are considered. Although several noteworthy issues emerged during this analysis, two issues have the greatest poten al to derail the City’s vision: the state of the economy and legisla ve ac on. Three years a er the worst recession to hit the United States since the Great Depression officially ended, the recovery remains painfully slow. The slow economic recovery has frustrated consumers and puzzled economists. Overall, however, economic indicators such as GDP, consumer spending, inventories, and even foreclosures are moving in the right direc on. Although economic indicators are moving in the right direc on, economic, poli cal, and policy uncertainty is making the business community cau ous and unwilling to rush to invest in the tools of produc on or hire addi onal workers. Consumers, who lost a large chunk of their wealth with the devalua on of

City of Coral Springs, Florida

their homes and re rement por olios, are taking a wait-and-see a tude. This guarded a tude among business and consumers has dampened spending causing the economy to move along in fits and starts which in turn makes consumers more cau ous. Nevertheless, most economists agree that business is basically healthy. As one pundit declared, “while there is a lack of hiring there is also a lack of firing.” There seems to be consensus that the economy is in the recovery mode, albeit a slow and listless mode, and will con nue on its upward trajectory. There also seems to be consensus among economists that the recovery is a fragile one. Just as concerning as the uncertain economy, non-economic forces on the horizon could have a significant impact on the City’s financial health. In the recently completed Florida legisla ve session, a number of bills were passed that will have a nega ve impact on city revenues such as the Business Tax and the Communica ons Service Tax. In addi on, expected reforms that would have allowed ci es to crea vely reform public safety pensions did not materialize. Further, a number of bills were introduced that would have imposed revenue and/or spending limits as well as curtail ci es’ ability to set property tax rates. These legisla ve ac ons have the poten al to limit the City’s home rule authority, diminish our residents’ ability to make their own decisions regarding their local governance, and ul mately erode the City’s revenue base.

81


Economic Analysis Overview Since the end of the recession in July 2009 there is good news and bad news. The good news is that the important economic indicators are moving in the right direc on. The bad news is that these indicators, while posi ve, are not as robust as we have experienced in previous economic recoveries. For example, providing evidence of a choppy recovery, the index of Leading Economic Indicators rose 0.3% in May following a 0.1% decline in April and a 0.2% increase in March.

Locally Real GDP approaching the na onal average 8.00% 6.00% 4.00% 2.00% 0.00% -2.00% -4.00% -6.00% -8.00%

2005

2006

2007 National

Gross Domes c Product (GDP), the total dollar value of all goods and services produced in the United States during any given me period, is one of the primary indicators used to measure the health of the na on’s economy. Calendar year 2011 started off slow (0.4% GDP growth in the first quarter) but finished strong (3.0% GDP growth in fourth quarter) raising hopes that this strong growth would con nue. This calendar year, however, has been disappoin ng with a modest 1.9% growth in GDP the first half of the year.

2008

2009

Florida

2010

2011

2012Q1 2012Q2

Miami/Ft lauderdale

growth rate of 3.5% in 2014. Likewise, employment and wages are expected to outpace the rest of the state which will, in turn, drive consumer spending. Therefore, the City will adopt an op mis c yet cau ous a tude toward the economy. This is an important dis nc on since it will guide our financial strategy of projec ng a moderate growth philosophy while at the same me taking steps to protect ourselves if the economic recovery is not as strong as hoped.

Employment As shown in the chart, Florida, which had been experiencing growth in GDP far above the na onal While there is encouraging news on the employment average in the early part of the decade, has suffered far front, there is a long way to go. Florida’s unemployment worse during the recession than much of the rest of the rate has been falling consistently from its peak of 12.3% in country. The growth in GDP for the Miami/Fort Lauderdale/ March 2010 to 8.5% in May 2012 (the latest available data). Pompano Beach area has surpassed that of the rest of Although Florida’s unemployment rate is at its lowest point Florida during the recovery period and is approaching the since August 2009, it remains substan ally higher than the na onal average in the first half of 2012. On a posi ve 5.4% of 2008. The unemployment rate in Broward County note, there appears to be a growing consensus among economists that the Unemployment rate lowest since February 2009 economy will grow by 2.7% in 2014 and 3% in 2015. 12% 11.2%

Consumer spending, which accounts for nearly 70% of real GDP, will ul mately drive economic growth. Consumer spending grew by 2.0% during the first half of 2012 and is expected to reach 2.2% in 2014. Locally, experts are expec ng strong economic growth in South Florida due to foreign investment, popula on growth, and tourism. In fact, personal income has grown by 4.2% which is the largest growth rate in the state. Personal income is expected to reach 5% in 2014 whereas the rest of the state is expected to achieve an average

10%

8.9% 8.5%

8%

9.5%

10.5% 8.9%

8.8%

8.5%

8.5% 8.2%

7.6% 5.1%

5.0%

4%

3.3%

3.4%

2% 0%

6.9%

5.4%

6%

4.7% 4.1%

3.3%

3.2%

2006

2007

2008

2009

Coral Springs

2010

National

2011

May 2012

Florida

Source: Florida Agency for Workforce Innova on

82

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


has fallen from 9.0% in May 2011 to 7.3% in May 2012. The City of Coral Springs’ unemployment rate, on the other hand, has fallen to 6.9%.

in the following table, the area actually experienced defla on which has the poten al to reduce economic ac vity by discouraging investment and spending.

Of most concern is the labor underu liza on rate (commonly referred to as “U-6”). U-6 includes the unemployed who are looking for work as well as discouraged workers (i.e., those who have stopped looking for work). Na onally, this figure stands at 14.2% or nearly twice the unemployment rate. In Florida, U-6 currently stands at 17.3% compared to 18% at this me last year. The number of discouraged workers in Florida remains stubbornly high due to the large number of workers previously employed in the construc on industry who have not been able to secure employment since the housing bubble burst.

Between May 2011 and May 2012, infla on has increased na onally by 1.7% and by 1.9% in the Miami-Ft Lauderdale area (April to April). This monthly infla on rate has been declining every month since September 2011 primarily as a result of decreasing energy costs. As a result, economists are expec ng low rates of infla on through the end of 2015. Nevertheless, the City does have a number of service contracts which provide for price increases linked to infla on which will cause the costs of those programs to increase over the next year.

As the economy begins to recover, those who have stopped looking for work will once again enter the labor market. Un l this excess labor is absorbed, the unemployment rate will remain high. Therefore, experts expect Florida’s unemployment rate to stay above 8% un l mid-year 2015. Employment growth in the region is expected to be the strongest in the professional and business services, health care, educa on, and manufacturing sectors. The Coral Springs Economic Development Founda on will focus on recrui ng emerging industries such as medical, informa on technology, health care, and educa on. Infla on From 2005 through 2008, the City struggled with the impact of infla on on its ability to purchase products and services. Infla on was especially troublesome in South Florida where the regional Consumer Price Index (CPI) was significantly higher than the na onal CPI. At its peak the infla on rate in Miami/Ft Lauderdale was 1.7% higher than the na onal average. In 2009, the Miami-Fort Lauderdale metropolitan area CPI not only dipped below the na onal average, as shown

Percent change in CPI Na onal 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

3.4% 3.2% 2.8% 3.8% 2.2% 1.5% 3.2% 1.7% (May to May)

MiamiFt. Lauderdale 4.7% 4.9% 4.2% 4.6% -0.3% 0.6% 3.5% 1.9% (April to April)

Difference 1.3% 1.7% 1.4% 0.8% -2.5% -0.9% 0.3% 0.2%

Interest Rates As shown in the interest rate yield curve chart, interest rates on 6-month US Treasury securi es con nue to be near zero with long-term rates just above 2.5%. Interest rates for maturi es of two years or more are lower than one year ago. The decline in rates, in comparison to a year ago, signals reduced borrowing costs for long term debt. The fla ening of the curve, meaning that rates are not increasing with dura on as much as they were, helps reduce the cost to the City for the longer maturi es on new bonds. Together, these condi ons provide the City with the opportunity to borrow money for long term capital projects at rates that are lower than last year.

Fla ening of the yield curve signals reduced borrowing costs for long-term debt 4.50% 4.00% 3.50% 3.00% 2.50% 2.00% 1.50% 1.00%

Energy

0.50% 0.00% 6 Month

1 Year

2 Year

5 Year

7/11/2011

7/9/12

City of Coral Springs, Florida

10 Year

30 Year

Last year at this me there was a genuine fear that the rapidly rising oil prices could derail the fragile economic recovery. Oil jumped more than $20 a barrel to $114 a

83


barrel between April 2010 and April 2011. This caused the retail price of gasoline to climb above $4 a gallon with fears that it would approach $5 a gallon during the peak summer driving season. Since then the supply of oil has increased significantly resul ng in a reduc on in its price. The price for a barrel of oil dropped from a high of $114 last year to just $83 by June 2012. Likewise, the average retail price for a gallon of gasoline has dropped from $3.99 a gallon to $3.39 a gallon. The U.S. Department of Energy is projec ng gasoline retail prices to average $3.49 per gallon in 2013, a 14% reduc on from last year’s average price. These stabilized fuel prices will be an important factor in the future economic growth of the region. The Department of Energy expects an increase of 1% in the consump on of motor fuels next year due to rising employment and incomes as well as the recent steep decline in retail fuel prices. This increased consump on should help stabilize the City’s fuel tax receipts, expected to be nearly $5 million in Fiscal Year 2013. In March 2012 Florida Power & Light (FPL) applied for a 16% base rate increase to be implemented in two phases. As shown in the following table, a 1,000 kwh monthly bill for residen al customer would increase by 12%, or $5.23, in January 2013 and an addi onal 4%, or $1.86, beginning in June 2013. However, this monthly increase will be offset by a proposed 23% decrease, or $7.71, by June 2013. Once adjustments to other charges and taxes are considered, the 1,000 kwh monthly bill for residen al customer is es mated to increase by 0.6%, or $0.57, in January 2013 and an addi onal 0.9%, or $0.84, beginning in June 2013. The overall electric bill for business customers is expected to decrease by 3% to 4% depending on usage due to fuel efficiency savings and reduc on in the fuel surcharge.

FPL proposed change in residen al electric bill for typical 1,000 kwh user

Base Rate Charges Fuel Surcharge Other Charges* Gross Receipts Tax Total

As of January 2012

Es mated January 2013

Es mated June 2013

$43.26

$48.49

$50.35

$33.43

$26.76

$25.72

$15.56

$17.56

$17.56

$2.37

$2.38

$2.40

$94.62

$95.19

$96.03

*Includes nuclear and non-nuclear capacity costs, environmental and conserva on cost recovery clause, and storm charge.

84

Given that FPL had agreed in January 2011 not to make any changes in the base rate un l at least the end of 2012, the Public Service Commission is expected to view FPL’s request favorably. While a rate increase will cause the City’s electric bill to increase, it will be more than offset by the increase in the electric franchise fee revenue the City receives from the U lity. The Public Service Commission is considering a proposal requiring FPL to meet energy conserva on goals. The proposal would require FPL to give homeowners a rebate for installing energy efficient devices, which would cover everything from hot water heater insula on to air condi oner tune-ups. FPL would be allowed to recover the costs of these rebates by increasing rates by a like amount. Although the total cost of this proposal is not known, it would require FPL to fund up to $15.5 million annually just for solar power pilot programs. FPL expects the proposal will lead to a $2 to $3 per month rate increase for the average customer. While no metable has been set for a decision, we expect the increased cost to the City in terms of elevated electric rates to be more than offset by increased electric franchise fee revenues.

Real Estate Trends A primary revenue source for the City (33% of $93 million) is ad valorem taxes and assessments, which are determined by the taxable value of real and personal property within the City limits. Changes in property values have a direct impact on the amount of revenue the City receives. Locally, market values are improving. For example, a er experiencing five years of declining values, Coral Springs’ taxable assessed values actually increased by 1.56% for Fiscal Year 2013. Foreclosures Declining The number of residen al proper es in some stage of foreclosure peaked at nearly 5,500 in May 2010. Since then the figure has dropped to 2,350, a 57% decrease. The City expects foreclosures will con nue to decline during 2012 enabling a stabiliza on of the housing market. Heading Toward a Sellers’ Market The residen al real estate market is experiencing low inventory levels available for buyers. Buyers are now compe ng with mul ple offers and most proper es are sold at or near lis ng with many closing well above. Compe on is especially tough for foreclosed proper es, where banks are receiving cash offers from investors. Because of this demand, most foreclosed proper es do not stay on the market for very long. Thirty-six new single family homes are planned on the La Placida site now called Daniela Springs. Three model homes have received a cer ficate of occupancy with 12 more expected in 2012.

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Foreclosures in Coral Springs have declined 1,600

267 through April 2012

Chart shows properties that have completed the foreclosure process. Source: BCPA

1,390

1,400 1,167

1,200 1,000 799

800

742

600 400 200

283 35

0 2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Fewer Commercial Vacancies The non-residen al real estate cycle started its decline later than the housing market and is likewise expected to follow the housing market to recovery. The good news is that non-residen al proper es have not, and are not, expected to experience the same steep level of decline in property values as residen al. Vacancy rates for office, retail, and industrial space are star ng to improve. This is par cularly true for retail. The City a racted major businesses including Kohl’s at the Coral Square Mall, the Renaissance Charter School at the former Target site on Sample Road, Aldi’s Grocery Store near Turtle Run, Benne Auto Supply, Salt Life, the Cheese Course at the Walk, Shoreline Aerospace in the Corporate Park, Science Care and Speed Source, and U18 Sports Medicine in Heron Bay, to name a few. Also, scheduled to open later this year are Sports Authority and Marshalls. Nearly all of the “big box” spaces within the City have been filled. Coral Springs has accepted 449 new occupa onal licenses in 2012 and 1,423 total in 2011 and 2012.

2011

The City will a ract businesses, events, and residents by figh ng crime, grime, and decline by inves ng in infrastructure improvements, economic development, and educa on. For example, the City will increase its contribu on to the Economic Development Founda on (EDF) by 4% in Fiscal Year 2013. The City will also fund a redesign of the EDF website as well as an economic development incen ve account to be er enable EDF to focus on a rac ng targeted industries, including medical services, informa on technology (IT), global IT, educa onal services, logis cs and distribu on, foreign trade opportuni es in the import/export market as well as small manufacturing.

Since vacancies con nue to be a challenge, we will establish a baseline of vacancy rates in the industrial, commercial/office and retail sectors. We will monitor and work toward improving these measures of economic vitality. A number of other ini a ves will be undertaken to facilitate our recovery from the recession, such as a City branding ac on plan, promo onal videos, master parking lot refurbishing along Sample Road, and economic incen ves for targeted industries. These efforts will expand and diversify the commercial tax base, laying the founda on for a stronger, more vibrant future.

Economic Development For the upcoming fiscal year, the City will con nue to posi on itself to take advantage of the economic recovery. The Economic Development Founda on (EDF) will focus on its core services of business development, business services, and workforce development. EDF will build on the findings of the branding study and use that as a catalyst for an economic development strategic plan. EDF will con nue to take many steps to posi on the City for future success by focusing on economic development oriented improvements that will increase revenues over the long term.

Coral Springs is a strong intergenera onal community, commi ed to passing on values and tradi ons.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

85


Downtown Coral Springs

Occupancy Rates

The Coral Springs Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) con nues to prepare the downtown area for private investment and redevelopment. Its ini a ves are focused on infrastructure improvements and transporta on, increasing ac vity in the downtown area with the imminent opening of the Broward College Coral Springs campus, improving communica on with business owners and residents of the downtown area, and reducing commercial vacancies.

100% 95%

85% 80%

93%

92%

90% 87%

88%

Dec-08

92% 89%

88% 89%

84% 85% 84%

90%

Dec-09 Dec-10 Dec-11

75% Office

The Sample Road and University Drive infrastructure improvements are underway. The plan includes construc on of right turn lanes, power and cable line burial, installa on of new traffic light mast arms, an enhanced pedestrian environment, installa on of new bus shelters, improved landscaping, and points of interest at the four corners. Design of u lity line burial has been completed, necessary easements and rights-of-way have been iden fied for acquisi on, and bids for the construc on manager for the project have been sought. The project is being funded by $4.2 million in low interest Recovery Zone Economic Development Bonds made available by the federal government. A $752,813 County Incen ve Grant will become available in 2015 for this project. The Broward College Coral Springs campus, located at the northwest corner of Sample and University, is currently registering students for the October 2012 class session. The opening of the college’s satellite center is the culmina on of efforts that began in 2005 with the University and College Partnership. Course offerings include day, evening, and weekend classes focusing on degree and cer ficate programs that will provide skilled workers for industries targeted by the economic development plan for the City.

Industrial

Retail

The CRA is involved in several ac vi es aimed at closer communica on with current and prospec ve business owners and residents of the downtown area. A newlydesigned website will allow visitors to learn about ongoing downtown plans as well as ac vi es, events, and programs. In addi on, the CRA is crea ng an electronic communica on database of its cons tuents to maintain regular and frequent communica on. The CRA con nues to work closely with the Economic Development Founda on to iden fy poten al businesses and show them the benefits of a downtown Coral Springs loca on. Numerous Business Plan ini a ves support the revitaliza on of the downtown area. Resurfacing of master parking along Sample Road and the ongoing commercial façade program for businesses will help a ract customers to downtown businesses. The annual BizArt event and the weekend green market currently in the planning phase will bring residents and visitors to the area as early as September 2012. New and improved pedestrian and bike pathways in the area, along with con nued collabora on with Broward County and our neighboring ci es on transporta on hubs will make it easier for people to travel to the downtown area.

The property located at the northeast corner of Sample and University has been cleared, resodded and landscaped by its owners, Publix and City Na onal. A Publix grocery store, Walgreens, and several other businesses had been on that site but damage from Hurricane Wilma in 2005 destroyed most of those buildings. Although there is ongoing development interest in the proper es, no current redevelopment plans exist. Because almost 30% of our residents are under 19 years old, the City strives to provide a rich variety of ac vi es for families, youth and teens.

86

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Demographics According to the 2010 Census, the popula on for the state of Florida is 18,801,310. This is an increase of 17.6% since the last census was conducted in 2000. As a result, Florida gained two seats in the U.S. House of Representa ves for a total of 27. Florida is one of eight states to gain at least one House seat. Florida has 350.6 people per square mile, making it the 10th most densely populated state. The decennial census provides the most accurate count of the City’s popula on. Popula on Es mate It is important to monitor popula on trends. If the City’s popula on declines dispropor onately to other ci es in the county, its share of intergovernmental revenues could decline. Our forecasts assume that our share remains constant. Further, the City has not experienced any decrease in demand for services, largely due to the counter-cyclical demand for many of our services. Popula on growth over the last two decades has not only fueled the growth in demand for City services, but the property taxes and sales taxes paid by this increasing popula on have provided the funds to pay for these increased services and infrastructure improvements. Our popula on is no longer growing at historic rates. The 2009 American Community Survey (ACS) and the University of Florida’s Bureau of Economic and Business Research (BEBR) es mates of popula on for Coral Springs were approximately 127,000, whereas the 2010 Census reported 121,096. The lower than expected popula on figure is primarily due to vacant housing units. There were 3,619 vacant homes in 2010 compared to 1,815 in 2000. The average household size is three persons. The 2010 Census provides the official counts of the popula on and housing units and the American Community Survey (ACS) produces five-year es mates (2006-2010) about social, economic, and housing characteris cs. American Community Survey The Census Bureau uses ACS to es mate municipal popula on between the na onal decennial Census. The ACS informa on is gathered through an annual survey ques onnaire mailed to a sample of households. The survey uses a five-year average to u lize a larger sample size and counter the poten ally large margin of error experienced with the single year surveys. In addi on, the larger sample size allows for the examina on of segmented survey data. A number of trends are worth monitoring as they may indicate the need for a new mix of services. Some trends include the small increase in the propor on of residents over the age of 65, the decrease in propor on of school age residents, and the growing rate of residents of Hispanic origin.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Demographic Trends

Total Popula on Popula on 65 years and over Hispanic or La no (of any race) Total households Households with individuals under 18 years Households with individuals 65 years and over

2000 Census 117,549 7,040 6% of total 18,233 15.5% of total

2010 Census 121,096 9,600 7.9% of total 28,442 23.5% of total

39,522

41,814

20,067 50.8% of total

18,293 43.7% of total

5,111 12.9% of total

7,144 17.1% of total

Popula on Age According to the 2010 Census, the median age of our residents is 36.5 years. When we compare these results to the 1990 Census of 31.6 years and the 2000 Census of 33.8 years, it is apparent the popula on is aging slightly. However, Coral Springs remains slightly younger than Broward County’s median age of 39.7 years. The bulk of Coral Springs’ popula on falls between five and 54 years of age, with 7.9% of residents aged 65 and older. Broward County, by contrast, has 14.3% of residents 65 years old and older. In 2000, 6% of Coral Springs residents were 65 years and older. Significantly, almost 30% of Coral Springs residents were under 19 years old, slightly less than in 2000 (33%) but more than countywide (25%). Therefore, many of the City’s services will remain geared to a younger popula on. Cultural Factors According to the U.S. Census Bureau, three-quarters of all new residents in Broward County were born outside the United States. If not for this influx of immigrants, the popula on of Broward County would have dropped by more than 55,000 between July 2005 and July 2007. In fact, Broward County’s popula on mix became a “majority minority” in 2005 with minority groups making up more than half the popula on. Coral Springs is also quite diverse. According to the 2010 Census, of those repor ng one race in Coral Springs, 69% were White, 18% Black or AfricanAmerican, 5% Asian, less than 0.5% Pacific Islander, less

87


than 0.5% American Indian or Alaska na ve, and 4% some other race. These figures represent li le change from the previous survey period. Three percent of the popula on reported being of two or more races. Twenty-three percent of our residents said they were of Hispanic or La no origin (who may be of any race), a steady increase each year since 2000 when 15.5% reported they were of Hispanic or La no origin. According to the 2006-2010 ACS, the percent of respondents who were foreign born was 26.2%. Among those at least five years old, 32% spoke a language other than English at home. Spanish is the most widely spoken among those speaking a language other than English. All of the City’s recent surveys and other informa on gathering methods indicate the vast majority of Coral Springs residents speak and read English. As of now, City communica ons will remain in English. In order to make the City Commission mee ngs more accessible, they are broadcast with closed cap oning for the hearing impaired.

87% had at least graduated from high school and 29.6% had a bachelor’s degree or higher. The majority (84%) of employed people in Coral Springs worked in the private sector, 11% worked for some level of government, and 4% were self-employed. The most common occupa ons were management and professional (38%); sales and office (32%); service (16%); natural resources, construc on, and maintenance (8%); and produc on, transporta on, and material moving (6.5%). The top five industries for Coral Springs’ employed popula on were educa on services, health care, and social assistance (21%); retail trade (13.6%); professional, scien fic, management, administra ve and waste management services (13.3%); finance, insurance, and real estate (9.6%); and arts, entertainment, recrea on, accommoda on, and food services (8.3%). The average travel me to work was about equal for those in Coral Springs and Broward County at 26.6 minutes and 26.8 minutes respec vely. The es mated median household income for Coral Springs was $71,456, compared to $51,694 for Broward County.

Households and Families

Conclusion

In 2010 the average Coral Springs household size was 2.9 people, compared to 2.5 in Broward County. The average household size has stayed the same historically, though there have been a few shi s. The number of households with one or more people 65 years or older has increased from 12.9% in 2000 to 17.1% in 2010. Coral Springs has a greater percentage (43.7%) of households with children under 18 than Broward County (32%), yet fewer than in 2000 (50.8%).

Although the City’s popula on growth has shi ed slightly, the City con nues to be populated by young families with school-aged children. The City has a diverse ethnic/ racial popula on who can read and understand English. The City con nues to have an educated popula on whose workforce earns more than the county average. We do not see a change in the taste and preferences for the goods and services we provide.

Families made up 78% of the households in Coral Springs, compared to 63% for Broward County. This figure includes both married couple families (55%) and other families (22%). Non-family households made up 22% of all households in Coral Springs. Most of the non-family households were people living alone; almost 20% of whom are female age 65 and over. We remain a family-oriented community, crea ng demand for family-oriented services.

Technology

The 2010 Census reported 45,433 housing units, of which almost 8% were vacant in Coral Springs. Historically, 3 to 5% of housing units stand vacant. Educa on, Employment, and Income According to the 2006-2010 ACS, almost 39,000 people age three and older were enrolled in school. Almost 2,300 (5.9%) were in nursery school and preschool, 1,736 (4.5%) were in kindergarten, 15,035 (39%) were enrolled in grades 1-8, 9,247 (24%) were in high school, and 10,113 (26%) were in college and graduate school. College students have historically averaged 20%, yet the recent ACS es mate is much higher. Among people 25 years and older living in Coral Springs, 92% had at least graduated from high school and 36% had a bachelor’s degree or higher. In Broward County,

88

The City will con nue to invest in tools that allow its employees to achieve high levels of produc vity as well as provide customer service that is second to none. A state of the art technology infrastructure is a crucial element in allowing the City to meet its service delivery goals now and in the future. This objec ve must be balanced against the need to protect ci zen confiden ality, integrity, and availability of informa on and at the same me control costs. It is also important that all City departments par cipate in the efforts to u lize technology in an efficient and effec ve manner. Technology Refresh The City completed the long awaited ini a ve to replace its desktop and laptop computers along with the associated opera ng and produc vity so ware. Many employees were using so ware that was more than 10 years old meaning it was at least three genera ons behind the latest version. In 2011 and 2012, the City replaced over 400 of its desktop and laptop computers and plans to replace another 300 in the coming months. These new computers were loaded with the latest so ware including Microso Office 2010,

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Server Technology Just as the desktop technology had fallen cri cally behind industry standards, the SQL server so ware has not been replaced since 2000 and is three genera ons behind. SQL server so ware has a similar func on to the opera ng system on a desktop computer. It will cost $360,000 to upgrade this so ware which includes an annual maintenance contract. To effec vely run the new so ware, the City replaced 59 of its servers at a cost of $300,000. Advances in virtualiza on technology have resulted in new methods of delivery. For example, the City has consolidated computer servers from standalone servers to mul ple virtual servers running on a single physical The City needs to upgrade its remote access so ware which allows Police, Fire and Code Enforcement personnel in the field to share informa on. server. Currently, the City operates 50 virtual servers and 50 physical servers. In addi on to reducing the amount of electricity for powering Windows 7, and Microso Outlook (e-mail). The cost to servers, virtualiza on reduces the data center’s cooling replace the hardware and so ware was nearly $2 million needs and further reduces the City’s carbon footprint. dollars. To prevent the new so ware from falling behind, an annual maintenance fee of $270,000 is required. Green Informa on Technology Modernizing this cri cal technology was a significant Wherever possible the City incorporates industry best achievement in terms of improving employee produc vity prac ces to achieve maximum green benefits in all aspects as well as our employee’s ability to communicate with our of technology opera ons. A green informa on technology customers. strategy is not only the environmentally responsible thing In Fiscal Year 2013, the City will upgrade other cri cal to do it also saves money. so ware pla orms that have fallen behind industry Green Informa on Technology Strategy standards. For example, the U.S. Department of Jus ce had mandated that all ci es upgrade the security features • Determine the total energy consump on of all electronic of the CJIS pla orm that is used by our Police Department equipment such as desktops, monitors, keyboards, to access vital crime data and informa on. The cost of this laptops, printers, copiers, scanners, phones, cell phones, upgrade is $150,000. In addi on, the City must upgrade and wireless devices. its remote access so ware (i.e., Citrix) which allows Police, Fire, and Code Enforcement personnel in the field to • Establish energy consump on metrics share informa on with headquarters and one another. • Monitor energy consump on on a regular basis The cost for this so ware upgrade is $240,000. Finally the Geographic Informa on System so ware must be • Iden fy areas for energy savings such as ensuring all upgraded to allow it to support code enforcement and desktop and laptop computers meet industry standards public safety. This so ware upgrade will cost $102,500. and are ‘Energy Star’ rated. This cri cal infrastructure is o en referred to as “back office” opera ons because they are o en out of public Network Infrastructure view. Although out of sight, these vital services are not out The City conducts business using combina ons of voice, of mind. video, data, and mobility network applica ons. With the The City will con nue to evaluate the use of alterna ve rapid changes occurring in voice and data technologies, technologies in an ongoing effort to improve the delivery it is cri cal that City staff have the capability to access of services to City staff and ci zens. For example, the City’s and communicate informa on in a variety of loca ons, current enterprise so ware (i.e., Sungard H.T.E.), which has whether from their desks, in conferences rooms, parks, been in use for nearly 20 years, is in need of moderniza on. or vehicles. Planning is underway to determine the The City will procure the services of an independent expert feasibility of merging the voice and data infrastructure to assist in the review of user needs and requirements and as well as enhance wireless connec vity throughout the advise on poten al solu ons. A modernized enterprise City. The current phone system has reached its technical so ware program will greatly enhance the produc vity of end of life and can no longer support addi onal users or employees as well as provide ci zens with a self-service features. The goal is to implement a unified communica on capability for some City services. infrastructure that fully incorporates voice over internet

City of Coral Springs, Florida

89


protocol and takes full advantage of internal technical resources. The voice and data network upgrade project will start in the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2013 with the project expected to be fully implemented by the end of the second quarter. A key element of this project is the u liza on of the exis ng investment that the City has made in network devices and ensuring that any new devices are fully compa ble.

Legisla ve Issues The City is most concerned about legisla on that could erode its home rule authority or impose mandates on the City without a corresponding funding source. Communica ons Service Tax HB 809, passed by the Florida legislature during its 2012 session and effec ve July 1, 2012, makes numerous changes to the communica ons service tax (CST), which represents about 5% of the City’s revenues. Technical changes to the defini on of “sales price” of communica ons services subject to various types of taxes may result in a slight decrease in our CST revenue. The bill also created a Communica ons Service Tax Working Group tasked with reviewing tax policy and iden fying op ons for removing compe ve advantages within the industry. This group will submit a report to the governor and legisla ve bodies in February 2013, and it is likely that more changes in the CST will occur next year as a result of this report. Exemp ons from Local Business Tax Another bill which passed during this session of the legislature exempts real estate sales associates and broker associates from paying local business tax. We expect our business tax revenue to decline by approximately $100,000 in Fiscal Year 2013 as a result of this change.

Cons tu onal Amendments on November 2012 Ballot Several proposed cons tu onal amendments passed in the 2011 and 2012 Florida legisla ve sessions will, if approved by the voters at the November 2012 elec on, affect City revenue beginning in Fiscal Year 2014. Amendment 4 is expected to have the greatest impact on City revenue. It will: • Prohibit increases in the assessed value of property if the just value decreases. • Reduce the limit on annual assessment increases for certain non-homesteaded property from 10% to 5%. • Allow new homeowners (those who have not received a homestead exemp on in the past three years) to receive an addi onal exemp on equal to 50% of the just value of the property, to be phased out over the first five years of the property’s ownership. While the intent of the amendment is to s mulate sales of foreclosed proper es, it will also reduce property tax revenue at an indeterminate level. Amendment 10 will provide a tax exemp on for personal property taxes for those owners (primarily small businesses) with tangible personal property of less than $50,000. Several other proposed amendments will provide addi onal property tax exemp ons for surviving spouses of veterans or first responders, and low-income seniors who have maintained long-term residency on their property. Amendment 3 will limit state revenues based on infla on and popula on changes. This limita on will trickle down to municipal governments, since about 10% of our revenues are derived from state revenues.

Pension Reform Legisla ve constraints placed on public safety pension plans con nue to have a significant effect on municipal budgets. While some headway was made in the 2011 legisla ve session, further reforms proposed in the 2012 session were not successful. The City will con nue to support and lobby for reforms in this area.

Coral Springs will con nue to meet the needs of our residents, and this Business Plan provides a sound blueprint for focusing on four key areas of importance: community aesthe cs, public safety, educa onal excellence, local business vitality.

90

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Service and Operations Strateg y This Business Plan covers the second year within a two-year Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013. The seven priori es iden fied by the City Commission for this strategic planning cycle set the agenda for this Business Plan, namely: • Customer-Involved Government • Neighborhood and Environmental Sustainability • Financial Health and Economic Development • Traffic, Mobility, and Connec vity • Youth Development and Family Values • Strength in Diversity • Excellence in Educa on While the Strategic Plan sets out the vision, the Business Plan outlines tangible plans for making the vision a reality. In each of the priority areas, department directors have developed ini a ves that will direct the way the City operates in order to address our seven priori es and implement the vision expressed in the Strategic Plan.

A Word About Exis ng Services and Ongoing Ini a ves In some sec ons, we have highlighted ini a ves that were in previous Business Plans that are s ll being implemented in Fiscal Year 2013. Generally, if an ini a ve is fully opera onal and integrated into our service package, it will not be men oned. The emphasis is on mul year implementa on and the evolu on of exis ng ini a ves. For more detail about the services we provide and the performance measures we use to manage those services, please reference the departmental sec ons of the Annual Budget.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Our New Ini a ves Ini a ves are chosen that will assist us in achieving our Key Intended Outcomes. We include those we feel are significant contributors to suppor ng our strategic priori es or put addi onal demands on our resources. In this way, we iden fy the most significant ac ons we plan to take next year. Fiscal Year 2013 will present new challenges. Adhering to our successful business model, we will be preparing for the new normal that is resul ng from the slow recovery from the Great Recession. This Business Plan includes several ini a ves designed to proac vely prime the engine of City of Coral Springs’ Business Model economic growth by assis ng our exis ng business Citizen Input Data Analysis community and deploying resources to Strategic Plan encourage redevelopment of commercial Business Plan areas such as the Corporate Park. In addi on, Budgets since aesthe cs and overall a rac veness Output to Citizens of a community have been shown to be essen al to draw new businesses and residents, a number of Business Plan ini a ves will enhance the City’s appearance and overall safety. Wherever applicable, opera ng expenditures have been iden fied for the first year only. Capital expenditures also reflect only the first year of the project, and do not include capital carrying costs.

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Customer-Involved Government New Ini a ves City Hall Ligh ng and Entrance ADA Modifica ons Lead Department: Public Works Capital Outlay: $205,000 This project will provide be er accessibility to this facility while improving the aesthe cs of the front entrance into City Hall North. In Fiscal Year 2012, an assessment was conducted along with an es mate of construc on costs. The next phase consists of construc ng a ramp outside the east and west doors of the lobby in place of the exis ng step down. This improvement will facilitate customer access to offices located on the east and west side of the building as well as entrance from the rear parking lot into City Hall offices. The concrete landing in the front of City Hall will be replaced with pavers or stamped concrete to create an aesthe c appeal and be er visibility to all customers and visitors. Other enhancements planned to improve safety at this building include ligh ng in front of the wings and along the center driveway.

Enterprise Resource Program Lead Department: Informa on Services Capital Outlay: $30,000 (allocated in FY 2012) Staff is planning to modernize the current enterprise so ware applica on (i.e., Sungard H.T.E.) or replace it with a different enterprise resource program (ERP). The main goal of modernizing the ERP is to streamline the financial, budge ng, human resources, building, permi ng, asset management, and licensing processes throughout the City. An improved ERP will also provide self-service func onality for both ci zens and staff. Other specific advantages of an ERP system is that it reduces redundant data entry, tracks ac vity and cost informa on associated with work orders, manages the collec on of money from mul ple loca ons with full audit trails, and produces flexible financial reports. Another major advantage of this applica on is the capability to fully integrate asset management with the general ledger. Prior to modernizing the system the City has used for more than 20 years, the City will spend this year learning stakeholders’ needs and determine the alterna ves available in the marketplace.

FY 2012 Goal

FY 2013 Goal

92%

Overall quality ra ng for City services by business owners (Business Survey)

92%

Employee sa sfac on ra ng (Human Resources Survey)

90%

90%

42,000

40,000

88%

88%

Customer service ra ng by residents (Resident Survey)

90%

Customer service ra ng by businesses (Business Survey)

90%

Key Intended Outcomes Overall quality ra ng for City services and programs (Resident Survey)

Number of ci zen volunteer hours Overall ra ng of the City in terms of communica ng with residents (Resident Survey) Overall ra ng of the City in terms of communica ng with businesses (Business Survey)

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Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


IT Infrastructure Moderniza on

City Charter Review

Lead Department: Informa on Services

Lead Department: City A orney’s Office

Capital Outlay: $1,000,000

Opera ng Expenses: $20,000

Lease: $500,000 per year for four years beginning in Fiscal Year 2014

The City’s Charter provides for the periodic review of the Charter to ensure the structure con nues to serve the needs of the community. Every ten years, the City Commission may appoint a 15-member commi ee to review the City’s charter, make recommenda ons for any changes to the Commission, and provide for public input at the commi ee’s mee ngs. This commi ee will be appointed in March 2013. Applica ons for membership to the commi ee will be made available at the beginning of 2013 to give the Commission me to review the applica on materials. The commi ee must submit its recommenda ons to the City Commission no later than March 2014. In 2004, (the last me the commi ee convened) the Commission directed staff to arrange for inclusion of the recommended changes on the General Elec on ballot.

The City is planning to merge its voice and data network onto a single pla orm. This merger is expected to increase the quality of service because of alternate rou ng of both voice and data. With this merger no single site outage will impact service at other loca ons and service will be rerouted automa cally using new and improved technology. The City will experience a reduc on in the cost of internal calls based on calls being routed on the City’s infrastructure as opposed to a local carrier. Key components of the new voice and data architecture include: replacing the exis ng phone system, servers, switches and routers, and the purchase of addi onal so ware licenses. The exis ng voice system has been in place for over seven years and is no longer supported by the vendor. It is an cipated the new pla orm will serve the City’s voice and data requirements for the next ten years.

Building Division Customer Service Enhancements Lead Department: Building Opera ng Expenses: $10,000 The Building Division will undertake two new programs to improve customer service. The first program will educate homeowners who make building improvements to their own homes. These people are o en inexperienced in construc on and may not be aware of their responsibili es and liabili es during the building process. All residen al owner/builders will be offered a pre-submi al mee ng with staff specific to the work involved which will allow them to understand the processes, procedures, and expecta ons of their project. In addi on, the Building Division will revise its website and handouts to make them more useful to builder/owners.

Downtown Planning Lead Department: Community Development Partner: Community Redevelopment Agency Opera ng Expenses: $5,000 Capital Outlay: $15,000 Based on input received at the May 2012 Visioning Summit and other survey results, the City will con nue to explore appropriate uses for the Downtown area in terms of public gathering opportuni es, future ac vi es, and the connec vity between the public and private spaces needed to create a sustainable Downtown. The City will coordinate a discussion of the an cipated gateway hub, amphitheater and other civic uses within the Downtown. These uses will also promote pedestrian and bicycling connec ons which together will create a “sense of place” the residents/ commercial owners have been seeking for the past several years. Encouraging public-private partnerships will be a cornerstone discussion. Ul mately, Downtown zoning district (s) will be codified in order to further this effort.

The second facet of the program will be a survey of building inspec on customers. We will gather feedback from our residents, business owners and contractors on ways we can provide the best building inspec on service. Each customer will be given a survey to complete. The completed survey will be returned by the customer directly to an independent survey firm. This firm will analyze the results and provide the City only aggregate level informa on.

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Ongoing Ini a ves

Code Enforcement Rangers (2012-2013) Lead Department: Code Enforcement

Street Ligh ng Improvements (2012-2013) Lead Department: Public Works Capital Outlay: $20,000 This program was ini ated last year in response to customer’s comments regarding inadequate street ligh ng in nine of 30 residen al survey sec ons. These concerns are also communicated during Slice of the Springs Mee ngs and through the City’s Help Desk. In Fiscal Year 2012, the City employed a licensed tree trimmer to properly prune trees away from blocked lights; therefore enhancing illumina on and visibility of City streets. In the event tree trimming doesn’t improve foot candle, streetlights would be upgraded from 70-wa to 150-wa high pressure sodium fixtures. Other measures that will con nue in Fiscal Year 2013 are focused on be er repor ng light outages and quicker replacement of non-working street lights. To do so, the City hired two part me staff to assist iden fying and monitoring ligh ng outages at night. In addi on, Code Rangers have been trained to find pole numbers and conduct inspec ons in neighborhoods during the winter months when sunset occurs earlier in the evening. A media educa onal campaign is under way to instruct residents on the proper method of repor ng streetlight outages. A mobile message board was deployed in front of the Slice of the Springs mee ngs encouraging the public to call the “Streetlight Outages” hotline, thereby contribu ng to the safety of their neighborhoods. Improving ligh ng in neighborhoods is expected to increase the percep on of safety among the Coral Springs’ community.

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Opera ng Expenses: $4,700 Code Rangers are volunteers trained to help improve the aesthe cs of the City by helping Code Officers uncover simple viola ons such as dirty roofs, overgrown lawns and hedges, trash and li er, and illegal signs. The group of volunteers receives 16 hours of training before being assigned to a patrol zone where they issue friendly reminder door hangers at proper es with viola ons. If viola ons aren’t corrected within a reasonable period, the case is assigned to a Code Officer. In Fiscal Year 2012, they have also assisted with the street tree program and business tax programs, and with checking streetlight outages. Several re red police vehicles have been converted to Code Ranger patrol vehicles for use by these volunteers. The Code Rangers have completed over 4,800 inspec ons in the first three quarters of this year, with a 70% compliance rate. Web-Based Crime Repor ng (2012-2013) Lead Department: Police Opera ng Expenses: Exis ng Forfeiture Fund: $36,000 (approved in previous years) The goal of the web-based repor ng program is to provide an op on for ci zens to report certain types of crimes directly from their home or business. Customers will be able to self-report incidents such as minor the , vandalism, lost property, harassing phone calls, or other minor crimes without a suspect 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, without having to wait for an officer to respond to their call. The report will be reviewed and approved by Police Department personnel, and ci zens will be able to obtain an official copy of the police reports within 5 business days. The program is currently under development. The City’s Informa on Services department is working on expor ng the informa on to the records management system. Once that has been accomplished, the program will be tested and publicized so that ci zens can begin making their reports.

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Neighborhood and Environmental Sustainability New Ini a ves Burglary Enforcement and Reduc on (BEAR) Unit Lead Department: Police

The permanent BEAR unit will be composed of one sergeant and six officers, all coming from current department staff. Opera ng expenses consist of addi onal salary for the sergeant upgrade as well as special assignment compensa on for officers assigned to the unit. The capital outlay consists of funding for vehicles, GPS locators, and other specialized equipment.

Opera ng Expenses: $15,000

Resurface Master Parking Lots

Capital Outlay: $80,000 In 2011, residen al and vehicle burglaries increased in Coral Springs. In December 2011, a temporary BEAR unit was formed to determine if the unit, in conjunc on with other police department programs, could have an effect on the burglary rate. The temporary unit has been very successful, using proac ve methods such as analyzing crime sta s cs to determine mes and loca ons where burglaries are likely to occur, educa ng residents on crime-preven on tac cs, and conduc ng high visibility patrols in targeted neighborhoods. From January 1 to March 31, 2012, residen al burglaries decreased over 15% and vehicle burglaries decreased 46% from the same me period in 2011.

Lead Department: Public Works Capital Outlay: $248,000 To encourage economic development and support its exis ng business the City will invest in the aesthe cs improvements to the master parking lots along Sample Road. In Fiscal Year 2013, the scheduled enhancements include repairing, resurfacing, and re-striping master parking lots east of Riverside Drive, as well as adding new signs, sign posts, and stubs. As part of the scheduled improvements, current parking stripes and ramps will be upgraded to comply with exis ng ADA requirements. This resurfacing effort will enhance safety in the community and the aesthe c improvements will enhance the curb appeal of these commercial areas.

FY 2012 Goal

FY 2013 Goal

Percent of Code cases brought into voluntary compliance prior to administra ve/judicial process

75%

75%

Number of formal and informal neighborhood partnerships each year

15

15

(A subset of the CIG KIO. Includes environmental partnerships, student research projects, Eagle Scout projects, EarthFest, Adopt-A-Street, and Waterway Cleanup.)

1,500

1,500

City crime rate (crimes per 100,000 residents)

2,530

2,600

92%

1,750

1,000

Key Intended Outcomes

Number of volunteer hours aimed at enhancing the environment

Safety ra ng in neighborhood (Resident Survey) Number of trees planted within the City (Note: NEC goal recommenda on)

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Public Safety Technology Upgrades

Public Art for 50th Anniversary

Lead Department: Police

Lead Department: Community Development

Capital Outlay: $132,000

Partner: Public Art Commi ee

Today’s police departments rely on numerous high-tech tools to effec vely fight crime, some of which are in need of upgrade. For example, the department’s exis ng license plate reader is outdated. The replacement units incorporate high-resolu on cameras to scan vehicle tags while an officer is driving. If a stolen or suspect tag is iden fied, the system will immediately alert the officer, provide a phone alert to inves gators, and upload the vehicle’s GPS loca on into a web-based program available to law enforcement agencies across the na on.

Public Art Fund: $75,000

The department’s automated fingerprint iden fica on system (AFIS) also needs to be replaced. The current AFIS system works in conjunc on with that of the Broward Sheriff ’s Office. Since BSO intends to upgrade its system, the CSPD must upgrade its system to remain compa ble. The AFIS unit consists of a computer, so ware, camera, and an FBI-cer fied scanner that allow users to capture, encode, and submit latent fingerprints and palm prints directly from evidence. With this equipment, latent print experts can conveniently track cases through the system, perform quality checks, and verify search results. Funds will also be used to purchase computer forensic analysis equipment to allow officers to retrieve evidence stored in cell phones, computers, and other electronic devices. The department currently must rely on other agencies’ computer forensic units for this type of analysis, and having its own equipment will allow inves ga ons to proceed more quickly.

The City’s Public Art Program will celebrate its 10th anniversary in 2013 and has introduced a number of ar sts and artworks to the City. Since its incep on, 14 works of art have been purchased or commissioned through this program. This ini a ve will provide increased publicity for the City’s 50th anniversary and the Public Art Program. The Public Art Commi ee has placed a call for ar sts to commission a unique piece of art for the City. The proposed loca on for the artwork will be at the east entry of Atlan c Boulevard. The Commi ee will review the ar sts’ submi als and ul mately recommend the ar st and artwork for the City Commission to approve. The Public Art Commi ee has budgeted $75,000 in Fiscal Year 2013 to complete this project.

Public Safety Communica on System and Equipment Upgrade Study Lead Department: Police Opera ng Expenses: $45,000 The current P25 communica on equipment is an analog based system. The development of digital technology has made it difficult to procure repair parts. In fact, the manufacturer of the City’s equipment stopped making replacement parts in 2005. The decrease in the availability of parts has greatly increased the cost to operate the system. Furthermore, the manufacturer has announced it will no longer support analog systems. The City, therefore, will take steps to upgrade this important system. Replacing the P25 communica on system is complex and costly. Es mates range from $4 million to $8 million. Therefore, it is important this project be done correctly the first me. The City will procure the services of an independent consultant to conduct a needs analysis, advise on the op ons available, assist in wri ng a request for proposal, and assist in evalua ng responses to its request for proposal. The consultant will explore both shortand long-term solu ons that will be cost-effec ve and serve the needs of our ci zens and employees.

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Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Single-Family Rental Registra on Program Lead Departments: Code Enforcement Opera ng Expenses: $120,389 Capital Outlay: $52,540 Declining real estate prices over the past several years and the foreclosure crisis have created the perfect market for the real estate investor. Many of the single-family home foreclosures in Coral Springs have been purchased by investors and are being used as rental proper es. We es mate there are approximately 2,700 rental homes in the city. These proper es have accounted for a significant por on of new code enforcement cases over the past year. This ini a ve will expand the current rental registra on program. Currently, owners of rental proper es with two or more units are required to register with the City, which provides us with a database of contact informa on for use in case of emergencies and for correc ng code viola ons. This ini a ve will require owners of single-family residences to register those proper es as well. The improved Single-Family Rental Registra on Program will consist of educa on of tenants and property owners on Coral Springs code requirements, and an annual exterior inspec on of those proper es. Addi onal personnel may be needed to implement this program. Expenses of the program consist of salary, benefits, and equipment and supplies. Opera ng expenses will be offset by the revenue generated from the registra on fee.

Mullins Park Revitaliza on—Phase II Lead Department: Parks and Recrea on Capital Outlay: $400,000 This program’s goal is to improve the overall aesthe c appearance of Mullins Park, the oldest and largest park in Coral Springs. An important element of the Mullins Park Revitaliza on was the crea on of an integrated architectural landscape design to give a coordinated look and feel to all neighboring facili es, including the Public Safety Complex and the Center for the Arts. In 2011, a landscape conceptual plan was developed for this park. Recommenda ons from the plan suggested improving the appearance, safety, and ease of movement within the park. A rac ng more tournaments and special events is an important outgrowth of this beau fica on effort by transforming this park into a showcase for the City.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

The first phase included architectural drawings for the construc on of three new buildings at Mullins Park. Design plans for a new pathway around the three baseball fields and football field was also completed last year, as well as demoli on of the soccer and flag football buildings. During phase II of this project, staff will coordinate installa on of ar ficial turf on the grass around the playground, complete construc on of new sidewalks from NW 29th Street to the main road in the park as well as the sec on near the pool. The construc on of the three park buildings will commence. Modernizing Mullins Park will require the installa on of direc onal signage throughout the park, upgrades to landscaping, and replacement of park equipment such as benches, trash cans, and picnic tables.

Royal Palm Entryway Construc on Lead Departments: Public Works and Community Development Capital Outlay: $94,709 allocated in FY 2012; $155,291 in FY 2013 Tree Trust Fund: $175,000. In 2012, staff obtained a survey instrument, select a landscape architect to implement the conceptual design and ul mately work towards construc on of an entry feature at the east entrance of the City on Royal Palm Blvd. This is the first of several poten al entryways iden fied for aesthe c improvements and involves coordina on with numerous en es. The City has received permission from the north side property owner (Coral Springs Chris an Academy) to obtain the necessary easements and design proposal in which to place a por on of the improvements within their property. This includes dele ng an unconstructed egress/ ingress opening on Royal Palm Boulevard that requires County ac on. Sunshine Water Control District and Coral Springs Improvement District must also approve the overall plans impac ng their easement (culvert) and pump sta on improvements. In addi on to the efforts described above, the Design Development Plan will be presented for review and approval by the City which includes a meandering sidewalk on the north side of Royal Palm Boulevard, a retaining wall and decora ve columns, landscaping with irriga on, landscape ligh ng, decora ve paving, and the installa on of pedestrian street lights. Royal Palm Blvd. will be curbed with improved drainage along the north side from the City’s east boundary Riverside Drive.

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Code Compliance Microgrants

Community Wildlife Habitat Designa on

Lead Department: City Manager’s Office

Lead Department: Community Development

Opera ng Expenses: $5,000

Opera ng Expenses: $1,500

Financial hardships being experienced by many homeowners have made it difficult for some City code viola ons to be corrected. The City will donate $5,000 to a non-profit corpora on that performs home improvements that will help Coral Springs homeowners in financial distress pay for the services they need to correct code viola ons. This pilot program will cover only viola ons involving discolored roofs.

Several years ago, the City of Coral Springs registered with the Na onal Wildlife Federa on to become a cer fied Community Wildlife Habitat. To receive this dis nc on 300 private proper es, seven public proper es, and five school proper es must be cer fied backyard habitats. Currently there are nine public proper es and seven school proper es cer fied but only 248 single family proper es. Although staff has taken every opportunity to encourage residents to register, the rate at which new proper es are being cer fied has slowed significantly over the last couple years.

Median Master Plan—Phase I Lead Department: Parks and Recrea on Capital Outlay: $150,000 In 2012, an architectural review of all City medians was conducted to analyze exis ng condi on and present recommenda ons. As a result, a Median Master Plan is being developed to implement the suggested improvements. Some of the recommended median upgrades include adding new trees, installa on of new shrubs, removing exis ng ground cover and replacing with new ground cover, installa on of a more efficient irriga on system, and adding new sod and shrubs. The plan is intended to unify the look of the medians, contribu ng to the City’s goal of revitalizing the aesthe cs and improving the percep on of how people view the City. In Fiscal Year 2013, median landscaping will begin along Coral Ridge Drive, Coral Springs Drive, and Wyndham Lakes. The remaining City maintained medians will be scheduled for beau fica on efforts in the near future.

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To achieve the goal of receiving Community Wildlife Habitat Cer fica on by the 2013 Earth Fest event, the City will refocus a en on in two ways. First, staff will send informa on to homeowners in neighborhoods explaining how their property fulfills all the requirements of the backyard habitat program by virtue of their loca on. Good examples include, but are not limited to, Whispering Woods and Woodside Estates, and The Preserve. Second, the City will offer na ve plants to homeowners who get cer fied to make their property even more wildlife friendly. The value of the plants will not exceed $15 per property. Providing adequate wildlife habitat throughout the City leads to a decrease in nuisance wildlife. In addi on, the use of bu erfly gardens and na ve plants to a ract na ve wildlife is in line with the new Florida Friendly Landscape Ordinance that encourages the use of more shrubs and bushes to reduce landscape watering needs.

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Park Facili es Maintenance Crew

CDBG Ac on Plan (2011-2013)

Lead Department: Parks and Recrea on

Lead Department: Community Development

Opera ng Expenses: $221,036

FY 2013 CDBG Alloca on: $586,468

Capital Outlay: $140,100

Each year, the City is required to complete an annual Ac on Plan as a part of the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program. The plan describes specific projects and ac vi es that the City will undertake in the coming year to address priority needs iden fied in the five year plan. These priori es include providing a suitable living environment, decent and affordable housing, and expanded economic opportuni es.

The purpose of this program is to maintain City parks in op mal condi ons. To do so, it will be necessary to hire a maintenance crew to assist exis ng staff in keeping all park facili es safe and aesthe cally pleasant for our customers. The crew will consist of three new technicians and one maintenance worker who will perform miscellaneous repairs. The goal is to have an in-house crew to immediately address plumbing and electric related issues occurring in City parks, as well as other upkeep and maintenance, such as carpet replacement, pain ng, and replacement of lights. Having in-house staff, rather than contractors, conduct proac ve maintenance and repairs will reduce costs and ensure the parks are maintained to the standards our customers expect.

The CDBG program allows the City to u lize grant funds for capital improvement projects in the City’s low- to moderate-income areas. The following projects are listed in the 2012-2013 Ac on Plan: • NW 38th Drive Sidewalk (curb, gu er and drainage): $250,000 • Commercial Façade Program: $80,000 • Playground Replacement (Poinciana Park): $51,205

Ongoing Ini a ves Water Saving Devices (2012-2013) Lead Department: Public Works Capital Outlay: $100,000 (Facili es Reserves)

• Youth Scholarship Program: $47,000 • Senior Recrea on and Func onal Training $30,970 • Senior Recrea on and Therapeu c Program: $10,000 • Planning and Administra on: $117,293

This program is to upgrade exis ng restroom plumbing fixtures, such as toilets, urinals, faucets, and shower heads in 12 City facili es to water saving devices, as recommended in an energy study conducted in 2009 and 2010. The Consultant’s report observed the poten al for 30% in water savings through the installa on of water conserving mo on ac vated low flow flush valves or water strainers at the Center for the Arts. The report iden fied similar benefits at the 12 buildings evaluated under the Audit. The implementa on phase began in Fiscal Year 2012. Plumbing retrofits were accomplished in City Hall South, Fire Sta ons 43 and 95, and the Westside Compound. In Fiscal Year 2013, the City will con nue replacing exis ng plumbing fixtures with improved and more efficient devices at the following facili es: Charter School, Fire Training Academy, City Hall North, Gymnasium, Tennis Center, Aqua cs, Cypress Hammock Park and Center for the Arts.

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Inflow and Infiltra on Program (2012-2013)

Community Pride Phase IV (2010-2013)

Lead Department: Public Works—U li es

Lead Department: Parks and Recrea on

Capital Outlay: $1M (Renewal and Replacement Fund)

Capital Outlay: $2,000,000

The purpose of this program is preven ng the inflow and infiltra on of ground water into the sewer lines, which ul mately travels to Broward County Wastewater Treatment Facility for treatment. A Wastewater Facili es Plan, created in 2007 iden fied this project as a top priority for the City. Rehabilita on of the sanitary sewer system began in Fiscal Year 2012 with relining defec ve or cracked sewer lines, manhole repair and coa ng, point repairs, and site restora on.

CDBG: $301,205

There are a number of vitrified clay segments and joints that are allowing groundwater to enter the sewer system due to decay, cracking and root intrusion. This extra water adds to the flow of wastewater sent to Broward County for treatment, needlessly increasing the pumping, treatment, and disposal costs. This ini a ve allows the City to con nue sewer rehabilita on, making great strides toward elimina ng the infiltra on, preven ng structural defects, while reducing wastewater treatment costs paid to the County.

The Community Pride ini a ve got off the ground in 2010 by developing a mul year plan focusing on revitalizing city facili es, rights-of-way, parks, and medians in prepara on for the City’s anniversary. This ini a ve, therefore, will dovetail with the 50th Anniversary Commi ee’s ini a ve meant to plan events celebra ng the City’s anniversary. Community Pride con nued in 2011 with projects designed to revitalize the look of the City, such as modifica ons to exis ng bicycle and pedestrian walkways, parking lot improvements, renova ons to neighborhood parks, and enhancing and alloca ng addi onal resources to the maintenance of roadway medians. In 2012, these projects con nued and addi onal projects designed to enhance the aesthe c appeal of City-owned proper es began. For example, park common grounds (non-athle c fields) were fer lized on a con nuing basis to beau fy the en re park. In previous years the City invested heavily in restoring the tree canopy. Therefore, the City hired an in-house tree trimming crew to maintain a healthy tree canopy by regular and proper trimming of those trees. A full- me arborist has established a master tree trimming program to include trees in medians and at all public buildings, parks and linear parks throughout the City. Other projects consistent with promo ng beau fica on efforts were implemented during Fiscal Year 2012. These include pain ng and pressure cleaning of buildings, resurfacing and maintaining City roads, repair and replacement of roofs at various City facili es, and upkeep of athle c fields and pools. Proposed ac vi es for Fiscal Year 2013 are: upgrades to Mullins Park, con nued replacement of playgrounds at City parks, upgrades to parking lots and pathways, pain ng the exterior of various park buildings, beau fica on of park grounds, streetlight upgrades, signage enhancements, pressure cleaning roofs and walls of City facili es, and installa on of new fencing at City facili es. Improvements to landscape will be made on linear parks and medians as suggested in the Median Master Plan. Pressure cleaning of curbs and sidewalks will con nue throughout the City.

100

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Neighborhood Stabiliza on Program (NSP3)

Code Enforcement Process Improvement (2012-2013)

Lead Department: Community Development

Lead Department: Informa on Services

Grant Funded: $1,657,845

Opera ng Expenses: $24,000

In 2010, Congress appropriated a third round of Neighborhood Stabiliza on Program funds through the Dodd-Frank Act enabling the City to receive an addi onal alloca on of $1,657,845.

The purpose of this ini a ve is to improve the efficiency and effec veness of parts of the Code Enforcement process by upda ng some of the division’s automated systems. New so ware should allow the staff to handle an increased caseload as well as allow ci zens to submit code viola ons more easily.

The main goal of NSP3 is to invest funds in programs and projects that revitalize targeted neighborhoods and reconnect those neighborhoods with the economy, housing market, and social networks of the community and metropolitan area as a whole. The City has been using these funds to provide grant assistance to lowto-moderate-income persons through the following strategies. Financing Mechanism (Purchase Assistance): This ac vity sets aside funds to address the abundance of vacant homes by assis ng qualified buyers with purchasing a foreclosed property that has been deemed eligible under NSP3.

In Fiscal Year 2012, the process for purchasing a complete business applica on for Code Enforcement began, and vendor presenta ons were made in the fourth quarter of the year. In the third quarter, a free smartphone applica on was launched that allows ci zens to report code viola ons and submit photos with the report.

Purchase and Rehabilita on Assistance: This ac vity sets aside funds to assist homeowners that purchased a foreclosed property with NSP3 funds to help them make minor repairs and/or make energy efficient improvements. Twenty-five percent of the funds from each type of assistance must be set aside to assist lowincome persons, with the remainder used for moderate-income persons. The City must expend 50% of funds by March 2013 and 100% by March 2014. Eight proper es have been purchased to date with five more proper es under contract. It is an cipated that fi een proper es will be purchased and improved.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

101


Tree Canopy Restora on (2010-2013) Lead Department: Community Development Opera ng Expenses: $60,000 (Tree Trust Fund) For many years, the City has been commi ed to reaching at least 30% tree canopy coverage Citywide. Thirty percent canopy coverage is significant because of the enhanced benefits to the environment at this level. The benefits include reduc on of heat islands, increased rainfall intercep on, reduced flooding and increased oxygen produc on. This goal was dealt a severe setback during the 2004 and 2005 hurricane seasons when nearly a third of the mature tree canopy was destroyed. The City had reached an approximate coverage of 23% prior to this but was reduced to an es mated 16% a er the hurricanes. To achieve to a 30% tree canopy by 2020, as outlined in the City’s Comprehensive Plan, several components are in place. Street Tree Subsidy Program – In 2006, the City began this program which allowed eligible property owners to plant appropriate shade trees as street trees and receive up to $200 in subsidy per tree. This program was later expanded to include mul family and commercial proper es as well. This program is now in its final year in 2012 and its conclusion will have provided all eligible neighborhoods in the City with an opportunity to take advantage of the street tree subsidy program. As a result, over 3,000 trees have been planted in residen al neighborhoods and nearly 600 street trees were planted in commercial districts.

Effec ve educa on including informa on on “Right Tree, Right Place” – In conjunc on with the Street Tree Subsidy Program, the City began an educa onal campaign for property owners. The goal is to encourage comprehensive tree care understanding that includes selec ng trees with quality structure, plan ng them correctly and in appropriate loca ons and caring for the trees over the long term. Evalua ng extent of canopy coverage – In accordance with the Comprehensive Plan, the City will begin performing a tree canopy analysis every five years to determine progress towards the 30% tree canopy goal. GIS-based tree inventory – The City has completed the first phase of developing a Geographic Informa on System-based tree inventory for public property. The inventory includes almost 2,000 trees located around public buildings. An expansion of the tree inventory to include medians and parks will be undertaken by the City arborist. This data will be valuable for ensuring that the City-owned trees will be properly documented and cared for. Addi onally, it opens up the possibility to begin quan fying the economic benefits of trees as part of the green infrastructure.

Tree Master Plan - The City has embarked on a mul year Tree Master Plan to install a significant number of trees in City parks and on other public property. These trees will be further supplemented by na ve understory plan ng where appropriate. Over the next 10 years, trees planted under the Tree Master Plan and the Street Tree Subsidy Program will mature and will contribute significantly to the overall canopy coverage.

102

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Financial Health and Economic Development New Ini a ves

Economic Development Enhancements Lead Department: City Manager’s Office

City Branding Phase II - Implementa on

Partner: Economic Development Founda on

Lead Department: Communica ons and Marke ng

Opera ng Expenses: $250,000

Partner: Economic Development Founda on

The City Manager’s Office, in partnership with the Economic Development Founda on (EDF), is facilita ng the forward progress of the economic recovery by making sure the City maintains the commercial and industrial property tax base at or above 20% of the total tax base. The EDF’s mission is to expand and diversify the commercial tax base through targeted strategies which support the City’s quest to be the premier community in which to live, work and raise a family. This targeted approach will iden fy specific industries that are establishing the future of the area and of the country, such as medical services and informa on technology (IT), global IT opportuni es, educa onal services, logis cs and distribu on, foreign trade opportuni es in the import/export market as well as light manufacturing.

Opera ng Expenses: $60,000 In Fiscal Year 2012, the City contracted with North Star Des na on Strategies to develop a branding strategy as part of the City’s overall marke ng effort to a ract and retain both residents and businesses. Phase I of this process has resulted in a brand pla orm, new logo, and an ac on plan for brand implementa on. City Branding Phase II will allow staff to put into place some of the key elements and recommenda ons in the branding strategic ac on plan. An important element of this effort is to contact new residents to make them familiar with the “A to Z” Guide as well as the City’s web site to inform them about the various services the City has to offer.

This ini a ve will encompass these primary efforts: • Revamping the EDF web site to provide relevant, useful informa on focused on EDF’s core services. • Developing an Economic Development Strategic Plan, providing regular status updates on progress, causes and effects. • Providing Economic Development incen ves for qualified targeted industries. • Include ways to enhance the compe veness of the Corporate Park in the Economic Development Strategic Plan.

Key Intended Outcomes Bond ra ngs Residents’ value ra ng (Resident Survey) Non-residen al value as percent of total taxable value

City of Coral Springs, Florida

FY 2012 Goal

FY 2013 Goal

‘AAA’

‘AAA’

72%

20%

20%

103


Corporate Promo onal Video

EMS Equipment: Time=Life

Lead Department: Communica ons and Marke ng

Lead Department: Fire

Partners: Economic Development Founda on, Community Redevelopment Associa on

EMS Grants: $79,275

Opera ng Expenses: $5,000 In Fiscal Year 2012, the City undertook an economic development ini a ve which included a branding study as well as producing a sports event promo onal website. Phase II of the economic development strategy will include the produc on of a corporate video. This video will be used to encourage business en es to relocate or expand their presence in Coral Springs. This ini a ve will focus on the City’s assets and also capitalize on the pres ge of being a Baldrige-award-winning community of excellence.

Fire Academy Promo onal Campaign Lead Department: Fire, Communica ons and Marke ng Opera ng Expenses: $25,000 During the recent recession, the Fire Academy’s customer base shi ed substan ally. Prior to the recession, the academy was filled with new students working toward basic fire service cer fica on, a lengthy, involved course of study which commands high tui on rates. As hiring of new firefighters has fallen off, the academy now primarily provides in-service training and required recer fica on of exis ng professional firefighters, at significantly lower rates. The Coral Springs Fire Academy is an integral part of the Fire Department but it has evolved to serve a wider purpose, fulfilling the training needs of over 35 fire departments across eight coun es. It was recognized as the top fire training center in the State of Florida in 2007 and 2011. The academy has con nually contributed to the improvement of fire service training in Florida and has one of the largest academies in the state by volume of students. The promo onal campaign will feature this long history of excellence, promo ng the City as an educa onal center, as a means to a ract students interested in the basic fire service cer fica on. The Coral Springs Fire Academy promo onal campaign will be designed to dovetail with the branding effort which is expected to be completed early in Fiscal Year 2013.

104

Capital Outlay: $26,425 (City Match) The City received two grants from the Florida Department of Health EMS Matching Grant program for the purchase of Emergency Medical Services equipment. The funds will be used to purchase four video laryngoscopes and three chest compression devices. The City is required to provide at least a 25% match of the total cost. During calendar year 2011, the Fire Department responded to 13,556 calls for service (23,698 total runs). Of these, 54 required advanced airway interven on and 17 required addi onal measures to secure an airway. Time is of the essence when establishing an airway and the longer this procedure takes, the lower the chances of survival. With the use of a video laryngoscope, it only takes seconds to intubate a pa ent. Cardiac events occurred in 62 of the calls for service. The key to a successful resuscita on of a pa ent suffering from cardiac arrest is con nuous effec ve chest compressions. The automa c chest compression devices offer high-quality, uninterrupted CPR. Both the video laryngoscopes and the chest compression devices allow the Department to increase opera onal efficacy as well as improve pa ent survival rates.

Water Rate Study Lead Department: Public Works—U li es Opera ng Expenses: $35,000 (Water and Sewer Fund) The 2007 Water and Sewer Rate Study recommended replacing the current two- er rate structure with an en rely new rate structure designed to encourage water conserva on. The two- er structure was replaced with a mul - er, inclining five-block rate structure for residen al customers. This rate structure was adopted to give residen al customers a price incen ve to conserve water. Beginning in November 2007 the recommended water rate increases have been implemented. With the adop on of the 10-Year Water and Sewer Master Plan, the water u lity will commission a new water and sewer rate study to determine whether current usage and rate structure will generate sufficient revenues to support the u lity’s ongoing opera ng costs as well as planned repair and rehabilita on of exis ng assets.

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Ongoing Ini a ves

Commercial Façade Program (2012-2013) Lead Department: Community Development

Internal Auditor (2012-2013) Lead Department: City Commission Opera ng Expenses: $100,000 In Fiscal Year 2012, the City contracted with an outside audi ng firm to provide an independent and objec ve review of the City’s finances and opera ons. The firm was tasked with ensuring internal controls are in place to safeguard assets, determining that financial and other reports disclose informa on fairly and accurately, making sure City resources and public funds are being u lized effec vely, and monitoring compliance with local, state, and federal laws and regula ons. A workshop was held on December 13, 2011, and the internal auditor outlined the process to complete the internal audit. Based on requests and sugges ons from the City Commission and City management, an audit plan was established based on the priority areas iden fied by the City Commission. The external auditor is now implemen ng this plan.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Community Development Block Grant: $80,000 This ini a ve’s goal is to assist businesses in the City by improving the look and aesthe cs of their storefronts. This program will poten ally a ract new customers to this area and contribute to future redevelopment within Coral Springs. U lizing Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the City will re-establish its commercial façade program. This program was part of the City’s 2004 and 2005 Business Plans and focused on proper es within the City’s Community Redevelopment Area. In Fiscal Year 2012, $57,000 was allocated to this ini a ve. Due to the number of businesses interested in the program, an addi onal $29,507 was added to the budget in Fiscal Year 2012. The $80,000 allocated for Fiscal Year 2013 will be targeted at small businesses along Sample Road and Wiles Road and focus on upda ng signage and ligh ng for these businesses as well as redesigning storefronts. The total available amount of $166,507 is projected to provide assistance to between eight and 10 businesses.

105


Traffic, Mobility and Connectivity New Ini a ves

Coral Hills Drive Sidewalk Design Lead Departments: Public Works

New Sidewalks at 38th Drive and 85th Avenue Lead Department: Public Works FY 2013 Capital Outlay: $250,000 Community Development Block Grant; $89,000 (Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s por on) FY 2012 Capital Outlay: $200,000 In 2010, the City contracted with a consul ng engineering firm to perform an evalua on of poten al sidewalk construc on in conjunc on with the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s master bike path comprehensive plan. The goal is to provide pedestrian connec vity to the future downtown, public transporta on, and industrial and commercial districts.

Capital Outlay: $50,000 The goal of this ini a ve is to increase safety to pedestrians walking on Coral Hills Drive. The design for this project will be completed during Fiscal Year 2013 and replacement of the exis ng asphalt path in place from Sample to Wiles Road is planned for the following year. Preliminary cost es mates were provided by an engineering firm on contract with the City. The project calls for construc on of a concrete sidewalk on one side of Coral Hills Drive from Sample to Wiles Road. Work will consist of a 6-foot sidewalk, curb, gu er and drainage as determined during the design phase.

The inspec on iden fied seven areas most in need of new concrete sidewalks. Two of the highest priority areas were iden fied as future pedestrian paths to University Drive and the downtown district. These areas are 38th Drive between University Drive and 85th Avenue from 38th Street to 40th street. Providing walkways along streets leading into the downtown area is consistent with the Community Redevelopment Agency plan to facilitate pedestrian access to downtown, specifically to the Northwest Regional Library and Coral Springs Charter School. There are currently no sidewalks on these roadway segments crea ng conflicts between pedestrians, bicyclists, and automobiles using these roads simultaneously.

FY 2012 Goal

FY 2013 Goal

Number of linear feet of improved sidewalks, bike paths, and bike lanes

2,500

2,500

Number of riders on intracity bus routes

85,000

85,000

Key Intended Outcomes

106

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Roadway Resurfacing and Alley Improvements

Right Turn Lane at Shadow Wood Boulevard and Riverside Drive

Lead Department: Public Works

Lead Departments: Public Works

Capital Outlay: $906,000

Capital Outlay: $63,700 (Road Impact Fund)

The City’s roadway resurfacing program’s goal is to resurface up to 10 miles of City roads per year. This resurfacing technique has proven to extend the life of the asphalt surface by 18-20 years which is more cost-effec ve than reconstruc ng the en re road bed and surface. Each City road is resurfaced between the 20th and 25th year of useful life, preven ng deteriora on of the road base. Improvements include removing the old street surface and base materials and replacing with more durable materials, followed by grading and installa on of new asphalt.

This project was ini ated as a response to ci zens’ concerns regarding pedestrian safety at this intersec on. Vehicles coming from the westbound direc on are encroaching into a striped non-vehicular access lane to make a right turn (northbound) from Shadow Wood Boulevard onto Riverside Drive. The Traffic Management team evaluated this situa on and recommended the construc on of a right turn lane to alleviate the traffic conges on, especially before and a er school hours. Adding a turn lane at this intersec on will also avoid any future unpermi ed use of the striped area, ensuring pedestrians’ safety.

In Fiscal Year 2013, por ons of the remaining sec ons of the Turtle Run area will be completed, as well as the roads in Butler Farms, Coventry, and Pine Ridge, and Creekside Drive north of Wiles. Other roads scheduled for the future resurfacing include 105th Avenue and Coral Springs Drive, 100th Avenue west of Coral Hills Drive, por ons of Coral Hills Drive and other roads listed in the Road Resurfacing Master Plan. Alleys improvements began in Fiscal Year 2007 with an engineering evalua on of 13 alleys in the City. The report iden fied alleys needing the installa on of a two-foot concrete valley gu er and an overlay of the surface with compacted asphalt. A master plan was created to classify public alley ways into low, medium and high priority categories, depending on the type of repair and improvements iden fied in the study. Since the program began, five alleys have been improved. For Fiscal Year 2013, this ini a ve includes refurbishing alleys on the following loca ons: • West side of University Drive between 14th and 16th Avenues. • East side of University Drive between 16th and 19th Avenues. • The alleyway behind 7500 block of Sample Road, on the west side of Woodside Drive. The remaining alleys listed in the master plan will be scheduled for enhancements in future years.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Ongoing Ini a ves Downtown Pathways Phase II (2012-2013) Lead Department: Community Development Opera ng Expenses: Exis ng This ini a ve is to construct a pathway in the downtown area of Coral Springs to improve access to local social service agencies, schools, places of worship, and medical facili es. This pathway will be suitable for pedestrians and bicyclists with direct access to downtown. The pathway will be constructed east of Coral Springs Drive along Ben Geiger Drive (also known as NW 29th Street) and north of Coral Hills Drive to Sample Road, with a sec on of the pathway cu ng across the southeast sec on of the Coral Springs Medical Center. Transporta on enhancement funding ($545,000) to construct the Downtown Pathway will become available in July 2014 and does not require a local match. However, the design of the pathway is the responsibility of the City and is es mated for comple on by the end of 2012. In Fiscal Year 2013, staff will work with the Florida Department of Transporta on in developing project melines and comple ng Local Agency Program cer fica on. Demoli on of exis ng sidewalks will follow in Fiscal Year 2014.

107


This is a long-term effort to obtain federal, state and county funding for projects that enhance the downtown area and improve transit ridership. Planners from Coconut Creek, Margate, and Coral Springs con nue to meet regarding this project.

Northwest Broward Consor um for Planning Transporta on Improvements (2012-2013) Lead Department: Community Development Opera ng Expenses: Exis ng The Broward Metropolitan Planning Organiza on’s 2035 Long-Range Transporta on Plan iden fied gateway hubs at two intersec ons: Sample Road/University Drive and Sample Road/State Road 7. Four ci es in northwest Broward (Coral Springs, Margate, Coconut Creek and Parkland) have begun coopera ng in developing plans and programs that will support transit services on the Sample Road corridor. The consor um will also develop transit suppor ve land use ini a ves to promote the development of gateway hubs at or near these intersec ons.

Traffic Management (2010-2013) Lead Department: Community Development Opera ng Capital: $10,000 Current projects include red light cameras, road resurfacing, intersec on improvements and turn lanes, and pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure improvements. Funding for this ini a ve is for ongoing maintenance of the City’s traffic calming program. In Fiscal Year 2012, 26 streets were tested for traffic calming measures, and speed cushions were repaired or installed on two streets. Community Development also worked with the Turtle Run CCD on improvements to several streets in that area. The Traffic Management team meets monthly to monitor traffic-related issues and proposed developments throughout the City and surrounding area. It is composed of representa ves from Community Development, Public Works, Police, Fire, and Engineering.

A primary direc ve of the planning consor um is to establish a transit connec on, referred to as the “Educa onal Corridor” connec ng Pompano Beach to the Broward College campuses in Coconut Creek and the new campus in Downtown Coral Springs, u lizing State Road 7 and Sample Road. This ini a ve lays the groundwork for long-term transporta on planning for the northwest por on of Broward County.

Long-Range Transporta on Improvement Plan

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! Future ( 1. University Drive/Sample Road - Add SB, EB and WB right turn lanes 2. University Drive/Wiles Road - Add NB, SB, EB, and WB left turn lanes - Add NB and SB through lanes 3. Sample Road/Coral Springs Drive - Add EB and WB right turn lanes 4. Sample Road/Riverside Drive - Add EB right turn lanes Add NB and SB left turn lanes 5. Sample Road/NW 85th Avenue - Add NB and SB left turn lanes 6. Coral Hills Drive - Sample Road to NW 29th Street Widen to provide a 3-lane cross section 7. NW 33rd Street - Coral Hills Drive to NW 99th Way Widen to provide a 3-lane cross section 8. University Drive - Wiles Road to NW 40th Street Widen from 4 to 6 lanes 9. Wiles Road - University Drive to Riverside Drive Widen from 4 to 6 lanes 10. Wiles Road - Rock Island Road to US 441- Widen from 4 to 6 lanes 11. Proposed Transit Center 12. Downtown Pathways 13. Future Sidewalks 14. University Drive - Sawgrass Expy to Wiles Road- Resurfacing 2014 15. Multi-Modal Improvements (MPO) 16. Entryway Improvements (Sidewalk, lighting, landscaping, and entry feature

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Completed

A. University Drive/ Sample Road - Add NB and EB right turn lanes, Bus Bay and Sidewalk Improvements (Completed 2007) B. Sample Road/Sportsplex Drive, install traffic signal (Completed 2006)

Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) Area

108

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Red Light Camera Implementa on (2012-2013) Lead Department: Police Opera ng Expenses: Exis ng Enhanced Revenue: $50,000 Seven cameras were installed at five intersec ons throughout the City at the end of FY 2011, and went live September 15, 2011. Early indica ons are that the cameras have been effec ve in preven ng traffic accidents at those intersec ons. Accidents at the 5 intersec ons have declined 17% from the same me period last year. The City is exploring the possibility of installing one more camera at the intersec on of Wiles Road and State Road 7.

2012-2014 Short-Range Transporta on Improvement Plan

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A B C D E F G H

City Roadway Resurfacing Program Sidewalk/Pathway Improvements Mast Arm Installation w/Video Detection (Broward County) Video Detection Installation (Broward County) Downtown CRA Infrastructure Project (Sample Road/University Drive) Downtown Pathway (Transportation Enhancement Grant) US 441 (RRR) - Sawgrass Expressway to Sample Road Coral Ridge Drive/Sawgrass Expressway - sidewalk connections, traffic signal interconnections Bus Shelters Entryway Improvements (Sidewalk, lighting, landscaping, and entry feature) Alleyways Refurbishment Program Regional Bike Trailhead (Broward County) Right Turn Lane (Shadow Wood Blvd. westbound)

Completed 2012

Alleyways Refurbishment Program Bus Shelters City Roadway Resurfacing Program Sidewalk/Pathway Improvements NW 44 Court Sidewalk & Drainage Improvements Video Detection Installation (Broward County) Westview Drive - Left turn lane-North Community Park Red Light Camera

Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) Area

City of Coral Springs, Florida

109


Youth Development and Family Values Half Marathon and 5K Run/Walk

New Ini a ves

Lead Department: Sportsplex

50th Anniversary Celebra on Lead Department: Community Development Opera ng Expenses: $150,000 Enhanced Revenue: $100,000 via sponsorship opportuni es Prepara on is underway for the City’s 50th Anniversary Celebra on on July 10, 2013. City staff is working in conjunc on with a commi ee of volunteers appointed by the City Commission on a host of events and promo onal efforts. The focus is on the planning and promo on of the Citywide events that will take place through 2013. The branding of all ongoing major City events will be part of the 50th Anniversary fes vi es. Funding will be offset by sponsorships obtained by the City’s consultant. Examples of the ac vi es include: par cipa on in the Holiday Parade, establishing a half marathon and 5K run, hos ng Broward County Pioneer Day, and other special events during the week of July 4 through July 10, 2013

Opera ng Expenses: $15,000 The City, in conjunc on with In the Zone Event and Sports Management, will be conduc ng a half marathon and 5K road race. The purpose of this event is to encourage healthy lifestyle choices while providing posi ve exposure to the City and its facili es and local businesses. The event is projected to bring 1,000 runners to the City and will begin and end at the Sportsplex. The event is going to be a part of the City’s 50th Anniversary Celebra on and is scheduled for March 30, 2013. The City expects this to develop into an annual event.

FY 2012 Goal

FY 2013 Goal

Number of youths involved in City sponsored leadership opportuni es

2,000

1,600

Number of teen volunteer hours

20,000

18,500

15

15

Key Intended Outcomes

Number of middle school a er-school programs offered annually

110

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Ongoing Ini a ves

Senior Empowerment Program (2009-2013) Lead Department: Parks and Recrea on

Car Club (2007-2013) Lead Department: Parks and Recrea on Opera ng Expenses: Exis ng The teen car club, Project CS, has had great success since its incep on in September 2007. It is one of the few car clubs in Broward County geared toward teens, and allows the teens to learn leadership as well as technical skills. The teens meet regularly to restore cars that have been confiscated by the Coral Springs Police Department. Members work on customizing vehicles, relying on funds collected through fundraisers. The members interact not only with automo ve professionals, but with the local business community and restaurants as sponsors. The Car Show was held on Saturday, February 4 at the Sportsplex. Flyers and press releases helped to promote the event; however, the weather kept some cars from entering. Overall, it was a good turnout, food trucks were a success and the event raised approximately $2,000 for the Car Club. The City will be housing the Blazer at the Westside maintenance yard and staff will con nue promo ng the club to recruit more members.

Opera ng Expenses: Exis ng This ini a ve began in 2009 to help make Coral Springs “a community for a life me.” The Senior Advisory Commi ee, City staff, and Commission work together to provide educa onal programs for seniors, teaching them to be self-sufficient and involved in the community, and to help them relate to younger age groups. In past years, physical fitness and computer classes have been offered. A very popular program is the “Window to My World” offered at St. Andrews Towers and the Sartory Senior Center. This event provides seniors the opportunity to tell a story, discuss their past, present, and future plans, and put together a book that will become a keepsake for their children and grandchildren. Due to the success of this event, staff will con nue invi ng Coral Springs residents who are 55 years or older to par cipate in this program in the future. Other senior ac vi es planned for next year include intergenera onal programs and incorporate a new photography class for seniors. Teen Cookoff (2011-2013) Lead Department: Parks and Recrea on

Teen Poli cal Forum (2009-2013)

Opera ng Expenses: Exis ng

Lead Department: Human Resources

The Teen Cookoff event began two years ago with the purpose of showcasing local teens’ culinary talents. Par cipants can be in grades 9 through 12 and must be a Coral Springs resident or a end school in Coral Springs. Teams may be made up of two to six par cipants to compete outdoors at the Sportsplex.

Opera ng Expenses: Exis ng The Teen Poli cal Forum gives our youth the opportunity to meet their elected officials in person, ask ques ons, and feel involved in the decisions affec ng their community. This year’s Forum was held on April 2, 2012, at the Coral Springs Center for the Arts, and was a ended by nearly 350 high school students. Nine elected officials made up the panel. The Police and Fire chiefs were also in a endance, ready to answer ques ons. The event was more interac ve than in past years, and the ques ons posed by the students showed a high level of interest in their community. The City plans to host this successful forum again in Fiscal Year 2013.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

In Fiscal Year 2012, this program was incorporated as part of the Teen Car Show event held in February. The annual cookoff contest is adver sed on the City’s web site to encourage teams to enter their applica on and show off their culinary skills. This year’s challenge was a barbeque with entries from three different teams. Each team received the same ingredients, provided by Whole Foods Market, to prepare barbeque ribs and a side dish. Prizes are awarded in different categories. The winning team for this year’s cook off was Coral Glades High School. In Fiscal Year 2013, this event will con nue to be offered with support from the Youth and Family Commi ee.

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Playground Equipment Replacement Program (2012-2013) Lead Department: Parks and Recrea on Capital Outlay: $130,000 Community Development Block Grant: $51,205 Phase I of this program consisted of crea ng a plan to ensure playground equipment in our parks is scheduled for replacement before the end of its expected useful life. We currently have 33 playgrounds throughout the City in our neighborhood and community parks and the average life expectancy of the equipment is 15 years. In the past, equipment in each park was replaced on an asneeded basis to maintain a safe recrea onal environment and to meet all the Americans with Disabili es Act requirements for playgrounds. All playground equipment and surfaces are inspected regularly by our maintenance staďŹ&#x20AC; and a cer fied playground inspector.

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In Fiscal Year 2012, each playground was evaluated and placed in the replacement cycle by priority with the purpose of replacing first those in cri cal need due to damage from inclement weather or unforeseen condi ons. The first new equipment installed was the playground in Cypress Park, followed by Kiwanis, DeDe Gilmore, Riverside and Fern Glen parks. In Fiscal Year 2013, the scheduled playgrounds to be replaced are Oakwood and North Community parks. In addi on, grant funds have been allocated by CDBG to replace the playground equipment at Poinciana Park. The remaining playgrounds have been included in the Capital Improvement Program for replacement in future years.

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Strength in Diversity New Ini a ves

BizArt Annual Event Lead Department: Community Development

Mullins Park Water Tank Mural

Partner: Community Redevelopment Agency

Lead Department: Coral Springs Museum of Art

Opera ng Expenses: $5,000 (Public Art Fund)

Partners: Community Development, Public Art Commi ee

In 2012, the City of Coral Springs, the Coral Springs Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) and the Public Art Commi ee co-sponsored an event en tled BizArt, a celebra on of the City’s business community and the City’s Sculpture on Sample exhibi on. Although the event was ul mately cancelled due to inclement weather, the venue selected (NW 94th Avenue south of Sample Road) proved to be an excellent loca on to hold a public event.

Grant-Funded: $67,000 Public art is an important aspect of the City of Coral Springs. The Coral Springs Museum of Art celebrated its 15th anniversary in 2012 and con nues to provide a venue for local and interna onal ar st to display their artwork. The Coral Springs Museum of Art was awarded a Community Founda on of Broward Grant to bring residents closer together through common efforts to address issues of public concern through arts. The museum will receive a $67,150 grant for this project. The project requires a 25% in-kind match ($33,575) along with an addi onal 25% ($33,575) to be raised through contribu ons to the museum. The grant requires the project be completed by March 31, 2013.

This year, City staff will work with these partner agencies to establish an annual event in Downtown Coral Springs. The City intends to seek collabora on from the Coral Springs Chamber of Commerce and other business organiza ons to promote and ensure a successful event. The Public Art Fund has allocated $5,000 for site prepara on, including trash collec on and adver sement costs.

FY 2012 Goal

FY 2013 Goal

Minority residents who feel that the City is a great place to live (Resident Survey)

90%

Ci zen ra ng of City government for respec ng religious and ethnic diversity (Resident Survey)

93%

Key Intended Outcomes

City of Coral Springs, Florida

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Ongoing Ini a ves

CommuniTea (2008-2013) Lead Department: Human Resources

Family Success Center (2005-2013) Lead Department: Human Resources Opera ng Expenses: Exis ng The Northwest Regional Family Success Center, located on Ben Geiger Drive (NW 29th Street), in the heart of Coral Springs, provides services to individuals and families through collabora on with other human services departments, governmental agencies, and non-profit organiza ons. Onsite services include emergency financial assistance, integrated intake, assessment, case management, counseling, and life skills classes. The center offers workshops and par cipates in community events providing informa on and referrals for employment, housing, counseling, legal aid, subsidized child care, and health, elderly, and veterans’ services. In FY 2011, the City HelpDesk team visited the center to familiarize themselves with the new programs and services offered there. The City will con nue to support the ac vi es of the Family Success Center.

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Opera ng Expenses: Exis ng The Coral Springs Mul -Cultural Commi ee created this event in 2007, and it was such a success that it has become an annual affair. CommuniTea is an a ernoon mul cultural tea party which encourages social interac on among members of the various ethnic groups of our community. Groups are encouraged to decorate their tables with a theme of their choice. Guests can bring their own special teacup to share their favorite teacup story. Whole Foods Market donates a variety of interna onal teas for everyone’s enjoyment. This year’s event was held May 19 at the Coral Springs Marrio at Heron Bay and was a ended by nearly 220 people, a significant increase over last year’s a endance of 165. Par cipants were treated to a lively folkloric Hai an dance performance by The Bu erfly Dancers, in addi on to being entertained by a comedian.

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Interna onal Dinner Dance (2009-2013) Lead Department: Human Resources Opera ng Expenses: Exis ng The Interna onal Dinner Dance was created to increase the awareness and apprecia on for the diversity of cultures that abound in our community and surrounding areas. We focus on a different culture each year as we celebrate together in a harmonious se ng. Guests experience global cuisine and entertainment without leaving Coral Springs. Ethnic dress is encouraged to lend a special flair to the evening. The popular event features food, dancing and live entertainment, all with an interna onal twist. This year’s event will be held at the Coral Springs Marrio on Saturday, September 29, 2012, and will highlight the countries of Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago to celebrate 50 years of independence for each. Partnership between Mul -Cultural Advisory Commi ee and One Planet United (2009-2013) Lead Department: Human Resources Opera ng Expenses: Exis ng The Mul -Cultural Advisory Commi ee was formed in 1995 to address the needs of an increasingly diverse community, and has been ac ve in producing educa onal and cultural programs. One Planet United is a nonprofit organiza on headquartered in Coral Springs that promotes unity among all people through experien al and educa onal programs, community projects, and resources. The two groups collaborate in numerous ac vi es: conduc ng monthly Peace Walks, entering a float in the annual Holiday Parade, organizing the Muslim Fes val of Eid, producing the annual Weekend of Peace, and sponsoring the Teen Club and annual Faith in Music concert.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Weekend of Peace Celebra on (2009-2013) Lead Department: Human Resources Opera ng Expenses: Exis ng The Coral Springs Mul -Cultural Advisory Commi ee brings the community together when celebra ng the annual Interna onal Day of Peace. Residents and local schools are invited to take part in the event that highlights ways to promote peace, diversity and unity in our community. The one-day celebra on expanded to a weekend event several years ago to make it more inclusive of all cultures and faiths. This year the weekend celebra on will begin on Friday, September 21 with a ceremony at the Interna onal Peace Garden, adjacent to the Coral Springs Center for the Arts. The weekend will come to a close on Sunday, September 23 with a newlyproduced “Peace in Music” concert. All local houses of worship and schools will be invited to send their choirs or choral groups to par cipate.

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WorldFest (2006-2013)

Mar n Luther King Program (2010-2013)

Lead Department: Human Resources

Lead Department: Human Resources

Opera ng Expenses: Exis ng

Opera ng Expenses: Exis ng

WorldFest is an outdoor one-day fes val, organized by the Mul -Cultural Advisory Commi ee, showcasing the variety of cultures that make up the community of Coral Springs. This year’s WorldFest, held April 15, 2012, at the Sportsplex, provided a spectacular array of entertainment, cuisine and culture that saluted the diverse popula on of the greater Coral Springs area. Commi ee volunteers conducted a cooking demonstra on offering taste samples and recipes of delicious and unusual food items. Kid’s World and Teen World offered games, dances and ac vi es to interest all ages. The event was a ended by approximately 5,000 people.

The Mar n Luther King Commi ee has been organizing the weekend celebra on honoring Dr. King for over 22 years. The program has grown from a grassroots event to a na onally renowned weekend celebra on and successful scholarship program.

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The keynote speaker for the 2013 event will be Ms. Joan Higginbotham, one of only three female African-American astronauts in America. The weekend event begins with a Business Luncheon and Community Celebra on on Friday, January 18, 2013. This is followed by a Leadership/Diversity Day on Monday, January 21, the King Holiday, for middle and high school students. The day’s program focuses on the life and teachings of Dr. King and makes the students realize that “This is a Day On, not a Day Off.”

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Excellence in Education Ongoing Ini a ves Coral Springs Outreach Database Lead Department: Communica ons and Marke ng Partner: Economic Development Founda on Opera ng Expenses: Exis ng In early Fiscal Year 2012 the website and database for the Coral Springs Outreach project was completed and the program was shared with school principals and guidance counselors. The program was expanded to include all job seekers, not just the student popula on. The Coral Springs Outreach Project will con nue this fiscal year, with a focus on expanding the involvement of local businesses. Cambridge Advanced Program at Coral Springs Charter School (2012-2013) Lead Departments: City Manager’s Office Partner: Coral Springs Charter School Opera ng Expenses: Exis ng Coral Springs Charter School ini ated the Cambridge Advanced Program of Studies (CAPS) for students in grades 7 through 9 during the 2011-12 school year. The program’s first year a racted 383 students with 99% desiring to stay in the program throughout their high school career. The program’s focus began with language arts and science and will expand during the 2012-13 school term to include high school CAPS op ons such as General Paper, Thinking Skills, Sociology, Environmental Science, high level mathema cs, Spanish, Psychology and Marine Science.

The Cambridge program is an interna onally recognized, pre-university curriculum which offers a rigorous program of studies. CAPS is sponsored by Cambridge University in England and is currently offered at only a handful of schools in Broward County. The program emphasizes the value of broad and balanced study for academically able students. Its strengths lie in the flexibility and structure of the curriculum encouraging in-depth, working knowledge of each subject, and in essay-based examina ons as assessment of that knowledge and skill mastery. These examina on papers are sent to Cambridge for marking. Students who complete the program will have a special designa on on their diploma and be able to earn college credit based on their examina on scores. All public colleges and universi es in Florida accept Cambridge credits.

Key Intended Outcomes Receive an “A” grade for Coral Springs Charter School (per FDOE) Number of students a ending courses offered by partnering ins tutes of higher educa on

City of Coral Springs, Florida

FY 2012 Goal

FY 2013 Goal

N/A

“A” grade

3,000

3,500

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Charter School Organiza onal Excellence (2009-2013)

Broward College Campus in Coral Springs (2011-2013)

Lead Department: City Manager’s Office

Lead Department: City Manager’s Office

Opera ng Expenses: Exis ng

Partners: Economic Development Founda on, Community Redevelopment Agency

The Charter School’s efforts in con nuous improvement are apparent in its students’ success. The school has been named an “A” school for eight consecu ve years, and was recognized for student engagement during the Florida Sterling conference in June 2010. The school con nuously focuses on process improvement. Its ability to review data on a regular basis allows for fluidity in the curriculum and other school programming. As the school moves in to the 2012-2013 school year it will look to deliver an enhanced curriculum with the founda on based on reading throughout mul ple content areas. School programs strategically developed based on prior performance will lead to innova ve opportuni es for all stakeholders.

Opera ng Expenses: Exis ng The University and College Partnership was established in 2005. Enrollment has climbed rapidly over the last two years with a majority of the students enrolled in Broward College, one of the three universi es in the partnership. Due to this impressive performance, the City, in conjunc on with the Economic Development Founda on, established an alliance dedicated to increasing the presence of Broward College in Coral Springs. The ul mate goal of having a permanent presence for the college somewhere within our Community Redevelopment Area and downtown was made a reality during Fiscal Year 2011. In January 2011, Broward College signed a lease for approximately 19,000 square feet in the Village Square Shopping Center located at the northwest corner of Sample and University. The tenant improvement renova ons for retrofi ng 10 classrooms and administra ve offices will be completed by end of July 2012. Broward College is currently registering students at Coral Springs Center campus for the Fall 2012 session beginning in October. Course offerings include day, evening, and weekend classes focusing on Bachelor’s and Associate Degrees, and college credit cer ficates in high wage, high demand occupa ons. It is projected that enrollment will reach 5,000 students over the next five years at this loca on. The Broward College Coral Springs Center is the strong anchor and spark that will accelerate retail vacancy absorp on in our downtown area.

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Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Financial Strateg y Overview Although business managers, investors, and consumers are frustrated with the slowness of the economic turnaround, it is worth no ng that the forces that brought about the Great Recession were different than those of previous recessions, the depths of the recession were deeper, and the forces that brought about this recession have changed the economic landscape for the foreseeable future. In fact, the depths of the recession were so deep it will be a long way back. Therefore, it is not reasonable to expect this recovery to mirror those of the past. Since we cannot expect the economic landscape to return to normal quickly, we must expect and plan for the long haul. We must temper our desire to put the recession behind us with the realism that the City’s long-term financial health is a key ingredient in maintaining Coral Springs as the na on’s premier community in which to live, work, and raise a family. The City, therefore, will take a leadership role in crea ng its future by inves ng in our community. In partnership with several business development organiza ons and our other stakeholders, the City will proac vely prime the engine of economic growth by assis ng exis ng and poten al businesses, and will devote resources to educa on, public safety, and aesthe cs. While our economic future is likely to be different than our past, we have relied on our business model to prepare for the worst and must rely on it moving forward. This financial strategy allows the City to succeed in the short term yet makes structural changes to ensure long-term success. Moreover, this strategy will allow the City to con nue to provide the same quality of services our customers have come to expect by maintaining our current workforce and capital improvement program, and preserve our community’s quality of life. Other noteworthy components of this financial strategy: • Increase the opera ng millage rate from $4.3939 to $4.5697, which will be considered a 5.6% increase over the Rolled-Back Rate ($4.3260). • Decrease the voter-approved debt service millage rate from $0.2915 to $0.2906 for a savings of $0.16 per typical single-family home.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

• In accordance with the 2007 Water and Wastewater Rate Study, increase water and sewer rates 3%, which is equivalent to $1.82 per month for the typical family. • Increase the fire special assessment fee $9.33, or 7.2%, for single-family homes. • Decrease the residen al solid waste special assessment by 3%, or $6.48, per single-family household. • No increase in user fees.

Inves ng in the Future of Our Community During the depths of the recession, the City adopted a three-pronged financial strategy. While this was an appropriate strategy for the me, the City rolled out a new financial strategy in Fiscal Year 2012 to place it in the most advantageous posi on to embrace the economic recovery. The City will build on that financial strategy in Fiscal Year 2013. As discussed in Market Environment, although the recession has officially ended, the return to pre-recession economic growth rates is not on the horizon. Since the fuel that powered the City’s economic engine (popula on growth and new construc on) will not return to previous levels quickly, if at all, we must expect and plan for a new normal. In this new era, therefore, it will take strong, visionary leadership to ensure Coral Springs can compete in this new environment. The City Commission has set the stage for this vision by incorpora ng language in the 2012-2013 Strategic Plan direc ng the City to take a leadership role in crea ng its future by inves ng in our community. In partnership with the Economic Development Founda on, Community Redevelopment Agency, the Chamber of Commerce, and other stakeholders, the City will proac vely prime the engine of economic growth by assis ng our exis ng business community by devo ng resources to encourage the redevelopment of the City’s commercial areas such as the Corporate Park. In addi on, the City will work to a ract businesses and increase property values by inves ng in the appearance and the safety of our community.

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The City’s intergovernmental, franchise, and other demand-driven revenues fluctuate with the economy. As the City has learned over the past few years, a slumping economy leads to lower retail sales, which in turn, translate to lower sales tax revenue. Less traveling leads to lower fuel tax revenue. Declining economic growth leads to less construc on, less renova on, fewer home improvements, and thus declining revenue. Posi ve economic growth, on the other hand, promises to reverse this trend.

Use of reserves decreases as economy rebounds $5

$4.00

$4

$3.55

$4

$3.00

$3 $Millions

Revenue Outlook

$3 $2 $2 $1

$2.00 $1.65 $1.25 $1.00

Actual

Actual

FY2010

FY2011

Reserves

Most economists are expec ng the economy to grow at a modest rate during the coming year. However, rather than growth returning to normal levels quickly, the economy is expected to move slowly but steadily upward. We have, therefore, adopted a moderate growth philosophy for Fiscal Year 2013 revenue es mates. To hedge against being too op mis c, we have adopted a con ngency that is higher than we otherwise would simply to counterbalance this risk.

Long-Term Financial Management Management of Reserves In Fiscal Year 2010 the City adopted a three-pronged financial strategy which included the use of reserves to bridge the gap between opera ng expenditures and demand-driven revenue receipts. The original plan called for the use of $15.5 million in reserves between Fiscal Year 2010 and Fiscal Year 2013. Unfortunately, it has taken much longer than an cipated for the economy to recover. Therefore, the original plan was modified to use $17.3 million in reserves between Fiscal Year 2010 and 2014. The original plan contemplated using as much as $6 million from the Stabiliza on Reserve (formerly known as the Financial Policy Reserve) beginning in Fiscal Year 2012. The City’s financial policy is to maintain the Stabiliza on Reserve at 17% of General Fund budgeted expenditures to provide 60 days of working capital in the event of an emergency. The use of $6 million contemplated in the original strategy would have le the Stabiliza on Reserve with less than 10% of budgeted expenditures available for emergencies. Primarily due to aggressively managing expenses and diversifying revenues, the City has been able to maintain its Stabiliza on Reserve at 17%. It appears as though we will not need to use that restricted reserve in Fiscal Year 2013 either. In fact, the modified plan called for the use of $3 million in undesignated reserves in Fiscal Year 2013 and $1.9 million of undesignated reserves in Fiscal Year 2014.

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$0.90

$1 $0

$1.90

$1.50

Budget

FY2012

ForfeitureforSROsalaries

FinancialStrategy

FY2013

$0.10

FY2014

OriginalStrategy

As shown in the chart, we now believe we can balance the Fiscal Year 2013 budget using just $1.75 million from undesignated reserve and will not need to use any undesignated reserves to balance the Fiscal Year 2014 budget. While the City will ul mately use $1.8 million more in total reserve than originally contemplated, most of those addi onal monies were the result of a larger contribu on from the Forfeiture Fund than originally planned. State and federal law strictly defines the limited use of police forfeiture funds. One defined legal use is the funding of School Resource Officers (SROs). Early in the Fiscal Year 2012 budget process the City had planned to use $750,000 in forfeiture funds for SRO salaries, which would have been a decrease from the $1.25 million used in the current fiscal year. However, given the con nued lackluster nature of the recovery and knowing the reliable nature of this funding source, the City used $1.5 million in forfeiture funds instead of the originally planned $750,000 in Fiscal Year 2012 for costs associated with the SRO program. Likewise, the City had planned to use $750,000 from the Forfeiture Fund in Fiscal Year 2013 for SRO salaries but increased that to $900,000 due to the con nued lackluster performance of many of its revenues. The City will also con nue to maintain restricted reserves necessary to finish our capital projects, or maintain reserves for encumbrances or those necessary to meet bond covenants. In addi on, we will keep enough cash in the Equipment Replacement Fund and the Computer Replacement Reserve to ensure we can replace our vehicles and technology when necessary, thereby avoiding the issuance of addi onal debt. Economic Development A key component to building a stronger, more vibrant future for the City of Coral Springs is the expansion of our commercial tax base. Roughly one-third of the City’s revenue comes from property taxes which are determined by the assessed value of real property within the City

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


limits. Increasing assessed values is vital to increasing revenue. For example, Coral Springs had an addi onal $6.3 million in new taxable value in Fiscal Year 2013. At the current millage rate of $4.3939, this will generate more than $27,000 in addi onal property tax revenue. Some of our neighbors, however, have added much more to their tax base. For example, Coconut Creek increased its taxable values by $35 million, Sunrise by $32 million, Pembroke Pines by $31 million, and Davie by $24 million. Even Margate, which is a much smaller city, added more to its tax base ($8 million) than Coral Springs. Clearly, Coral Springs can do be er. As outlined in the Market Environment, the City has many efforts underway focused on improving new commercial development and redevelopment including the branding study and the downtown infrastructure improvements. The City will partner with the Economic Development Founda on (EDF) to develop an Economic Development Strategic Plan to guide these development efforts. This shared vision will establish the framework for the direc on and type of development/redevelopment we desire in the City. Ul mately, this investment will yield dividends in terms of enhanced property tax revenue. The Economic Development Strategic Plan dovetails nicely with the City’s Strategic Plan which has iden fied economic development as a strategic priority. The Strategic Plan asserts encouraging redevelopment in the downtown area, Corporate Park, and other commercial areas are the means to the City’s long-term viability.

Solid Waste Coral Springs is one of 26 partner ci es that formed the Broward County Solid Waste Disposal District in 1986. The District and its governing board, the Resource Recovery Board (RRB), was established to oversee the construc on, opera on, and maintenance of a system for the disposal of solid waste generated within the district. The Interlocal Agreement (ILA) that formed the Broward County Solid Waste Disposal District will expire on July 3, 2013. The District, therefore, will be dissolved on that date. Member ci es will be open to nego ate waste disposal service contracts as they see fit. In fact, Coral Springs’ waste hauling contract will expire at the end of calendar year 2013. The RRB is currently nego a ng with the county on the disposi on of the district’s assets. These assets are of two types. First, the RRB maintains a debt reserve as a guarantee on the waste-to-energy plant bonds. With the re rement of those two bonds it is no longer necessary to maintain that reserve. The RRB has decided to distribute $20 million of that reserve to member ci es to encourage single stream recycling. Coral Springs received $1,714,861 of this distribu on to purchase single steam containers for its residents as well as to fund other related programs.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

The RRB is likely to consider making a recommenda on to the County Commission for a por on of the remaining $40 million debt reserve be distributed to member ci es in propor on to the amount of waste contributed by each city. Coral Springs, for example, would account for approximately 9% of the total. Coral Springs plans to deposit most, if not all, of its share into the General Fund reserve. As of this prin ng, it is uncertain whether the County will release any por on of the debt reserve. The second type of asset which the District must dispose are it’s physical assets such as vehicles and land. There is uncertainty as to the method by which the value of these assets will be distributed to the partner ci es, if at all, but the process will likely require nego a on between the County and Ci es. Solid Waste Tipping Fee With the 2012 re rement of the construc on bond that was used to build the Wheelabrator South Plant and the 2013 re rement of the construc on bond used to build the Wheelabrator North Plant, pping fees have decreased substan ally during the past two years. Tipping fees are simply the rate charged to dump one ton of garbage at the waste disposal site. Tipping fees dropped 27% from $99.20 per ton in Fiscal Year 2011 to $72.57 per ton in Fiscal Year 2012 as a result of re ring the first bond. As a result, the City was able to increase its solid waste franchise fee while s ll saving residents $16.56 on its Solid Waste Special Assessment. Commercial customers saved $0.89 per cubic yard. With the re rement of the second bond in 2013, pping fees will drop to $67.93. However, this pping fee will only be in force during the term of the ILA which is un l July 3, 2013. Broward County and Wheelabrator have agreed on a $42 pping fee a er July 3. Since residents pay a Solid Waste Special Assessment once a year, the City has developed a blended pping fee that takes into account the amount of me the customer will be paying the different pping fees. As a result, the residen al Solid Waste Special Assessment fee will decrease from $233.64 to $227.16 per dwelling unit in FY 2013. Commercial customers will also benefit from a reduc on in pping fees. However, since commercial customers pay as they use the service, the price will change as the pping fee changes. In other words, the price per yard will decrease from $13.05 to $12.98 for the period October 1, 2012, through July 3, 2013, and fall to $12.87 per cubic yard a er July 3, 2013. Solid waste frachise fees will increase from $51.60 to $66 per year for residen al customers. For commercial customers the franchise fee will increase from $2.25 per cubic yard to $2.29 from October 1, 2012, to July 3, 2013, and $3.61 from July 4, 2013, through September 30, 2013. The addi onal revenue resul ng from adjus ng these franchise fees allows the City to close the budget gap –

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without raising taxes – while allowing our customers to share the benefit of reduced pping fees. Single Stream Recycling As men oned previously, the RRB has given the City a $1.7 million grant to purchase single steam containers and fund other related programs. These new containers will be distributed during the winter of 2014. Single stream recycling will help the City reach its goal of recycling 75% of its solid waste stream by 2020. The new recycling containers will be 64-gallon size which is larger than the recycling containers currently in use. Larger containers have the poten al to increase the tonnage of recycled materials cead to higher revenue from the sale of recycled materials. Ul mately, the return on recycled materials is market driven. The City is expec ng recycled material revenue to increase by 7% in Fiscal Year 2013.

Fiscal Year 2013 Capital Improvement Program The Capital Improvement Program (CIP) is a long-range plan for the mely replacement and maintenance of the City’s equipment and facili es. Financing op ons for recommended capital needs are examined to determine the best source for each poten al project including: opera ng fund balances, capital reserves, grant revenue available for capital projects, outstanding debt, and ra ng agency criteria for borrowing. Because capital requests and needs exceed available financing this year, they must to be priori zed. Decisions must be made about which requests to approve and fund in the upcoming year’s capital budget and which to schedule for future considera on and inclusion in the CIP. To do so, the Senior Management Team conducted an exercise that involved reviewing all capital requests with the focus on iden fying projects that are cri cal for the City to implement or con nue in Fiscal Year 2013. Projects were ranked by priority according to specific criteria. The highest priority projects are being proposed for funding in the capital budget. Those are projects that sa sfy a regulatory requirement, are ed to a new ini a ve to maintain or improve standards of service, contribute to enhancing aesthe c value or achieving the City’s strategic goals and objec ves, and maintenance programs to protect the City’s infrastructure.

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As a result of this evalua on, the adopted capital expenditure for Fiscal Year 2013 is programmed at $23,841,975, of which $11.1 million is being recommended for funding capital projects in the General Fund departments, $7.9 million for improvements to the City’s water and wastewater infrastructure, $3.2 million for replacement of City vehicles that otherwise would be more costly to maintain, and for repairs and preven ve maintenance of 25 vehicles with the purpose of extending their useful life. This annual strategy of priori zing the complete fleet inventory and inves ng in preven ve maintenance has saved the City addi onal replacement cost. Grant funds totaling $2.5 million will supplement 10.7% of the total capital investment for this budget year. This funding assistance will be provided by various state, federal, and local grants such as the Resource Recovery Board grant for single stream recycling program. Refer to “Solid Waste” sec on for more informa on on use of Resource Recovery Board Grant funds. In addi on, the City will appropriate $2.1M of capital and debt service reserves to perform maintenance and upkeep of facili es. Opera ng capital is es mated at $803,925 for the General Fund, $1,006,500 for the U li es Fund, $389,800 for the Fire Fund, and $3,162,157 for the Equipment Services Fund. Projects funded by the Tree Trust Fund total $475,000, the Charter School Fund $645,653, and the Public Art Fund $86,500. Water and Sewer impact fees totaling $1.2M will be used to pay for the construc on of water lines into Downtown along with sanitary force mains to service three future li sta ons. In Fiscal Year 2013, the City will issue a $4.7M loan to finance necessary capital enhancements and acquisi ons for the General Fund. Terms of this financing are expected to be between 15-20 years with repayments scheduled to begin in FY 2014; therefore, debt service obliga ons associated with this loan will not affect this year’s budget. Principal and interest payments are programmed in the City’s Five-year-Forecast for the General Fund.

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


rainwater that seeps into cracked and broken clay sewer pipes. In high rainfall years, the volume of wastewater sent for treatment can approach 10% more water than potable water sold to customers due to ground water seepage. In other words, the City is paying to treat rainwater which does not need treatment.

Financing plan for General Fund capital improvements—FY 2013 Sources of funds Capital Fund—Undesignated Fund Balance

$189,000

Facili es Reserve Fund

$1,139,304

Debt Service Reserve Fund

$1,000,000

Grants

$2,536,404

General Fund Opera ng

$803,925

Public Safety G.O.Bond—series 2006

$753,000

Road Impact Fund

As shown in the “Wastewater Treatment Cost” chart, while the number of gallons sent for treatment has remained fairly constant over the last 10 years, the cost to treat that flow has more than doubled from about $1 per 1,000 gallons treated in year 2000 to $1.80 projected by the end of 2012. The City will budget $6.4 million in FY 2013 just for the treatment of wastewater which represents 28.3% of the total water and sewer budget. Clearly, reducing wastewater treatment costs has the greatest poten al for reducing overall costs.

$63,700

Loan

$4,636,532

Total

$11,121,865

Uses of funds Public Safety Building Emergency Preparedness Upgrades Technology

$753,000

Right Turn Lane (Riverside/Shadowwood)

$63,700

Facili es Ongoing Maintenance

$1,501,904

Public Safety (Police & EMS)

$1,548,277

Parks Renova ons/Beau fica on/Aesthe cs

$1,691,596

Aqua cs Complex and Pools Upkeep

The I&I program sends a romote-controlled camera into the sewer pipes. Technicians are able to use this live feed to iden fy cracks, leaks, and root intrusion. Once located, defec ve areas are repaired remotely via inflatable sleeves. This technology is much cheaper than tradi onal detec on and repair methods because it is done without digging.

$388,470

Roads/Bike Paths/Sidewalks/ Parking Lots Improvements

$1,878,500

Single Stream Recycling Program

$1,539,861

Permits/Feasibility Studies Total General Fund CIP—FY 2013

This Business Plan incorporates a strategy for controlling expenses by reducing the amount of wastewater sent to the county for treatment. The City intends to reduce wastewater flows by inves ng in Inflow and Infiltra on (I&I) correc on technology.

$1,645,557

$111,000 $11,121,865

The City’s I&I program started in 2008 but progress has been slow due to resource limita ons. In Fiscal Year 2012, the City will use

Water and Sewer Based on the recommenda ons from the Fiscal Year 2007 Water and Sewer Rate Study, the City replaced its exis ng two- er rate structure with a mul - er, declining fiveblock rate structure for residen al customers designed to encourage conserva on.

Wastewater treatment costs con nue to soar $7,000,000

$0.96

$1.15

$1.19

$1.35

$1.53

$1.62

$1.88

$2.10

$5,893,628

$6,000,000

$5,279,144 $4,983,328

City of Coral Springs, Florida

3,010,009

3,061,419

2,863,923

3,096,615

3,069,405

$2,775,367

2,888,625

$1,000,000

$3,656,997

2002

2004

2006

2008

2009

3,128,012

$2,000,000

$3,482,289

2,516,794

Wastewater Treatment Cost

$3,858,635

$4,000,000

$3,000,000

$5,492,397

$4,738,698

3,132,978

The City will commission a new water and sewer rate study to determine whether the current rate structure will con nue to generate sufficient revenue to support the u lity while also encouraging conserva on.

$5,000,000

Although the City has been successful in controlling most opera onal costs in its U lity, wastewater treatment costs con nue to rise. Wastewater is sent to Broward County for treatment. Wastewater originates in homes and business but also includes

$1.76

2010

2011

2012

$0 2000

cost per gallon

# of Gallons Treated

Waste Water Charges

123


approximately $1.5 million in low-interest loans from the Florida Department of Environmental Protec on wastewater program to jump start its I&I program. In Fiscal Year 2013 the U lity will invest another $1 million toward elimina ng inflow and infiltra on thereby further reducing wastewater treatment costs. The County has no fied ci es of a proposed amendment to the schedule of charges for debt service for treatment, transmission, and disposal services. Coral Springs’ share of the new debt obliga ons will be $366,000 per year. To cover this, and other, cost increases the City will increase water and sewer rates by 3% effec ve October 1, 2012. This rate adjustment will result in a $1.82 monthly increase for the average residence. Funding Infrastructure Improvements The City’s water and sewer infrastructure requires ongoing repair and maintenance to ensure the safe, efficient opera on of the u lity. To meet these capital requirements, the City has taken out $19 million in low-interest loans from the Florida Department of Environmental Protec on’s Drinking Water and Clean Water State Revolving Fund programs betwenn 2008 and 2012. Beginning in FY 2013, the annual debt service on these SRF loans will total just over $1 million.

As shown in the debt service chart, the 2010 Water and Sewer Refunding debt will be re red in FY 2013. The City will be able to devote some of the $2.7 million it had been using to pay this debt service to equity fund future capital projects. In fact, the City will use $3.2 million in undesignated capital reserves to finance the following capital projects in FY 2013, thereby avoiding debt service: • $1 million for ongoing inflow and infiltra on correc on program to prevent ground water from seeping into sewer lines. • $850,000 for replacement of galvanized water pipes throughout the City’s u lity service area. This on-going replacement plan seeks to minimize service interrpu ons due to water line breaks. • $300,000 for security improvements at the Water Treatment Plant. • $250,000 for the design of the rehabilita on of raw water supply wells and wellheads. • $250,000 for replacement and maintenance of valves, pumps, and li sta on isola on valves. Scheduled replacement of these components prevents sewer overflow and interrup on of opera ons.

Water and Sewer Debt service will peak in FY 2013 SRF Loans

Revenue Bond

$3,307,200

$4,500,000 $4,000,000 $3,500,000

$1,707,433

$1,004,138

$1,233,172

$1,233,172

$1,233,172

$1,233,172

$1,233,172

FY 2013

FY 2014

FY 2015

FY 2016

FY 2017

FY 2018

$1,500,000 $1,000,000

$1,499,205

$1,054,290

$2,000,000

$834,956

$2,500,000

$1,279,871

$3,000,000 $2,775,867

Principal & Interest Payments

$5,000,000

$500,000 $0

$201,046

FY 2012

124

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Pension Status

$7.7 million in the first five years and 19 million over the first ten years using the EAN methodology.

Police Pension City contribu ons to the police pension plan have increased from $5.8 million in Fiscal Year 2009 to $13.0 million in Fiscal Year 2012. The City’s contribu on toward a police officer’s pension as a percentage of his or her salary increased from less than 10% in 2001 to 50% in 2004. This contribu on level remained constant un l 2007 when it began to climb to its current rate of over 80%. With nearly 12% of the en re Fiscal Year 2012 General Fund budget devoted to police pensions, these increases were simply not sustainable. In May 2011, the City opened nego a ons with the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 87 to design a benefit to reduce the City’s future pension Annual Required Contribu on (ARC) while providing a re rement plan that is fair and equitable to our officers. On July 16, 2012, the City and FOP presented a joint recommenda on for the resolu on of impasse to the City Commission which it accepted at a Special Commission Mee ng. The terms of that agreement are outlined in the table below,

Mul plier Maximum Benefit Normal Re rement Compensa on

Compensa on Calcula on Cost of Living Adjustment Employee Contribu on

Current Benefit 3.5% 87.5% 20 years of service regardless of age or age 55 with 10 years of service Base salary plus up to 14.5% of addi onal compensa on with a maximum of 300 hours over me Average of top 3 years 2.5% annually 9.875%

Firefighter Pension

As a rela vely new pension plan, the Firefighter Pension Plan was not as severely impacted as the Police Pension Plan. For example, while approximately 7.9% of the Police Officers’ Pension Plan ARC is the result of investment losses, it is just 1.17% in the Firefighters’ Plan. The ARC for the Firefighters’ Plan increased from $2.89 million in Fiscal Year 2009 to $3.23 million in Fiscal Year 2011. This increase was primarily the result of adding a new benefit - 1% Prospec ve Benefit* annual COLA to begin 5 years a er 3.0% re rement. This plan has an 80% funded 75% or $110,000 ra o as compared to a 58% funded ra o for the Police Officers Plan.

25 years of service regardless of age or age 55 with 10 years of service Base salary only

Average of top 4 years 1% annually a er a 5-year delay 8.0%

*All Police Officers hired on or a er October 1, 2012

These changes are expected to reduce the City’s contribu on from $13 million in Fiscal Year 2012 to $9.2 million in Fiscal Year 2013 using the Frozen Ini al Liability (FIL) methodology. In Fiscal Year 2012, the Police Pension Board approved a shi to the Entry Age Normal (EAN) methodology. Using EAN, the City’s contribu on will decrease from $10.4 million in Fiscal Year 2012 to $8.7 million in Fiscal Year 2013. This plan is expected to save

City of Coral Springs, Florida

The City an cipates it could lose its $893,477 annual contribu on from the State Chapter 185 due to the reduc on of benefits below 1999 levels. The City and FOP have agreed that should the City become eligible to receive 185 due to legisla ve reform, these monies will be deposited directly in the Police Officers’ Pension Plan, without the need to impact bargaining. Toward that end, staff will con nue to work with the Florida League of Ci es, the Broward League of Ci es, and with other interested par es to advocate for legisla on that will provide the needed flexibility for ci es to provide compe ve benefits to their employees while retaining state funding.

General Employee Re rement Plans The City has two different re rement plans for its general employees. First, the General Employees’ Re rement Plan is a closed plan. No new par cipants have been allowed to enter the plan since January 1, 1988. This is a defined benefit plan with 51 re rees or beneficiaries currently drawing or eligible to draw benefits. The Plan enjoys a 69% funded ra o. Its ARC has been roughly $500,000 per year and is unlikely to deviate appreciably from that figure in the future.

Second, the City provides a defined contribu on plan for general employees not covered under the plan discussed above. This plan offers a general employee and a management op on. Under the general employee op on, the City contributes 7% of each par cipant’s salary with the par cipant having the op on of contribu ng 6%, 8%, or 10% of earnings. Under the management plan, the City contributes 11% of each par cipant’s salary with the par cipant having the op on of contribu ng 0%, 5%, or 10% of earnings. Since the incep on of the plan, the City has made and will con nue to contribute 100% of its annual obliga on.

125


Fire Fund As municipali es reduce the number of firefighters they hire, the number of cadets entering the Fire Academy falls, which, in turn, leads to decreased Fire Academy tui on revenue. Overall, tui on revenue dropped 42% from a high of $1.38 million in Fiscal Year 2008 to a year-end projec on of $800,000 in Fiscal Year 2012. Tradi onally, this revenue was used to offset the cost of providing fire services. As this revenue declines, however, increased fire assessment fees charged to users of the service must make up the difference. To counteract this decline, the Fire Department and the Communica ons and Marke ng Department will join forces to develop an adver sing campaign to promote the academy’s services to men and women interested in pursuing a career in the fire service.

Grant Program AFG

AFG AFG AFG EMS

EMS Total

Item Driving Simulator for Fire Training Center 20 No Smoke Systems 20 Dry Suits for Dive Team Dive Boat 4 video laryngoscopes

3 chest compression devices

Grant $

City Match $

Total Cost (est.)

$289,036

$72,259

$361,295

$140,000

$35,000

$175,000

$40,000

$10,000

$50,000

$8,000

$2,000

$10,000

$42,600

$14,200

$56,800

$36,675

$12,225

$48,900

$556,311

$145,684

$701,995

Coral Springs has one of the lowest fire assessment Fees for a single-family home in the area, even with an increase of $9.33 or 7.2%. The City pays the fire assessment fee on behalf of schools and houses of worship that are exempt from this assessment. This subsidy represents a $959,675 cost to the General Fund in Fiscal Year 2013. Since this is one of the categories of users which has experienced a growing number of calls for service over the past four years, the subsidy paid by the City’s General Fund will increase by 4% in Fiscal Year 2013. With the comple on of Fire Sta on 71, three of the City’s five fire sta ons have been renovated or completely rebuilt to make them suitable for a full- me, professional department rather than a volunteer force. The City will begin planning for the renova on of the remaining two sta ons. In Fiscal Year 2012, a FEMA Assistance to Firefighters Grant (AFG) was awarded to the City for the purchase of health and safety equipment for the Fire Department, as detailed below. In addi on, the City received two EMS matching grants from the Florida Department of Health for the purchase of video laryngoscopes and chest compression devices. An applica on was also submi ed under FEMA’s Staffing for Adequate Fire & Emergency Response (SAFER) grant program to fund the addi on of four new firefighters. The City will con nue to aggressively pursue grant opportuni es to supplement the cost of necessary capital improvement projects for the Fire Department.

126

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Measuring Results Quarterly Performance Review Overview The City has developed a performance measurement and management system to align department services and programs with the City Commission’s seven strategic priori es. The system enables departments to systema cally measure results and make mely adjustments when results fall short of expected performance levels. Three components make up the system: a quarterly performance repor ng program, a composite index that measures the overall financial and service opera on posi on, and the State of the City report. These elements play an important part in the City’s overall Business Plan and help keep the organiza on on target. Departmental Measures A total of 108 performance measures have been established to measure results achieved through services and programs provided by the City’s 12 opera ng and support departments. Four of the performance measures double as Key Intended Outcomes (KIOs) and are discussed in the KIO Analysis. Sixty (55%) of the measures met their goals for Fiscal Year 2012, and ten more (9%) were within 95% of their goal. Ten goals are not being reported this year, as they are dependent upon results of the Resident Survey which was not conducted this year. Informa on on six more goals was not available due to changes in repor ng methods or so ware. Twenty-two goals, or 20% were not achieved. Half of these goals will be discon nued beginning Fiscal Year 2013 and most have been replaced with different measures that are more relevant to current departmental opera ons. Some of the remaining unmet goals have been revised to more realis c levels based upon the current economy.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Key Intended Outcome Analysis and Current Ini a ve Update Twenty-six Key Intended Outcomes (KIOs) have been established, all of which support at least one of the seven strategic priori es. Performance goals for each KIO were developed as part of the City Commission’s Fiscal Years 2012-2013 Strategic Plan. As of the end of Fiscal Year 2012, ten of those goals have been met, and seven are not being reported this year since they are based on results of the resident survey that was not conducted this year. Informa on for the employee sa sfac on goal is not yet available due to the ming of the employee survey. Informa on for the goal regarding test scores for Coral Springs Charter School is not available due to a change in the tests administered by the Florida Department of Educa on; as a result, this goal has been revised for Fiscal Year 2013. Seven goals for the year have not been achieved. The business survey ra ng of the City’s communica on with businesses was 81% compared to the goal of 88%. In the coming year, the City will be improving its methods of communica ng with local businesses to be er conform with those used by the businesses. The City’s crime rate for calendar year 2011 was higher than goal. The increase was par ally due to a decrease in popula on, and par ally due to an increase in burglaries. The newly-formed BEAR unit will address this problem. The level of volunteer ac vity con nues to be in a trough, which has affected two KIOs. Both the total number of volunteer hours and the number of teen volunteer hours were 92% of their goal levels. Both goals have been revised downward for Fiscal Year 2013. The number of youths in City-sponsored leadership opportuni es did not meet its goal of 2,000 students. Increased par cipa on in the youth mentoring program was not enough to offset the decline in youth par cipa on in the Mar n Luther King ac vi es, which is the single largest youth leadership program sponsored by the City.

127


The number of trees planted is likely to fall short of the goal of 1,750 due to the lower level of development and redevelopment ac vity in the City. Goals for both these KIOs have also been revised for Fiscal Year 2013. The number of students a ending higher-educa on courses at partner ins tu ons did not meet its goal as a result of the delays in the opening of the Broward College campus in Coral Springs Business Survey Results In the spring of 2012, ETC Ins tute administered a phone survey to a random sample of 401 businesses in the City of Coral Springs. The purpose of the survey was to gather feedback from business owners and senior managers to help iden fy ways to improve the quality of City services to those businesses. A survey of business owners was last performed in 2008. Overall, results of the survey were posi ve. Businesses are sa sfied with City services and perceive the City as being friendly to business. Ninety-five percent of the businesses surveyed felt the quality of City services was higher than or mee ng their expecta ons. Overall sa sfac on with City services has improved since the last survey in 2008, and

the percentage who gave “very good” ra ngs for customer service increased significantly from 40% in 2008 to 61% in 2012. The respondents ranked the following City services or departments as most important to their organiza on: • Fire inspec on – 49% • Police – 48% • Business tax – 28% • EMS – 18% • Code enforcement – 18% Survey recommenda ons include: con nuing to give high priority to public safety and enhancing the overall image of the City, finding ways to improve the code enforcement process for businesses, and improving awareness in the business community about the types of services available to them through the City’s web site. All of the KIO results and ini a ves for Fiscal Year 2012 are summarized on the following pages and in the appendix.

Sa sfac on with items that influence percep ons of Coral Springs QualityofnewdevelopmentintheCity

29%

34%

Qualityofpubliceducation

36%

Overallfeelingofsafety

36%

26%

37%

11%

17%

45%

10%

14% 6%

OverallimageoftheCity

50%

37%

10% 4%

Overallqualityoflife

50%

38%

9% 4%

0% VerySatisfied

Satisfied

20%

40% Neutral

60%

80%

100%

Dissatisfied

Source: ETC Ins tute, 2012 Business Survey

128

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Supplier and Partner Performance Data

Sustainability Index In Fiscal Year 2009, the City created a Sustainability Index to track a broad spectrum of green and sustainability benchmarks. This tool lines up with our Neighborhood and Environmental Sustainability strategic priority. During Fiscal Year 2011, the index was refined by assigning weights to index items according to their rela ve importance. The indicators of fuel use, electricity use, and paper consump on carry the greatest weights because they impact not only our environment, but directly affect City expenditures as well. A total index value of over 100 indicates progress in improving the environmental sustainability of City programs and opera ons.

The City’s most important suppliers, partners, collaborators, and distributors are those that provide direct service to customers. Waste Management, Inc. picks up and processes trash and recycling. Professional Facili es Management operates the Coral Springs Center for the Arts. Charter Schools U.S.A. manages and staffs the City’s charter middle and high school. Advanced Cable Communica ons provides the infrastructure for television programming. Median mowing is accomplished through a group of contractors. Service standards are part of the contracts with these organiza ons; the standards spell out customer requirements and are discussed through periodic regularly scheduled mee ngs. For instance, Public Works management meets quarterly with Waste Management to review performance data and exchange informa on and ideas on opera ons. City management meets quarterly with the principals of schools in the City to assess our partnership with them regarding athle c field use, a er school programs, leadership development, etc.

Since the index is fairly new, the Fiscal Year 2011 results offered us the first opportunity to evaluate our overall performance. Results for 2011 were buoyed by strong performance of two index items: linear feet of sidewalk improvements and number of trees planted. Fiscal Year 2012 results show a decline, primarily due to fuel and paper consump on. Paper consump on is lower than in FY 2011, but is s ll well above the base level. Fuel consump on has increased steadily since 2009. Part of this increase for both 2011 and 2012 can be a ributed to Community Pride and Code Ranger ini a ves. Several addi onal vehicles were purchased in FY 2012, which accounts for another por on of the fuel increase. On a posi ve note, replacement of older air condi oning systems with those that are more energy-efficient has allowed us to achieve an encouraging reduc on in electricity use.

Sustainability Index 2008-2012 Actual 2008 6,873 3,000

Actual 2009 3,491 2,000

Actual 2010 2,061 2,000

Actual 2011 2,118 2,000

27 73

46 73

15 73

6 73

12 73

0.25000

3 Biodiversityindexforenvironmentalsites (SandyRidge,PineFlats,RedLichen,CypressGateway) Baseequalsactualnumberfor2008,notmeasuredbefore

0.80 0.80

0.80 0.80

0.79 0.80

0.79 0.80

0.79 0.80

0.50000

4 Percentageof"GreenBuilding"checklistitemsfulfilled Baseequalsactualnumberfor2008,notmeasuredbefore

25% 25%

29% 25%

30% 25%

26% 25%

26% 25%

0.50000

5 AverageDailypercapitaconsumptionofpotablewater(gallonsused) Baseequalsactualnumberfor2007

93 103

97 103

89 103

93 103

89 103

1.00000

13,506,275 13,506,275

12,913,802 13,506,275

12,852,467 13,506,275

13,476,300 13,108,338 13,506,275 13,506,275

1.83334

4,750,000 4,750,000

5,600,000 4,750,000

5,000,000 4,750,000

5,600,000 4,750,000

5,200,000 4,750,000

1.58333

386,325 386,325

384,440 386,325

389,180 386,325

408,467 386,325

425,435 386,325

1.83333

9 Linearfeetofimprovedornewbikelanes,sidewalks,pathways BaseequalsKIOforrespectiveyear

500 500

3,678 500

3,866 2,500

15,674 2,500

6,179 2,500

0.25000

10 NumberofCSresidentsdroppingoffhouseholdhazardouswaste Baseequalsactualnumberfor2008,notmeasuredbefore

827 827

881 827

966 827

875 827

910 827

1.00000

115.5

124.4

103.7

109.4

97.2

1 Numberoftreesplanted BaseequalsKIOforrespectiveyear 2 NumberofCertifiedBackyardHabitats Baseequalsactualnumberfor2007

6 KwHofelectricityusedinselectCityfacilities (Aquatics,FireTraining,CityHallN&S,CharterSchool,Gymnasium, TennisClubhouse,PublicSafetyBldg.,UtilityPlant) Baseequalsactualnumberfor2008,notmeasuredbefore 7 Sheetsofwhitecopierpaperused Baseequalsactualnumberfor2008,notmeasuredbefore 8 FuelConsumedbyCityOperations(dieselandunleaded) Baseequalsactualnumberfor2008

Totalindexvalue

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Actual 2012 Goal 1,185 1,750

Weight 1.25000

For Fiscal Year 2013, an ini a ve to increase the number of cer fied backyard habitats should provide some improvement to the index total. Stronger efforts to reduce fuel and paper consump on are needed, and base (target) levels for those items will be evaluated to determine if they need adjustment.

129


Composite Index

Composite Index

The Composite Index comprises ten indicators, carefully chosen to give an overall snapshot of our financial and opera ng results. The Composite Index score is projected to remain steady in Fiscal Year 2013, primarily because of the increase in residen al property value. A chart and descrip on for each indicator is presented on the following two pages.

175

150

136.7 120.7

125

141.1

140.9

145.6

151.4

156.8

160

162.4

162

161.8

158.5

158.8

158.4

126.5

75

Projected

Projected

100

50

25

0 FY1999 FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013

Residen al Property Values

Good

$9.0 $8.3

$7.0

$6.5

$6.2

$5.7

$6.0

$5.4

$5.2 $5.0 $4.0

Source: Broward County Property Appraiserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office

$7.7

$5.4

$5.5

Projected

$7.6

Projected

Billions $8.0

$4.7 $3.6

$3.7

$4.0

$4.3

$3.0 $2.0

(Propertyvalues reflectcalendar yearratherthan fiscalyear.)

Residen al taxable assessed property values decreased dras cally in Fiscal Years 2010 and 2011. The decrease is due to property tax legisla on passed in January 2008 and is indica ve of the na onal recession which began in 2008. Values remained steady for Fiscal Year 2012 and are expected to increase slightly for Fiscal Year 2013.

$1.0 $0.0 FY1999 FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013

Non-Residen al Property Values 30%

27.9% Asa%ofTotalPropertyValues

25% 21.2% 20%

15%

22.1%

22.9%

23.8%

23.6%

22.6%

22.1%

21.2%

28.8% 27.4%

26.5%

21.9% 20.1%

Source:Broward CountyProperty Appraiserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office

19.7%

Projected

The decrease in residen al property values (see chart above) caused the increase in nonresiden al as a percentage of total value. Nonresiden al includes commercial/industrial sites, as well as agricultural, ins tu onal, government and miscellaneous real estate. As residen al values improve, non-residen al values should ease back to about 20%.

Good

10% (Property valuesreflect calendaryear ratherthan fiscalyear.)

5%

0% FY1999 FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013

130

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Customer Sa sfac on 100% 91%

93%

90%

92%

93%

93%

95%

95%

93%

93%

92%

92%

95%

95%

92%

20%

0%

Projected

40%

Nosurveyconducted;usedprioryearresult

60%

Nosurveyconducted;usedprioryearresult

80% Nosurveyconducted;usedprioryearresult

The City has consistently received high ra ngs in customer sa sfac on from our residents. The overall sa sfac on ra ng decreased in Fiscal Year 2009, yet ra ngs for departments and services increased. Results from the 2011 survey show a return to record high levels. In an effort to save money, the Residen al Survey is being conducted every other year.

Good

Source:2011 Resident Survey conductedby ETCInstitute.

FY1999 FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013

Crime Rate

Good

4,500

Incidentsofmajorcrimesper100,000population

2530.0

2688.8

2469.4

2559.1

2530.1

2583.9

2500.5

2259.3

2,000

2731.4

3085.5

3193.5

2,500

3001.2

3390.1

3,000

3506.9

3,500

3987.6

4,000

1,500

Projected

1,000 500

The incidents of major crimes per 100,000 popula on increased. This is due to a 4% rise Source: in the number of indexed crimes (3,271 from CityofCoral SpringsPolice Departmentand 3,145) coupled with a lower popula on number. Florida Departmentof The 2010 Census for Coral Springs was 4% less LawEnforcement than prior es mates by BEBR. The new burglary CrimeReport reduc on unit is intended to prevent crimes. (Crimefigures arecalculated utilizingcalendar yearratherthan fiscalyear)

0 FY1999 FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013

The rise in the crime rate from FY 2009 to FY 2010 was the result of a mathema cal anomaly. While the number of crimes decreased during this period, the popula on upon which the ra o is based decreased at a faster rate.

Athle c League Par cipants 14,000 12,500 12,636 12,000

11,757

11,624

10,855 10,959

11,150 10,151 9,500 8,763

8,500 7,792

8,000

8,158

8,200

8,200

Projected

10,000

Projected

Some of the ac vi es offered by the Parks and Recrea on Department are basketball, soccer, football, baseball, roller hockey, lacrosse, and cheerleading. Independent teams and programs, though not counted in this measure, also u lize City facili es. The decline in FY 2011 was due primarily to the number of par cipants moving from recrea onal leagues to more compe ve travel leagues, whose par cipants are not included in this measure.

Good

6,000

4,000

2,000

Source: CityofCoral SpringsParks andRecreation Department

0 FY1999 FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013

Accidents at Major Intersec ons 140

169 160 147 138 130

131

132 122

120

123

123

120

124

124

124

Projected

160

Projected

180

Good

116

100 80 60 40 20

Source: CityofCoral SpringsPolice Department TrafficDivision

The number of accidents at 16 major intersec ons is tracked and analyzed to reveal trends and to iden fy which methods are effec ve at reducing the number of crashes. Overall, this measure has been trending downward since Fiscal Year 1994. It is projected that the number of accidents at major intersec ons will not exceed 124 during the fiscal year based on current trends.

0 FY1999 FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013

City of Coral Springs, Florida

131


Volunteers in Government

Good

458 410

431

463

494

479 454

519

509

520

520

Projected

500

Projected

600

463

404

400

300

303 266

200 Source: Databaseof Boardsand Committees

100

The number of volunteers in government reached an all- me high of 519 for Fiscal Year 2010. The slight decline in FY 2011 was expected. We an cipate the number of volunteers increasing in FYs 2012 and 2013 because of the City’s 50th Anniversary events. Members of our commi ees and boards are counted as volunteers for this indicator.

0 FY1999 FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013

Employee Sa sfac on 100% 91%

95%

95%

93%

91%

94%

95%

97%

95%

95%

97% 90%

90%

90%

Projected

92%

Projected

All employees are surveyed annually by the Human Resources Department to determine overall job sa sfac on. The decline in sa sfac on for FY 2011 is likely due to increased employee work loads that began in FY 2009 and the wage freeze in FY 2010.

Good

80%

60%

40%

Source: CityofCoral SpringsHuman Resources Department Employee Survey

20%

0% FY1999 FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013

Employee Produc vity

Good It will take fewer than six full- me employees to generate one million dollars of revenue, down from 10.91 in Fiscal Year 1994.

12.0 EmployeesPerMillionDollarsofRevenue 10.0 8.78 7.96

8.0

6.0

7.61

7.25

7.17

6.94

6.57

6.39

5.97

5.77

5.77

5.60

5.39

5.13

5.24

Projected

4.0

2.0

Source: Financial Services AnnualBudget (Calculation includesfullͲ time employeesfor allfunds dividedbyNet Revenues)

0.0 FY1999 FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013

School Overcrowding Overcrowding has con nually decreased for Coral Springs schools since FY 2002. Enrollment and capacity numbers are provided by the Broward County School District.

Good

150%

Source: Broward County School Board

%CapacityStudentStations 125%

119%

122%

122%

123% 113%

114%

112% 104%

100%

96%

95%

92%

92%

93%

92%

92%

50%

25%

Projected

75%

(Percentages reflect academicyear ratherthan fiscalyear.)

0% FY1999 FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013

132

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Fiscal Year 2012 KIO Summary FY2010 Actual

FY2011 Actual

FY2012 Goal

FY2012 Actual

CustomerͲInvolvedGovernment(8) 1 OverallqualityratingforCityservicesandprograms(ResidentSurvey)

92%

95%

2 OverallqualityratingforCityservicesbybusinessowners(BusinessSurvey)

93%

93%

92%

97% 41,567

90% 37,504

90% 42,000

5 OverallratingoftheCityintermsofcommunicatingwithresidents(ResidentSurvey)

86%

93%

6 OverallratingoftheCityintermsofcommunicatingwithbusinesses(BusinessSurvey)

88%

88%

88%

7 Customerserviceratingbyresidents(ResidentSurvey)

89%

94%

8 Customerserviceratingbybusinesses(BusinessSurvey)

97%

97%

90%

97% 3

90%

90%

75%

80% 3

15

15

15

3 Numberofvolunteerhoursaimedatenhancingtheenvironment

590.25

545.5

1,500.0

2,196 3

4 Citycrimerate(crimes/100,000residents—CalendarYear)

2,559.8

2,469.4

2,530.0

2,688.8 2

93%

95%

2,061

2,118

1,750

3 Employeesatisfactionrating(HumanResourcesSurvey) 4 NumberofcitizenvolunteerhoursdonatedtotheCityofCoralSprings

N/R N/R 95% 3 N/A N/A 38,943 2 N/R N/R 81% 2 N/R N/R

NeighborhoodandEnvironmentalSustainability(6) 1 PercentofCodecasesbroughtintovoluntarycompliancepriortoadmin./judicialprocess 2 Numberofformalandinformalneighborhoodpartnershipseachyear

5 Safetyratinginneighborhood(ResidentSurvey) 6 NumberoftreesplantedwithintheCity

15 3

N/R N/R 1,185 2

FinancialHealthandEconomicDevelopment(3) 1 MaintainCitybondratingsMoodyAaa,FitchAAA,S&PAAA

MoodyAaa MoodyAaa

2 Residents'valuerating(ResidentSurvey)

MoodyAaa MoodyAaa

FitchAAA

FitchAAA

FitchAAA

S&PAAA 77%

S&PAAA 72%

S&PAAA —

27.9%

28.8%

20.0%

3 NonͲresidentialvalueasapercentoftotaltaxablevalue

FitchAAA 3 S&PAAA N/R N/R 27.4% 3

Traffic,MobilityandConnectivity(2) 15,674

2,500

6,179 3

87,513 88,299

85,000

97,060 3

1 Numberoflinearfeetofimprovedsidewalks,bikepaths,andbikelanes

3,866

2 Numberofridersonintracitybusroutes

YouthDevelopmentandFamilyValues(3) 1,484

1,602

2,000

21,432

18,424

20,000

1,446 2 18,473 2

18

14

15

15 3

94%

98%

N/R N/R

95%

98%

N/R N/R

1 Achievegainsinmath/readingmeanscalescoreattheCharterSchool

1.0%

0.4%

0.6%

N/A N/A

2 Numberofstudentsattendingcoursesofferedbypartneringinstitutesofhighereducation

2,468 2,531

3,000

1 NumberofyouthsinvolvedinCitysponsoredleadershipopportunities 2 NumberofteenvolunteerhoursdonatedtotheCityofCoralSprings 3 NumberofmiddleschoolafterͲschoolprogramsofferedannually 

StrengthinDiversity(2) 1 MinorityresidentswhofeelthattheCityisagreatplacetolive(ResidentSurvey) CitizenratingofCityGovernmentforrespectingreligiousandethnicdiversity(Resident 2 Survey)

ExcellenceinEducation(2) 1,995 2

Note:PriorBusinessSurveyconductedinFY2008.ReportedFY2008BusinessSurveyResultsasActualsforFY2010andFY2011.

FiscalYear2012YearͲEndResults Metorexceededgoal Notreported Notavailable

City of Coral Springs, Florida

3

10 7 2

N/R N/A

Didnotmeetgoal

7

2

Total

26

133


Sportsplex/Tennis

Aquatics

Parks & Recreationn

Information Service ces

Human Resourcess

Fire/EMS

Police

Financial Servicess

Public Works

No or Low Impact- Blank

Development Servvices

Legend: Direct Impact- ~ Indirect Impact-{

City Manager's Offfice

Department Impact of Key Intended Outcomes for Fiscal Years 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ 2013

Customer-Involved Government Overall quality rating for City services and programs (Resident Survey)

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Overall quality rating for City services by business owners (Business Survey) Employee satisfaction rating (Human Resources Survey) Number of citizen volunteer hours Overall rating of the City in terms of communicating with residents (Resident Survey) Overall rating of the City in terms of communicating with businesses (Business Survey) Customer service rating by residents (Resident Survey) Customer service rating by businesses (Business Survey)

~ { ~ ~ ~ ~

~ { ~ ~ ~ ~

{ { { { { {

~ ~ { ~ { { ~ { { { ~ { ~ {

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ { ~ ~ ~ ~

~ { ~ ~ ~ ~

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

~ { ~ ~ ~ ~

~ { ~ ~ ~ ~

~ { ~ ~ ~ ~

~ { ~ ~ ~ ~

~ { ~ ~ ~ ~

~ { ~ ~ ~ ~

Neighborhood and Environmental Vitality Percent of Code cases brought into voluntary compliance prior to administrative/judicial process Number of formal and informal neighborhood partnerships each year Number of volunteer hours aimed at enhancing the environment City crime rate (crimes per 100,000 residents) Safety rating in neighborhood Number of trees planted within the City

{ { { { { { { { ~

Financial Health and Economic Development General obligation 'AAA' rating Residents' value rating (Resident Survey) Non-residential value as percent of total taxable value

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ { { { { { ~ ~ { ~ { { { { { { { ~ { ~

Traffic, Mobility and Connectivity Number of linear feet of improved sidewalks, bike paths, and bike lanes Number of riders on intracity bus routes

{ ~ {

{ ~

Youth Development and Family Values Number of youths involved in City-sponsored leadership opportunities Number of teen volunteer hours Number of middle school after-school programs offered annually

{

{

~

~

{ { { { ~ { { { { { { { ~ { {

Strength in Diversity Minority residents who feel that the City is a great place to live (Resident Survey) Citizen rating of City Government for respecting religious and ethnic diversity (Resident Survey)

~ ~ ~ { ~ ~ ~ { ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ { ~ ~ ~ { ~ ~ ~

Excellence in Education Achieve gains in math/reading mean scale score at the Charter School Number of students attending courses offered by partnering institutes of higher education

134

~

{

~ {

{

{ { { {

{ { {

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Department Performance Measurements DepartmentPerformanceMeasurements FY2010 YearEnd Actual Police(10) 1 Policedepartment’soverallqualityrating(ResidentSurvey) Percentageofcustomerswhohascontactwithorknowtheirneighborhoodofficers(Resident 2 Survey) 3 AveragePoliceresponsetime 4 Averagenumberoffalsealarms(businesses&residences) 5 Volunteerhoursdonatedbyboardandcommitteemembers 6 PercentageofresidentswhofeelthatCoralSpringshasremainedassafe orbecomeasaferplacetolive(ResidentSurvey) 7 Stabilizetheburglaryrateata0%increaseadjustedforpopulationͲCal.Yr 8 Maintain0%increaseincrimerateasadjustedforpopulationͲCal.Yr. 9 Clearancerateforcrimes 10 Trafficcrashesper1,000citizensͲCal.Yr. NumberofstudentsthatparticipateinYouthMentoringProgram 11 (programdiscontinuedduringFY2011) Fire/EMS(8) 1 Averageresponsetimeofeightminutesorlessfor90%ofservicecalls 2 Aminimumoffourteenfirefightersonscenewithintenminutes90%oftimefor allstructurefires 3 Amaximumofcustomercomplaintsand/orpublicsafetyservice professionalcomplaintsoflessthanonepercentofthetotalcallvolume 4 Medicalcomplaintsfiledbymedicaldirectorand/ormedicalpersonnel athospitalswillbelessthanonepercentofthetotalcallvolume 5 Provideinspectionreporttocustomerwithin12daysfromdateofinspection 6 MinimumofFloridaFirefighterMinimumStandardsclasses 7 andEMTclasses 8 Firedepartment'soverallqualityrating(ResidentSurvey)[revisedFY2009] PublicWorks(12) 1 PublicWorksdepartmentoverallqualityservicerating(ResidentSurvey) NumberofcomplaintsfromresidentialcustomersaboutWasteManagement 2 per10,000pickups 3 Availabilityrateofallvehicles/equipmentforalldepartments 4 CompleteroutineFacilitiesworkorderswithin15workingdays90%ofthetime 5 Custodialservicesexpenditurespersquarefeet 6 Percentageofhydrantsoutofservicemorethan20days 7 Potholerepairresponsetime 8

Operatingcostsperlanemileforstreetsweeping

9

PercentofStreetsDivision'savailablestaffhoursforpreventivemaintofCity'sinfrastructure

10 11 12

Averagelessthan9.79mgdofwastewaterflowonaquarterlybasis Waterusagepercapita(forCoralSpringsWaterDistrict) Percentof"unaccountedfor"water

City of Coral Springs, Florida

FY2011 YearEnd Actual

95%

48%

4:58 4,854 6,166 —

4:45 4,323 4,969 74%

15.60% Ͳ0.19% 1.07% Ͳ3.70% 29.20% 26.30% 31 30 21

N/R

FY2012 YearͲEnd Goal —

FY2012 YearEnd Actual —

N/R

— 5:00 4,000 5,500 —

— 4:47 4,372 5,423 —

N/R

0% 0% 28% 35

28.18% 8.88% 27.00% 32

10

3 2 c N/R

2 2 c

3

25

3

88.2% 100.0%

88.8% 100.0%

90% 90%

93% 100%

3 3

0.00%

0.00%

<1%

0.00%

3

0.00%

0.00%

<1%

0.00%

3

6days 11 4 —

8days 8 5 99%

12days 8 5 —

8days 7 5 —

3 2 3 N/R

93%

N/R

1.82

2.27

<6

1.30%

98% 98% $1.19 0% 2days

97% 98% $1.24 0% 2days

92% 92% $1.61 <1% 3days

$30

$30

$30

41% 8.58 89.31 5.0%

31% 30% 6.90 <9.79 94.09 100gal/day 8.5% <10%

97% 97% $1.24 0% 1.5days

3 3 3 3 3 3

$30

3

29% 8.58 93.03 9.23%

c

3 3 3

135


Department Performance Measurements (con nued) DepartmentPerformanceMeasurements FY2010 YearEnd Actual DevelopmentServices(16) 1 CommunityDevelopmentsatisfactionrating 2 CycletimeforsmallpermitsbytheZoningDivision(BuildingPlanReview) 3 CycletimeforsignpermitsbytheZoningDivision(BuildingPlanReview) 4 CycletimeforplanreviewsbytheZoningDivision(DRC) 5 ComprehensivePlanconsistencywithDepartmentofCommunityAffairs 6 NumberofappealsonArchitecturalReview(ARC) Numberofhousingunitsrehabilitatedusingpublicfinancialassistanceper$100,000 7 housingrehabilitation 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

Averagenumberofdaysfromapplicationforrehabilitationassistancetocompletionof rehabilitationwork TimelinessratioofCDBGspending:annualCDBGallocationavailablebyJuly31 Numberofformalandinformalneighborhoodpartnershipseachyear(KIO) NumberoftreesplantedwithintheCity(KIO) Requestedbuildinginspectionswithinoneday Percentofplanreviewscompletedwithin15days Percentofcodecasesbroughtintovoluntarycompliancepriortoadmin/judicialprocess(KIO) (calculationmethodrevisedduringFY2012;FY2011and2012resultsadjusted)

PercentofsurveyrespondentssatisfiedwithCityeffortsatmaintainingqualityoftheir neighborhoods(ResSurvey)

InformationServices(5) 1 NumberofISDevelopmentProjectsimplementedinaccordancewithCity’sBusinessPlan andISWorkProgram 2 3 4 5

Meetservicelevelagreementregardingsystemavailability Meetservicelevelagreementregardingresponseandresolutiontoreportedproblems Meetservicelevelagreementregarding“ondemandservicerequests” CustomersatisfactionratingfromtransactionsurveyofInformationServices (switchedfromannualtotransactionsurveyinFY2010)

ParksandRecreationͲParks(4) 1 Qualityserviceratingforrecreation/athleticfacilities(ResidentSurvey) 2 Customerserviceratingforparks&recreationstaff(ResidentSurvey) 3 Safetyratingofneighborhoodparks(ResidentSurvey) 4 Numberofvisitorsparticipatingintoursof2ESLsites(excludingEarthFest) ParksandRecreationͲRecreation(4) 1 ProgramparticipationofatͲriskyouth 2 Customerserviceratingofsummerrecreationprogram 3 CostrecoveryratiofortheRecreationDivision 4 Numberofridersoncommunitybuses(KIO) Aquatics(8) 1 CombinedcostrecoveryratiofortheAquaticComplex 2 CombinedcostrecoveryratiofortheAquaticServicesDivision 3 MembershipatAquaticComplexand membershipturnover 4 CypressPoolaveragedailypoolusage *PoolclosedJanandFeb2010,JanͲMar2011,OctͲDec2011,JanandFeb2012 5 MullinsPoolaveragedailypoolusage 6 CustomerserviceratingatAquaticsfacility 7 CustomerserviceratingatCypressParkPool 8 CustomerserviceratingatMullinsParkPool

136

FY2011 YearEnd Actual

98% 1.4days 2days 8days Yes 0

99% 1.5days 1day 8days Yes 0

3.52

3.42

275days 392.5days

FY2012 YearͲEnd Goal 95% 2days 2days 8days Yes 1 3.60 365days

FY2012 YearEnd Actual 100% 1.5days 1.3days 9days Yes 0

3 3 3 2 3 3

3.2

2

400days

2

1.34 15 2,061 100% 99%

1.49 15 2,118 100% 99%

1.50 15 1,750 90% 95%

1.47 15 1,185 100% 99%

3 3 2 3 3

90% —

71% 89%

75% —

80% —

N/R

31 projects

28 projects

99.9%

99.7%

20 projects 99.5%

28 projects N/A

N/A

94% 97%

93.2% 95.6%

90% 95%

85% 90%

c

99%

99.1%

95%

99%

3

— — — 151

97% 95% 93% 143

— — — 150

— — — 81

9,177 99% 70% 87,513

8,964 99% 61% 88,299

9,000 98% 60% 85,000

9,825 99% 63% 97,060

3 3 3 3

77% 69% 6,025 36% 220

76% 70% 3,232 43% 311

60% 50% 5,800 49% 205

81% 72% 4,951 38% 364

3 3 2 3 3

106 99% 100% 99%

107 98% 99% 99%

125 92% 92% 92%

117 98% 98% 100%

2 3 3 3

3

3 2

N/R N/R N/R

2

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Department Performance Measurements (con nued) DepartmentPerformanceMeasurements

TennisCenter(9) 1 Combinedcostrecoveryratio 2 Tennislessonrevenue 3 CustomerserviceratingatTennisCenter 4 CustomerserviceratingatCypressPark 5 MembershipbaseatCypressPark 6 MembershipturnoverfortheTennisCenter 7 CustomerserviceratingforcourtmaintenanceattheTennisCenter 8 Numberoftennisspecialevents 9 Numberoftennisteams Sportsplex(2) 1 RevenuegeneratedfromSportsplexactivities 2 NumberofspecialeventsandactivitieshostedatSportsplex

FY2010 YearEnd Actual

FY2011 YearEnd Actual

59% $312,310 97% 92% 43 21% 91% 27 64

60% $335,176 97% 92% 37 21% 91% 31 56

60% $320K 90% 90% 50 30% 90% 20 60

57% $292,859 94% N/A 33 28% 79% 27 48

$244,637 $242,027 64 70

$255K 75

$230,659 87

HumanResources(11) 1 Percentageofemployeeswhoagreewiththestatement“Iwouldrecommend workingfortheCitytoafriend.”(KIO) 2 PercentageofemployeeswhofeelHumanResourcesprovidesqualityservices 3 Percentageofemployeesthataresatisfiedwithliaisonservices 4 Percentageofemployeesthataresatisfiedwithwellnessactivities 5 Percentageofemployeeswhobelievebenefitsareinlinewithneeds 6 Numberofdayslostfromonthejobinjuries(per100employees) 7 Sickhoursperemployee 8 Respondtocustomerrequestsforserviceandinformationwithin48hrs andcloseservicerequestwithinoneweek 9 CycletimeͲexternalrecruitment(requisitiontojoboffer) 10 Percentageofminorityapplicantsperrecruitment 11 Percentageofemployeeswhoagreewith“Iamabletoapplytheskillsorknowledge learnedthroughCitytrainingtomyjob.” CommunicationsandMarketing(5) 1 Customersatisfactionwithcommunications(internalsurvey) 2 AwarenessofCoralSpringsmagazinebynewresidents(ResidentSurvey) Averagenumberofuniquepageviewsonwebsite 3 (changedfrom"numberofuniqueusersessions"forFY2012) 4 Numberofepisodesproducedfor"What'sHappening"(formerlycalled"IntheLoop") 5 Numberofnewpromotional/informationalcampaignsdeveloped(RevisedforFY2009) FinancialServices(6) 1 Internalcustomersatisfactionrating(FinancialServicesSurvey) 2 Percentageofpurchaserequisitionsunder$10,000processedwithin24hours 3 4 5 6

Waterbillingspastduemorethan180daysaspercentageofoutstandingbills (revisedduringFY2012,prioryearsrecalculated) NumberofitemsinmanagementletterspreparedbytheCity’sexternalauditors Percentageofinvoicespaidwithin30days OutofstocklevelofthetotalinventoryatCentralStores

CityClerk'sOffice 1 NumberoffilesaddedtotheIBPMsystem(NewforFY2010) 2 NumberofimagesaddedtotheIBPMsystem(NewforFY2010) 3 NumberofsearchestotheIBPMsystem(NewforFY2010) 4 Numberofboxesstoredoffsite(NewforFY2010) 5 Numberofboxesretrievedfromoffsite(NewforFY2010) 6 Numberofboxesdestroyed(NewforFY2010)

Actual

Actual Actual Actual FiscalYear2012Results Metorexceededgoal 60 Notreported 10 Notavailable 6 Goalnotmet 22 Within95%ofgoal TotalMeasures

City of Coral Springs, Florida

10

97%

90%

99% 95% 94% 95% 49.5 53.1 94% 100% 39days 54% 90%

99% 96% 92% 88% 35.2 52.4 96% 100% 38days 58% 88%

94% —

97% 87%

106,557 12 45

123,661 12 38

97% 92%

98% 91%

2.60% 0 99.8% 2.8%

2.79% 0 99.8% 2.9%

118,630 811,590 116,263 3,409 934 426

109,764 758,608 120,248 3,905 814 271

FY2012 YearͲEnd Goal

95% 97% 92% 91% 90% 50 48 100% 90% 40days 45% 90%

94% — 115,000 12 20

95% 90% 3.20% 0 99% 1.75%

132,000 950,000 125,000 3,900 900 400

FY2012 YearEnd Actual

N/A 90% 90% 91% 91% 49.9 60.4 96% 100% 50days 59% 89%

100% —

c

2 3 N/A

2 3 2 3 2

2 3

N/A

2 c

3 3 c

2 c

3 2 3 c

3 N/R

131,063 12 36

3 3 3

91% 89%

c

2.30% 0 99.9% 2.00%

3 3 3 2

56,700 680,564 83,421 4,073 619 969

2

N/A N/A N/A

3 3 3

Actu

3 N/R N/A

2 c

108

137


Fiscal Year 2012 Ini a ve Update Customer-Involved Government Ini a ve

Department(s)

Update as of Fourth Quarter Fiscal Year 2012

Status

50th Anniversary Planning

CMO, Communica ons During Q1, the logo and website were developed, and commi ee and Marke ng members were recruited. In Q2, the Coralsprings50.org website was launched and the members of the 50th Anniversary commi ee were selected by the City Commission. A part- me event coordinator was hired in Q3 and par cipates in commi ee mee ngs. Members of the internal staff meet every two weeks, while the volunteer commi ee meets monthly. The sponsorship package was completed and is being distributed in the community. The website is being kept updated. Ongoing mee ngs con nue with the internal and external commi ees, as well as event organizers, to plan the marke ng of the upcoming events. Public Works Streetlight outage repor ng was enhanced by the combined efforts of Streets staff, Code Rangers, and PD personnel. Two part- me streetlight monitors were hired in Q3 to increase repor ng of outages. During Q1, a message board was placed adver sing the “streetlight outage hotline” to report outages, and public educa on con nued at Slice mee ngs throughout the year. Almost 1,000 streetlights have been reported and repaired during FY 2012. A survey of streetlights blocked by trees was completed in Q2 and trimming began during Q3. Trimming generated a significant increase in light output. The City is working with FPL on new streetlight installa ons where they are warranted. Parks and Recrea on This program has been adver sed and promoted throughout the fiscal year. Although we have few long term members signed up, we do get many volunteers who have been helping to iden fy issues within our Parks. We receive numerous e-mails and calls informing us of poten al issues. These calls and e-mails allow us to take care of issues before they become a problem. The sports leagues have agreed to inform staff of any issues they see around the fields and courts they use. The Parks Moms program is combining with this program to generate more interest. Communica ons and During Q2,the closed cap oning equipment was ordered and Marke ng received. It was installed and was used for the first me in Q3. Purchasing assisted in the selec on of the closed cap oning services required to transcribe the City Commission mee ngs. The June 5 City Commission broadcast was the first broadcast using closed cap oning technology. The availability of this service has been marketed via eNews, What’s Happening, and social media and will be included in the next issue of the Coral Springs Magazine. Police Web-based repor ng has not started yet, awai ng for I.S. to work on the expor ng of the informa on to the Police Department RMS program. Once that has been accomplished, actual web-based repor ng can begin. CMO, Communica ons On January 23, an evalua on commi ee selected 1 vendor out of and Marke ng 15 who responded to the City’s Branding RFQ. The City Commission approved the selec on of North Star on February 7. The in-market visit from Northstar took place in May. In mid-June the community survey was launched. On July 5 the survey was closed with 571 surveys collected. The Understanding and Insights Presenta on to staff took place July 18, and a presenta on to the City Commission took place July 24. The Crea ve Commi ee had its first teleconference with the North Star Crea ve Team on September 11.

In progress

Street Ligh ng Improvements

Park VIPs (Volunteers in Parks)

Closed Cap oning City TV

Web-Based Crime Repor ng

City Marke ng Plan

138

In progress

Complete

Complete

In progress

In progress

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Fiscal Year 2012 Ini a ve Update (con nued) Code Enforcement Rangers (ongoing)

Code Enforcement

City Hall Security Improvements Police

Sta on 71 Improvements (ongoing)

Fire

Building Division and EDF Customer Communica on (ongoing)

Building

As of Q4 there are 15 ac ve Code Rangers that are assis ng Code Officers and administra ve staff in various tasks. Code Rangers are now working with Code Officers in their zones using door hangers for code viola ons. The Code Rangers conducted 1,688 inspec ons in Q1, 1,553 in Q2, 1,716 in Q3, and 1,594 in Q4, with about 70% compliance. Code rangers have been assis ng by sending no ces on delinquent Business Tax receipts, working on the street tree program, and checking and re-inspec ng streetlight outages. There are 5 former police vehicles converted to Code Ranger Patrol vehicles. The City Hall Security Project received the UASI approvals for funding during the first quarter of calendar year 2012. Also during Q1, Facili es began internal project enhancements which included secure door installa on for the City A orney’s Office and construc on in Water Billing for enhanced employee security limi ng public access, which were all completed by Q4. Installa on of the access card system, cameras, and alarm system began and was completed during Q4 for City Hall North and South. Human Resources dra ed policy for the access card system and issued employee iden fica on cards. This project is opera onal and was collaborated with a project management team consis ng of mul ple departments: Public Works, Human Resources, Informa on Services, Police, City Manager’s Office, and Emergency Management. Training recommenda ons and policy enhancements were formally suggested and have been provided to City Hall Human Resources for final development and implementa on. Architectural and engineering design was completed in October 2011, construc on began early in 2012, and was completed during the 4th quarter. The official ribbon-cu ng ceremony was held August 17, 2012. The Building Division held the following mee ngs 1st quarter 2012: 3 pre-review mee ngs, 6 pre-construc on mee ngs, 2 in progress mee ngs, and 2 wrap-up mee ngs. During the 2nd quarter, there were 3 pre-review mee ngs, 5 pre-construc on mee ngs, 5 inprogress mee ngs, and 1 wrap-up mee ng. During Q3, there were 2 pre-review mee ngs, 4 pre-construc on mee ngs, 5 in-progress mee ngs on 2 projects, and 1 wrap-up mee ng. The Focus Group meets quarterly.

Complete

In progress

Complete

In progress

Neighborhood and Environmental Sustainability Ini a ve

Department(s)

Park Improvement Master Plan Parks and Recrea on

Water Saving Devices

Public Works

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Update as of Fourth Quarter Fiscal Year 2012

Status

The Master Park Plan was completed in Q1 and is used constantly Complete to plan renova ons in the parks. Comple on of all items within the 5 Year Park Master Plan will depend on available capital funds in upcoming years. Recent renova ons at Pride Promoters Park are a great example of the what can happen as a result of the plan. In During Q1, scope of work and pricing was agreed upon with the progress City’s plumbing contractor, West Broward Plumbing, to install new urinals, toilets and faucets in City-owned buildings. During Q2, plumbing retrofits were completed at CH South, and Fire Sta ons 43 and 95. Plumbing retrofits have showed significant reduc ons in water use at CH South and FS 43. Water consump on at FS 95 has remained constant. Work is in progress at the Charter School, the Fire Training Facility and Tennis Center. When completed, the plumbing contractor will move to the Gymnasium, Cypress Hammock Park and the Aqua cs Complex.

139


Fiscal Year 2012 Ini a ve Update (con nued) Fats, Oils, and Grease (FOG) Regula on Program

Public Works

Community Pride Phase III

Parks and Recrea on

Neighborhood Stabiliza on Program (NSP3)

Community Development

Neighborhood Preserva on Program Enhancement

Code Enforcement

Nuisance Abatement Board

City A orney’s Office

FPL Transformer Screening Feasibility Study

Parks and Recrea on

140

Preliminary research and data has been collected by City staff and the engineering consultant on the impact of fats, oils and grease on the wastewater collec on system. A mee ng with the other u lity districts was held in Q2 to assess the impact of FOG on their wastewater collec on systems. We have determined the annual added costs to the u li es to deal with FOG to be about $55,000 for the City of Coral Springs Public U lity, approximately $5,000 for CSID. No addi onal costs have been segregated due to FOG for NSID and Royal U li es. A dra of the FOG Study has been reviewed and discussed with Eckler Engineering. There is insufficient data to warrant a Code change to mandate the inspec on and cleaning of grease traps. A mee ng with the other U lity Districts is planned to request careful tracking of expenses associated with FOG, and then revisit the need for an ordinance in one year. In the interim, City and Districts will focus on educa on. During FY 2012 pressure cleaning was completed for the medians, sidewalks and gu ers on various roadways and at City facili es. Landscape architects were hired in January and began designing the Royal Palm entranceway, Maplewood Estate linear park upgrade and landscaping for transformers on University Dr. & Cardinal Road. Renova ons to 11 parks throughout the City were made. New landscaping was installed at 4 parks and at City Hall and other facili es. The contractor was hired for the new buildings at Mullins Park. To date 12 proper es have been purchased. Two of the proper es purchased have completed the home repair por on; ten have transi oned to home repair and are under construc on. A public no ce was done on Sunday, September 23, 2012 to adver se for the 3 low-income spots remaining. During Q1, the Code Division sent out over 800 le ers requiring landlords of 2 units or more to register their proper es with the City. This registra on program lets the City obtain a more current database of ownership and management of rental proper es. A total of 865 applica ons were received this fiscal year. Code will be stepping up enforcement on the registra ons program. A Landlord/ Tenant Workshop was held in April with Code Enforcement, Police and Community Development. About 100 landlords learned about the registra on program, fair housing and the nuisance abatement program. The 7-member Nuisance Abatement Board was appointed at the October 4, 2011, Commission mee ng, and the group met once in December 2011 for organiza onal purposes. The board will implement the Nuisance Abatement ordinance that was approved by the Commission on July 5, 2011. The Board last met June 26, and will meet as needed to take ac on on nuisance proper es. The landscape architect has been hired and has completed the conceptual design. As of Q3, the landscape plans have been completed and they were sent to FP&L for their approval. Staff has contacted their representa ve several mes, but s ll have not received an approval to move forward with the landscaping. If approved the next step will be to enter into an agreement with WCI to allow us to plant on their property around the transformers on University Dr. between Wiles Rd. and Sample Road. Landscaping cannot be within 3 . of the transformer on 3 sides and 8 . on the 4th side, which will prevent us from landscaping some sides of specific transformers.

In progress

Complete

In progress

Complete

Complete

Complete

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Fiscal Year 2012 Ini a ve Update (con nued) Mullins Park Revitaliza on

Parks and Recrea on

Code Enforcement Process Improvement

Informa on Services

Playground Equipment Replacement Program

Parks and Recrea on

Inflow and Infiltra on Program Public Works

Foreclosures: Neighborhood Protec on (ongoing)

Code Enforcement

Sustainability Ini a ves (ongoing)

Community Development

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Demoli on of soccer and flag football buildings occurred in April; construc on is expected to begin early in FY 2013 and should take about 7 months. Playground lights, fencing, and ar ficial sod were installed, and sod renova ons were made on 3 fields. New landscaping near St. Andrews Towers and the pool was installed, as were shade covers and fences near tennis courts. The sand volleyball courts were renovated. Pathways in most of the park were renovated. The pathway plans for around the baseball and football field are completed, and construc on of them will begin once the framework is completed for the buildings. The landscape architect is finishing plans for new direc onal signs and field iden fica on signs. Work on the signs will occur in FY 2013. Completed the development of the app-order program to allow ci zens to report code viola ons via their Android or IOS phones (including iPads). The applica on enables reports to be electronically downloaded with photos of the viola on. Ci zens can download the app at no cost. The app-order program went live on the Internet with a formal presenta on at the May 1 Commission mee ng. A vendor for new code compliance so ware has been selected, but changes in management of the Code division will likely postpone the contract approval and implementa on process. The Cypress Park playground was completed in Q2. Dede Gilmore and Sandy Ridge Sanctuary playgrounds have been removed, the new playground equipment has arrived and should be installed by the end of September. The ground material will be installed in early October and playgrounds should be opened by late October. A contract was awarded November 15, 2011, by the City Commission to two contractors to perform inflow and infiltra on correc on. The 2012 Inflow and Infiltra on correc on program has addressed leaks in manholes amoun ng to 194,040 gallons per day at a cost of $141,769. The City will realize its return on investment in 1.5 years based on current Broward County wastewater treatment charges. There are two contractors performing the I&I correc ve work. The pipe lining is 100% complete, and the manhole sealing is 55% finished. The contract termina on date is January 2013. An update on the return on investment will be forthcoming a er comple on of all the work. The Foreclosure Registra on Program has been very successful in providing Code with data on property managers of vacant buildings, enabling us to correct code viola ons. Code has registered 793 proper es in FY 2012. Many of the foreclosed homes have been occupied in the last year but Code is expec ng more vacant homes to appear. Banks have been more ac ve in evic ng previous owners, leaving proper es vacant. Submi ed a grant applica on for “Global Green’s Crea ng Sustainable Neighborhoods Technical Assistance Program” which was not awarded. Researched the logis cs and costs associated with bringing the Na onal League of Ci es Sustainability Steering Commi ee spring 2012 mee ng to Coral Springs. Hosted Broward County to present the Municipal Green Ini a ves Survey to the NEC during Q2. In Q3, the City received silver cer fica on with Florida Green Government. Began analyzing the silver cer fica on report and developing a strategy for achieving gold cer fica on.

In progress

In progress

Complete

In progress

Complete

Complete

141


Fiscal Year 2012 Ini a ve Update (con nued) Tree Canopy Restora on (ongoing)

Community Development

CDBG Ac on Plan (ongoing)

Community Development

“Make a Call, Make a Difference” Campaign

Police

Provided the NEC with an updated analysis of the Street Tree Complete Subsidy program which will serve as a basis for reques ng a further extension of the program through 2012. Worked with the new City Arborist to develop a way of u lizing and expanding the GIS based tree inventory. Worked with Parks and Rec to iden fy addi onal plan ng op ons in parks and medians. The City is in conversa on with Broward County about the par cipa on in the County’s Urban Forestry Management Program. Worked with Code Enforcement and Marke ng to develop White Fly educa onal materials for homeowners to help them minimize the damage to their trees and landscaping. Coordinated the Sunshine Water Control District tree removal pilot project. City was awarded $814,096 funds for FY 2012. The grant agreement Complete was executed in November 2011. Designs and plans for NW 110th Avenue Sidewalk Project and drainage project and Mullins Park Pathway project are in progress. Fire hydrants at Mullins Park and NW 25th Ct traffic calming projects were completed in Q3. NW 85th Ave project has completed construc on, working with general contractor to complete required Davis Bacon payroll cer fica ons. In July the City met its CDBG meliness test, which was 1.47 (must be at or below 1.50). City Commission approved the City’s FY 2012/2013 Annual Ac on Plan, and the item was transmi ed to HUD for approval on August 15, 2012. The “Make a Call, Make a Difference Campaign” was chosen the Complete “Outstanding Crime Preven on Program” for 2012 by the Florida Crime Preven on Associa on. Our en re department con nues to promote the program. Presenta ons have been made to self-defense classes, schools, and parent /teacher organiza ons. Flyers or e-mail a achments have been distributed to area businesses, convenience stores, gas sta ons, and all area schools. 20 Twenty Digital Adver sing adver sed the “Make a Call, Make a Difference” ad on 30 TV loca ons throughout the city. Public Safety Announcements are being shown at the local movie theatre. Signs have been placed at several entrances to the city, message boards displayed within the parks, gyms and mall, and posters have been placed in Publix supermarkets within the city. Several burglary arrests were the result of ci zens calling in suspicious ac vity.

Financial Health and Economic Development Ini a ve Internal Auditor

Business Development

Commercial Facade Program

142

Department(s) City Commission

Update as of Fourth Quarter Fiscal Year 2012 Status The firm of Morre, Stephens, Lovelace was selected as internal In auditor in December. The audit contract between the firm and the progress City Commission was finalized in Q2, and work began during Q3, with several reports issued during Q4. City Manager’s Office, Created database using CoStar and foreclosure websites. Fewer In EDF commercial vacancies, but office vacancy rate is cri cal due to progress foreclosures on key proper es. EDF delivers quarterly economic development updates to Retail Coali on core group. Assis ng 15 businesses that are part of the Preferred Client Program. Community Revised the applica on package to tailor the emphasis of signs/ In Development ligh ng in the Commercial Façade program. The flyer and applica on progress package were posted on the City’s website. Property owners in the target area received a le er and flyer about the program. We received 14 applica ons, and recommended 5 projects to receive assistance. Three projects are underway: Colonial Building (9825 W. Sample), Coral Springs Diner (10410 W. Sample) and the Convenience Store (7800-7808 Wiles Rd.). The architects are working on schema c designs for these projects.

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Fiscal Year 2012 Ini a ve Update (con nued) In Standards of Response Coverage: Began development work with progress target comple on of second dra on December 13, 2012. This includes a community risk analysis, me and on-scene performance expecta ons, distribu on of resources and other data analysis. It will form the cornerstone for all our other work on accredita on. Self-assessment documenta on: This aspect of accredita on process will begin Q1 of FY 2013, with each division within the department comple ng an analysis of consistency between documented opera ng procedures, legal authoriza on, departmental goals and 253 separate performance indicators spread over ten different categories. Target for comple on of self-assessment is April 2013. CS BizAssist (ongoing) City Manager’s Office, This is an ongoing ini a ve. New content is added each quarter to Complete Communica ons and the csbizassist.org website. Marke ng, EDF Enhanced Code Enforcement Code Enforcement During FY 2012 there were 120 proper es sold with original fine Complete amounts of $9.2 million. These fines were reduced to $587,415. Lien Reduc on (ongoing) Many of the proper es were foreclosures and the lien reduc ons allowed houses to be sold and occupied. Business Tax Amnesty (ongoing) Code Enforcement The FY 2013 amnesty program runs from June 1 through December In 31, 2012. This program allows businesses that have never applied progress for a business license to register with the City for the current year without penal es.

Fire Department Accredita on Fire Process Phase I

Traffic, Mobility, and Connec vity Ini a ve Westview Turn Lane

Department(s) Public Works

Street Indexing Signs Phase II

Community Development Community Development

Northwest Broward Consor um for Planning Transporta on Improvements

Update as of Fourth Quarter Fiscal Year 2012 Status This project began early in Q1 and was completed in Q2. The turn Complete lane into North Community Park has improved traffic flow on Westview Dr. Permits have been issued for 13 indexing signs along Sample Road. Complete All signs have been installed along Wiles Road for Phase II. Complete Planners from Coconut Creek, Margate, Coral Springs and the Metropolitan Planning Organiza on met twice during FY 2012. University Dr. Alterna ves Analysis began this year. Broward County’s Transit Development Plan (TDP) 2013 update scope of services has been approved and we promoted Sample Road to be elevated to a Strategic Priority in this TDP update. Pompano Beach has been awarded a planning grant for the Educa on Corridor that will define a new transit service extending to downtown Coral Springs and linking to Broward College. A mee ng is being organized for the next NW planners mee ng to be hosted by Coral Springs.

Traffic Management (ongoing)

Community Development

26 streets were tested for the City’s traffic calming program (11 for evalua on of exis ng speed humps and 15 were new streets or follow-up from ci zen requests). Staff worked with Turtle Run CDD on proposed roadway improvements at Creekside Drive/NW 41st Drive, Creekside Drive/Turtle Creek Drive, and Turtle Run Boulevard. Speed cushions on Shadow Wood Blvd. were repaired. Construc on of permanent speed humps was completed on NW 25 Ct. Two new sets of traffic counters have been ordered so that addi onal tes ng can be accomplished. TRCDD has begun construc on of the roundabout on Turtle Run Boulevard. Working with Renaissance Charter School to resolve traffic issues.

Complete

Downtown Pathways Phase II

Community Development

Staff members a ended FDOT Local Agency Program workshop on 11/9/11. Survey has been completed and design of the pathway is now started. Working with FDOT on op ons related to an easement on the Harbor Chase property.

In progress

City of Coral Springs, Florida

143


Fiscal Year 2012 Ini a ve Update (con nued) Bike Path and Walkway Inventory and Master Plan

Public Works

Red Light and Security Cameras Police Implementa on (ongoing)

In Engineers have completed the design of a bike path/sidewalk for progress NW 38th Drive from NW 85th Avenue to University, ul mately providing connec vity to the downtown district. A public mee ng to present the project to the neighborhood took place in Q2. The City has contracted with an engineering consultant to document exis ng bike path lanes on state and county roadways and determine the feasibility of adding bike lanes to City roads within the paved right-of-way limits. Botek Thurlow Engineering’s (BTE) field reviews indicate that 12 of the 22 roadway links reviewed seem to have poten al to incorporate bicycle facili es (designated bike lanes and wide outside lanes). The study will determine whether onroad bicycle facili es can be accommodated on exis ng roadways through various strategies, typical sec ons for each segment, and likely bo leneck conflict points and alterna ves. The preliminary recommenda ons for providing designated bike lanes and wide curb lanes were presented to the Traffic Management Team at their August mee ng. During Q4, staff and the consultant met with Broward County MPO for addi onal recommenda ons; presented proposed study network; discussed methodology and strategies for incorpora ng bicycle facili es; reviewed Long Range Transporta on Plan (LRTP); examined poten al to incorporate bike facili es within the city by others (example – Wiles Road from Rock Island to 441 by the County); examined poten al to connect (via this study) to exis ng/future bicycle facili es. Next phase of the study includes ranking the top ten road sec ons in the inventory and assigning costs for the bike lane projects. Report should be in final dra by end of calendar year 2012. Complete Seven cameras are ac ve at 5 intersec ons, most of them along University Drive. In the months since the cameras have been ac ve, accidents at those intersec ons have dropped. Viola ons and fine revenues have declined each quarter since the cameras were installed, indica ng a change in driver behavior which makes our roadways safer for all our ci zens. On September 7, 2012, members of the police department and the City Manager’s office met with ACS to discuss the decline in viola ons. ACS representa ve Abby Jenkins is exploring other intersec ons, be er technology for capturing viola ons and tes ng current equipment for accuracy. ACS is scheduled to provide their findings on October 23.

Youth Development and Family Values Ini a ve Sports Events and Venues Promo on

Department(s) City Manager’s Office, Communica ons and Marke ng

Holiday Fun Run

Sportsplex

Mentoring Leadership Program Police

144

Update as of Fourth Quarter Fiscal Year 2012 Status This ini a ve will dovetail with the City’s branding/marke ng In progress ini a ve and will take shape as the branding recommenda ons are developed. C&M staff has held several mee ngs to discuss the development of a Coral Springs Sports Events and Venues Promo on website. The website design is complete and the content is being reviewed by facility managers. The Holiday Family Fun Run was held prior to the 2011 City Holiday Complete Parade. The run, which went up and back on Sample Road drew approximately 100 runners of all ages. The event was considered a success and planning is underway for the Second Annual Family Fun Run prior to the 2012 Holiday Parade. Students that were involved in the summer Leadership Mentoring In progress Program of July 2011 were invited to par cipate in addi onal volunteer programs during Q1 (holiday card project for the soldiers and Holiday Parade). In Q2 33 students took part in Teen Success Day on March 29, 2012. 25 teens took part in summer 2012 ac vi es.

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Fiscal Year 2012 Ini a ve Update (con nued) Teen Poli cal Forum (ongoing)

Human Resources

This event was held on April 2 at the Coral Springs Center for the Arts. Approximately 350 high school students a ended the program. There were 9 panelists represen ng local, county and state levels of government Staff worked with the seniors to hold another Windows to My World Program in Q3. Staff has also applied for a grant, which, if received, will help fund intergenera onal programs. A new photography class was held in July. The Senior Advisory Commi ee asked for a be er way of communica ng with the Seniors since many don’t have computers. As a result a new Senior newspaper has been created with the assistance of Communica ons and Marke ng. This newspaper will be distributed quarterly to the seniors by mail and from key loca ons in the City. During the first quarter staff worked to get new members for the club by distribu ng fliers to all high schools and issuing press releases. These efforts produced two new members of the club. Club members par cipated in the Holiday Parade. The annual Car Show was held at Sportsplex on February 4. There was a good turnout, but the weather kept some cars from entering. The food trucks were a success. The event raised approximately $2,000 for the Car Club . The City will be housing the Blazer at the Westside maintenance yard as soon as the club purchases a car cover Our contract is s ll ac ve with Workforce One un l May 2012. We contacted the organiza on in January 2012 to reac vate our partnership. The agreement was approved at the July 17, 2012 City Commission Mee ng. The new agreement is valid un l June 14, 2014. Teen Cookoff was held on February 4, 2012, with 3 teams compe ng. It was held as part of the Teen Car Show. This year’s contest was a barbeque. The winning team was Coral Glades High School.

Complete

Department(s) Update as of Fourth Quarter Fiscal Year 2012 Human Resources, City This event was held on April 26 and April 27 at the Coral Springs Manager’s Office Library. There were about 100 par cipants from the community, in addi on to about 25 members of staff and City Commission who acted as observers/advisors. City Manager’s The Commission resolu on to change the name of 29th Avenue to Office, Community Ben Geiger Drive was approved December 6, 2011. Broward County Development agreed to fabricate and install the new signs. Ben Geiger Drive will be the primary name and NW 29 Street will be the secondary name. A formal dedica on ceremony was held April 2, 2012. Human Resources Staff con nues to maintain close contact with the Family Success Center to exchange informa on and provide mutual assistance. As of Q2, communica on with the center has become more difficult. We are sensing some resistance on their part to ge ng involved in community events. Human Resources This event was held on Saturday, May 19, 2012, at the Coral Springs Marrio and a ended by nearly 220 people. A female comedian, Marion Grodin, and a group of Hai an dancers, called The Bu erfly Dancers, provided entertainment. Human Resources The Mul -Cultural Commi ee had a very successful event on September 29th. Approximately 420 people a ended. Ticket sales had to be halted as the crowd was becoming overwhelming. A wai ng list was started. The two countries highlighted this year were Jamaica and Trinidad/Tobago, as both were celebra ng their 50th Anniversaries of Independence.

Status Complete

Senior Empowerment Program Parks and Recrea on (ongoing)

Car Club (ongoing)

Parks and Recrea on

WorkForce One Partnership (ongoing)

Human Resources

Teen Cookoff (ongoing)

Parks and Recrea on

Complete

Complete

Complete

Complete

Strength in Diversity Ini a ve Visioning Summit Update

Rename 29th Street “Ben Geiger Drive”

Family Success Center (ongoing)

CommuniTea (ongoing)

Interna onal Dinner Dance (ongoing)

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Complete

Complete

Complete

Complete

145


Fiscal Year 2012 Ini a ve Update (con nued) Partnership Between Mul Human Resources Cultural Advisory Commi ee and One Planet United (ongoing) Weekend of Peace Celebra on Human Resources (ongoing)

WorldFest (ongoing)

Human Resources

Mar n Luther King Program Enhancements (ongoing)

Human Resources

The two groups con nue to work closely to host monthly Peace Walks and other events throughout the year. This rela onship con nues to thrive.

Complete

This event was held in September. Members of the Mul -Cultural Complete Commi ee and One Planet United have started discussions on a new program called Peace in Music which will most likely be held in October/November this year. This event took place Sunday, April 15. About 5,000 people a ended Complete the event, which provided an array of entertainment, cuisins, and culture salu ng the diverse popula on of Coral Springs and surrounding areas. Commi ee volunteers conducted a cooking demonstra on, and Kid’s World and Teen World offered games and ac vi es of interest to all ages. Complete The 22nd Annual MLK weekend celebra on began Friday, January 13 with a Business Luncheon and Community Celebra on and ended on Monday, January 16 with a Diversity/Leadership Day for middle school and high school students. Our keynote speaker for the event was Willie Gary, a trial a orney and humanitarian from Stuart, Florida. We have started working on securing a speaker for the January 2013 event. Scholarship interviews were held in April to award MLK Scholarship funds to high school seniors.

Excellence in Educa on Ini a ve Department(s) Cambridge Advanced Program City Manager’s Office, at Coral Springs Charter School Coral Springs Charter School

Status Complete

Charter School Organiza onal Excellence (ongoing)

Complete

Student Database Outreach Project (ongoing)

Broward College Campus in Coral Springs

146

Update as of Fourth Quarter Fiscal Year 2012 The program is in its first year at the school, focusing on language arts and science for grades 7 through 9. 383 students are enrolled in the program for the 2012-13 school year. All of our middle school CAPS instructors and several of our high school instructors a ended several professional growth seminars aimed at increased understanding of integra ng the Cambridge program with our State Curriculum Standards. We had seven different parent evening mee ngs centered around our CAPS program. Our CAPS students are very enthusias c about the program, with 99% of all students desiring to stay in the program throughout their high school career. Students are excited about the opportunity to earn college credit while in school and the possibility of achieving the dis nguished Cambridge Diploma in addi on to the high school diploma. Beginning with the 2012-13 school term we plan to add at least 8 subjects to the high school CAPS op ons. We will be adding addi onal courses for subsequent years. Human Resources City staff con nue to provide support to the Charter School regarding quality, strategic planning, performance measurement, and any other areas as needed. Coral Springs Charter School received an “A” for the eighth consecu ve year. The school grade accounts for students’ performance in several subjects as well as gradua on rate, college readiness, and accelera on among high school students. Communica ons and The website is complete and marke ng of this ini a ve con nues Marke ng with emphasis on encouraging businesses to use the site to recruit poten al employees. During FY 2012, the par cipants totaled 512 job seekers and 18 businesses. City Manager’s Office, Broward College has leased a parcel at the northwest corner of EDF, CRA Sample and University. Tenant improvements needed to retrofit at least 11 classrooms and administra ve offices have begun. City staff is working with the college on a marke ng plan. The college is currently registering students for the class term beginning October 2012.

In progress

In Progress

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Fiscal Year 2013 Ini a ve Summary Customer-Involved Government City Hall Lighting and Entrance Modifications Enterprise Resource Program Information Technology Infrastructure Modernization Building Division Customer Service Enhancements City Charter Review Amphitheater Study Street Lighting Improvements (ongoing) Code Enforcement Rangers (ongoing) Web-Based Crime Reporting (ongoing)

Neighborhood and Environmental Sustainability

Public Works Information Services Information Services Building City Attorney’s Office Community Development Public Works Code Enforcement Police

Burglary Enforcement and Reduction (BEAR) Unit Public Safety Technology Upgrades Public Safety Communication System and Equipment Improvement Study Enhanced Neighborhood Preservation Program

Police Police Police Code Enforcement

Resurface Master Parking Lots Code Compliance Microgrants Pilot Program 50th Anniversary Artwork Royal Palm Entryway Construction Mullins Park Revitalization Phase II Median Master Plan Phase I Community Wildlife Habitat Designation Park Facilities Maintenance Crew CDBG Action Plan (ongoing) Water Saving Devices (ongoing) Inflow and Infiltration Program (ongoing)

Public Works City Manager’s Office, City Attorney’s Office Community Development Public Works, Community Development Parks and Recreation Parks and Recreation Community Development Parks and Recreation Community Development Public Works Public Works Utilities

Community Pride Phase IV (ongoing)

Parks and Recreation

Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP3) (ongoing)

Community Development

Code Enforcement Process Improvement (ongoing)

Code Enforcement

Tree Canopy Restoration (ongoing)

Community Development

Financial Health and Economic Development Economic Development Enhancements Corporate Promotional Video City Branding Phase II (Implementation) Marketing Fire Academy Services EMS Equipement: Time = Life Water Rate Study

City Manager’s Office Communications and Marketing Communications and Markeing Fire, Communications and Marketing Fire Public Works Utilities

Internal Auditor (ongoing) Commercial Facade Program (ongoing)

City Commission Community Development

City of Coral Springs, Florida

147


Fiscal Year 2013 Ini a ve Summary (con nued) Traffic, Mobility, and Connec vity

New Sidewalks at 38th Drive and 85th Avenue Right Turn Lane at Shadow Wood Boulevard at Riverside Drive Roadway Resurfacing and Alley Improvements Coral Hills Drive Sidewalk Design Northwest Broward Consortium for Planning Transportation Improvements (ongoing) Downtown Pathways Phase II (ongoing) Traffic Management (ongoing) Red Light and Security Cameras Implementation (ongoing)

Youth Development and Family Values

Public Works Public Works Public Works Public Works Community Development Community Development Community Development Police

50th Anniversary Celebration Half Marathon and 5K Run Playground Equipment Replacement Program (ongoing) Car Club (ongoing) Teen Political Forum (ongoing)

Community Development Sportsplex Parks and Recreation Parks and Recreation Human Resources

Senior Empowerment Program (ongoing) Teen Cookoff (ongoing)

Parks and Recreation Parks and Recreation

Strength in Diversity Downtown Coral Springs Artisan Food and Green Market BizArt Annual Event Mullins Park Water Tank Mural International Dinner Dance (ongoing) Family Success Center (ongoing)

Sportsplex Community Development Coral Springs Museum of Art, Community Development Human Resources Human Resources

Partnership Between Multi-Cultural Advisory Committee and One Planet United (ongoing) Weekend of Peace Celebration (ongoing)

Human Resources Human Resources

WorldFest (ongoing) CommuniTea (ongoing) Martin Luther King Program (ongoing)

Human Resources Human Resources Human Resources

Excellence in Educa on

Cambridge Advanced Program at Coral Springs Charter School (ongoing) Coral Springs Outreach Database (ongoing) Charter School Organizational Excellence (ongoing) Broward College Campus in Coral Springs (ongoing)

148

City Manager’s Office, Coral Springs Charter School Communications and Marketing City Manager’s Office City Manager’s Office

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Performance Budget Contents Performance Budget Overview .........................................................................................................152 Understanding Departmental Performance Budgets .................................................................152 Sample Performance Budget Page ....................................................................................................153 Department Performance Levels.......................................................................................................154 City Commission .........................................................................................................................155 City Managerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s OďŹ&#x192;ce .................................................................................................................157 Human Resources.......................................................................................................................162 Financial Services .......................................................................................................................167 Informa on Services ..................................................................................................................171 City A orney ..............................................................................................................................175 Development Services ................................................................................................................177 Police ..........................................................................................................................................184 Economic Development .............................................................................................................189 Fire/EMS .....................................................................................................................................190 Public Works ...............................................................................................................................195 Sportsplex/Tennis .......................................................................................................................204 Parks and Recrea on ..................................................................................................................208 Aqua cs ......................................................................................................................................214 Coral Springs Center for the Arts................................................................................................218 Coral Springs Charter School ......................................................................................................220 Customer Requirements Analysis ......................................................................................................222 Overview ....................................................................................................................................222 Residen al Sa sfac on Survey Results ......................................................................................222 Business Sa sfac on Survey Results ..........................................................................................223 SWOT ..........................................................................................................................................224 Neighborhood Mee ngs ............................................................................................................225 CityHelpDesk Responses ............................................................................................................226 Benchmarking ...................................................................................................................................227 Florida Ci es Comparison..................................................................................................................231 Process Improvement Teams.............................................................................................................232 Cross-Func onal Teams ..............................................................................................................232 Awards and Special Recogni ons ......................................................................................................236

City of Coral Springs, Florida

149


Budget Process Map

January

February

March

Workbooks Compiled & “Hot Topics” IdenƟĮed

Commission Workshop

April

May

June

Strategic Plan

Management SWOT Exercise

V

Resident / Business Survey (as scheduled)

Final DraŌ Published

KIO’s Set

Business Plan Environmental Scan

Select IniƟaƟves

Business Plan Workshop

V Departmental Budget Packages Distributed for Business Plan, Staĸng, OperaƟng Budget, CIP & Replacement Programs

OperaƟng Budget & Performance Measures Five-Year Forecast

Quarterly PM Report

Budget Client Feedback

Packages Returned Staĸng & Capital CMO/Dept. MeeƟngs

Line Item Review Performance Measures

Quarterly PM Report

Capital Budget Replacement Programs Distributed

Replacement Programs Updated

New Capital Items

Fixed Asset Inventory Distributed

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Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


July

August

September

Note: The Strategic Plan is a mulƟ-year plan. In certain years the Business Plan Environmental Scan is the Įrst element.

Business Plan PresentaƟon

October

November

December

ElecƟons

New Commission OrientaƟon

City of Coral Springs Strategic Planning & Performance Measurement Process Map January 2012

Composite Index

V Fund Summaries Balanced First Budget Hearing Proposed Budget Prepared

To Environmental Scan

Second Budget Hearing

V

Quarterly PM Report

Quarterly PM Report

Adopted Budget Published

Budget Adopted

Budgeted Purchases

Proposed CIP Prepared

Fiscal Year Ends

City of Coral Springs, Florida

V

To Next Year’s Quarterly PM

Fixed Asset Inventory Updated

151


Performance Budget Overview Understanding Departmental Performance Budgets The department’s budget is separated into the following components: Mission Statement—the statement must iden fy the par cular purpose for the department and how it relates to the City’s overall mission. Core Processes—a lis ng of the fundamental business processes that the department is designed to provide. Outputs— indicate the volume, frequency or level of service provided. New Ini a ves—new services or the removal of exis ng services as they relate to the Strategic Plan. A list of the new ini a ves follows. Organiza on Charts—outline of program structure within the department. Program/Expenditure Summary—the budget for the department, summarized by program, if applicable, and by major category of expenditure: • Personal Services—salaries, over me and other pay including vaca on payment incen ve, holiday pay, temporary wages. • Benefits—FICA, re rement contribu ons, health and other benefits. • Other Expenses—supplies, repairs, u li es, services and other costs. • Capital—departmental machinery and equipment under $5,000. Objec ves and Performance Measures—the objec ves focus on par cular program accomplishments that will be a ained within the current year. All objec ves are measurable by the performance indicators supplied. Each performance measure includes explicit links showing how program objec ves and their indicators are directly related to KIOs and strategic priori es that they support. A summary of all capital projects for each department indica ng funding source and total project cost is also included in this sec on.

152

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


Sample Performance Budget Page Title

New Ini

Indicates the department.

Fiscal Year 2012 Business Plan Initiatives for this department, if available.

Mission

Revenues and Expenditures

Developed by the department, this is a statement that identifies the particular purpose for the department.

A summary of the budgeted departmental revenues and expenditures.

Core Processes and Outputs A listing of the fundamental processes and the outputs for the department.

Organiza

a ves

on Chart

An organization chart showing the breakdown of programs, divisions and personnel.

Performance Linkage The Strategic Priority and Directional Statement that support the department’s performance measures.

Performance Measures The actual historical performance and future goals for the department.

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City of Coral Springs, Florida

153


Department Performance Levels Each of the City’s departments develops a work plan and new ini a ves based on the current Strategic Plan. The Business Plan summarizes the new ini a ves and the Performance Budget summarizes the resources allocated to each department and the performance measures nego ated to define acceptable results. Included on the following pages are each department’s mission statement, core processes, outputs, organiza on chart, new ini a ves, program/expenditure summary, objec ves and performance measures. A summary table of revenues, expenditures and posi on counts by department for Fiscal Year 2013 is listed below.

Department Revenue, Expenditure and Posi on Summary for Fiscal Year 2013 Department CityCommission CityManager'sOffice(MBO,C&M/Clerk) HumanResources HealthFund FinancialServices GeneralInsuranceFund* InformationServices CityAttorney DevelopmentServices Police FireFund** EmergencyMedicalServices PublicWorks Water&SewerFund EquipmentServices Sportsplex/Tennis Parks&Recreation Aquatics C.S.CenterForTheArts*** C.S.CharterSchoolFund PublicArtFund

Personal $106,860 1,751,496 842,502 99,860 1,438,891 106,633 1,422,957 470,528 3,837,639 23,346,389 8,286,067 5,418,595 1,383,197 1,826,319 803,086 630,465 3,824,554 1,001,763 0 0 0

Benefits $90,433 645,202 323,690 11,387,155 640,667 740,327 562,813 182,791 1,636,203 15,820,984 4,103,496 2,463,362 651,671 845,256 359,356 239,494 1,848,272 395,132 0 0 0

Operating $126,325 539,297 196,692 1,591,560 449,280 2,006,137 1,009,744 185,695 887,112 5,240,055 1,272,968 993,208 2,195,389 9,133,483 2,198,415 786,661 4,164,544 976,210 50,000 9,198,327 0

Capital $0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4,443 389,800 0 4,000 1,024,136 0 6,200 23,200 0 0 848,153 86,500

Total Other Expenditures $0 $323,618 0 2,935,995 0 1,362,884 0 13,078,575 0 2,528,838 0 2,853,097 0 2,995,514 0 839,014 15,000 6,375,954 0 44,411,871 3,275,553 17,327,884 0 8,875,165 0 4,234,257 9,884,060 22,713,254 5,608,640 8,969,497 0 1,662,820 0 9,860,570 0 2,373,105 395,000 445,000 1,420,000 11,466,480 0 86,500

Total Revenues $0 7,234 628,515 13,078,575 225,000 2,853,097 18,304 0 5,155,606 2,265,217 17,327,884 2,599,120 385,025 22,713,254 8,969,497 835,379 1,792,383 1,688,317 0 11,466,480 86,500

Total Positions 5.00 20.50 11.25 1.25 25.00 1.50 19.50 6.00 63.00 298.00 107.84 65.16 27.00 35.00 15.00 9.00 80.00 16.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

*Workers’ Compensa on—Property—Casualty **Includes City of Parkland, Florida ***Center for the Arts is now a division in the General Fund

154

Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget


City Commission Mission

Excellence in Educa on

To provide the Charter offices clear policy direc on toward making the City of Coral Springs the premier community in which to live, work and raise a family.

Maintain effec ve partnerships with the Broward County School Board and individual local public and private schools within Coral Springs to address overcrowding, promote safety, increase parental par cipa on, elevate student achievement, and expand educa onal opportuni es.

Customer-Involved Government Develop innova ve ways to make par cipa on in local government ac vi es possible for all residents and foster a sense of engagement among the ci zenry by effec vely communica ng a common iden ty, ac vely seeking insight into the needs of the community, aligning City services with customer expecta ons, and con nuing to strive for excellence. Financial Health and Economic Development Con nue to enhance the high level of service quality and financial stability that the City has become known for by encouraging redevelopment, diversifying tax and revenue sources, ensuring the long-term viability of financial strategies, and implemen ng “new urbanism” techniques.

Neighborhood and Environmental Sustainability Provide support to neighborhood groups and individual homeowners and business owners in maintaining and improving property values, aesthe cs, and safety throughout the City. Lead by example in the stewardship of natural resources by preserving exis ng Environmentally Sensi ve Land sites, promo ng the replenishment of the City’s tree canopy, encouraging na ve landscaping, and planning for the conserva on of resources. Youth Development and Family Values Promote and increase opportuni es for youth to become engaged in the world, while providing support in addressing the profusion of issues facing them. Empower families to create strong es, pass on values and tradi ons, strive for economic security, increase health and safety, and join in crea ng a shared community vision.

City Commission

1

Mayor (0100) 0

Vice-Mayor 1 (0100) 0

Commissioner 3 (0100) 0

Left Number = Number of Positions Right Number = Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent) Center Number = Department/Division Number

City of Coral Springs, Florida

155


City Commission (continued) Strength in Diversity

Core Processes

Capitalize on the strength of diversity in our community through ongoing dialogue and gathering together to communicate, understand, and celebrate our differences and similari es.