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AN N UAL BU D G E T FISCAL YEAR 2020

ADOPTED


Fiscal Year 2020

Annual Budget City of Coral Springs, Florida

Mayor Scott Brook

Commissioner Shawn Cerra

Commissioner Larry Vignola Commissioner Joshua Simmons

City Manager Michael Goodrum

City Attorney John Hearn

Budget Development Team Michael Goodrum, City Manager Melissa Heller, Deputy City Manager Horace McHugh, Deputy City Manager Frank Babinec, Fire Chief / Assistant City Manager Robert Curnow, Assistant City Manager Catherine Givens, Director of Budget and Strategy Vannelys Rivera, Budget Business Partner Laurie Bishara, Budget Business Partner Tyler Kohrt, Senior Financial Analyst Ronald E. Gomez. Financial Business Analyst Kristin Holowicki, Budget Business Partner Marissa Williams, Budget Analyst Ana Fernandez, Principal Office Assistant Cover design by Christine Parkinson Jahrsdoerfer

Vice Mayor Joy Carter

Adopted September 18, 2019


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Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Distinguished Budget Presentation Award

The Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada (GFOA) presented a Distinguished Budget Presentation Award to City of Coral Springs, Florida for its annual budget for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2018. In order to receive this award, a governmental unit must publish a budget document that meets program criteria as a policy document, as a financial plan, as an operations guide, and as a communications device. This award is valid for a period of one year only. We believe our current budget continues to conform to program requirements, and we are submitting it to GFOA to determine its eligibility for another award.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

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Table of Contents Introduction................................................................................................................................................................................... 9 City Manager’s letter...................................................................................................................................................................... 9 Strategic Goals............................................................................................................................................................................. 13 Core Values.................................................................................................................................................................................. 14 City of Coral Springs Organization Chart...................................................................................................................................... 15 History of Coral Springs................................................................................................................................................................ 16 Budget and Strategy Division....................................................................................................................................................... 17 Budget Overview ................................................................................................................................................................................. 19 Budget Process Overview............................................................................................................................................................. 19 Budget Highlights........................................................................................................................................................................ 24 Fund Structure Overview............................................................................................................................................................. 30 Budgeted Funds Overviews......................................................................................................................................................... 35 General Fund Budget.......................................................................................................................................................... 35 Fire Fund Budget................................................................................................................................................................ 44 Water and Sewer Fund Budget........................................................................................................................................... 48 Stormwater Fund Budget................................................................................................................................................... 51 Health Fund Budget........................................................................................................................................................... 53 General Insurance Fund Budget.......................................................................................................................................... 55 Coral Springs Charter School Fund Budget.......................................................................................................................... 57 Public Art Fund Budget....................................................................................................................................................... 58 Equipment Services Fund Budget....................................................................................................................................... 59 Pension Fund Budget.......................................................................................................................................................... 62 Solid Waste Fund Budget.................................................................................................................................................... 64 Debt Service Fund Budget.................................................................................................................................................. 65 Debt Management............................................................................................................................................................. 70 Capital Improvement Program..................................................................................................................................................... 72 Impact of CIP on the Operating Budget.............................................................................................................................. 76 Capital Improvement Summary by Fund............................................................................................................................ 81 CIP Budget by Funding Source - All Funds.......................................................................................................................... 82 General Fund CIP Summary by Funding Source.................................................................................................................. 83 Major Capital Projects by Department................................................................................................................................ 84 Major Capital Projects by Location...................................................................................................................................... 85 Business Plan........................................................................................................................................................................................ 86 Introduction................................................................................................................................................................................. 86 Market Environment.................................................................................................................................................................... 87 Environmental Scan..................................................................................................................................................................... 97 Financial Strategy...................................................................................................................................................................... 100 General Fund Five-Year Forecast Summary ............................................................................................................................... 106 Customer Requirements Analysis............................................................................................................................................... 110 Service and Operations Strategy................................................................................................................................................ 120 Performance Management Summary........................................................................................................................................ 146 Department Budgets Overview................................................................................................................................................. 156 Sample Department Budgets Page............................................................................................................................................ 157 Department Budgets................................................................................................................................................................. 158 City Attorney.................................................................................................................................................................... 158 City Commission............................................................................................................................................................... 160 City Manager’s Office........................................................................................................................................................ 161

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Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Table of Contents (continued) Development Services...................................................................................................................................................... 165 Financial Services............................................................................................................................................................. 170 Fire/EMS........................................................................................................................................................................... 173 Human Resources............................................................................................................................................................. 178 Information Technology.................................................................................................................................................... 182 Parks and Recreation........................................................................................................................................................ 185 Police................................................................................................................................................................................ 192 Public Works..................................................................................................................................................................... 196 Summary of Fleet Purchases 2020............................................................................................................................................. 201

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Tables and Illustrations Budget Overview ................................................................................................................................................................................. 19 FY 2020 Budget Calendar............................................................................................................................................................. 23 Coral Springs operating millage rate ........................................................................................................................................... 24 Operating millage rate comparison with other municipalities..................................................................................................... 24 Voter-approved debt service millage rate.................................................................................................................................... 24 Tax Rate Fiscal Year 2020.............................................................................................................................................................. 24 Net full-time position changes per fiscal year.............................................................................................................................. 25 Full-time staff changes during Fiscal Year 2019........................................................................................................................... 26 Changes in FTE’s in Fiscal Year 2019............................................................................................................................................. 26 Full-time staff changes for Fiscal Year 2020................................................................................................................................. 27 Fiscal Year 2020 changes to full-time staff................................................................................................................................... 27 Timeline of major events impacting the City’s financial condition............................................................................................... 28 Annual net operating budget and capital.................................................................................................................................... 29 Major Funds................................................................................................................................................................................. 30 Fund structure overview.............................................................................................................................................................. 31 Summary of net budgeted revenues — Fiscal Year 2020............................................................................................................ 32 Summary of net budgeted expenditures —Fiscal Year 2020....................................................................................................... 33 Where the money comes from by source (all funds).................................................................................................................... 34 Where the money goes by category (General Fund only)............................................................................................................. 34 Where the money goes by type of program (all funds)................................................................................................................ 34 Millage rates, combined, historical.............................................................................................................................................. 38 General Fund total revenues—$133,595,003*........................................................................................................................... 38 Franchise fees.............................................................................................................................................................................. 39 Utility service taxes...................................................................................................................................................................... 39 General Fund total expenditures—$133,595,003....................................................................................................................... 41 General Fund revenue and expenditure summary ....................................................................................................................... 42 General Fund non-departmental operating expenses................................................................................................................. 43 Fire Assessment rate schedule ..................................................................................................................................................... 45 Fire Fund total revenues—$26,654,759...................................................................................................................................... 45 Fire Assessment rate comparison Fiscal Year 2020 Proposed........................................................................................................ 46 Fire Fund total expenditures—$26,654,759*............................................................................................................................. 46 Fire Fund revenue and expense summary.................................................................................................................................... 47 Water bill for average single-family residence............................................................................................................................. 49 Water and Sewer Fund Total Revenues—$25,958,135............................................................................................................... 49 Water and Sewer Fund revenue and expense summary............................................................................................................... 50 Water and Sewer Fund Total Expenditures—$25,958,135 ......................................................................................................... 50 Stormwater Fund revenue and expense summary....................................................................................................................... 52 Health Fund revenue and expense summary............................................................................................................................... 54 General Insurance Fund revenue and expense summary............................................................................................................. 56 Ten-year fleet replacement cost................................................................................................................................................... 60 Equipment Service Fund revenue and expense summary............................................................................................................ 61 Solid Waste Assessment............................................................................................................................................................... 64 Allocation of Non-Voted Debt Service for Fiscal Year 2020........................................................................................................... 66 General Obligation Bonds Outstanding........................................................................................................................................ 67 Ad Valorem Millage Rate Charged for General Obligation Bonds.................................................................................................. 67 Debt Maturity Schedule............................................................................................................................................................... 68 Capital expenditure Fiscal Year 2020............................................................................................................................................ 72

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Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Tables and Illustrations (continued) Capital expenditure Fiscal Years 2020-2025................................................................................................................................. 72 Fleet Replacement Program contributions and expenses............................................................................................................. 74 Computer Replacement Program contributions and expenses..................................................................................................... 74 CIP funding sources- Fiscal Year 2020........................................................................................................................................... 75 CIP Operating Capital- Fiscal Year 2020........................................................................................................................................ 77 CIP impact on the operating budget FY 2020............................................................................................................................... 78 FY2020 Capital Projects Financed Via Grants................................................................................................................................ 80 Capital Improvement Summary by Fund..................................................................................................................................... 81 CIP Budget by Funding Source - All Funds.................................................................................................................................... 82 Major Capital Projects by Department......................................................................................................................................... 84 Major Capital Projects by Location............................................................................................................................................... 85 Business Plan........................................................................................................................................................................................ 86 Total Taxable Assessed Values...................................................................................................................................................... 88 Demographic charts.................................................................................................................................................................... 97 Population age............................................................................................................................................................................ 97 Population trends........................................................................................................................................................................ 97 Growing Hispanic Population....................................................................................................................................................... 98 Place of birth............................................................................................................................................................................... 98 Language spoken at home........................................................................................................................................................... 98 Income......................................................................................................................................................................................... 99 Population below poverty level................................................................................................................................................... 99 General Fund Revenues............................................................................................................................................................. 102 Fire Assessment rate comparison Fiscal Year 2020..................................................................................................................... 107 Water and Sewer Fund forecasted debt service ......................................................................................................................... 108 Residential Solid Waste Assessment Rate.................................................................................................................................. 109 Survey respondents by general location.................................................................................................................................... 110 City Communications Rating Comparison.................................................................................................................................. 111 Coral Springs as a place to live & raise children.......................................................................................................................... 113 Overall ratings of customer service............................................................................................................................................ 115 Overall perceptions of Coral Springs........................................................................................................................................... 116 Overall Business Atmosphere Rating.......................................................................................................................................... 117 Reasons Businesses Decide to Locate Here................................................................................................................................. 117 Ratings of City Property Taxes Compared to Other Communities ............................................................................................... 118 Best Ways for the City to Communicate with Businesses ........................................................................................................... 118 Ratings of City Property Taxes.................................................................................................................................................... 119 City of Coral Springs’ Business Model......................................................................................................................................... 120 2019-2021 Short Range Transportation improvement plan....................................................................................................... 133 2040 Long range development of regional impact transportation improvement plan............................................................... 134 Summary of Fiscal Year 2020 Initiatives..................................................................................................................................... 144 Department Scorecard............................................................................................................................................................... 146 Summary of Fleet Purchases 2020............................................................................................................................................. 201

City of Coral Springs, Florida

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Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Introduction

To:

The Honorable Mayor and City Commissioners

From:

Michael Goodrum, City Manager

Subject:

FY2020 Adopted Annual Budget

Date:

September 18, 2019

Copy:

John J. Hearn, City Attorney Debra Thomas, City Clerk

Coral Springs is a city with a defined mission, commitment to excellence and employees dedicated to our core values of delivering a high level of service to the community with a great sense of pride in serving. The City of Coral Springs continues to make intentional, proactive, and strategic steps to strengthen the financial position while increasing transparency, innovation, and operating efficiencies citywide. Throughout the year, informative discussions and community surveys with residents and employees provided valuable feedback. Guidance from the Commission through Strategic Planning sessions, Budget Workshops, Budget Briefings, and Budget Adjustments have built the enhanced service levels in the development of the FY 2020 budget. Strategic Plan for the Future The City is committed to financial integrity and long-term sustainability. It is my pleasure to submit the City of Coral Springs Proposed Annual Budget for Fiscal Year 2020; beginning October 1, 2019 and ending September 30, 2020. The budget document represents the policy direction set by the City Commission through the Strategic Planning process. The proposed business plan is intended to give a comprehensive view of the City’s new initiatives, market environment, environmental scan, and our customer requirements analysis from our business community. The FY 2020 Business Plan contains numerous tangible initiatives the City will undertake to move it closer to its vision of serving with excellence, innovation and integrity. The strategic goals were established by the Commission during a series of multiple workshops last fiscal year and continue to guide the organization. Each quarter the Commission meets to discuss projects in the strategic plan and a report is delivered to the Commission to ensure transparency and timeliness of the plan. The proposed budget supports the goals and priorities of the City Commission while at the same time maintaining the City’s outstanding service levels and AAA bond rating, with expenditures strategically linked to the goals, objectives, core businesses, and existing obligations of the City. The strategic goals include:

CITY OF CORAL SPRINGS, FLORIDA • OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER 9500 W. Sample Rd. • Coral Springs, FL 33065 • 954-344-5906 • Fax 954-344-1043 • mgoodrum@coralsprings.org


Strategic priorities form the basis for how we develop goals for the future and deploy resources necessary to pursue and achieve those goals. Focus on Financial Sustainability During last fiscal year the City began the process of reshaping the financial trajectory to a positive 5 year forecast enabling a plan to fund upcoming costs and long-term liabilities. This was achieved by City employees meeting in five town hall settings throughout the City buildings suggesting ideas and participating with an interactive 5 and 10 year forecast modeling various optimal and dismal scenarios. Employee focus groups, leadership and commission discussion took place to form the recommended action. The issue was an increasing cost growth for expenditures with a rate of 4.5% combined with a low, steady revenue growth rate of 2.5%. The recommended action was to structurally correct and slow the cost growth through reducing staff merit increases to a rate the City can afford, begin an increased cost share for health care over 5 years to a 80/20 split and to reduce FTE’s by 10 through attrition. In addition, the City refocused the City’s vision with employees to support a culture of “Serving with excellence, innovation, and integrity” and revised the core values to Teamwork, Respect, Accountability, Innovation, Leadership, and Superior Service. Employees now have an incentive to submit ideas for innovation and receive compensation for categories of customer service, process improvement, high quality, safety, and cost savings. This incentive is termed “Innovation Shark Tank” and will continue to be funded in FY2020. The City has also spent a year updating the financial policies to guide the preparation and ongoing monitoring of the budget and financials throughout the years ahead. Additional strategic elements to this process reflected in the FY 2019‐20 Proposed Budget include: • • • • • • • • •

Increasing public outreach with educational guides for the upcoming US Census Exploring shared services with outside agencies to reduce costs Increasing focus on building Stabilization Reserve fund balance Creating organizational efficiency by moving the Office of Emergency Management under the City Manager’s Office for City wide incidents Continuing to invest in employees and organizational culture Mitigating the increasing healthcare costs by establishing an employee health clinic Addressing cost growth in pension costs through contract negotiations Creating the Horticultural division in the Public Works Department to separate dedicated funding for plants, trees, shrubs, etc. Increasing budget transparency through budget videos shared through social media, website, and City TV.

The City Commission will be voting on generating a new revenue source to specifically fund Stormwater operations and projects within the City. By approving this assessment, the increase funding generated is estimated at $1.6 million in new revenue annually. Coral Springs’ unique terrain and proximity to the Everglades makes controlling Stormwater challenging and dangerous during heavy bouts of rain. To address and improve our City’s aging infrastructure and drainage systems, especially in commonly flooded communities, a Stormwater program, which is funded by an annual assessment effective for Fiscal Year 2020 will appear on the November 2019 tax bill. The Stormwater Assessment will apply to residential, commercial, and institutional properties at a varying rate structure. Assessments are not based on property value, rather at a rate of impervious area per parcel (estimated amount of runoff from the property). The City is expanding the economic development department with additional resources and a continued partnership with the CRA to increase downtown development efforts. The City works diligently on business retention, attracting new businesses, and developing a retail strategy to diversify the tax base and increase property values of our community. During last fiscal year the City embarked on an Economic Development Strategic Plan. This will incorporate a market needs assessment, public and business input, and alignment to the City’s strategic plan with a presentation to the Commission schedule for November 2019. We welcome Costco, Athletica Health and Fitness, Young Chefs Academy, Air Adventure Park, John the Baker, Wild Fork, Aldora Aluminum and Glass, Grace Roofing, Emser Tile and Decimal Engineering. With a healthy housing market, new residential development is underway, and an energized commercial sector, developing growing and further diversifying the economic base will provide a more solid foundation to withstand future economic downturns.

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Priorities and the Impact of Maintaining the Current Millage Rate in 2020 We are proposing a balanced budget for Fiscal Year 2020 using a millage rate of $5.8732. Although this millage rate is the same millage rate as the FY 2018 and FY 2019 millage rate, it must be advertised as a tax increase because it is higher than the rolled-back rate of $5.6004 mills. The FY 2020 budget includes the following public safety enhancements for staffing and equipment, infrastructure and drainage upgrades, innovative projects that lead to operational efficiency, grant opportunities, and investing in our future: • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Enhancing staffing levels in Public Safety Adding 3 Firefighter/Paramedics Converting a Part Time to Full Time position of Community Involvement Liaison in the Police Department Adding Public Safety equipment for field use and health and wellness of staff Converting 7 grass fields to turf fields and adding 4 pickleball courts to our park system Adding a Splash Pad and continuing to refresh our parks and maintenance plans Addressing aging drainage infrastructure through funding a Stormwater Assessment Program Developing an updated Economic Development Strategic Plan Increasing funding for median maintenance and landscape improvements Addressing IT Infrastructure Growth and Cybersecurity Implementing an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) project Enhancing grant research by adding a Part time Grant Writer and implementing a grant reasearch and management software tool to access additional grant opportunities Continuing our commitment to attracting and retaining a well-qualified, highly regarded workforce while setting up an employee clinic which will help minimize the rising cost of health care.

Additional points from the FY 2020 budget to highlight include: • • • • • • • • •

Replenish reserves from Hurricane Irma. The Debt Service millage rate will slightly decrease from $0.2652 to $0.2534. The Water rates will increase 3.5% per the 2013 Water and Wastewater Study, which equates to approximately $2.40 per month for the average single-family homeowner. The residential Solid Waste Assessment will increase by $30.00, from $260.00 to $290.00. The Single-Family Fire Assessment will increase from $200 to $227.82. The Multi-Family Fire Assessment will increase from $215 to $227.82. The Commercial Fire Assessment will increase from $26.19 to $26.99 per sq ft. The Industrial/Warehouse Fire Assessment will decrease from $3.64 to $2.71 per sq ft. The Institutional Fire Assessment will increase from $31.87 to $54.51 per sq ft.

Coral Springs continues to maintain a AAA bond rating from Standard and Poor’s and Fitch and Moody’s reaffirmed the Aa1 bond rating this past August 2019 which signals to the market the City of Coral Springs is a low-risk investment, thus, lower interest rates on any borrowing and lower payments on general obligation bonds. The City also received another unqualified opinion from external auditors. Excellent Customer Ratings Customer satisfaction is a cornerstone of our Business Model. The City of Coral Springs continues to set the standard with regard to the overall quality of City services and customer satisfaction. Our most recent community survey conducted in the Spring of 2019, 94% of the residents surveyed in the 2019 community survey rated the City’s customer services as “very good” or “good” and found 95% of the business surveyed in 2018 were satisfied with the service provided by City employees.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

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Financial Summary Based on the priorities identified and discussed above, the FY 2020 adopted budget totals $298.5 million. Of the total, $257.5 million is for operations and $40.9 million is for capital projects. In prioritizing the long‐term fiscal sustainability of the City, the Adopted Budget is structurally balanced, while maintaining a Stabilization Fund reserve of at least 17 percent, working toward a 17 – 25% target range for future contributions, as well as an Open Line of Credit of $10 million for Hurricane related incidents.

Fund General Fund

Fiscal Year 2020 Budget $133,595,003

Fire Fund

26,654,759

Water and Sewer Fund

25,958,135

Health and General Insurance Funds

23,407,464

Coral Springs Charter School

14,486,806

Public Art Fund

223,200

Equipment Services Fund

12,432,473

Solid Waste Fund

5,729,635

Stormwater Fund

3,782,735

Debt Service Fund

11,274,232

Total Operating Budget

$257,544,442

Total Capital Improvement Program

$40,920,710

Total City Budget

$298,465,152

I encourage you to read further into the information describing the FY 2020 budget. Acknowledgements The development of this year’s Budget has taken a great deal of time, energy, and hard work from Department Directors, their dedicated staff and the Budget and Strategy Department. I would like to extend my sincere appreciation for the collaboration between the City, the Commission, our residents and businesses. As we move forward with the many great initiatives we have on the horizon, I appreciate the confidence and support the Mayor and Commission have shown me and our tremendous staff. Thank you to our employees who live our vision of serving with excellence, innovation and integrity. We are deeply grateful for their dedication, commitment and ability to deliver quality services to our community.

Respectfully Submitted,

Michael Goodrum City Manager

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Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Strategic Goals Serving with Excellence, Innovation, and Integrity.

Responsible City Government

City Investment in Today and Future

Upgraded City Infrastructure, Facilities and Parks

Financially Sound City Providing Exceptional Services

Downtown Becoming Vibrant

Growing Local Economy

Creating A Sense of Place and Premier Community in South Florida a Destination

Increased Business Investment and Jobs

The Place for Families to Live in Great Neighborhoods Key Initiatives: • Grant Research Enhancement

• Landscape Operation Enhancement

• Federal Lobbyist

• Bus Shelter add Solar Power Fan

• Census 2020 Outreach

• Implementation of Economic Development Strategic Plan

• ADA Compliance Support • Senior Programming (Enhancement) • Employee Health Clinic • Adds to Staff: Civil Engineer • Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) • IT Infrastructure Growth • Pickleball Courts • American League Upgrades

• Implementation of Economic Development Customer Relationship Management (CRM) system • Assist Developer for Cornerstone Project • Form Village Square Plan with Developer • Continue City Outreach on Business Retention, Expansion and Attraction (BRE) visits

• Splash Pad

City of Coral Springs, Florida

• Infrastructure Improvements in Downtown • Enhance Downtown Events/ Entertainment • Develop Retail Strategy • Educational Guides • Add (3) Firefighter/Paramedics • License Plate Reader • Add to Staffs: Community Involvement Liaison • Body worn cameras and in-car LPRs • Police Replacement Equipment • Adds to Staff: AHA Training Center Coordinator

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Core Values Teamwork

Leadership

• Supportive: Provides encouragement and supports team members in a kind and trusting manner; listens and responds constructively to support other’s ideas; manages conflict.

•  Supportive and Caring: Supports risk taking and removes barriers to encourage innovative new ideas; encourages unity; responds with empathy; delegates responsibility to staff and encourages them; recognizes initiative; is fair and consistent in treatment of employees.

• Communication: Is clear and concise when communicating; is open-minded and respectful; uses a positive tone and body language. • Collaborative: Partners with other departments and customers to obtain the best possible solution; builds and sustains cooperative relationships.

Respect •  Consideration: Exhibits concern and consideration for others.

•  Change Management: Clearly communicates need for change; implements strategies for effecting and controlling change; prepares and supports employees in making organizational change and takes action to develop skills needed as a result of change.

•  Tolerance: Ability and willingness to accept another’s ideas and beliefs even if you they are different from your own.

•  Develops Others: Creates a learning environment to ensure employees realize their highest potential; provides meaningful coaching and feedback, clear direction, and expectations.

•  Gratitude: Shows appreciation early and often; expresses pleasure/thankfulness by what someone has done.

Accountability

•  Follows Through: Sees a task through to its completion; follows through on promises. •  Truthful: Tells facts that are true; can be trusted to be honest and sincere.

Superior Service (Customer Centric) •  Professional: Possesses self-control; shows respect at all times; is courteous, conscientious, reliable and competent. •  Patient: Great listener, empathetic, and attentive. •  Communication: Active listener, clear and concise, positive tone and body language; possesses great phone etiquette (i.e., transfers calls only once, uses person’s name). •  Knowledgeable: Resourceful, self-learner, confident without being condescending, accurate, share knowledge; provides the correct answer; trained/certified. •  Proactive: Anticipates customer needs by reading body language and responding professionally; offers alternatives to best meet customer needs; identifies real problem by asking appropriate questions.

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•  Committed to Organization: Fully committed to the success of the organization; models the City’s core values; ensures that employees understand how their work is important to the big picture.

• Takes Ownership: Takes responsibility and ownership for decisions, actions and results (this may include personal wellbeing and cost-effective decision-making); accountable for how and what is accomplished; takes pride in their work. • Transparent: Communicates how and why something occurs; operates in a way that creates openness and honesty; no hidden agendas creating collaboration, cooperation and collective decision making. • Ethical: Treats others with civility; demonstrates behaviors that are morally right.

Innovation • Creative Thinker: Thinks “outside of the box”; fresh perspective; pushes for new ideas; focused on improvements. • Forward Thinker: Interested in change and progress; thinks of new ways to do things; open to change; plans for the future not just the present; thinks of new and fun ways to engage employees and residents. • Dealing with Change: Responds to change with understanding and using a “problem-solving” approach; rapidly learns and uses new information; flexible and adaptable.

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

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E


City of Coral Springs Organization Chart Citizens/ Customers

Citizens Advisory Committees and Boards

City Commission City Attorney

John J. Hearn jhearn@coralsprings.org

Internal Auditor

City Manager

Michael Goodrum mgoodrum@coralsprings.org

Fire/EMS

Fire Chief/Assistant City Manager

Frank Babinec fbabinec@coralsprings.org

Assistant City Manager Robert Curnow rcurnow@coralsprings.org

Information Technology

Emergency Management

Director of Information Technology Stephen Dyer sdyer@coralsprings.org

Innovation

Deputy City Manager

Horace McHugh hmchugh@coralsprings.org

Budget and Strategy

Director of Budget and Strategy Catherine Givens cgivens@coralsprings.org

Communications and Marketing

Director of Comm. and Marketing Liz Kolodney lkolodney@coralsprings.org

Development Services

Director of Development Services Susan Hess Krisman skrisman@coralsprings.org

Public Works

Director of Public Works Rich Michaud rmichaud@coralsprings.org

Deputy City Manager

Melissa Heller mheller@coralsprings.org

Police

Chief of Police

Clyde Parry cparry@coralsprings.org

City Clerk’s Office

City Clerk Debra Thomas dthomas@coralsprings.org

Public Safety Dispatch

Financial Services

Director of Financial Services Kim Moskowitz kmoskowitz@coralsprings.org

Human Resources

Director of Human Resources Dale Pazdra dpazdra@coralsprings.org

Parks and Recreation

Director of Parks and Recreation Rick Engle rengle@coralsprings.org

Economic Development

Director of Economic Development

Legend

Kristi Bartlett

Legislative Affairs

kbartlett@coralsprings.org

Areas of Focus

Charter Offices

Charter Offices

Charter Offices Community Redevelopment Agency

City of Coral Springs, Florida

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History of Coral Springs History of Coral Springs 2018 City Celebrates 50th /anniversary

Ribbon cutting to New City Hall

2013 The City of Coral Springs becomes the first state or local government to receive the Baldrige Award

2007 30 year old City faces staggering growth rate- creating a huge demand for City services- Coral Springs City Center was renovated to add museum, Aquatic Complex was expanded, Sportsplex and Tennis Center created

1995 1990 1980

O. Benjamin Geiger was elected Mayor and began the task of making Coral Springs independent-including establishingthe City’s first ad valorem property tax- $4.0000 mils

City holds first election: Mayor Lewie Mullins and Vice Mayor Robert Fuller elected

Growth continued to be the City’s greatest concern. By 1985, the population surpassed 50,000 and schools were overcrowded. In 1983 total property value passed $1 billion mark

1974

The census of 1970 set Coral Springs’ population at 1,489/ Broward County School Board voted to build the City’s first elementary school

1970 1967 1966

Westinghouse Electric Corporation acquired Coral Ridge Properties

1965

City’s First employee was hiredPolice Chief Richard Vedilago

1964 July 1963, Coral Springs was Incorporation as a city

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The Strategic and Business planning system we use today—allocating resources strategically through data-driven decision making—was instituted

Master plan for 50,000 residents living in small neighborhoods was developed

1963

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Budget and Strategy Division We are pleased to present this nationally recognized planning and budgeting document as one of the many services we provide to the City of Coral Springs. Budget and Strategy is a division of the City Manager’s Office and is responsible for managing and implementing several cross-functional processes within the City, including: Strategic Plan

Grants

Business Plan

Program Analysis

Performance Management System

Financial Analysis

Annual Budget

Performance Benchmarking

Capital Improvement Program

Operational Auditing

Performance Improvement Projects

Technical Assistance for Departments

Our budgeting system meets all of the best practice recommendations of the National Advisory Council on State and Local Budgeting, as well as previous recommendations by the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA). We have had the good fortune to receive the Government Finance Officers Association Distinguished Budget Presentation Award for twenty-six consecutive years. In past years, our Annual Budget has received “Special Performance Management Recognition” from GFOA as well as “Outstanding as a Policy Document and Operations Guide.” In addition, our performance Management and budgeting system has been cited as a “Best Practice” by the National Partnership for Reinventing Government. The Fitch Rating Agency uses our planning system as a model for cities interested in achieving the distinction of an ‘AAA’ bond rating. Our performance Management system was selected as a “Best Practice” by the American Quality and Productivity Center. We also received the Certificate of Distinction from the International City/County Managers Association Center for Performance Analytics. Our strategic planning, performance Management, and budgeting efforts also contributed to the receipt of the 2007 Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award. We are the first state or local government to receive the Baldrige Award. In addition, we also received the Florida Governor’s Sterling Award for Organizational Performance Excellence in 1997 and again in 2003. We are the first organization to win the Governor’s Sterling Award for the second time. For more information, please visit our web site, www.coralsprings.org, to download copies of our Strategic Plan, Business Plan, Annual Budget, Capital Improvement Plan, and other related documents and presentations.

Thank You! Thanks to the City Manager’s Office, the department heads and their staff for helping us make this budget successful! We would also like to acknowledge the valuable assistance of Christine Parkinson Jahrsdoerfer for developing the cover design of this budget document.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Catherine Givens

Director of Budget and Strategy (954) 344-5920 cgivens@coralsprings.org

Vannelys Rivera

Budget Business Partner (954) 344-5928 vrivera@coralsprings.org

Laurie Bishara

Budget Business Partner (954) 344-5938 lbishara@coralsprings.org

Tyler Kohrt

Senior Financial Analyst (954) 346-1723 tkohrt@coralsprings.org

Marissa Williams Budget Analyst (954) 344-1133

mjwilliams@coralsprings.org

Kristin Holowicki Grant Coordinator (954) 344-5902

kholowicki@coralsprings.org

Ronald E. Gomez

Financial Business Analyst (954) 340-4210 rgomez@coralsprings.org

Ana Fernandez

Principal Office Assistant (954) 340-1191 anafernandez@coralsprings.org

City of Coral Springs 9500 West Sample Road Coral Springs, FL 33065 www.coralsprings.org Fax: (954) 344-1198

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Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Budget Process Overview How the Budget Was Created The Strategic Plan began with the City’s vision, mission, strategic goals, and core values stated for the following five years. Reviewed and updated annually, the action plan creates a shared vision for the future of the community. Strategic Goals In 1997, the City Commission began a process of strategic planning designed to identify the issues that must be addressed to achieve our mission and that will persist over the lifetime of the Strategic Plan. These long-range policy issues developed by the City Commission in Fiscal Year 2018, emphasize the values of our customers: • Premier Community in South Florida • Growing Local Economy • Downtown Becoming Vibrant • City Investment in Today and Future • Responsible City Government For each strategic goal, an action plan is developed for implementing policy, department operations, and key performance indicators. Through this process, the Business Plan was developed: • Commission goal: Identify the vital issues. • Initiatives: Allocate activities, resources, personnel, investment and time planned for the year to achieve each key performance indicator. • City Key Performance Indicators: Quantifiable performance measures used to evaluate customer satisfaction levels and the overall performance of the City. • Departmental Key Performance Indicators: Quantifiable performance measures used to evaluate the operational performance of a department. By setting a performance target for each KPI, we are able to determine the resources necessary to attain the desired outcome. The Business Plan section includes scorecards listing the KPIs and the departments that impact each. Business Plan Once the strategic goals are established, the operations of the City are reviewed and resources aligned to bring the strategic vision to life. Specific actions, programs, capital purchases, staffing requirements and funding levels are developed in response to the needs identified in the Strategic Plan. The Business Plan is an outgrowth of the strategic goals, capturing the City’s vision in a quantifiable form, improving decision-making and resource allocation. Initiatives in this year’s plan focus on innovative projects that lead to greater safety for our residents, economic growth, additional City services, improvements to an aging infrastructure and higher levels of customer service.

City Key Performance Indicators

A benefit of using a business plan is that we can establish a direct link between costs, activities, and key drivers. We use this model to monitor our performance by:

Departmental Key Performance Indicators

City Mission Strategic Goals

• Performing variance analysis using cost drivers. • Mapping the process that links budget items to activities. • Identifying value-added and non value-added activities. In developing the annual operating budget, departments analyze both existing and potential services in light of the strategic goals. The Business Plan identifies added and removed services, which are then quantified in the line item budget. They

City of Coral Springs, Florida

19


reflect not only the strategic goals as set by the City Commission, but also incorporate feedback from customer surveys and environmental scans that contribute to the long-term financial health of the City. Departments set targets to meet the needs identified by the strategic goals. To meet these targets, programs within the departments have specific objectives that are measured through process indicators. Staff’s individual objectives and performance indicators are then linked to the program objectives. Each employee knows what the end result should be and how it contributes to the Strategic Plan. In this way, the budget becomes a tool for monitoring, rather than controlling, operating performance. The scorecards included with each department’s summary is designed to show how the program objectives support the strategic goals. Each performance indicator directly linked to the strategic goal it addresses. Our policy deployment model follows the illustrated path. It is significant we view the process in this fashion, so we combine top-down and bottom-up input, tightly linking targets to the strategic plan.

Budget Methodology The budget methodology for the City of Coral Springs is a performance-based budgeting system. This type of budgeting system identifies a particular level of service performance for each type of service (program) and the resources needed to operate it, as well as describes the structure of the departments and the programs into which they are divided. The department’s budget is separated into the following components: Mission Statement— identifies the specific purpose for the department and how it relates to the City’s overall mission. Core Processes and Outputs—a listing of the fundamental processes and the outputs for the department. New Initiatives—new services or the removal of existing services as they relate to the strategic plan. Objectives and Key Performance Indicators—the objectives focus on particular program accomplishments that will be attained within the current year. All objectives are measurable by the performance indicators supplied. Each key performance indicator includes explicit links showing how program objectives and are directly related to the strategic goals they support. Organization Charts—outline of program structure within the department. Program/Expenditure Summary—the budget for the department, summarized by program, if applicable, and by major category of expenditure: • Personal Services—salaries, overtime and other pay including vacation payment incentive, holiday pay, temporary wages. • Benefits—FICA, retirement contributions, health and other benefits. • Other Expenses—supplies, repairs, utilities, services and other costs. • Operating Capital—departmental machinery and equipment under $5,000.

Approach To The Budget Review Process Start-Up We begin by reviewing all current services in light of the Strategic Plan. Are current services sufficient or necessary? What are our customers’ needs and desires? Through resident and business surveys, SWOC (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, challenges) analysis, Slice of the Springs meetings, our customers’ input is a critical piece of the budget process. What new initiatives should be undertaken to meet constituent requirements or a changing market environment? Then we develop a list of recommended changes arising out of this analysis, forming the basis for the Business Plan. Beginning with each department’s mission statement, which is a driving force behind the department’s budget and should set the direction of the department, we develop a projected budget based on the previous year’s budget with any new initiatives appended, and any discontinued services removed. From there, goals and objectives are developed that relate to each other and to the department’s mission and the City’s Key Performance Indicators as outlined in the Strategic Plan. Goals and objectives should be realistic, quantifiable, and include improvements to the efficiency and effectiveness of the department. Current goals and objectives may be used to establish a starting point for the future.

20

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


In the spring, the Budget and Strategy Department distributes to departments a target budget for the coming year, which is based on projections of current year expenditures, as well as the two prior years’ actual expenditures. Included in this target budget are budgeted line items for salaries and benefits (for example, pension and health plan allocations). Also included are the current year’s goals and objectives for the department. At the same time, Capital Replacement Program, Capital Improvement Program and physical inventory worksheets are distributed for department input. Verification of all numbers and assumptions made in these categories is carried out by departmental staff. Personnel changes such as retirements, projected salary increases or changes in hours worked are submitted to the Budget and Strategy Departmenr. Methodology Given the slow and steady economic recovery, the budget process proceeded in two steps. First, the Budget and Strategy Deparment asked departments to develop a budget with the expectation of no new money. Second, the City Manager’s Office asked departments to identify cost savings and/or revenue enhancements resulting from service refinements. The service refinement exercise was not necessarily about cutting service, but about finding a different way of providing that service. Investments were considered if they would lead to enhanced productivity or reduced expenditures. While indiscriminate, across-the-board cuts are easy to implement and have the pretense of equity and fairness, these cuts do not consider customer (that is, residents’ and business’) needs and expectations. The City of Coral Springs’ business model, by contrast, has customer-driven excellence as its foundation. Our customer-driven excellence philosophy enables the City to address potential challenges strategically. It involves awareness of current and emerging customer needs, expectations and trends, which, in turn, leads to increasing levels of customer trust, value, and satisfaction. Operating Expenses The target budget will also contain operating expenses based on projections of the current year’s expenditures. Actual users of the supplies and services review their practices and habits involving daily expenditures for possible efficiencies. Departments review line item account codes for descriptive accuracy to determine if they reflect the actual types of expenditures. Lastly, Departments provide justification for any changes from the target budget based on information from current year expenditures or information obtained from other sources, such as trends in next year’s contracts or service costs provided by the Purchasing Division. Capital Expenses Departments also evaluate all existing equipment, facilities, and other capital items, to determine if useful life has been exceeded, or will be exceeded, in the coming budget year. They then identify all recommended capital expenditures from this evaluation of equipment. Vehicle life expectancy information is provided by the Public Works Department-Equipment Services Division. Other capital expenses, such as office equipment, are estimated with help from the Purchasing Division. Each department maintains a six-year Capital Improvement Program plan for its equipment needs and submits same to the Budget and Strategy Department for review, summarization and presentation to the City Commission for approval. Business Plan Taking into account the market environment, customer expectations and emerging issues, the changes to service structure (discontinued services, new initiatives, etc...) are outlined and cross-referenced to the Strategic Plan. Citywide financial strategies are identified to address the long-term needs of the City in relation to emerging issues that have been identified through the strategic planning process. Anticipated results are identified and linked to strategic goals for inclusion in the City’s performance management system. Based on the recommended projects and services, a preliminary budget is presented at the Business Plan workshop.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

21


Budget Format A municipal budget document should provide sufficient, meaningful and useful information to elected officials, City staff, and to the public. To that end, we have developed a budget document that serves six primary functions: • Policy document • Financial plan • Operations guide • Communication device • Performance Management tool • Values document. Together, these budget elements define what the City of Coral Springs has done, what it plans to do, and how it will accomplish its objectives. The budget is a program- and performance-based plan that links prescribed organizational goals and objectives with the financial resources necessary to achieve them. Each of the budget’s programs represent a “product” of the City. Contained within each program are objectives and achievements. The program/performance budget is integrated with line item financial information to ensure optimal budget control. This program/performance budget enables the City Commission and the public to analyze the budget based on program goals and performance objectives rather than line item costs. In addition, this format provides information so that the City Commission and the public will have a better understanding of the allocation of resources among programs and the measurable work that each department will accomplish. The annual budget includes the following sections: Introduction, Budget Overview, Business Plan, and Department Budgets.

Approving The Budget During the summer months, recommended operating and capital improvement program budget documents are prepared and presented to the City Manager and forwarded to the City Commission for review during public budget workshops. In accordance with State law, public hearings and final adoption of the budget occurs in September.

Monitoring The Budget The Budget staff is authorized to transfer funds within individual departments. Revisions that alter the total expenditures of any department within a fund must be approved by the Director of Budget and Strategy. Actual expenditures and operating transfers out may not exceed budget appropriations at the individual fund level. Appropriations which are neither expended, encumbered, nor specifically designated to be carried over, lapse at the end of the fiscal year.

Amending The Budget If it becomes evident that a particular fund has circumstances requiring a budget to increase, a budget amendment may be done. The Director of Budget and Strategy submits a request to amend the budget to the City Commission. The request contains a written explanation for the request. City Commission approval is required for budget amendments which alter the total adopted budget amount of any fund. Budget amendment must be posted on the City’s website within 5 days after adoption in accordance with Florida Statute 166.241.

22

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


FY 2020 Budget Calendar As of June 14, 2019

FY 2020 Budget Calendar

Date

Description

Time

Location

12/10/2018

Directors Planning

8:30 a.m.

CMO Executive Conf Room

8:30 a.m.

Everglades Conf Room

12/11–12/12 CC Planning Workshop February

Develop Budget Theme

4/03/2019

CC Spring Retreat

10:00 a.m.

The Center – Rooms A & B

4/04/2019

Budget Kickoff

2:00 p.m.

Chambers

4/05/2019

Budget Training Session I

10:00 a.m.

Everglades Conf Room

4/08/2019

Budget Training Session II

2:00 p.m.

Everglades Conf Room

5/1/2019

Budget Package due to Budget

2:00 p.m.

N:\Budget Forms

5/13– 5/20

Departmental Budget Meetings

Individually scheduled

CMO Executive Conf Room

6/6/2019

Budget Recommendation to Sr. Staff

10:30am

CMO Executive Conf Room

6/11/2019

Business Plan Appeal

Individually scheduled

CMO Executive Conf Room

6/13/2019

Business Plan Decision

7/10/2019

CC Business Plan Workshop I*

6:00 p.m.

Sawgrass Room

7/24/2019

CC Business Plan Workshop II* 5:15 p.m.  TRIM Notification prepared and submitted to CC  Adopt Preliminary Assessment Resolutions

Chambers

9/12/2019

First Public Budget Hearing*

Chambers

9/18/2019

Second Public Budget Hearing* 6:30 p.m.  Adopt Operating Budget and Capital Improvement Program

5:15 p.m.

Chambers

*All Commission meetings and workshops are open to the public Abbreviations Used: CC—City Commission CMO—City Manager’s Office TRIM—Truth in Millage

T:\Division Share\City Administration\Management and Budget\Budgets\Fiscal Year 2020 Budget\Budget Calendar 2020.docx

City of Coral Springs, Florida

23


Budget Highlights

Tax Rate Fiscal Year 2020

General Operating Millage

Debt Service Millage

Introduction

$5.8732 $0.2534

Combined City Millage Rate $6.1266

The Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget, which was adopted on September 18, 2019, is a numerical reflection of the Fiscal Year 2020 Business Plan. By allocating resources in alignment with the City Commission’s five strategic goals and performance indicators, we believe this budget will successfully meet the challenges before us and set the stage for continued success in the future.

Operating Millage Rate rate Coral Springs operating millage

Voter-Approved Debt Service Millage Ratemillage rate Voter-approved debt service $1.0000

$7.0000 $5.8732 $5.8732 $5.8732

$6.0000 $5.0000 $4.0000

$4.5697 $4.5697 $4.5697 $4.3559 $4.3939

$0.8000

$4.7982 $4.7982

$0.6000

$3.8866

$3.0000

$0.4000 $0.2915

$2.0000

$0.2000

$1.0000 $0.0000

$0.1763

$0.2933

$0.2906 $0.2033

$0.1763

$0.2948

$0.2753

$0.2652

$0.2534

$0.2038

$0.0000

FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 FY 2019 FY 2020

FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 FY 2019 FY 2020

Budget in Brief The adopted operating net budget for Fiscal Year 2020 for all funds totals $212,471,956. This represents an increase of $11,394,442 or 5.7% compared to the Fiscal Year 2019 net budget. The Fiscal Year 2020 budget reflects community needs as identified in the Fiscal Year 2018-2023-2033 Strategic Plan and 2020 Business Plan. Highlights of the Fiscal Year 2020 budget include: • Total taxable assessed value increased 4.6% in the City of Coral Springs to $10,755,584,476. • Operating millage rate will remain at $5.8732. Combined with the increase in assessed values, the City will receive approximately $2.64 million in additional property tax revenue. • The voter-approved debt service millage rate will decrease from $0.2652 to $0.2534, a decrease of $0.0118 or -4.4% mainly driven by the increase in assessed values.

FY 2019 Final Millage Rates

Plantation Pembroke Pompano Pines Beach*

* Pompano Beach includes a separate EMS millage of 0.5000

* Pompano Beach includes a separate EMS millage of 0.5000

24

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

Davie

4.1193

5.6270

Coral Springs

5.6361

Sunrise

5.6736

5.8732

Deerfield Beach

5.8000

6.0543

Hollywood Miramar

Comparing Coral Springs’ Fiscal Year 2020 operating millage rate to other cities’ final Fiscal Year 2019 operating millage rates.

2020

6.1267

7.1172

$10 $9 $8 $7 $6 $5 $4 $3 $2 $1 $0

7.4665

Operating millage rate comparison with other municipalities

Ft Lauderdale


• The combined general operating and debt service millage rate is $6.1266 per $1,000 of assessed value, a decrease of $0.0118 or 0.19%. • The Fire Assessment for single-family homes will increase by $27.82, from $200.00 to $227.82. Multi-family assessment will increase by $12.82, from $215.00 to $227.82 per unit. Fire for commercial properties will increase by $0.80, from $26.10 to $26.99 per 100 square feet and industrial warehouse will decrease by $0.93, from $3.64 to $2.71 per 100 square feet. Institutional properties will also see an increase of $22.64, from $31.87 to $54.51 per 100 square feet. • Water and Sewer rates will increase by 3.5%, an increase of $2.40 per month for the average residential customer. • The Residential Solid Waste Special Assessment will increase by $30.00, from $260 to $290 per single-family home. • General Fund debt service for franchise and capital revenue bonds, as a percentage of total budget, will equal 6.1% in Fiscal Year 2020 as compared to 6.0% last year. The increase of 4.61% or $356,429 versus Fiscal Year 2019 is driven by the full year impact of the 2017 capital revenue note related to the Public Safety and Public Works Campus and to the addition of the 2019 lease payment for the Turf fields. The debt levels are well within the General Fund debt service policy limitation of 12.5% of total General Fund expenditures. • With a General Obligation bond indebtedness of 0.24% of total taxable assessed value, the City is well below its self-imposed debt policy limit of 5%. Capital Improvements • In Fiscal Year 2020, the City will invest $40,870,710 in capital improvements and upkeep of City-owned facilities. For details of the projects planned for this year, refer to the Capital Improvement Program section included in this document. Staffing • Total full-time positions in Fiscal Year 2020 is 831 (excludes Fire/EMS services for Parkland, contractual staff and commission). This represents an addition of three (3) full-time employees, offset partially by the conversion of a part-time position to full-time status. The table below shows the newly authorized positions for the upcoming budget year. • In Fiscal Year 2019, the City added 3 full-time employees and 8 contractual for Fire/EMS Parkland.

Net full-time position changes per fiscal year Net Full-Time Position Changes per Fiscal Year 50

44

40 30

29 22

20

16 8

10

15

5

12

7

13

14

4

11 3

6

3

0 -2

-10 -13

-11

-8

City of Coral Springs, Florida

FY 2020

FY 2019

FY 2018

FY 2017

FY 2016

FY 2015

FY 2014

FY 2013

FY 2012

FY 2011

FY 2010

FY 2009

FY 2008

FY 2007

FY 2006

FY 2005

FY 2004

FY 2003

FY 2002

FY 2001

-20

25


Full-time staff changes during Fiscal Year 2019 During the Fiscal Year 2019, the City established a goal of slowing cost growth. One of the objectives was reducing the headcount base by 10 Full Time Equivalent (FTE’s). Other objectives were addressed in the city and department operations. By the end of Fiscal Year 2019, twelve (12) vacant positions were eliminated via attrition. Conversely, a total of five (5) positions were added to support the fulltime needs of several city departments. The net impact was a reduction of seven (7) FTEs. In addition, the Fire department added eight (8) Firefighter/Paramedic positions to meet the demand and requirements of the new Parkland contract. The new FTE count at the end of Fiscal Year 2019 was 870 (excluding the five (5) commissioners) and was approved by the City Commission on July 2019 via Budget Amendment. The 870 FTE’s include regular and contractual resources: 828 regular, 42 contractual. The forty-two (42) contractual resources are: forty-one (41) for Parkland Contract and one (1) Emergency Management Planner. Fiscal Year 2020 will reflect a full- time staff total net increase of three (3) positions for a new total headcount of 873 (excluding five (5) commissioners)

Changes in FTE’s in Fiscal Year 2019 FY2019 FTE Count (before changes) Position Name

Department

Fund

Principal Office Assistant

Development Services

GF

(1.0)

Development Services Support Specialist

Development Services

GF

(1.0)

Code Compliance Officer

Development Services

GF

(1.0)

Parks Technician

Parks & Recreation

GF

(1.0)

Maintenance Worker

Parks & Recreation

GF

(7.0)

Principal Office Assistant

Police

GF

Positions Managed via Attrition

(1.0) (12.0)

Executive Assistant

City Manager's Office

GF

1.0

Event Coordinator

Communications & Marketing

GF

1.0

Director of Economic Development

Economic Development

GF

1.0

Project Support Specialist

City Clerk

GF

1.0

Emergency Management Planner (Contractual)

Emergency Management

Firefighter/Paramedics (Parkland)

GF

1.0

Adds to Staff FY2019

5.0

Adjusted FY2019 FTE Count

862.0

Fire/EMS

GF/Fire

Final FY2019 FTE Count

26

869.0 Incr/(Decr)

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

8.0 870.0


Full-time staff changes for Fiscal Year 2020 Fiscal Year 2020 will reflect a full- time staff net increase of three (3) positions for a new total headcount of 873 (excluding five (5) commissioners) During the Fiscal Year 2020 Adopted Budget, staff requested the following five (5) new positions: •

(3) Firefighter Paramedics: The department is requesting three (3) additional firefighters in the Fiscal Year 2020 budget. The additional personnel would add one (1) firefighter/paramedic to each of the three (3) fire department shifts. Benefits include: increase in the amount of personnel on particular units such as the busier units that are running a heavy amount of calls for service. This would also decrease the need for some of the busiest ladder and engine companies having to respond to medical calls for additional staffing. Having the suppression companies remain available will allow faster and more efficient responses in their respective response zones. One (1) additional person per shift will allow additional personnel to utilize their allotted accrued leave time for both vacation and comp time at a more consistent rate, which would greatly improve morale and efficiency within the fire department.

(1) Civil Engineer: The addition of a Civil Engineer to the Utilities Division will improve the quality of the engineering services the City provides. This includes engineering design, inspections, and construction management all related to Capital Improvement Projects. This alleviates the expense of hiring an outside engineering consultant for routine engineering design and allows the current Civil Engineer to direct more attention to other time-sensitive projects within the City.

(1) Community Involvement Liason: The Community Involvement Liaison will take the lead in coordinating the City’s Summer Breakspot, Summer Camp, Safety Town, Special Needs Database, Angel Tree gifting program, Holiday Programs, Shop with a Cop and Special Olympics. With the upgrade of this liaison position from part-time to full-time, the department will have the much needed coverage working with the citizens.

By installation of the Turf fields in the Parks and Recreation Department, two (2) vacant positions will be reduced in Fiscal Year 2020. •

(2) Vacant Parks Technician positions will be eliminated via attrition. Efficiencies gained from the installation of the Turf fields will translate in a reduction on the maintenance requirements needed for the parks.

Fiscal Year 2020 changes to full-time staff Position Name Firefighter/Paramedics Civil Engineer Community Involvement Liason Parks Technician

FY2019 FTE Count 870.0 Fund Incr/(Decr) Fire/ Fire/EMS 3.0 General Fund Water & Sewer Utilities Administration 1.0 Fund Police General Fund 1.0 Adds to Staff FY2020 5.0 Parks & Recreation General Fund (2.0) Positions Managed via Attrition (2.0) Net change in Staffing Fiscal Year 2020 3.0 Final FY 2020 FTE Count 873.0 Department

City of Coral Springs, Florida

27


Financial Condition The improving local and regional economy has favorably impacted the City’s financial outlook. The City’s unemployment rate (July 2019 3.1%) is expected to remain below the National (3.7%) and State (3.3%) rates and signs point toward moderate economic growth. Despite downward pressure on revenues due to residential build-out, tax relief legislation, tariffs, and the increasing costs of goods, our City’s priority is to continue efforts in maintaining sound fiscal management and stability. The City’s healthy financial position can be attributed to long-term financial planning that identifies emerging issues which may affect our ability to provide the level and type of service customers expect. For that commitment to our citizens, the City Commission is proposing to maintain the current millage of $5.8732 this fiscal year, FY 2020. As shown in the table below, our financial, political and natural environment is forcing management to make the hard but much needed decisions, to ensure the City continues to provide the exceptional level of services, control expenditure growth rate, and build up a healthy stabilization fund to prepare the City for future challenges.

How We Got Here

Timeline of major events impacting the City’s financial condition

Hurricane Wilma

Tax Reform

Ad Valorem Revenues

Economic Recession

Taxable Value

Other Revenue

Hurricane Irma

2005 (FY2006)

2007-current

2007-2015

2007-2013

2008-2017

2007-2016

2017-2018

Used ~$30M reserves

Limited tax revenue a City could collect

Recently returned to pre-recession: $35M in 2007 $35M in 2015

Recession impacted all revenue sources

Taxable value ↓ 29% from 2008 to 2012

CST ↓ $1.8M (legislative driven)

$12.7M in costs (estimated)

↑ Foreclosures

Save Our Homes caps limit increase to 3%

↑ Unemployment

Recovering: at $9.69B, still not up to $10.39B In 2008

Interest Income ↓ $1.5M

↑Sworn Pension due to Δ State of Florida Mortality Tables

(unfunded mandates)

Additional $25,000 homestead exemption New homestead portability New property tax caps

↑ Commercial vacancies

FY18 – Unfunded mandate for Police & Fire $860,000

Home values reset at lower values and are locked due to SOH

Licenses and Permits ↓ $1.3M

Bond Ratings The City is proud to have earned the highest bond rating available from Standard and Poor’s (S&P) (AAA) and Fitch Ratings (AAA). As of August 2019, the City was reaffirmed from Moody’s Investors Service receiving the Aa1 rating. The City’s goal is to maintain the AAA from S&P and Fitch while making the changes needed to earn the Aaa bond rating from Moody’s. Increasing fund balance is an important change the City can make to achieve this goal. Achieving AAA bond rating is important for our residents because it indicates to investors that the City is a low-risk investment which translates into lower interest rates and corresponding lower interest payments on general obligation bonds.

28

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Revenues The City’s intergovernmental, franchise, and other demand-driven revenues fluctuate with the economy. Most experts agree the economy will continue to grow at a modest rate in the near term. However, rather than growth returning to normal levels, the economy will move slowly but steadily upward. In the past two fiscal years, the City Commission maintained a millage rate as the property tax values increase was adequate to operate City services. In addition, a new revenue assessment will be incorporated to fund Stormwater operations and capital funding. This new revenue source will further diversify City revenues. Longer term, the City’s revenue growth is anticipated to be slow and more closely approximate to inflation; therefore, forecasts exhibit a growth rate under 3%. The City continues to suppress the expenditure growth rate to keep within the revenue growth rate. However, as CPI and other cost drivers increase with inflation, the need for future periodic millage increases may need to be considered in future years. Fund balances are improving as a result of growth-related revenues, improved productivity, and prudent financial management policies. Those fund balances have been leveraged to avoid future debt service by equity financing high priority capital purchases.

Annual net operating budget and capital Net Operating Budget Capital Improvements (CIP) Total Financial Program

Net Operating Budget General Fund Special Revenue Funds Fire Fund C.S. Charter School Fund Public Art Fund Enterprise Funds Water and Sewer Fund Solid Waste Fund Stormwater Fund Internal Service Funds Health and General Insurance Funds Equipment Services Fund Pension Fund Debt Service Fund Total Net Operating Budget

FY 2019 Budget $201,077,515 18,611,587 $219,689,102

FY 2020 Budget $212,471,956 40,920,710 $253,392,666

$ % Change Change $11,394,442 5.7% 22,309,123 119.9% $33,703,565 15.3%

FY 2019 Budget $85,918,500

FY 2020 Budget $89,678,203

$ % Change Change $3,759,702 4.4%

16,768,180 14,346,538 215,200

17,248,072 13,066,806 223,200

479,892 (1,279,732) 8,000

2.9% -8.9% 3.7%

19,236,622 4,893,880 0

20,564,075 5,675,317 3,374,944

1,327,454 781,437 3,374,944

6.9% 16.0% n/a

19,986,968 12,466,818 16,363,576 10,881,232 $201,077,515

23,335,093 12,104,454 15,927,560 11,274,232 $212,471,956

3,348,125 (362,364) (436,016) 393,000 $11,394,442

16.8% -2.9% -2.7% 3.6% 5.7%

Note: For a more comprehensive overview of net budgeted revenues and expenditures/expenses, refer to the Budget Overview section of this Budget.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

29


Fund Structure Overview 325

FY 2020 Total Operating Budget and Capital $253,392,666

FY 2020 Net Operating Budget $212,471,956

General Fund $89,678,203

Special Revenue Funds $30,538,078

Internal Services Funds $35,439,547

Water and Sewer $20,564,075

Fire $17,248,072

Insurance $23,335,093

Solid Waste $5,675,317

Charter School $ 13,066,806

Equipment Services $12,104,454

Stormwater $3,374,944

Public Art $223,200

Enterprise Funds $29,614,336

Trust and Agency Fund $15,927,560 Pension $15,927,560

Debt Service Fund $11,274,232 Debt Service $11,274,232

Major Funds

Fund Name

Fund Type

General Fund*

City Operating Fund

Fire Fund*

Special Revenue Fund

Water and Sewer Fund*

Enterprise Fund

Solid Waste Fund*

Enterprise Fund

Stormwater Fund**

Enterprise Fund

Health and General Insurance Funds* Coral Springs Charter School Fund*

Internal Service Funds Special Revenue Fund Internal Service Accounts for the costs of maintaining the City’s fleet Fund Includes the Public Art fee receipts collected during the Special Revenue permitting process for new construction and renovations of Fund existing structures

Equipment Services Fund* Public Art Fund*

Fund Description Accounts for police, code compliance, parks and recreation, public works, building, emergency medical services, and administration services Covers the fire department and subsequent divisions, including administration, suppression, inspection, training, and communications Provides water and wastewater services to approximately 51% of Coral Springs residents Includes the non-franchise portion of the City’s residential solid waste special assessment to cover cost of hauler and disposal fees Provides for a Stormwater Collection Program to fund the operation, maintenance, planning, design, and construction of stormwater infrastructure to ensure effective drainage and water quality management. Contribute to the City’s insured general liability, property, workers’ compensation, life, and employee medical benefits Includes the revenues and expenses incurred in the operation of the Coral Springs Charter School

Pension Fund

Trust and Agency Fund

Accounts for the accumulation of resources to be used for retirement benefit payments to the City’s employees

Debt Service Fund*

Debt Service Fund

Covers the revenues and payment of voter approved longterm general obligation debt and revenue bond debt

30

*Indicates appropriated funds in accordance with the Budget Ordinance. **New in Fiscal Year 2020

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Fund Structure Overview (continued)

*FY 2020 Capital Budget $40,920,710

General Fund $15,004,213

Special Revenue Funds $13,708,874

Internal Services Funds $5,680,592

Water and Sewer $5,495,000

Fire $12,095,284

Insurance $1,062,352

Stormwater $1,032,031

Charter School $1,293,590

Equipment Services $4,618,240

Enterprise Funds $6,527,031

Public Art $110,000

Tree Trust $210,000

City of Coral Springs, Florida

31


Summary of net budgeted revenues — Fiscal Year 2020 FY 2019 Adopted Net Budget General Fund

Percent of Total

FY 2020 Adopted Net Budget

Percent of Total

Dollar Change

Percent Change

$122,399,751

60.9%

$125,635,009

59.1%

$3,235,258

2.6%

Fire Fund

22,579,341

11.2%

23,662,948

11.1%

1,083,607

4.8%

Water and Sewer Fund

24,395,789

12.1%

25,958,135

12.2%

1,562,346

6.4%

2,713,025

1.3%

5,641,364

2.7%

2,928,339

107.9%

15,766,538

7.8%

14,486,806

6.8%

(1,279,732)

-8.1%

215,200

0.1%

223,200

0.1%

8,000

3.7%

Equipment Services Fund

5,371,651

2.7%

4,670,740

2.2%

(700,911)

-13.0%

Solid Waste Fund

4,947,273

2.5%

5,729,635

2.7%

782,362

15.8%

Debt Service Fund

2,688,946

1.3%

2,681,384

1.3%

(7,562)

-0.3%

0

0.0%

3,782,735

1.8%

3,782,735

n/a

100.0%

$11,394,442

5.7%

Health and General Insurance Funds C. S. Charter School Fund Public Art Fund

Stormwater Fund Total

$201,077,515

100.0% $212,471,956

Note: The total net budgeted revenues and expenditures/expenses are equal. However, the total by fund for revenue and expenditure/expenses are different due to inter-fund transfers.

Fiscal Year 2020 Net Budget - All Funds - Revenues $212,471,956 Debt Service Fund Stormwater Fund 1.3% 1.8% Fire Fund 11.1% Health and Insurance Fund & Public Art Fund 2.8%

Charter School Fund 6.8%

General Fund 59.1%

Water and Sewer Fund 12.2%

Equipment Services Fund 2.2% Solid Waste Fund 2.7%

32

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Summary of net budgeted expenditures —Fiscal Year 2020 FY 2019 Adopted Net Budget General Fund

Percent of Total

FY 2020 Adopted Net Budget

Percent of Total

Dollar Change

Percent Change

$85,918,500

42.7%

$89,678,203

42.2%

$3,759,702

4.4%

Fire Fund

16,768,180

8.3%

17,248,072

8.1%

479,892

2.9%

Water and Sewer Fund

19,236,622

9.6%

20,564,075

9.7%

1,327,454

6.9%

Health and General Insurance Funds

19,986,968

9.9%

23,335,093

11.0%

3,348,125

16.8%

C.S. Charter School Fund

14,346,538

7.1%

13,066,806

6.1%

(1,279,732)

-8.9%

215,200

0.1%

223,200

0.1%

8,000

3.7%

Equipment Services Fund

12,466,818

6.2%

12,104,454

5.7%

(362,364)

-2.9%

Pension Fund

16,363,576

8.1%

15,927,560

7.5%

(436,016)

-2.7%

Solid Waste Fund

4,893,880

2.4%

5,675,317

2.7%

781,437

16.0%

Debt Service Fund

10,881,232

5.4%

11,274,232

5.3%

393,000

3.6%

0

0.0%

3,374,944

1.6%

3,374,944

n/a

100.0%

$11,394,442

5.7%

Public Art Fund

Stormwater Fund Total

$201,077,515

100.0% $212,471,956

Note: The total net budgeted revenues and expenditures/expenses are equal. However, the total by fund for revenue and expenditure/expenses are different because of interfund transfers.

Fiscal Year 2020 Net Budget - All Funds - Expenditures $212,471,956 Solid Waste Fund 2.7% Stormater Fund 1.6%

Equipment Services Fund 5.7% Water and Sewer Fund 9.7%

General Fund 42.2% Fire Fund 8.1%

Charter School Fund 6.1%

Debt Service Fund & Public Art Fund 5.4% Pension Fund 7.5%

Health and Insurance Fund 11.0%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

33


Where the money comes from by source (all funds) 9.2% 1.8% 1.5%

Ad Valorem Taxes Sales and Use Taxes Utility Service Taxes Intergovernmental Fines and Forfeitures Misc. Revenues

26.7%

1.1%

Special Assessments Franchise Fees License and Permits Charges for Services Capital Other Financing Sources

19.6%

Where the money goes by type of program 12.0% 13.0%

3.8% 5.0%

1.9%

4.4%

Where the money goes by type of program (all funds) 0.4%

7.0%

8.0%

5.4% 6.4%

General Government Services Education Public Safety Physical Environment Economic Environment Culture and Recreation Debt Service Capital Improvements Other Financing Uses Reserves

9.4%

6.9%

Where the money goes 0.4% by category (General Fund Only) 38.7%

17.2%

Where the money goes by category (General Fund only) 4.4%

6.1%

4.2% 0.5%

43.9% 18.7%

Personal Services Benefits Other Operating Operating Capital Non-Departmental Interfund Transfers Debt Service

22.3%

34

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Budgeted Funds Overviews GENERAL Fund Budget Summary FY 2017 Actual

FY 2018 Actual

FY 2019

FY 2020

Adopted Budget

Adopted Budget

General Fund Budget $

%

Change From FY19 Budget

Change From FY19 Budget

Revenues General Operating $41,736,095 2,143,527

$54,358,346 2,180,670

$57,370,851 2,189,175

$60,011,214 2,189,175

Electricity Solid Waste Towing/Other Subtotal - Franchise Fees

7,054,851 3,061,125 134,842 10,250,817

6,933,541 3,288,947 143,838 10,366,326

7,050,000 3,131,000 120,000 10,301,000

7,000,000 3,275,000 140,000 10,415,000

(50,000) 144,000 20,000 114,000

-0.71% 4.60% 16.67% 1.11%

Utility Service Taxes Electricity Water Propane/Natural Gas Subtotal - Utility Taxes

9,162,356 2,048,622 140,326 11,351,304

9,489,135 2,038,092 128,722 11,655,949

9,650,000 2,075,763 161,019 11,886,782

9,400,000 2,068,967 140,000 11,608,966

(250,000) (6,796) (21,020) (277,816)

-2.59% -0.33% -13.05% -2.34%

State Intergovernmental Revenues: Communications Services Tax Shared Revenues Alcoholic Beverages/Casino Sales Tax Other Revenue/Municipal Rebate Subtotal State Intergovernmental

3,839,170 4,351,475 171,140 8,210,210 54,580 16,626,574

3,529,670 4,525,113 265,758 8,759,771 56,876 17,137,188

3,700,000 4,800,000 59,382 8,868,219 51,896 17,479,497

3,200,000 4,800,000 50,000 8,900,000 53,453 17,003,453

(500,000) (9,382) 31,781 1,557 (476,044)

-13.51% 0.00% -15.80% 0.36% 3.00% -2.72%

Other Intergovernmental Revenues Miscellaneous Community Bus Program Revenues First Local Option Fuel Tax Second Local Option Fuel Tax Public Safety E911 Recycling Material Revenue Subtotal Other Intergovernmental Subtotal Intergovernmental

40,000 126,773 1,340,606 961,332 229,891 212,912 2,911,515 19,538,089

40,000 123,836 1,349,045 958,476 225,233 131,296 2,827,886 19,965,074

40,000 125,002 1,390,000 980,000 240,316 50,000 2,825,318 20,304,815

40,000 125,002 1,340,000 984,900 242,719 0 2,732,621 19,736,074

(50,000) 4,900 2,403 (50,000) (92,697) (568,740)

0.00% 0.00% -3.60% 0.50% 1.00% -100.00% -3.28% -2.80%

Permits and Business Tax Building Permits Not Related State Surcharge Rebillable Overtime Other Permits (Waste Hauling) Subtotal Permits

3,707,713 149,330 93,606 15,000 3,965,649

3,084,027 209,760 85,398 15,000 3,394,185

2,725,652 126,000 126,479 15,000 2,993,131

2,850,000 150,000 96,210 15,000 3,111,210

124,348 24,000 (30,269) 118,079

4.56% 19.05% -23.93% 0.00% 3.94%

Business Tax Subtotal Permits and Business Tax

1,127,204 5,092,852

1,175,659 4,569,844

1,244,795 4,237,926

1,297,795 4,409,005

53,000 171,079

Charges For Services Parks and Recreation Cypress Park Mullins Park North Community Park Neighborhood Parks Activity Center Recreation Services Summer Recreation Transportation Gymnasium Aquatics—Cypress Pool Aquatics—Mullins Pool Aquatic Complex Sportsplex Tennis Center Cypress Tennis Subtotal Parks and Recreation

116,168 278,442 28,946 90,813 43,672 20,495 481,614 29,391 449,782 50,613 58,621 1,374,660 378,961 321,654 95,103 3,818,936

106,778 304,533 33,399 109,100 61,451 19,031 416,791 24,956 462,735 84,308 52,678 1,487,396 480,192 292,584 106,887 4,042,819

127,889 259,830 47,477 116,388 46,023 18,946 510,000 38,031 475,262 131,971 69,348 1,557,428 346,862 344,387 129,187 4,219,029

230,447 315,027 148,426 118,716 46,943 19,325 520,200 28,792 484,767 134,610 70,735 1,588,577 347,500 356,802 131,771 4,542,638

102,558 55,197 100,949 2,328 920 379 10,200 (9,239) 9,505 2,639 1,387 31,149 638 12,415 2,584 323,609

Ad Valorem Taxes Solid Waste Assessment-FF

$

2,640,363 -

4.60% 0.00% /

Franchise Fees

City of Coral Springs, Florida

4.26% 4.04%

80.19% 21.24% 212.63% 2.00% 2.00% 2.00% 2.00% -24.29% 2.00% 2.00% 2.00% 2.00% 0.18% 3.60% 2.00% 7.67%

35


General Fund Budget Summary (continued) FY 2017 Actual

FY 2019

FY 2020

$

%

Adopted Budget

Adopted Budget

Change From FY19 Budget

Change From FY19 Budget

Charges for Services to other funds W&S Fund—Admin Services W&S Fund—Economic Development Fire Fund—Admin Services Subtotal - Charges for Services - Other Fund

2,200,109 271,050 1,797,982 4,269,141

2,373,409 283,247 1,878,891 4,535,547

2,487,616 296,701 1,968,139 4,752,456

2,575,154 296,701 3,668,139 6,539,994

87,538 1,700,000 1,787,538

3.52% 0.00% 86.38% 37.61%

Charges for Services—Other General Government City Hall in the Mall Public Safety EMS Transport Fees EMS Interfacility Transportation Public Emergency Medical Transportation EMS Contract Subtotal - Charges for Services - Other

885,794 949,448 1,512,562 2,406,184 17,921 172,823 1,751 5,946,482

1,096,260 1,068,727 1,876,816 2,568,708 15,883 174,360 1,751 6,802,505

860,127 1,088,592 1,707,784 2,572,000 20,000 0 1,751 6,250,254

781,307 1,143,022 1,776,095 2,649,160 19,000 175,000 0 6,543,584

(78,820) 54,430 68,311 77,160 (1,000) 175,000 (1,751) 293,330

-9.16% 5.00% 4.00% 3.00% -5.00% n/a -100.00% 4.69%

Subtotal - Charges For Services

14,034,559

15,380,871

15,221,739

17,626,216

2,404,477

15.80%

Fines and Forfeitures Court Fines Other Police Fines Adult Deferred Prosecution Misdemeanor Diversion Prog-Admin fee Code Compliance Citations and Liens Other Miscellaneous Subtotal Fines and Forfeitures

878,665 144,339 89,859 28,413 3,468,864 823,526 5,433,666

1,206,205 160,063 93,180 26,598 1,935,753 638,993 4,060,792

900,000 180,426 90,000 30,000 1,208,000 390,000 2,798,426

927,000 184,035 90,000 30,000 658,000 659,700 2,548,735

27,000 3,609 (550,000) 269,700 (249,691)

3.00% 2.00% 0.00% 0.00% -45.53% 69.15% -8.92%

Other Income: Interest Rents & Royalties/Cell Tower Lease Sale CRA Contribution Charter School Lease Auction Adjusments for Hurricanes SW Disposal Rebate Solid Waste Disposal Agreement Facility Rental Other Miscellaneous Subtotal Other Income

325,159 1,288,094 50,000 1,420,000 11,587 0 22,605 404,010 165,601 294,691 4,016,322

436,366 1,262,160 70,614 1,420,000 23,832 261,933 22,580 425,286 158,457 366,065 4,447,294

338,130 1,484,404 155,675 1,420,000 20,188 0 3,222 418,323 150,638 132,999 4,123,579

360,507 1,484,404 155,000 1,420,000 20,592 0 2,400 422,506 150,638 178,932 4,194,979

22,377 (675) 404 (822) 4,183 45,933 71,400

6.62% 0.00% -0.43% 0.00% 2.00% n/a -25.51% 1.00% 0.00% 34.54% 1.73%

113,597,232

126,985,166

128,434,294

132,739,364

4,305,070

3.35%

137,913 137,913

137,913 717,726 855,639

(0) 717,726 717,726

0.00% n/a 520.42%

5,022,796

3.91%

Total General Operating Other Transfer from Grants Fund for CDBG Appropriation of fund balance for CIP Total Other Total Revenues

36

FY 2018 Actual

625,385 625,385

0 0

$114,222,617 $126,985,166

$128,572,207 $133,595,003 $

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


General Fund Budget Summary (continued) FY 2019

FY 2020

$

%

FY 2017 Actual

FY 2018 Actual

Adopted Budget

Adopted Budget

Change From FY19 Budget

Change From FY19 Budget

Expenditures: Departmental City Commission City Manager Human Resources Financial Services Information Technology City Attorney Development Services Police Emergency Medical Services Public Works Parks and Recreation

$332,801 4,227,647 1,968,743 2,474,452 3,367,163 1,055,459 6,251,616 48,584,560 9,804,177 5,153,583 14,869,586

$343,834 4,134,715 2,139,311 2,734,040 3,925,979 1,044,383 6,364,793 50,864,273 10,442,114 7,205,703 14,349,497

$374,914 4,833,278 2,258,503 2,945,653 4,253,429 1,144,891 7,111,938 53,705,972 11,018,928 7,748,262 14,989,105

$381,247 5,562,868 2,472,245 2,989,796 4,666,238 1,219,261 7,144,124 54,939,564 11,842,637 6,608,263 15,580,598

Total Departmental

98,089,786

103,548,642

110,384,873

113,406,841

6,333 729,590 213,742 44,143 412,809 74,370 32,186 1,233,592 823,709 (1,139,999) 591,493 3,021,968

1.69% 15.10% 9.46% 1.50% 9.71% 6.50% 0.45% 2.30% 7.48% -14.71% 3.95% 2.74%

Non-Departmental Operating Capital Non-Departmental Operating Contingency Rebuild Stabilization Fund Contingency Economic Development Incentive Market Adjustments Other Post Employment Benefits Inventory/Over/shortage Microsoft Licensing CRA Special Assessment Tuition Reimbursement Charter School (Lease Expense) Center for the Arts Internal Auditor City Hall at the Walk Lease Library/Grounds Parking lot Maint Subtotal - Non-Departmental

341,922 725,176 10,307 27,750 113,928 95,103 418,036 193,647 41,676 522,267 503,744 10,825 284,309 7,554 3,296,243

459,770 1,046,090 327,356.00 25,935 2,326 116,206 (25,052) 201,273 312,574 45,625 504,740 413,673 0 123,985 9,505 3,564,007

697,765 959,149 637,172 0 150,000 75,000 116,206 220,000 353,223 80,000 568,873 464,600 25,000 0 10,000 4,356,987

559,576 1,091,649 669,031 12,242.00 150,000 75,000 168,000 220,000 354,315 80,000 580,250 425,000 25,000 10,000 4,420,063

Interfund Transfers Property/Casualty Fire Fund (Nonprofit Subsidy Churches/Schools) Fire Fund Govt. Assessment To Capital Fund Subtotal - Interfund Transfers

1,328,064 1,092,401 236,049 1,258,932 3,915,446

1,476,668 1,297,046 219,753 2,940,000 5,933,467

1,616,359 1,513,746 317,225 2,645,582 6,092,912

1,814,425 2,497,510 494,301 2,868,000 7,674,236

1,453,095 1,433,899 390,513 490,973 353,164 234,395

1,534,445 1,517,553 412,822 519,600 373,756 248,062

1,537,352 1,521,145 412,347 519,600 400,000 248,062

1,536,039 1,521,213 411,861 519,600 400,000 248,062

1,176,529 1,327,700 0

1,002,190 1,405,596 0

691,286.00 1,002,190 1,405,452 0

941,375 1,002,190 1,405,682 107,841

250,089 230 107,841

36.18% 0.00% 0.02% #DIV/0!

7,737,434

8,093,863

356,429

4.61%

(138,189) 132,500 31,859 12,242 51,794 1,092 11,377 (39,600) 63,075 198,066 983,764 177,076 222,418 1,581,324

-19.80% 13.81% 5.00% n/a 0.00% 0.00% 44.57% n/a 0.00% 0.31% 0.00% 2.00% -8.52% 0.00% n/a 0.00% 1.45% 12.25% 64.99% 55.82% 8.41% 25.95%

Debt Service Revenue Bond 2014 Rev Bonds - (Refunding 2004) 2015 Rev Bonds - (Refunding 2008) 2010 Recovery Zone Bond ($5.9M/20yr/2.79%) 2013 Capital Revenue Note ($4.7M/10yr/1.95%) 2013 Lease Purchase Financing (Phone) 2014 Municipal Cmplx Loan Ph.1 ($10M / 2.47%) 2017 Capital Revenue Note ($10M/15yr/2.5%) 2015 Municipal Complex Bond Ph. 2 ($27.3M) 2015 Capital Revenue Note ($12M / 10yr / 2.32%) 2019 Turf Field Lease Subtotal - Debt Service Hurricane Gainsharing Total Miscellaneous Expenditures Total Non-Departmental Total Expenditures Revenues in Excess of Expenditures Number of FTE's

(1,313) 68 (486) -

-0.09% 0.00% -0.12% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

6,860,269

7,014,024

1,756,172

6,137,631

-

-

-

n/a

345

0

-

-

-

n/a

1,756,517 15,828,474

6,137,631 22,649,129

$113,918,261 $304,356

$126,197,771 $787,395

664.29

18,187,334

20,188,162

2,000,828

n/a 11.00%

$ $

5,022,796 0

3.91% 0.00%

680.19 $

16

-1.14%

$128,572,207 $133,595,003 ($0) $0 688.06

City of Coral Springs, Florida

37


General Fund Description The General Fund, as the main operating fund for the City of Coral Springs, provides for a broad spectrum of premier services including public safety, beautiful parks and recreational facilities, code compliance, athletic programs, an attractive aquatic complex, public works, building plan review and inspections, emergency medical services, and more. The majority of resources are provided by taxes. The General Fund budget is $133,595,003 for Fiscal Year 2020. This represents an increase of $5,022,796 or 3.91% from the Fiscal Year 2019 budget. This budget is adequate to finance the General Fund expenses and a portion of the Coral Springs Center for the Arts, Insurance, Debt Service, Equipment Services, and pension expenses relative to the General Fund.

General Fund Total Revenues - $133,595,003 General Fund total revenues—$133,595,003*

Revenues A summary of the Fiscal Year 2020 General Fund revenue by source is provided in the chart to the right.

Fines and Forfeitures 2.0%

Major revenue sources for the General Fund Fiscal Year 2020 budget include: Ad valorem taxes: $60,011,214 (44.9% of total revenues)

Sales Tax 6.7%

Charges for Services 13.2%

Intergovernmental 8.1%

Utility Taxes 8.7%

Permits and Business Tax 3.3%

Ad valorem taxes represent a levy on the assessed value of real and personal property. In Fiscal Year 2020 ad valorem taxes will account for 44.9% of total General Fund revenues.

Misc. Revenues 3.1%

Franchise Fees/Solid Waste Assessment 9.4%

Other 0.6%

The general operating tax millage rate is $5.8732, same as Fiscal Year 2019. This rate is still below the state-imposed ten mill cap. The ad valorem revenue generated by the Fiscal Year 2020 tax millage rate is based on the July 1, 2019 assessed value provided by the Broward County Property Appraiser’s Office.

Ad Valorem Taxes 44.9%

* %’s may not add 100% due to rounding

Tax year 2019 gross taxable property value increased by 4.6% to $10,755,584,476 at July 1. New additions, annexations, and construction added $67,239,320 or 0.63% to the tax roll. The voter-approved debt service millage rate will decrease from $0.2652 to $0.2534 in Fiscal Year 2020. This represents a decrease of $0.0118 or -4.45% due to the increase in assessed values. There is no legal debt millage limit established by the State of Florida for its municipalities, counties, or independent taxing districts. City policy does, however, limit annual General Fund debt service expense to 12.5% of the total General Fund budget. At 6.1%, the City is well within its General Fund debt service limitation policy.

Millage rates, combined, historical Adopted FY 2017

Adopted FY 2018

Adopted Adopted FY 2019 FY 2020

Percent Change

General Operating Voter-Approved

$4.7982

$4.7982

$5.8732

$5.8732

0.00%

$0.2948

$0.2753

$0.2652

$0.2534

-4.45%

Total Millage

$5.0930

$6.1485

$6.1384

$6.1266

-0.19%

38

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Franchise fees

Franchise fees: $10,415,000 (7.8% of total revenues) Franchise fees are charges to service providers for the right to operate within the municipal boundaries of the City. The “Franchise Fees” table presented on the right, includes current franchise fee rates, projected Fiscal Year 2020 revenues, and percent change from the adopted Fiscal Year 2019 budget. For more details, see Financial Strategy in Business Plan section of the document.

Type (% of Gross)

FY 2018 Budgeted Receipts

FY 2019 Budgeted Receipts

Electricity (6%)

$6,758,313

$7,050,000

$7,000,000

-0.71%

3,131,000

3,131,000

3,275,000

4.60%

120,000

120,000

140,000

16.67%

$10,009,313

$10,301,000

$10,415,000

1.11%

FY 2019 Budgeted Receipts

FY 2020 Budgeted Receipts

Solid Waste Towing/Other Total

Percent Change

Utility service taxes Type (% of Gross)

FY 2018 Budgeted Receipts

Electricity (10%)

$9,466,730

Utility service taxes: $11,608,966 (8.7% of total revenues) The City charges a 10% utility service tax on all utility payments made in the City. As shown in the “Utilities service taxes” chart to the right, Fiscal Year 2020 utility service tax revenues are projected to decrease by 2.34% or $277,816 from Fiscal Year 2019 budgeted revenue.

FY 2020 Budgeted Receipts

Water (10%) Propane (10%) Total

2,055,210

$9,650,000 $9,400,000 2,075,763

Percent Change -2.59%

2,068,967

-0.33%

159,425

161,019

140,000

-13.05%

$11,681,365

$11,886,782

$11,608,966

-2.34%

Solid Waste Assessment: $2,189,175 (1.6% of total revenues) The City assesses residences for solid waste services. Waste Pro is the exclusive provider of residential solid waste service since January 2014. Intergovernmental revenue sharing: $10,671,072 (7.99% of total revenues) Intergovernmental revenue sharing is provided to local municipalities by the state using a predetermined allocation methodology based, in part, on population. Anticipated revenues to be received in Fiscal Year 2020 are as follows:

Communications service tax

$3,200,000

State shared revenue

$4,800,000

First local option fuel tax

$1,340,000

Second local option fuel tax

$984,900

Public safety E911

$242,719

Alcoholic beverage license

$50,000

Municipal rebate

$53,453

The Communications service tax revenue is projected to decrease by $500,000 or -13.51% driven by the decline in the usage of land lines. The State shared revenue is estimated to remain flat, while the First and Second local option fuel taxes are projected to decrease by 1.90% or $45,100 in Fiscal Year 2020. Revenue for recycling materials is expected to decrease to $0.0 driven mainly by China’s decision to stop purchasing recyclable materials from USA. Public safety E911 revenues are expected to increase by 1.0% in 2020. Sales tax: $8,900,000 (6.7% of total revenues) Also considered an intergovernmental revenue, half-cent sales tax may be used for municipal-wide programs, municipal-wide property tax or utility tax relief, or principal and interest payments on capital projects only. Sales tax revenue is expected to increase 0.36% or $31,781 for Fiscal Year 2020 budget.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

39


Permits and business tax: $4,409,005 (3.3% of total revenues) Building permit revenues are budgeted at $2,850,000, an increase of $124,348 or 4.56% from Fiscal Year 2019. This includes charges for permit and inspection services related to any construction, alteration, repair, or other activity required by the City Code and South Florida Building Code. After the steep decline in the number of building permit applications during Fiscal Years 2008 through 2013, the economy has significantly improved since then with the majority of current permits being issued for homeowner renovations. We are projecting a moderate increase based on the economic recovery that is bringing additional commercial and residential projects to our city. Building permits are 2.1% of total General Fund revenues. Business tax revenues are expected at $1,297,795, an increase of $53,000 or 4.26% over Fiscal Year 2019 budget. Formerly known as an “occupational license,” local governments are authorized to charge an annual “business tax” to businesses, professionals, and other for-profit enterprises for the privilege of operating a business within the City boundaries. Business tax revenues represent 1.00% of total revenues. Revenues received from rebillable overtime for building services and waste hauling permits are also included in this revenue category and account for another 0.1% of total revenues. Charges for services—Parks & Recreation: $4,542,638 (3.4% of total revenues) Parks and Recreation revenues are generated from user fees at the City’s parks, pools, and athletic facilities. Fiscal Year 2020 revenues are projecting to increase by 7.67% or $323,609. The increase is related to the adjusted user and administrative fees as well as field rental fees. Also, the Turf Fields installation will reduce maintenance downtime, adding capacity to the Parks. Charges for services—other funds: $6,539,994 (4.9% of total revenues) The transfer from the Water and Sewer Fund to the General Fund for administrative services is increasing by $87,538 or 3.52%. The transfer from the Fire Fund to the General Fund for indirect cost is increasing by $1,700,000, or 86.38%, in Fiscal Year 2020. These inter-fund transfers will fully reimburse the General Fund for the cost of administrative services related to Fire and the Utilities fund. The driver for the $1.7 million increase is the transfer from Fire for the EMS costs related to the resources dedicated to the Parkland contract. In addition, a transfer in the amount of $296,701, same level as 2019, is budgeted from the Water and Sewer Fund to the General Fund to support the Economic Development Division. Charges for services—other: $6,543,584 (4.9% of total revenues) Charges for services rendered represent a fair method of recovering the cost of providing a service to an individual or group, not the community at large. These user fees are primarily related to planning, EMS, and general governmental services. Fiscal Year 2020 revenues are projected to increase 4.69% or $293,330 from the Fiscal Year 2019 budget. EMS transport fees revenues are expected to increase by 3.0% or $77,160 over Fiscal Year 2019. City Hall at the Mall, that includes passport fees revenues, is expected to increase by 5.0% or $54,430. Public Safety revenues to increase by $68,311 mainly driven by an increase in the School Board reimbursement for resource officers (SRO’s). General Government revenues are expected to decrease by $78,820 or 9.16% from Fiscal Year 2019 budget mainly driven by a decrease in Landlord registration fees. This is a temporary impact driven by a change on the billing from calendar to fiscal year. Fines and forfeitures: $2,548,735 (1.9% of total revenues) Fines and forfeitures are revenues generated by enforcement and prosecution of municipal ordinances and state statutes. Fiscal Year 2020 revenues are projected to decrease $249,691 or -8.92% from Fiscal Year 2019 mainly driven by Code liens revenues. Miscellaneous revenues: $4,194,979 (1.73% of total revenues) The majority of the miscellaneous revenues include the Coral Springs Charter School lease, rents and royalties, interest earnings, and the Solid Waste Disposal agreement.

40

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


The Coral Springs Charter School lease revenue will remain the same, $1,420,000. This represents 1.1% of total General Fund revenues. Rents and royalties include telecommunication tower leases and facility rentals. Fiscal Year 2020 revenues are expected to be $1,484,404, same level as Fiscal Year 2019. Interest earnings are expected to be $360,507, an increase of $22,377. This line of revenue is generated by investment earnings on the portion of cash reserve investments attributable to the General Fund. Interest earnings represent 0.3% of total General Fund revenues. Other financing sources: $855,639 (0.6% of total revenues) This revenue includes an appropriation from Fund Balance of $717,626 for CIP projects. This also contains a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) for $137,913 that is budgeted to be received in Fiscal Year 2020.

Expenditures

Fundexpenditures—$133,595,003 Total Expenditures - $133,595,003 General General Fund total

The Fiscal Year 2020 General Fund budgeted expenditures total $133,595,003. This adopted budget represents an increase of $5,022,796 or 3.91% from the Fiscal Year 2019 budget of $128,572,207. A recap of departmental expenditures in the General Fund Budget includes:

Development Services Emergency Medical Svc. 5.3% 8.9% Financial Services HR/CAO 2.2% 2.8%

Non-Departmental 15.1%

City Commission: $381,247 (0.3% of total expenditures) The City Commission’s budget remains nearly flat over Fiscal Year 2019. City Manager: $5,562,868 (4.2% of total expenditures)

Information Technology 3.5%

CMO/Commission 4.4%

Police 41.1%

The City Manager’s Office (CMO)includes Administration, Economic Development, Parks and Recreation 11.7% Budget and Strategy, Communications Public Works and Marketing, City Clerk, Emergency 5.0% Management and the CRA (Community %’s may not add 100% due to rounding Redevelopment Agency). The overall department increased by $729,590 or 15.1% in Fiscal Year 2019. The majority of the increase is attributed to a 3.0% in salaries, increases in benefits costs, additional staff approved later in FY19 (via budget amendment), forming the Office of Emergency Management in CMO, higher operational costs including equipment chargebacks and training. Human Resources: $2,472,242 (1.9% of total expenditures) Human Resources’ budget increased $213,742 or 9..46% mainly due to increase in wages and benefits costs for regular and parttime employees. Financial Services: $2,989,796 (2.2% of total expenditures) Financial Services’ budget increased by $44,143 or 1.50% from Fiscal Year 2019 budget mainly driven by wages. Information Technology (IT): $4,666,238 (3.5% of total expenditures) IT’s budget increased by $412,809 or 9.71%. The increase is mainly due to an increase in wages, higher service contract costs and new operating initiatives including training.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

41


City Attorney: $1,219,261 (0.9% of total expenditures) The City Attorney’s budget increased by $74,370 or 6.50% driven by wages. Development Services—Administration, Code, Building and Community Development: (5.3% of total expenditures)

$7,144,124

Development Services includes the Administration Division, Code Compliance, Building, and Community Development. The budget for this department increase by $32,186 or 0.45%. Mainly driven by wages increase offset by positions reduced via attrition and other decreases in several operating expenses accounts. Police: $54,939564 (41.1% of total expenditures) The Police Department’s budget increased by $1,233,592 or 2.30% mainly driven by higher salaries and benefits. Emergency Medical Services (EMS): (8.9% of total expenditures)

$11,842,637

The EMS budget increased $823,709 or 7.48% primarily due to increased wages and staffing, and fleet life replacement cycle of recuses from 7 to 6 years useful life. Public Works: $6,608,263 (4.9% of total expenditures) The Public Works budget decreased by $1,139,999 or 14.71%, mainly due to the transfer of wages and benefits of staff supporting the newly created Stormwater fund. A portion of operational expenses was also allocated to the new fund. Parks and Recreation—includes Aquatics, Tennis, and Sportsplex: (11.7% of total expenditures)

$15,580,598

Parks and Recreation’s budget increased by $591,493 or 3.95%. This increase is mainly driven by higher salaries and benefits.

General Fund revenue and expenditure summary Sources Revenues: Ad Valorem Taxes Solid Waste Assessment Sales and Use Taxes Franchise Fees Utility Service Taxes Licenses and Permits Intergovernmental Charges for Services Fines and Forfeitures Miscellaneous Revenues Other Financing Sources Appropriated Fund Balance Total Revenues Uses Expenditures: Personal Services Benefits Other Operating Operating Capital Non-Departmental Interfund Transfers Debt Service Total Expenditures Rev. in Excess of Exp. Total full-time FTE's

42

FY 2017 Actual

FY 2018 Actual

FY 2019 Budget

FY 2020 Budget

$41,736,095 2,143,527 8,210,210 10,250,817 11,351,304 5,092,852 11,327,879 14,034,559 5,433,666 4,016,323 0 625,385 $114,222,617

$54,358,346 2,180,670 8,759,771 10,366,326 11,655,949 4,569,844 11,827,813 15,380,871 4,060,792 3,824,784 0 0 $126,985,167

$57,370,851 2,189,175 8,868,219 10,301,000 11,886,782 4,237,926 11,436,596 15,221,739 2,798,426 4,123,579 137,913 0 $128,572,207

$60,011,214 2,189,175 8,900,000 10,415,000 11,608,966 4,409,005 10,836,074 17,626,216 2,548,735 4,194,978 137,913 717,726 $133,595,003

$2,640,363 $0 $31,781 $114,000 ($277,816) $171,079 ($600,522) $2,404,477 ($249,691) $71,399 $0 $717,726 $5,022,797

4.6% 0.0% 0.4% 1.1% -2.3% 4.0% -5.3% 15.8% -8.9% 1.7% 0.0% n/a 3.9%

52,390,021 26,389,641 20,770,103 638,460 4,282,385 2,587,382 6,860,269 113,918,261

53,268,751 30,982,872 19,297,019 459,770 10,718,536 4,456,799 7,014,024 126,197,771

56,276,038 30,248,623 23,860,211 697,765 5,275,583 4,476,553 7,737,434 128,572,207

58,663,214 29,810,799 24,932,828 559,576 5,674,912 5,859,811 8,093,863 133,595,003

2,387,176 ($437,824) $1,072,617 ($138,189) $399,329 $1,383,259 $356,429 5,022,797

4.2% -1.4% 4.5% -19.8% 7.6% 30.9% 4.6% 3.9%

($0) (7.87)

n/a -1.2%

$304,356 664.66

$787,396 680.8

($0) 688.06

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

($0) 680.19

$ Change from FY19 Budget

% Change from FY19 Budget


Non-departmental: $4,420,063 (3.3% of total expenditures) The non-departmental budget increased by $63,075 or 1.45%. The increase is due to Other Post Employment benefits (OPEB), Charter School expenses, Federal Lobbyist and Census (new initiatives), partially offset by a decrease in the operating capital for Fiscal Year 2020. Internal fund transfers: $7,674,236 (5.7% of total expenditures) The interfund transfers budget increased by $1,581,324 or 25.95%. This increase is driven by higher allocations for the Fire Subsidy and Government assessments as well as an increase in the transfer to the Capital Fund to cover the costs of infrastructure projects. Debt service: $8,093,863 (6.1% of total expenditures) Debt service consists of capital and franchise revenue bonds, including an Economic Recovery Zone Bond issued in December 2010. General Fund Debt Service will increase $356,429 or 4.61% over the Fiscal Year 2019 budget driven by the 2017 Capital revenue note for the Public Safety/Public Works Campus and the addition of the Turf field lease. The amounts in 2020 reflect both, principal and interest payments estimated for the fiscal year.

General Fund non-departmental operating expenses Adopted FY 2019 Budget

Item Financial Quality Program

Internal Auditor Tuition Reimbursement Credit Card Charges Resident/Business Survey Benchmarking Innovate Downtown Election Expense Unemployment Festival of the Arts

25,000 80,000 90,000 25,000 15,000 20,000 44,000 14,000 20,000

State Lobbyist

Boards & Advisory Committees

Grants

Events

Total

$ Change

25,000 80,000 90,000 25,000 15,000 20,000 44,000 14,000 20,000

% Change 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

40,000

40,000

0

0.00%

Other Contractual Services Hurricane Preparedness (Safety) Special Event Banner Printing Census Innovative Ideas Incentive

0 8,700 184,718 6,500 40,000 0 100,000

70,000 8,700 184,718 6,500 40,000 65,000 100,000

70,000 0 0 0 0 65,000 0

n/a 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% n/a 0.00%

CRA Assessment Boards and Commission Expense Accessibility Issues (Disability) Historical Advisory Committee Sports Commission Multi-Cultural Events Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Celebrat Sports Event Grants Education Grants Coral Springs Community Chest Holiday Parade Teen Political Forum Half-Marathon Kreul Classic Tournament Art Walk Events Community Outreach Pop Up July 4th

353,223 17,500 2,500 10,000 3,000 35,231 15,000 35,000 10,000 52,500 22,000 7,500 15,000 15,000 71,000 0 40,000

354,315 25,000 2,500 10,000 3,000 35,231 20,000 35,000 0 52,500 22,000 7,500 0 15,000 71,000 10,000 40,000

1,092 7,500 0 0 0 0 5,000 0 (10,000) 0 0 0 (15,000) 0 0 10,000 0

0.31% 42.86% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 33.33% 0.00% -100.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% -100.00% 0.00% 0.00% n/a 0.00%

$1,417,372 $1,550,964

$133,592

9.43%

Cross Federal Lobbyist Departmental Center for the Arts Rentals

Special Projects

Adopted FY 2020 Budget

City of Coral Springs, Florida

43


Fire Fund Budget Fire Fund Budget Summary Fire Fund Revenues: Non Ad Valorem Special Assessment Fees Non-Ad Valorem Special Assessment Fee Government Assessment Nonprofit Subsidy (Churches & Schools) Sub-Total Non Ad Valorem Special Assessment Fees Partial Year Assessment Intergovernmental Base Contract (Parkland) Base Contract (Broward County) Sub-Total Intergovernmental Charges for Services: Fire Inspection Services Fire Re-Inspection Fees Plan Review Fees Training Tuition Fees Training Miscellaneous Fees State Education Incentive Fund Off Duty Fire Rescue Service Sub-Total Charges for Services Fines and Forfeitures: Fire Inspection Fines False Alarm Recovery Sub-Total Fines and Forfeitures Other: Interest Income Miscellaneous Revenue Sub-Total Other Grants: Matthew Maria Sub-Total Grants

FY2018 Actual

FY2019 Adopted Budget

$ Change from FY19 Budget

FY2020 Adopted Budget

% Change from FY19 Budget

10,344,575 236,049 1,092,401 11,673,025 49,040

$11,119,952 219,753 1,297,046 12,636,751 108,257

$12,198,885 317,225 1,513,746 14,029,856 39,893

$13,442,982 494,301 2,497,510 16,434,793 70,895

$1,244,097 177,076 983,764 2,404,937 31,002

10.20% 55.82% 64.99% 14.63% 77.71%

5,707,100 12,124 5,719,224

6,074,761 12,124 6,086,885

6,407,372 12,124 6,419,496

6,213,615 6,213,615

(193,757) (12,124) (205,881)

-3.02% -100.00% -3.21%

816,209 19,657 135,738 1,374,333 449,320 66,500 29,777 2,891,534

813,126 2,811 159,533 1,669,889 453,826 69,420 94,534 3,263,139

861,213 35,000 137,526 2,264,889 455,219 50,000 44,702 3,848,549

900,000 10,000 175,000 2,090,492 599,964 50,000 30,000 3,855,456

38,787 (25,000) 37,474 (174,397) 144,745 (14,702) 6,907

4.50% -71.43% 27.25% -7.70% 31.80% 0.00% -32.89% 0.18%

15,524 15,524

21,344 4,550 25,894

15,518 2,000 17,518

10,000 15,000 25,000

(5,518) 13,000 7,482

-35.56% 650.00% 42.71%

40,094 3,120 43,214

49,099 4,983 54,082

50,000 5,000 55,000

50,000 5,000 55,000

-

0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

-

47,548 39,221 86,769

-

-

-

n/a n/a n/a

Grand Total - Revenues

20,391,561

22,261,777

$24,410,312

$26,654,759

$2,244,447

9.19%

Expenditures: Departmental Administration Communication Service Suppression Training Community Risk Reduction Total Departmental

$708,234 128,030 13,348,163 1,864,693 1,345,531 17,394,651

$749,895 131,211 14,366,676 2,145,857 1,552,432 18,946,071

$924,846 162,127 14,947,755 2,729,026 1,626,381 20,390,135

$908,685 165,416 16,190,913 2,685,426 1,752,325 21,702,765

($16,161) 3,289 1,243,158 (43,600) 125,944 1,312,630

-1.75% 2.03% 8.32% -1.60% 7.74% 6.44%

466,542 75,000 62,857 20,000 19,629 34,874 1,797,982 82,180 2,559,064

531,585 64,114 126,448 19,636 15,962 1,878,891 4,173 2,640,809

829,930 64,114 150,000 81,153 17,182 1,968,139 105,571 18,450 3,234,539

479,784 27,300 150,000 21,000 17,182 2,027,183 105,571 806,196 38,100 3,672,316

(350,146) (36,814) (60,153) 59,044 806,196 19,650 437,777

-42.19% n/a -57.42% 0.00% -74.12% 0.00% 3.00% 0.00% n/a 106.50% 13.53%

89,745 230,705 320,450

47,588 100,000 256,520 404,108

100,000 280,786 380,786

415,500 100,000 315,193 830,693

415,500 34,407 449,907

n/a 0.00% 12.25% 118.15%

132,860 100,000 50,000 282,860 3,162,374

132,860 100,000 50,000 282,860 3,327,777

132,860 100,000 121,992 50,000 404,852 4,020,177

132,860 100,000 166,125 50,000 448,985 4,951,994

44,133 44,133 931,817

0.00% 0.00% 36.18% 0.00% 10.90% 23.18%

$20,557,025

$22,273,848

$24,410,312

$26,654,759

$2,244,447

9.19%

($165,464)

($12,071)

$0

$0

$0

Non-Departmental C.I.P. Other Contractual (Wellness) OPEB Contingency Other Contractual Services Microsoft Licensing Indirect Costs Economic Conditions Financial Strategy Computer Replacement Sub-Total - Non-Departmental Interfund Transfers: Capital Transfer to Equip Replacement Fund Property Casualty Transfer Sub-Total - Interfund Transfers Bond Debt Service: Revenue Bond-'04 (Refunding) Revenue Bond-'08 Revenue Bond-'17 Potential ERP Debt Service Sub-Total - Debt Service Total Non-Departmental Grand Total - Expenditures Revenues in Excess of Expenditures

44

FY 2017 Actual

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Fire Fund Description The Fire Fund is a special revenue fund to provide fire protective services to the citizens of Coral Springs. The City of Coral Springs also has a contractual agreement with the City of Parkland, Florida, to provide fire/rescue services. The Fire Department is funded by a special assessment. The Emergency Medical Services (EMS) portion of the Fire Department is funded in the General Fund (refer to the General Fund revenues and expenditures for information on the EMS budget).

Fund Total Revenues - $26,654,759 The Fire Fund budget is $26,654,759 in Fiscal Year 2020. This represents an Fire increase of $2,244,447 or 10.2% over the Fiscal Year 2019 adopted budget. Fire Fund total revenues—$26,654,759

Revenues

Other 0.3%

Major revenue sources for the Fire Fund for Fiscal Year 2020 budget include: Special Assessment: (61.9% of total revenues)

Charges for Services 14.5%

$16,505,688

The primary revenue source for the Fire Fund is a non-ad valorem special assessment which makes up 61.9% of total revenues. The assessment increased $2,435,939 or 17.3% from Fiscal Year 2019. A portion of this fire assessment fee is subsidized by the General Fund for churches and schools that are exempt from this assessment. The General Fund also covers the fire assessment fee for government properties. The table below shows fire assessment fees are based on the type of property, not the value of that property.

Intergovernmental 23.3%

Special Assessment 61.9%

Intergovernmental: $6,213,615 (23.3% of total revenues) Intergovernmental revenues decreased by $205,881 or 3.38% due to expiration of the Broward County contract as well as the allocation of revenue from the contract with the City of Parkland for the delivery of Community Risk Reduction, Emergency Medical and Fire Protection Services. This partnership began in March 2004. The five-year contract was renewed beginning October 1, 2016. Charges for services: (14.5% of total revenues)

$3,855,456

Charges for services, also known as user fees, are fees charged for a city service that are provided to an individual or group, not the community at large, such as training, inspections, and plan reviews. Charges for services revenue remained relatively flat. The training tuition and miscellaneous fees are tied directly to the training division expenditures. Other revenue sources for charges for services saw an increase in fire inspection services and plan review fees, offset by a decrease in off duty fire rescue services as well as fire re-inspection fees. Other: (0.3% of total revenues)

$80,000

Other revenue includes interest income, fines, forfeiture, and false alarm recovery.

Fire Assessment rate schedule Property Use:

Adopted

Adopted

Adopted

Adopted

$

%

FY 2017

FY 2018

FY 2019

FY 2020

Change

Change

Residential (per unit) Single-Family

$155.00

$180.00

$200.00

$227.82

$27.82

13.9%

Multi-Family

$195.25

$195.25

$215.00

$227.82

$12.82

6.0%

$23.03

$23.00

$26.10

$26.99

$0.89

3.4%

$2.98

$2.98

$3.64

$2.71

-$0.93

-25.5%

$22.50

$27.00

$31.87

$54.51

$22.64

71.0%

Commercial (per 100 sq. ft., up to 400,000 sq. ft.)

Warehouse/Industrial (per 100 sq. ft., up to 400,000 sq. ft.)

Institutional/Governmental (per 100 sq. ft., up to 400,000 sq. ft.)

City of Coral Springs, Florida

45


Expenditures The Fire Fund expenditures increased by $2,244,447 or 10.2% over the Fiscal Year 2019 adopted budget. The increase is primarily attributable to operating expenditures and capital.

Fire Fund Total Expenditures - $26,654,759 Fire Fund total expenditures—$26,654,759*

Major expenditures for the Fire Fund budget include: Suppression: (60.7% of total expenditures)

$16,190,913

Community Risk Reduction 6.6%

The Fire Suppression Division responds to all fire calls and other emergency situations. The Suppression Division is comprised of Assistant Fire Chiefs, Battalion Chiefs, Captains, Rescue Lieutenants, and Firefighter/Paramedics. These units not only provide fire service for the City of Coral Springs, but also for the neighboring City of Parkland. This partnership has improved emergency response times and has benefitted both cities. The overall Suppression budget has increased $1,243,158 or 8.94% from Fiscal Year 2019. This increase is primarily due to the addition of three Firefighter/Paramedics, higher wages, and the increase of 8 firefighters for the Parkland Contract. Training: (10.1% of total expenditures)

Debt Service 1.7%

Training 10.1%

Interfund Transfer 3.1%

Suppression 60.7%

Non-Departmental 13.8%

Administration 3.4% Communication Services 0.6%

* %’s may not add 100% due to rounding

$2,685,426

The Fire Training Division is responsible for the certification of fire and emergency rescue personnel. The Training Division budget decreased by $43,500 or 2.03% from Fiscal Year 2019. The Academy is self-sustaining, meaning revenues offset operational expenditures. Community Risk Reduction (formerly known as the Inspection Division): (6.6% of total expenditures)

$1,752,325

This division recently changed its name to Community Risk Reduction (CRR) to better reflect the mission to prevent a fire incident or personal injury before it occurs. CRR staff provides fire inspection, plan review, public life-safety education, and fire related investigation services for the citizens of Coral Springs. The CRR budget increased $125,944 or 8.23% from Fiscal Year 2019. This is primarily due to an increase in personnel costs as well as operating and capital expenses. Administration: (3.8% of total expenditures)

$908,685

Fire’s Administration budget decreased by $16,161 or 2.2%. This decrease is from lower operational expenses as well as personal services and benefits decreasing.

Fire Assessment Comparison

local cities with full service fire departments

Fire Assessment rate comparison Fiscal Year 2020 $450 $400

$398.23

$350

*ISO 1 Fire Departments $350.00

$300

$311.00

$300.00

$250

$285.00

$282.38 $235.00

$200

$229.50

$227.82

$220.00

$206.00

$150 $100 $50 $0

46

*Miramar

*Tamarac

*Ft Lauderdale

*Margate

*Hollywood *Pembroke *Deerfield Pines Beach (BSO)

Sunrise

*Coral Springs *Pompano Beach

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

Davie


Fire Fund (continued) Communication Services: (0.6% of total expenditures)

$165,416

The Communication Services Division consists of telecommunicators and emergency call takers. Expenses in this area increased $3,289 or 2.1% from Fiscal Year 2019. The increase is primarily due to personnel costs. The cost of this division is split between the Fire Fund and EMS in the General Fund. Non-departmental: $3,672,316 (13.8% of total expenditures) Non-departmental expenses increased by $437,777 or 15.3%. The budgeted capital outlay and indirect costs make up 68% of the non-departmental expenses. Starting in fiscal year 2020, a recurring plan has been developed for capital items that are not a onetime purchase. These items have been removed from non-departmental expenses into interfund transfers. The major Fiscal Year 2020 Fire non-departmental expenditures include the following: • $2,027,183 to cover indirect costs associated with various City departments • $895,284 for capital outlay • $806,196 for financial strategy, $150,000 dedicated to financial policy contingency and $105,571 to economic conditions • $27,300 for contributions to Other Post Employment Benefits (OPEB) and $17,182 for Microsoft licensing costs • $21,000 for other contractual services and $38,100 for computer replacement Interfund transfer: (3.1% of total expenditures)

$830,693

The cost of property/casualty insurance premiums increased $34,407 or 13.4% from Fiscal Year 2019. An interfund transfer in the amount of $100,000 will be used to repay the Equipment Services Fund. One million dollars was borrowed from the Equipment Services Fund in 2016 to help fund an unexpectedly high bid to construct Fire Stations 43 and 95. The entire amount will be repaid within 10 years. New for fiscal year 2020 is the interfund transfers for capital. This includes capital projects that will take longer than the current fiscal year. Debt service: (1.7% of total expenditures)

$448,985

For Fiscal Year 2020, the Debt Service expenditure for the Revenue Bond Note 2017 has increased by $44,133. This funding is for the Public Safety/ Public Works Campus.

Fire Fund revenue and expense summary FY 2017 Actual

FY 2018 Actual

FY 2019 Budget

FY 2020 Budget

Sources Revenues: Fire Fund Special Assessment Intergovernmental Revenue Charges for Services Misc. Revenue/Interest Income Fines and Forfeitures Partial Year Assessment Total Revenues

$11,673,025 5,719,224 2,891,534 43,214 15,524 49,040 $20,391,561

$12,636,751 6,086,885 3,263,139 140,851 25,894 108,257 $22,261,777

$14,029,856 6,419,496 3,848,549 55,000 17,518 39,893 $24,410,312

$16,434,793 6,213,615 3,855,456 55,000 25,000 70,895 $26,654,759

Uses Expenditures: Personal Services Benefits Other Operating Operating Capital Training Division Non-Departmental Interfund Transfers Debt Service Total Expenditures

$10,413,069 3,681,869 1,435,019 466,542 1,864,694 2,092,522 320,450 282,860 $20,557,025

$10,728,497 4,492,403 1,579,314 531,585 2,145,857 2,109,224 404,108 282,860 $22,273,848

$11,176,200 4,662,887 1,822,022 829,930 2,729,026 2,404,609 380,786 404,852 $24,410,312

12,161,639 4,793,202 2,062,498 479,784 2,685,426 3,192,532 830,693 448,985 $26,654,759

($165,464) 111.34

($12,071) 115.20

$0 118.44

$0 124.76

Rev. in Excess of Exp. Total full-time FTE's

City of Coral Springs, Florida

$ Change from FY19 Budget

$ $ $ $ $

% Change from FY19 Budget

$2,404,937 (205,881) 6,907 7,482 31,002 $2,244,447

17.1% -3.2% 0.2% 0.0% 42.7% 77.7% 9.2%

$985,439 $130,315 $240,476 ($350,146) ($43,600) $787,923 $449,907 $44,133 $2,244,447

8.8% 2.8% 13.2% -42.2% -1.6% 32.8% 118.2% 10.9% 9.2%

$0 6.32

n/a 5.3%

47


W Statement of Revenues and Expenses Water and Sewer Fund Budget Summary Water & Sewer Fund FY 2017 Actual

FY 2018 Actual

FY 2019 Adopted Budget

FY 2020 Adopted Budget

$9,063,534 13,083,232 27,077 13,085 22,945 (5,631) 337,613 22,541,855

$9,318,618 13,652,366 28,097 36,955 38,750 5,314 318,081 23,398,181

$9,378,788 14,058,830 27,171 10,609 19,675 10,000 217,514 23,722,587

$9,707,045 14,550,889 27,986 10,927 19,871 10,300 224,037 24,551,055

$328,257 492,059 $815 $318 $196 $300 $6,523 $828,468

3.50% 3.50% 3.00% 3.00% 1.00% 3.00% 3.00% 3.49%

54,906 54,906

77,481

1,383,256 1,460,737

31,632 641,570 673,202

31,632 1,375,448 1,407,080

$0 $0 $0 $0 $733,878 $733,878

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 114.39% 109.01%

$ 22,596,761

$ 24,858,918

$ 24,395,789

$ 25,958,135

$1,562,346

6.40%

1,300,251 $ 1,172,993 1,347,067 3,243,445 7,063,756

119,886 37,811 10,350 81,295 249,342

10.16% 3.33% 0.77% 2.57% 3.66%

7,005,318 $ 335,000 1,925,826 649,328 362,784 5,160,000 296,701 927,543 19,500

333,587 47,900 91,706 (4,168) 7,450 750,000 101,253 13,450

5.00% 16.68% 5.00% -0.64% 2.10% 17.01% 0.00% 12.25% 222.31%

(1,969) 990 -

0.00%

Revenues Operating Revenues Water Wastewater Private Fire Line Fee Meter Sales Backflow Recertification Adm. Fee Miscellaneous Income Charges for Service Total Operating Revenue Non-Operating Revenues Interest Income - Operating Interest Earnings-Revenue Bond Series 2012 Doubtful Accounts Capitalization from Prior Year CIP Appropriated Fund Balance Total Non-Operating Revenue Grand - Total Revenues Expenses Departmental Administration Water Distribution Wastewater Collection Water Treatment Total Departmental

$

Non-Operating Wastewater Treatment Capital Administrative Services Revenue and Collection Non-Departmental Transfer To Renewal and Replacement Business Development Property/Casualty Computer Replacement Debt Service Potential ERP Debt Service Revenue Bond-Series 2010 Revenue Bond-Series 2012 ($8.7M/2.29%/20 years) Revenue Bond-Series 2015 ($4.7M/2.002%/10 years) SRF Loans Water Plant Imp DW0603010 ($5.4M/2.57%/20 years) Wells & wellheads DW0603020 ($1.8M/2.79%/20 years) Transm. Dist, Interconnect DW0603030 ($3M/2.79%/20 years) Source & Treatment DW061620 ($1.1M/3.06%/20 years) Lift Stations Rehab WW822020 Sewer Rehab WW06160 Forest Hills Wellfield DW061630 Subtotal Debt Service Total Non-Operating Grand Total - Expenses Revenues in Excess of Expenses

996,088 $ 1,038,984 $ 1,016,342 1,007,687 1,161,658 1,222,129 2,619,044 2,672,466 5,793,132 5,941,266

1,180,365 $ 1,135,182 1,336,717 3,162,150 6,814,414

5,353,580 235,057 1,643,397 556,712 349,416 5,246,000 271,050 678,913 6,623

6,025,105 368,748 1,750,950 622,459 290,100 6,599,000 283,247 754,879 9,752

6,671,731 287,100 1,834,120 653,496 355,334 4,410,000 296,701 826,290 6,050

50,000 582,056 563,683

50,000 582,056 563,683

50,000 609,658 563,223

50,000 607,689 564,213

361,943 121,225 203,318 75,902 34,926 68,528 151,830

361,943 121,225 203,318 75,902 34,926 68,528 151,830

361,943 121,225 203,318 75,902 34,926 68,528 151,830

361,943 121,225 203,318 75,902 34,926 68,528 124,638

(27,192)

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% -17.91%

2,213,411

2,213,411

2,240,553

2,212,382

(28,171)

-1.26%

-0.32% 0.18%

16,554,159

18,917,652

17,581,375

18,894,382

$

1,313,007

7.47%

$22,347,291

$24,858,918

$24,395,789

25,958,135

$

1,562,346

6.40%

$249,470

$0

$0 $

0

0.00%

1.0

2.82%

Positions

48

$ % Change From Change From FY19 Budget FY19 Budget

$0 40.50

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

41.50


Water and Sewer Fund Description The Water and Sewer Fund, as an enterprise fund, must be self-supporting through user fees charged for services. The purpose of the Water and Sewer Fund is to provide clean water and to safely dispose of wastewater for customers living in the Coral Springs water district, which is the area between Wiles Road and Royal Palm Boulevard. The Fiscal Year 2020 Water and Sewer budget totals $25,958,135. This amount represents a increase of $1,562,346 or 6.4% from Fiscal Year 2019. This increase is primarily due to higher departmental cost of $249,342, higher wastewater treatment costs of $333,587 and an increase in Renewal & Replacement capital funding of $750,000.

Revenues

Water bill for average single-family residence

Water Wastewater Total Monthly Bill

2019 Average Bill

2020 Average Bill

$ Increase (Decrease)

% Increase (Decrease)

$25.10 $43.46

$25.98 $44.98

$0.88 $1.52

3.5% 3.5%

$68.56

$70.96

$2.40

3.5%

Note: Rates are calculated using an average consumption of 5,000 gallons for a single family residence (including 10% utility tax on water). Rate increase will be in effect October 1, 2018.

Water and Sewer Fund Total Revenues - $25,958,135 Water and Sewer Fund Total Revenues—$25,958,135

The City will continue with the 3.5% annual rate adjustment recommended by the 2013 Water and Wastewater Study for Fiscal Years 2014-2023. One of the principal objectives of the study was to develop a multi-year plan of water and wastewater rate revenue increases that will satisfy annual operating, debt service, and capital cost requirements as well as maintain adequate operating reserves. The City Commission has approved the recommended 3.5% rate adjustment for FY 2020. As illustrated in the table above, a typical single family residence in Coral Springs (consumption of 5,000 gallons per month) will notice an increase of $2.40 on the total monthly water bill.

Other 6.5%

Water 37.4%

Wastewater 56.1%

Major revenues for the Water and Sewer Fund include: Water: (37.4% of total revenue)

$9,707,045

Revenue from the sale of water is estimated to increase by $328,257, or 3.5% compared to Fiscal Year 2019 budget. This increase is due to the recommended 3.5% annual rate adjustment. Wastewater: (56.0% of total revenue) $14,550,889 The wastewater revenue consists of a base charge to the customer for sewage disposal and a volume-based charge based on the monthly water consumption. For Fiscal Year 2020, the rate to calculate the volumetric charge will be $4.39 per 1,000 gallons of water use. This represents a 3.5% annual rate adjustment. Appropriated fund balance (5.30% of total revenues) $1,375,448 The allocation of surplus or fund balance will increase by $733,878 or 114.39% compared to FY 2019. This increase is due to the financing of specific capital projects in order to maintain the City’s water and sewer infrastructure. Other (1.2% of total revenue) $324,753 Other miscellaneous revenues include meter sales, private fire line fee, administrative fee for backflow certification, and interest income from fund balance.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

49


Water and Sewer Fund Total Expenditures - $25,958,135 Water and Sewer Fund Total The City has an aggressive plan to mitigate wastewater system Expenditures—$25,958,135

Expenses

inflow and infiltration problems, has acquired additional wastewater treatment reserve capacity, and has implemented measures to reduce operational costs. In Fiscal Year 2020 we will continue our efforts to control expenses and improve services to our customers.

Non-Operating 44.5% Wastewater Treatment 27.0%

Major expenses in the Water and Sewer Fund include: Administration: $1,300,251 or 5.01% of total expenses Administration costs increased by $119,886 or 10.16% from the previous year’s budget. Water Distribution: $1,172,993 or 4.52% of total expenses The overall Water Distribution division is projected to increase by $37,811 or 3.33%

Wastewater Collection 5.2%

Capital 1.3%

Wastewater Collection: $1,347,067 or 5.19% of total expenses.

Administration 5.0%

Water Treatment 12.5%

Water Distribution 4.5%

The budget in this division increased $10,350 or .77%. Water Treatment: $3,243,445 or 12.5% of total expenses Water treatment expenses increased by $81,295 or 2.57%. Wastewater Treatment: $7,005,318 or 27.0% Wastewater treatment costs are expected to increase $333,587 or 5%. Capital: $335,000 or 1.3% of total expenses Operating capital funds will be used to continue inspection, repair, and maintenance of water and wastewater valves, ongoing replacement of fire hydrants and the purchase of portable emergency generators at lift stations within the City.

Water and Sewer Fund revenue and expense summary FY 2017 Actual

FY 2018 Actual

FY 2019 Budget

FY 2020 Budget

$ Change from FY19 Budget

% Change from FY19 Budget

Sources Revenues: Water Wastewater Charges for Services Meter Sales Interest Income Appropriated Fund Balance Total Revenues

$9,063,534 13,083,232 382,004 13,085 54,907 0 $22,596,762

$9,318,618 13,652,366 390,242 36,955 77,481 1,383,256 $24,858,918

$9,378,788 14,058,830 274,360 10,609 31,632 641,570 $24,395,789

$9,707,045 14,550,889 282,194 10,927 31,632 1,375,448 $25,958,135

$328,257 $492,059 $7,834 $318 $0 $733,878 $1,562,346

3.5% 3.5% 2.9% 3.0% 0.0% 114.4% 6.4%

Uses Expenses: Personal Services Benefits Other Operating Operating Capital Debt Service Renewal and Replacement Insurance Other Non-Operating Total Expenses

$2,429,200 1,066,455 2,297,477 235,057 2,213,411 5,246,000 678,913 8,180,778 $22,347,291

$61,686 54,251 5,825,329 368,748 2,213,411 6,599,000 754,879 8,981,613 $24,858,918

$2,567,770 1,072,038 3,174,606 287,100 2,240,553 4,410,000 826,290 9,817,432 $24,395,789

$112,694 62,720 8,201,346 287,100 2,240,553 4,410,000 826,290 9,817,432 $25,958,135

($2,455,076) ($1,009,318) $5,026,740 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $1,562,346

-95.6% -94.1% 158.3% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 6.4%

$249,471 40.5

$0 40.5

$0 40.5

$0 41

Rev. in Excess of Exp. Total full-time FTE's

50

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

$0 0.50

n/a 1.2%


Stormwater Fund Budget STORMWATER fund budget summary FY 2019

FY 2020

Adopted

Adopted

Change From Change From

Budget

Budget

FY19 Budget FY19 Budget

$

%

Revenues: $0 0 $0

$3,782,735 0 $3,782,735

$3,782,735 $0 $3,782,735

100.00% n/a 100.00%

$0 0 0

$863,929 $708,332 $247,254

$863,929 $708,332 $247,254

100.00% 100.00% 100.00%

Total Expenses Revenues in Excess of Expenditures

0 0 $0 $0

$1,032,031 931,189 $3,782,735 $0

$1,032,031 $931,189 $3,782,735 $0

100.00% 100.00% 100.00% 0.00%

# FTEs

0.00

9.55

100.00%

Stormwater Special Asessment Fee Interest Total Revenues

Expenditures: Departmental Operating Expenses Personal Services Benefits Non-Operating Capital Reserve/Fund Balance

9.55

City of Coral Springs, Florida

51


Stormwater Fund Description The Stormwater Fund is an enterprise fund established in Fiscal Year 2020. This fund provides for a Stormwater Collection Program to fund the operation, maintenance, design, and construction of stormwater infrastructure to ensure effective drainage and water quality management.

Revenues Stormwater Special Assessment (100% of total revenues)

Expenses $3,782,735

Operating Expenses: (22.8% of total expenses)

The Stormwater Special Assessment is collected as part of the City’s non-ad valorem special assessment upon residential and non-residential properties. The City has determined to assess and levy the assessment based upon the ERU rate in order to fund the costs of operating a Stormwater Collection Utility and Stormwater Collection Program.

$863,929

This represents the cost for contractual services, supplies such as chemicals, materials, patching and concrete, as well as vehicle chargebacks and fuel and maintenance allocations all related to program administration. Personal Services: (25.3% of total expenses)

$955,586

This represents the cost for salaries/benefits related to the Stormwater Collection Program. Capital: (27.3% of total expenses)

$1,032,031

This represents costs related to the planning, design, engineering and construction of capital improvement projects. Fund Balance: (24.6% of total expenses)

$27,030

This represents funds set aside for future appropriations and required fund balance in accordance with financial policies.

Stormwater Fund revenue and expense summary

Sources Revenues: Water Interest Income Total Revenues

FY 2019 Budget

FY 2020 Budget

$ Change from FY19 Budget

% Change from FY19 Budget

$0 0 $0

$3,782,735 0 $3,782,735

$3,782,735 $0 $3,782,735

n/a n/a n/a

Uses Category Expenses: Personal Services Benefits Other Operating Capital Reserve Fund Balance Total Expenses

0 0 0 0 0 $0

$708,332 247,254 863,929 1,032,031 931,189 $3,782,735

$708,332 $247,254 $863,929 $1,032,031 $931,189 $3,782,735

n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a

Rev. in Excess of Exp. Total full-time FTE's

$0 0

$0 9.55

$0 9.55

n/a n/a

52

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Health Fund Budget health fund budget summary FY 2018 Actuals

FY 2019 Adopted Budget

FY 2020 Adopted Budget

$10,340,315 626,307 1,721,766 11,598 38,660 231,962 12,970,607

$10,164,610 596,901 1,697,731 40,524 36,840 221,041 12,757,647

$10,078,008 581,791 1,722,683 39,991 36,354 218,128 12,676,955

$9,847,184 593,559 1,806,155 39,812 36,193 217,156 138,256 12,678,315

29,633

47,430

20,000

737,950 30,000

805,594 27,272 605,770 75,000 292,223 1,805,858

883,303 28,805 782,128 100,000 400,185 2,194,421

990,000 20,000 1,118,025 100,000 300,000 2,528,025

914,450 20,000 1,570,430 150,000 673,182 3,328,062

FY 2017 Actual Revenues Transfers: General Fund Water and Sewer Fund Fire Fund Solid Waste Fund General Insurance Fund Equipment Services Stormwater Fund Subtotal Transfers Appropriated Fund Balance Interest Income Recoveries: Premium/Retirees Terminated/Cobra Employees W/Dependent Wellness Other/Pharmacy Rebate Subtotal Recoveries

$ % Change From Change From FY19 Budget FY19 Budget

($230,824) 11,768 83,472 (179) (161) (972) 138,256 (136,896)

-2.29% 2.02% 4.85% -0.45% -0.44% -0.45% n/a -1.08%

737,950 10,000

n/a 50.00% n/a

(75,550) 452,405 50,000 373,182 800,037

-7.63% 0.00% 40.46% 50.00% 124.39% 31.65%

Total Revenues

$ 14,806,098

$

14,999,498

$

15,224,980

$ 16,774,328

$ 1,549,348

10.18%

Expenses Health-Dental Contingency Long Term Disability Life Insurance

$ 13,739,461 188,107 137,802

$

14,631,019 194,305 117,086

$

14,887,950 27,030 200,000 110,000

$ 16,424,271 17,557 215,000 117,500

$ 1,536,321 (9,473) 15,000 7,500

10.32% -35.05% 7.50% 6.82%

Total Expenses

$ 14,065,370

$

14,942,410

$

15,224,980

$ 16,774,328

$ 1,549,348

10.18%

$0

$0

$0

0.00%

Revenues in Excess of Expenses

$740,728

$57,088

City of Coral Springs, Florida

53


Health Fund Description The City provides insurance to employees in the areas of long-term disability, life insurance, and medical/dental insurance. The General, Water and Sewer, Fire, Solid Waste, General Insurance, Equipment Services and Stormwater funds are billed to cover premiums and claims, and to maintain an adequate reserve balance. Given the diversity of the Health Fund, the fund is categorized as health/dental, long-term disability, and life insurance to enhance accountability and budget control. The Fiscal Year 2020 Health Fund budget is $16,774,328. This represents an increase of $1,549,348 or 10.18 % from the Fiscal Year 2019 adopted budget.

Revenues

Expenses

Interfund transfers: (75.58% of total revenues)

$12,678,315

Group health/dental program: (97.91% of total expenses)

Interfund transfers from the General Fund, Water and Sewer, Fire, Solid Waste, General Insurance, Equipment Services and Stormwater funds decreased by $136,896 or 1.08%. This revenue consists of recovering administrative cost for services regarding health, dental, life, and long-term disability insurance. This fee is calculated annually based on the number of full-time employees assigned to each department and fund. Recoveries: (19.84% of total revenues)

This represents health and dental insurance costs for the City, which is self-insured. This expense increased $1,536,321 or 10.32% from Fiscal Year 2019. The cost of the new employee clinic, $737,950, is also part of the increase. Long-term disability: (1.28% of total expenses)

$215,000

This represents the cost to cover long-term disability for fulltime employees. This program has enabled the City to cap sick leave accruals at 480 hours per employee, while providing employees long-term disability coverage. This expense is projected to increase $15,000 in Fiscal Year 2020.

$3,328,062

Recoveries are premiums and other charges to employees, terminated employees, and retirees for the service of health insurance. Recoveries revenue increased by $800,037 or 31.65%. This increase is mainly due to increase projections in employee and retirees’ contributions. Other income: (4.58% of total revenues)

$16,424,271

Life insurance: (0.70% of total expenses)

$117,500

The cost of life insurance increased $7,500 or 6.82% from Fiscal Year 2019.

$737,950

Contingency:

This income includes an appropriation from Fund Balance of $737,950 to start an employee clinic (see more details in the Business Plan section of this book). Also, this accounts for interest income, which is an estimate of the interest earnings that will be generated by the fund balance during the fiscal year. Interest income for Fiscal Year 2020 is projected to increase $10,000 from Fiscal Year 2019 budgeted income.

A contingency of $17,557 was budgeted to cover for differences in estimates versus actual payments. This expense decreased $9,473 or 35.05% from Fiscal Year 2019.

Health Fund revenue and expense summary FY 2017 Actual

FY 2018 Actual

FY 2019 Budget

FY 2020 Budget

$12,970,607 1,805,858 29,633

$12,757,647 2,194,421 47,430

$12,676,955 2,528,025 20,000

$12,678,315 3,328,062 30,000

$1,360 $800,037 $10,000

0.0% 31.6% 50.0%

Appropriated Retained Earnings Total Revenues

0 $14,806,098

0 $14,999,498

0 $15,224,980

737,950 $16,774,328

$737,950 $1,549,348

n/a 10.2%

Uses Expenses: Health-Dental Long-Term Disability Life Insurance Contingency Total Expenses

$13,739,461 188,107 137,802 0 $14,065,370

$14,631,019 194,305 117,086 0 $14,942,410

$14,887,950 200,000 110,000 27,030 $15,224,980

$16,424,271 215,000 117,500 17,557 $16,774,328

$1,536,321 $15,000 $7,500 ($9,473) $1,549,348

10.3% 7.5% 6.8% -35.0% 10.2%

$740,728 2.25

$57,088 2.25

$0 2.25

$0 2.25

Sources Revenues: Interfund Transfers Recoveries Interest Income

Rev. in Excess of Exp. Total full-time FTE's

54

$17,557

$ Change from FY19 Budget

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

$0 0.00

% Change from FY19 Budget

n/a 0.0%


General Insurance Fund Budget general insurance budget Generalfund Insurance Fund summary FY 2017 Actual

FY 2018 Actual

$2,625,727 757,393 446,457 4,360 29,067 1,453 3,864,457

$2,907,469 838,761 495,117 4,660 31,067 5,696 4,282,770

41,952

67,940

98,651 54,646 79,351 232,648

137,396 92,492 19,750 249,638

FY 2019 Adopted Budget

FY 2020 Adopted Budget

$ % Change From Change From FY19 Budget FY19 Budget

Revenues Transfers: General Fund Water and Sewer Fund Fire Fund Health Fund Equipment Services Solid Waste fund Stormwater Fund Subtotal Transfers Appropriation Fund Balance Interest Income/Other Recoveries: Motor Vehicle Property Damage Workers' Comp Subtotal Recoveries Total Revenues

$3,164,772 $ 3,392,049 915,657 1,022,638 545,402 604,560 5,027 5,219 33,513 34,790 6,144 6,378 22,150 4,670,515 5,087,784

$227,277 106,981 59,158 192 1,277 234 22,150 417,269

7.18% 11.68% 10.85% 3.82% 3.81% 3.81% n/a 8.93%

25,000

1,375,352 30,000

1,375,352 5,000

n/a 20.00%

50,000 40,000 50,000 140,000

50,000 40,000 50,000 140,000

-

0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

$ 4,139,057 $ 4,600,348 $ 4,835,515 $ 6,633,136 $ 1,797,621

37.18%

Expenses Workers' Compensation $ 1,576,992 $ 1,778,868 $ 2,007,459 $ 2,092,563 $ 85,104 Property/Motor Vehicle Liability 2,037,027 2,109,194 2,529,903 3,181,743 651,840 Casualty/General Claims 224,836 334,227 298,153 296,478 (1,675) Transfer to Capital Fund 1,062,352 1,062,352

4.24% 25.77% -0.56% n/a

Total Expenses

37.18%

Revenues in Excess of Expenses Positions

$ 3,838,855 $ 4,222,289 $ 4,835,515 $ 6,633,136 $ 1,797,621 $300,202

$378,059

$0

$0

$0

0.00%

2.50

2.50

0.00

0.00%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

55


General Insurance Fund Description The City is insured in the areas of general liability, property and auto liability, and workers’ compensation. The General, Water and Sewer, Health, Fire, Health, Equipment Services, Solid Waste and Stormwater funds are billed to cover premiums, claims, and to maintain an adequate reserve balance in the General Insurance Fund. Given the diversity of the General Insurance Fund, the fund is categorized as workers’ compensation, property/motor vehicle liability, and casualty/general claims to enhance accountability and budget control. The Fiscal Year 2020 General Insurance Fund budget totals $6,633,136. This represents an increase of $1,797,621 or 37.18% from the Fiscal Year 2019 adopted budget.

Revenues

Expenses

Interfund Transfers: (76.7% of total revenues)

$5,087,784

Interfund transfer revenue consists of administrative fees charged to other funds for services related to workers’ compensation and property/casualty insurance. The fee for workers’ compensation is calculated proportionally using the number of full-time employees per fund. The annual cost of property/casualty is allocated among the General Fund, Fire Fund, and Water and Sewer Fund. The increase is primarily attributable to higher insurance premium costs in Fiscal Year 2020. Recoveries: (2.1% of total revenues)

$140,000

Recoveries revenue consist of motor vehicle, property, and workers’ compensation recoveries. Other Income: (21.2% of total revenues)

$1,405,352

Includes an appropriation from Fund balance of $1,375,352 for Capital projects. Also includes Interest earnings from fund balance which are projected to increase $5,000 from Fiscal Year 2019.

Workers’ compensation: (31.55% of total expenses)

$2,092,563

Workers’ compensation claims are estimated to increase by $85,104 or 4.24%. Property/motor vehicle liability: (47.97% of total expenses)

$3,181,743

This represents a $651,840 or 25.77% increase for property/ motor vehicle liability due mainly to a rise in property insurance premium costs. Casualty/general claims: (4.47% of total expenses)

$296,478

Casualty/general claims are expected to decrease by -.56% from Fiscal Year 2019 budget. Transfer to Capital Fund: (16.02% of total expenses)

$1,062,352

A transfer to Capital Fund, from the Fund balance, is budgeted for Fiscal Year 2020.

General Insurance Fund General Insurance Fund revenue and expense summary Sources Revenues: Interfund Transfers Recoveries Interest Income Appropriation from Fund Balance Total Revenues

FY 2017 Actual

FY 2018 Actual

$3,864,457 232,648 41,952 $4,139,057

$4,282,770 $4,670,515 249,638 140,000 67,940 25,000 $4,600,348 $4,835,515

$5,087,784 140,000 30,000 1,375,352 $6,633,136

$417,269 $0 $5,000 $1,375,352 $1,797,621

8.9% 0.0% 20.0% n/a 37.2%

Uses Expenses: Workers' Compensation Property/Motor Veh. Liability Casualty/General Claims Transfer to Capital Fund Total Expenses

$1,576,992 2,037,027 224,836 $3,838,855

$1,778,868 $2,007,459 2,109,194 2,529,903 334,227 298,153 $4,222,289 $4,835,515

$2,092,563 3,181,743 296,478 1,062,352 $6,633,136

$85,104 $651,840 -$1,675 $1,062,352 $1,797,621

4.2% 25.8% -0.6% n/a 37.2%

$0 2.5

$0 0.0

n/a 0.0%

Rev. in Excess of Exp. Total full-time FTE's

56

$300,202 2.5

$378,059 2.5

FY 2019 Budget

$0 2.5

FY 2020 Budget

$ Change from FY19 Budget

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

% Change from FY19 Budget


Coral Springs Charter School Fund Budget cs charter school fund budget summary FY 2020 Adopted Budget

FY 2017 Actual

FY 2018 Actual

FY 2019 Adopted Budget

Revenues Intergovernmental Other Revenue/ Miscellaneous Appropriation of Fund Balance

$12,657,815 60,574 -

$13,347,504 70,891 -

$13,027,311 72,400 2,666,827

$13,175,932 60,874 1,250,000

$148,621 (11,526) (1,416,827)

1.13% -18.93% -113.35%

Total Revenues

$12,718,389

$13,418,395

$15,766,538

$14,486,806

($1,279,732)

-10.60%

Expenditures Operating Expenses (CSUSA) Transfer to General Fund-Lease Capital

$11,289,977 1,420,000 32,389

$11,304,276 1,420,000 265,887

$12,296,538 1,420,000 2,050,000

$11,773,216 1,420,000 1,293,590

($523,322) (756,410)

-4.45% 0.00% -58.47%

Total Expenditures

$12,742,366

$12,990,163

$15,766,538

$14,486,806

($1,279,732)

-10.04%

($23,977)

$428,232

$0

$0

Revenues in Excess of Expenditures

$ Change From FY19 Budget

% Change From FY19 Budget

$0

Coral Springs Charter School Fund Description Charter Schools USA (CSUSA), a professional education management company, operates the school on the City’s behalf. The Fiscal Year 2020 Charter School Fund budget is $14,486,806. This represents an decrease of $1,293,732, or -10.04% from the Fiscal Year 2019 adopted budget.

Revenues

Expenditures

Intergovernmental: $13,175,932 (91.3% of total revenues)

Operating expenditures CSUSA: (81.6% of total expenditures)

This revenue represents funds received from Broward County for students attending the Coral Springs Charter School. It is based on the updated calculation by the state for the new school year.

This represents the funds needed to operate the Coral Springs Charter School. Total operating expenses decreased $523,322 or -4.45%.

Other revenue: (0.4% of total revenues)

$60,874

A majority of this revenue represents funds received for interest income. Appropriation of fund balance: (16.9% of total revenues)

$1,250,000

Fund balance will be used to pay for building capital improvements such as air conditioner replacement.

Transfer to General Fund: (9.8% of total expenditures)

$11,773,216

$1,420,000

This is a lease expense to repay the General Fund for all schoolrelated expenses necessary to operate the Charter School including telephone, electricity, cable/satellite, water and sewer, waste disposal, pest control, building repairs and maintenance. There is no change from the current year. Capital: $1,293,590 (8.6% of total expenditures) Capital expenditures will be used for air conditioning replacement.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

57


Public Art Fund Budget

public

Statement of Revenues and Expenses Public Art Fund art fund budget summary FY 2017 Actual

Revenues Public Art Fees Realized/Unrealized Gain/Loss Interest Rents and Royalties Appropriated Fund Balance Total Revenues Expenditures Operating Expenses Capital Total Expenditures Revenues in Excess of Expenditures

FY 2018 Actual

FY 2019 Adopted Budget

FY 2020 Adopted Budget

$ % Change From Change From FY19 Budget FY19 Budget

$147,821

$234,574 7,780 $242,354

$15,000 5,000 3,000 192,200 $215,200

$15,000 $ 5,000 203,200 $223,200 $

(3,000) 11,000 8,000

0.00% n/a 0.00% -100.00% n/a 3.30%

$22,109 135,479 $157,588

$57,542 92,553 $150,095

$105,200 110,000 $215,200

$113,200 110,000 $223,200

$8,000 $8,000

13.90% 0.00% 5.33%

($9,767)

$92,259

$0

n/a

$141,848 (1,458) 7,431 -

$0

$0

Public Art Fund Description The Public Art Fund is a special revenue fund utilized to account for the collection of Public Art fees, as well as operating expenditures to maintain all sculptures. No public tax money is used by this fund. Instead, Public Art Fees are fees charged to developers which are then used to purchase and maintain public art. The Fiscal Year 2020 budget for the Public Art Fund totals $223,200, a increase of $8,000 or 5.33% from Fiscal Year 2019.

Revenues The only source of revenue for this fund is the Public Art fee receipts collected during the permitting process for new construction and renovations of existing structures. The fee only applies to structures in excess of 12,500 square feet, except residences on less than one acre. Revenues are collected only from those developers who choose not to purchase and maintain public art on their own property.

Expenditures The cost of selecting, purchasing, and maintaining public art are the main expenditures 1:59 with PM consultants, materials, of 9/24/2019 the fund, along and supplies needed to support the Public Art Committee.

58

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Equipment Services Fund Budget equipment services fund budget summary

Revenues Operating Revenues Fuel and Maintenance Transfers General Fund Water and Sewer Fund Fire Fund Stormwater Fund Vehicle Charge Back Transfers General Fund Water and Sewer Fund Fire Fund Stormwater Fund Miscellaneous Revenues Interest Income Auction Charges for Fleet Services City of Parkland City of Margate Total Operating Revenue Non-Operating Revenues Appropriations from Fund Balance Financial Strategy Equipment Purchases Total Non-Operating Revenue Grand Total Revenues Expenses Operating Expenses Personal Benefits Other Expenses Charge Back Expense Total Operating Expenses Non-Operating Expenses Transfer to Capital Fund Equipment Purchases Total Non-Operating Expenses Grand Total Expenses Revenues in Excess of Expenses

FY 2020 Adopted Budget

FY 2019 Adopted Budget

FY 2017 Actual

FY 2018 Actual

$2,401,856 221,756 361,609 -

$2,521,932 $ 232,842 379,687 -

$ % Change From Change From FY19 Budget FY19 Budget

2,648,012 244,195 398,669 -

$2,698,432 256,403 418,600 81,960

$50,420 12,208 19,931 81,960

1.90% 5.00% 5.00% n/a

26,047 16,208 14,326 126,349

0.85% 4.61% 1.98% n/a

2,433,262 310,824 584,356 -

2,682,499 324,789 687,574 -

3,047,932 351,555 723,921 -

3,073,979 367,763 738,247 126,349

58,532 517,986

82,539 160,548

50,000 200,000

50,000 200,000

42,367 5,943 6,938,491

44,039 8,002 7,124,451

32,000 3,500 7,699,784

35,000 5,500 8,052,233

3,000 2,000 352,449

9.38% 57.14% 4.95%

3,205,949 3,205,949

24,090 3,788,288 3,812,378

170,381 4,915,770 5,086,151

4,380,240 4,380,240

(170,381) (535,530) (705,911)

-100.00% (0) -13.88%

$ 10,144,440 $ 10,936,829 $ 12,785,935 $ 12,432,473

$

-

(353,462) $

0.00% 0.00%

(0)

890,163 $ 392,378 1,518,548 3,328,442 6,129,531

874,495 $ 385,240 1,751,714 3,694,862 6,706,311

949,162 $ 974,988 394,254 401,210 2,019,834 2,131,697 4,123,408 4,306,338 7,486,658 7,814,233

25,826 6,956 111,863 182,930 327,575

2.72% 1.76% 5.54% 4.44% 4.72%

198,740 3,205,949 3,404,689

442,230 3,788,288 4,230,518

383,507 4,915,770 5,299,277

238,000 4,380,240 4,618,240

(145,507) (535,530) (681,037)

-37.94% -10.89% -15.37%

$9,534,220

$10,936,829

$12,785,935 $ 12,432,473

($353,462)

-3.11%

$610,220

$0

$0

City of Coral Springs, Florida

$0 $

-

n/a

59


Equipment Services Fund Description The Equipment Services Fund is an internal service fund used to account for the purchase, operation, and maintenance costs of the City’s vehicles and other major equipment; such as mowers and emergency generators. The City’s fleet inventory includes emergency vehicles (patrol units, rescues, fire trucks), buses for recreation, trucks for Building, Code Compliance, and fire inspections, as well as vehicles for maintenance of streets and parks, and generators. In addition, other small equipment such as workmans, mowers, ballpros, tillers, paint machines, pressure cleaners, trailers, etc. are essential to maintain tennis and basketball courts, city buildings and sport fields in optimal condition. The Fiscal Year 2020 Equipment Services Fund budget totals $12,432,473. This represents an decrease of $353,462 or -3.11% from Fiscal Year 2019. As a self-sustaining fund, the Equipment Services Fund provides maintenance services to all applicable departments in the City on a cost reimbursement basis. Cost recovery is performed for depreciation, also known as chargeback, fuel, maintenance, and operating expenses. These expenses are budgeted and paid for by the Equipment Services Fund; therefore, monthly interfund transfers are processed to reimburse this fund. For example, depreciation or chargeback, is an operating expense to gradually pay for the use of all equipment assigned to each department. The amount of annual chargeback is calculated for each piece of equipment using a simple formula that takes the cost of the item divided by the expected life (i.e., straight-line depreciation). The result is the amount to allocate to the user department annually for the number of years the item will be in service (refer to interfund transfers for allocation by fund). Budgeting depreciation for capital assets allows the City to “pay-as-you-go” finance its vehicles; therefore, avoiding debt. As illustrated on the “Ten-year fleet replacement cost” table, the average annual vehicle replacement cost for Fiscal Year 2020 through Fiscal Year 2030 is estimated to be $5.5 million.

Ten Year fleet replacement Ten-year fleet replacement cost

$9.0 $8.0 $7.0

$7.7

Millions

$6.0

$8.1

$5.0

$5.9

$4.0 $3.0 $2.0

$4.3

$8.2 $6.3 $5.7

$3.2

$3.7

$4.4

$1.0 $0.0

60

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

$3.2


Revenues Major revenues in the Equipment Services Fund include: Interfund transfers: (62.4% of total revenues) $7,761,733 Departments are charged an annual administrative fee plus a proportional fuel, maintenance and replacement cost of their assigned vehicles and their share to operate the fleet division. For Fiscal Year 2020, interfund transfers into the Equipment Services Fund are allocated as follows: • Chargeback: General Fund: $3,073,979; Fire $738,247; Water and Sewer Fund $367,763; Stormwater Fund $126,349. • Fuel and maintenance transfers: General Fund $2,698,432; Fire $418,600; Water and Sewer Fund $256,403; Stormwater Fund $126,349 Appropriated Fund Balance: (35.2% of total revenues) $4,380,240 This revenue appropriation consists of $4,380,240 for replacement of vehicles and equipment. Miscellaneous Income: (2.3% of total revenues) $290,500 This source of revenue includes: • Return on investment or interest earnings on fund balance during the fiscal year. The projected interest for Fiscal Year 2020 is budgeted at $50,000, remaining at the same FY 2019 budgeted levels.

• Auction of vehicles is estimated at $200,000, remaining at the same FY 2019 budgeted level.. • Charges for Fleet Services is estimated at $40,500, increasing $5,000 from the FY 2019 budgeted level

Equipment Service Fund revenue and expense summary Sources Revenues: Interfund Transfers Parkland Maintenance Fee Margate Maintenance Fee Interest Other Approp Fund Balance (Fin. Strategy) Approp Fund Balance (Equip. Purchases) Total Revenues

FY 2017 Actual

FY 2018 Actual

FY 2019 Budget

FY 2020 Budget

$ Change from FY19 Budget

% Change from FY19 Budget

$6,313,663 42,367 5,943 58,532 517,986 0 3,205,949 $10,144,440

$6,829,323 44,039 8,002 82,539 160,548 24,090 3,788,288 $10,936,829

$7,414,284 32,000 3,500 50,000 200,000 170,381 4,915,770 $12,785,935

$7,761,733 35,000 5,500 50,000 200,000 0 4,380,240 $12,432,473

$347,449 $3,000 $2,000 $0 $0 ($170,381) ($535,530) ($353,462)

4.7% 9.4% 57.1% 0.0% 0.0% -100.0% -10.9% -2.8%

Uses Expenses: Personal Services Benefits Other Operating Vehicle Chargeback Interfund Transfers Equipment Purchases Total Expenses

$890,163 392,378 1,518,548 3,328,442 198,740 3,205,949 $9,534,220

$874,495 398,293 1,738,661 3,694,862 442,230 3,788,288 $10,936,829

$949,162 394,254 2,019,834 4,123,408 383,507 4,915,770 $12,785,935

$974,988 405,410 2,127,497 4,306,338 238,000 4,380,240 $12,432,473

$25,826 $11,156 $107,663 $182,930 ($145,507) ($535,530) ($353,462)

2.7% 2.8% 5.3% 4.4% -37.9% -10.9% -2.8%

Rev. in Excess of Exp. Total full-time FTE's

$610,220 15

$0 15

$0 15

$0 15

City of Coral Springs, Florida

$0 0.0

n/a 0.0%

61


Pension Fund Budget pension fund budget summary FY 2017 Actual Revenues Transfers: General Fund Fire Fund Water and Sewer Fund Solid Waste Fund Equipment Services Health Fund Stormwater Fund General Insurance Fund Total Revenues Expenses Police Pension Sworn EMS/Fire Pension Certified ICMA(401)a - General Employees ICMA(401)a - Management OPEB General Employees Pension City Commission Pension Total Expenses

FY 2019 Adopted Budget

FY 2018 Actual

FY 2020 Adopted Budget

$ Change From FY19 Budget

$

13,355,982 $ 1,094,896 209,360 3,185 64,100 22,305 9,684

12,762,775 $ 1,739,885 245,301 3,571 79,784 22,563 10,004

14,146,578 $ 1,878,466 231,652 7,258 67,476 21,985 10,161

13,819,482 $ 1,722,001 231,841 8,128 76,073 23,285 39,076 7,674

(327,096) (156,465) 189 870 8,597 1,300 39,076 (2,487)

$

14,759,512 $

14,863,883 $

16,363,576 $

15,927,560 $

(436,016)

$

8,766,068 $ 3,043,037 1,555,771 656,345 204,285 529,000 5,006

9,168,553 $ 2,604,882 1,591,822 652,184 254,054 587,157 5,231

10,254,797 $ 2,820,586 1,822,604 651,737 208,370 600,000 5,482

9,924,259 $ 2,642,152 1,789,613 756,054 210,000 600,000 5,482

(330,538) (178,434) (32,991) 104,317 1,630 -

$

14,759,512 $

14,863,883 $

16,363,576 $

15,927,560 $

(436,016)

-

-

-

Revenues in Excess of Expenses

-

-

Pension Fund Description The Pension Fund accounts for the accumulation of resources to be used for benefit payments to retired City employees. The Fiscal Year 2020 Pension Fund allocation is $15,927,560. This represents an decrease of $436,016 or 2.66% increase from the Fiscal Year 2019 budget.

Revenues The $15,927,560 Pension budget has been allocated as follows: • $13,819,482 transfer from General Fund • $1,722,001 transfer from Fire Fund • $231,841 transfer from Water and Sewer Fund • $76,073 transfer from Equipment Services Fund • $23,285 transfer from Health Fund • $7,674 transfer from General Insurance Fund • $8,128 transfer from Solid Waste Fund • $39,076 transfer from Stormwater Fund

62

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Expenses Police pension expense: (62.31% of total expenses)

$9,924,259

This represents a $330,538, or 3.22%, decrease from Fiscal Year 2019 budget. Since this is a defined benefit plan, it is necessary to maintain the appropriate funding levels for the pension’s obligation as determined by an actuary. EMS/Fire pension expense: (16.59% of total expenses)

$2,642,152

This defined benefit plan was established in 2005 for firefighters and paramedics. This represents a decrease of $178,434 or 6.33%. As a defined benefit plan, it is required to maintain the appropriate funding level for the pension’s obligation as determined by an actuary. Employee (ICMA) expense: (11.24% of total expenses)

$1,789,613

This represents a $32,991 or 1.81% decrease from Fiscal Year 2019. This is a defined contribution plan available to full-time general employees. Management (ICMA) expense: (4.75% of total expenses)

$756,054

This is a defined contribution plan, based on salary, available to managers and supervisors. General employee pension expense: (3.77% of total expenses)

$600,000

This is a single-employer defined benefit plan that was established in 1973 and was closed to new participants in 1988. This expense will remain flat compared to Fiscal Year 2019. OPEB $210,000 (1.32% of total expenses) This represents the City’s contribution to Other Post Employment Benefits (OPEB) provided to the City’s retired employees. These benefits principally involve health care benefits, but also may include life insurance, disability and/or other services. City Commission pension expense: $5,482 (0.03% of total expenses) There is no change from Fiscal Year 2019. This is a former Commission closed pension plan with only one remaining participant.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

63


Solid Waste Fund Budget solid waste fund budget summary FY 2019

FY 2020

$

%

FY 2017

FY 2018

Adopted

Adopted

Change From Change From

Actual

Actual

Budget

Budget

FY19 Budget FY19 Budget

$4,415,912

$4,619,530

Revenues: Solid Waste Non Franchise

$4,947,273

$5,729,635

$782,362

17.06%

0

$0

n/a

-

Interfund Transfer (from General Fund)

$4,415,912

$4,619,530

$4,947,273

$5,729,635

$782,362

17.06%

$4,279,828

$4,346,830

$4,756,373

$5,554,221

$797,848

18.03%

Personal Services

44,135

61,686

100,350

$112,694

12,344

12.3%

Benefits

19,571

54,251

61,550

$62,720

1,170

1.9%

0

0

29,000

0

0

n/a

$4,343,534

$4,462,767

$4,947,273

$5,729,635

$782,362

17.06%

Revenues in Excess of Expenditures

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

n/a

# FTEs

0.00

0.00

2.75

2.75

0.00

Expenditures: Operating Expenses

Interfund Transfer (to Capital)

--

Solid Waste Fund Description The Solid Waste Fund was established as an enterprise fund in Fiscal Year 2014. This fund includes the non-franchise portion of the City’s residential solid waste special assessment which covers the cost of hauler and disposal fees. In the first year of this fund, Fiscal Year 2014, only nine months’ of expenditures were included, to coincide with the start of the Waste Pro contract on January 1, 2014. At that time, the City began paying for solid waste collection and disposal separately. For Fiscal Year 2020, payments to the hauler and disposal providers will increase by the level of inflation plus a cost of service adjustment. The Fiscal Year 2020 Solid Waste Fund budget totals $5,729,635 which is an increase of $782,362 or 17.06% from Fiscal Year 2019.

Revenues

Expenses

Solid Waste Non-Franchise: (100% of total)

$4,529,635

The solid waste non-franchise revenue is collected as part of the City’s residential non-ad valorem special assessment on residents’ tax bill and distributed to the Solid Waste Fund to cover the cost of collection and disposal of solid waste.

Operating Expenses: (96.9% of total)

$5,554,221

This represents the cost for the waste hauler contract with Waste Pro and the cost of waste disposal paid to Sun Bergeron and Waste Pro. Personal Services/Benefits: (3.06% of total)

$175,414

This represents the cost for the litter crew staff and a portion of the Streets Assistant Superintendent and Public Works Analyst salaries/benefits.

Solid Waste Assessment 2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

$220.92

$225.84

$234.75

$239.75

$248.00

$260.00

$290.00

The residential solid waste assessment is included on the property tax bill issued each November. The assessment period is the upcoming calendar year.

64

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Debt Service Fund Budget debt service fund budget summary The Debt Service Fund accounts for the repayment of voter-approved long-term General Obligation debt, as well as other long-term financing utilized by the City. Ad valorem taxes are used to pay debt service on general obligation bonds. Debt service on all other financing is allocated among the various funds of the City. The City is not subject to a legally-imposed debt limit but makes careful use of debt to finance major capital projects, such as new buildings, renovations, infrastructure improvements, and major equipment purchases, per self-imposed policies (see Financial Policies in the Appendix for details.)

Statement of Revenue and Expenditures

The Fiscal Year 2020 Debt Service Fund budget is $11,274,232. This represents an increase of $393,001 or 4% from the Fiscal Year 2019 budget primarily due to a capital revenue note for 2017 and theService addition of the turf field lease. Debt Fund

FY 2017 Actual

FY 2018 Actual

FY 2020 Adopted Budget

FY 2019 Budget

$

%

Change from

Change from

FY19 Budget

FY19 Budget

Revenues Ad Valorem Taxes Transfer from General Fund Transfer from Fire Fund Transfer from Water & Sewer Fund Interest Rebate-Revenue Bond Series 2010 Interest Income

$2,563,871 $2,545,525 6,860,269 7,014,024 282,860 282,860 50,000 50,000 99,084 93,306 18,646 28,119 $ 9,874,730 $ 10,013,835 $

Total Revenues

$2,590,802 $ 2,589,259 $ 7,737,434 $ 8,093,862 404,852 $ 448,985 50,000 $ 50,000 86,742 $ 80,560 11,400 $ 11,566 10,881,231 11,274,232 $

(1,543)

0%

356,427

5%

44,133

11%

-

0%

(6,182)

-7%

166

1%

393,001

4%

-100%

Expenditures General Obligation Bond-2005B (Refunding) General Obligation Bond-2013 - (Refunding) Public Safety General Obligation Bond-2015 Public Safety NEW General Obligation Bond-Other

Total General Obligation Bond Franchise Revenue Bond-2014 (Refunded 2004) Capital Revenue Bond-2015 (Refunded 2008) Capital Revenue (RZED) Bond Series 2010 Capital Revenue Note 2013 Capital Revenue Bond 2015B Municipal Complex-Phase 1 Loan 2014 Municipal Complex-Phase 2 Series 2016A Municipal Complex-Phase 2 Series 2016B Capital Revenue Note 2017** Potential ERP Debt Service TURF Field Other - Trustee Fees

$

Total Revenue Bonds

531,603 998,498 1,006,828 750 2,537,679

528,750 1,013,766 1,006,567 750 2,549,833

534,844 $ 1,049,506 $ 1,006,452 $ 750 $ 2,591,552

1,583,193 1,006,232 750 2,590,175 $

(534,844) 533,686 (220)

1,670,680 $ 1,617,505 511,888 519,600 1,405,114 248,062 889,669 76,330 7,412,605

1,667,305 $ 1,617,553 505,578 519,600 1,405,596 248,062 923,000 79,190 7,439,639

1,670,212 1,621,145 499,090 519,600 1,405,452 248,062 923,000 79,190 813,278 500,000 650 8,279,679

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,668,899 1,621,213 492,421 519,600 1,405,682 248,062 923,000 79,190 1,107,500 500,000 107,841 650 8,674,057 $

-

-

51% 0%

-

0%

(1,377)

0%

(1,313) 68 (6,669) (1) 230 294,222 107,841 -

0% 0% -1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 36% 0% n/a 0%

394,378

5%

-

0%

-

0%

Other Issuance Costs

$

Total Other Total Expenditures

$

9,950,284

Revenues in Excess of Expenditures

$

(75,554) $

10,000 $ 10,000

$

$9,989,472

11,274,232 $

$10,881,231

24,362 $

-

10,000 10,000 $

$

-

$

393,001 -

4% n/a

**Capital Revenue Note of $10M issued for Westside Facility purchase

City of Coral Springs, Florida

65


Debt Service Fund Description Debt Issuance and Refundings Capital improvements, equipment purchases, and facility projects are classified into “pay-as-you-go” and “debt financing” classifications. Pay-as-you-go capital items are $5,000 or less with short lives (less than four years) or involve the replacement of existing equipment where depreciation has been paid to a sinking fund. It is generally not prudent to spend operating cash on assets that have useful lives greater than five years because capital assets are paid for gradually over their useful lives by an annual depreciation charge to the current accounting period. Debt financing is used for major, non-recurring items with a minimum four years of useful life. When the City finances capital projects by issuing debt, it is amortized over a term not to exceed the average useful life of the project(s) financed. Current relatively low interest rates make debt financing economical and wise compared to cash financing. The City’s goal is to keep the average maturity of General Obligation bonds at or below 12 years. The City reviews its outstanding debt regularly to determine if the financial marketplace will afford the opportunity to refund an issue and lessen debt service costs. To consider the possibility of refunding an issue, a present value savings of three percent over the life of the respective issue, at a minimum, must be attainable.

Revenues Revenue sources for the Debt Service Fund Fiscal Year 2020 budget include: Ad valorem taxes: $2,589,425

23% of total revenues

Ad valorem taxes represent a levy of $0.2534 per $1,000 of taxable assessed value on real and personal property. This debt service millage rate is calculated separately from the operating millage rate and covers the debt service on the City’s general obligation bonds (voted debt) only. There is no legal debt millage limit established by the state of Florida for municipalities, counties, or independent taxing districts. Transfers from Other Funds: $8,592,847

76% of total revenues

Transfers in from other funds are the debt service payments for which each fund bears responsibility for the non-voted outstanding debt, including franchise and capital revenue bonds, a recovery zone bond, and lease purchase financing.

Allocation of Non-Voted Debt Service for Fiscal Year 2020 Capital Municipal Revenue Capital Complex Loan Bonds (RZED) Capital Ph. I 2014 & Revenue Bond Revenue 2010* Note 2013 Ph. 2 2016 2015B General Fund

Fire Fund

$1,250,252

$411,861 $1,405,682

$519,600

Capital Revenue Bond 2015

Capital Revenue Note 2017

$1,521,213 $941,375 $100,000 $166,125

Water & Sewer Fund Allocations by Issuance

Franchise Revenue Bond 2014

Turf Field Lease

Allocations by Fund

$1,536,039 $400,000 $107,841

$8,093,863

$132,860

Planned ERP Debt

$50,000

$448,985

$50,000

$50,000

$1,250,252 $411,861 $1,405,682 $519,600 $1,621,213$1,107,500 $1,668,899 $500,000 $107,841 $8,592,848*

* RZED debt service shown net of interest rebate. Only the net expected RZED debt service ($492,421-$80,560) is allocated to the General Fund.

The City limits its debt service expense allocated to the General Fund to no more than 12.5% of the General Fund budgeted expenditures. The General Fund expenditures for Fiscal Year 2020 are budgeted at $133,595,003. The debt service allocated to the General is $8,093,863, or 6.1%, well below the self-imposed limit of 12.5%. Annual General Fund debt service expense is limited to 12.5% of the total General Fund budget: current = 6.1%

66

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Debt Service Fund Description - cont. Expenditures Expenditures in the Debt Service Fund are the principal and interest payments on most of the City’s outstanding debt. There are two categories of debt: voted General Obligation (GO) bonds, and non-voted debt, which consists of a variety of instruments including bonds, notes, bank loans and lease purchase financing. General Obligation Bond Debt Service: $2,589,425

23% of total expenditures

General Obligation (GO) bonds allow municipalities to borrow money to pay for capital improvements and projects that benefit the entire community. Repayment of GO bonds is guaranteed by the “full faith and credit” of the City and the ability to raise taxes to pay the debt service via a separate voter-approved debt levy. The City has two voter-approved GO bonds outstanding, funded by ad valorem taxes. The current dedicated debt millage rate is $0.2534 per $1,000 of taxable assessed value. The City limits its total outstanding General Obligation debt to no more than 5% of the City’s total taxable assessed value. For Fiscal Year 2020 the General Obligation debt outstanding is $18.9 million which is 0.18% of the total taxable assessed value. General obligation debt outstanding shall not exceed 5% of the City’s taxable assessed value: current = 0.18%

General Obligation Bonds Outstanding

Rating Agency

Series

Purpose

Outstanding

2013

Mullins Master Plan, Public Safety add’n

$9,927,824

2015

PS Comm., 2 Fire Stations, Safety Town...

$8,934,884

TOTAL

$18,862,708

Ad Valorem Millage Rate Charged for General Obligation Bonds FY2015

FY2016

FY2017

FY2018

$0.2038

$0.2933

$0.2948 $0.2753

FY2019

FY2020

$0.2652

$0.2534

Moody’s Investor Service

GO Bond Rating Aa1

Standard and Poor’s

AAA

Fitch

AAA

Much like an individual’s credit rating, a bond rating is a measure of an organization’s credit worthiness. The higher the bond rating, the more favorable the interest rates that can be obtained. Coral Springs has the highest bond rating (triple A) from two of the three rating agencies.

GO Refunding Bond Series 2013 This bond, issued April 25, 2013, matures October 1, 2026. Debt service totals $1,583,193 leaving a balance of $9,927,824. Refunded at a 2.18% interest rate, replacing the original 4.2% rate, this bond was originally issued in 2006 to fund the Mullins Master Plan project, including additional Public Safety Building space, a new fire station, and parking and access improvements to Mullins Park. GO Bond Series 2015 Public Safety Approved by voters in November 2014, this $12.45 million bond was issued in January 2015 at a rate of 2.40% to fund Public Safety projects: Upgrade Public Safety communications, construct two new fire stations, construct a new Safety Town, and renovate the CSI building. This bond has a maturity date of October 1, 2029. Debt service will be $1,006,232 leaving a year-end balance of $8,934,884.

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Debt Service Fund Description - cont. Debt Maturity Schedule Mun Complex Ph 2 2016A

$18.5 M Bond $923,000

Mun Complex Ph 2 2016B

$3.8 M Bond

$79,190

Mun Complex Ph 1

$10 M Bond

$248,062

RZED Bond

$5.9 M Bond

$492,421

Cap Revenue Note 2017

$10 M Bond

$1,107,500

Cap Revenue Bond 2015B

$12 M Bond

$1,405,682

Cap Revenue Note 2013

$4.7 M Note

$519,600

Cap Revenue Bond 2015

$7.8 M Bond

$1,621,213

Franchise Rev Bond 2014

$9.4 M Bond

$1,668,899

ERP Debt (estimate)

$5.0 M  $500,000

GO Bond 2015 GO Bond 2013 Turf Field Lease

$12.45 M GO Bond  $1,006,232 $14.3 M GO Bond  $1,583,193 $6.1 M Lease  $107,841

Par Value $18,460,000

Matures FY2034

Debt Service $923,000

Outstanding $18,460,000

Mun Cmplx Bond Phase 2 2016B Mun Cmplx Bond Phase 1 2014 Capital Revenue (RZED) Bond 2010

$3,770,000 $10,043,000 $5,913,000

FY2026 FY2024 FY2030

$3,770,000 $10,043,000 $3,494,813

Capital Revenue Bond 2015B Capital Revenue Note 2013 Capital Revenue Bond 2015 Capital Revenue Note 2017 Franchise Revenue Bond 2014 ERP Debt Turf Field Lease

$12,089,000 $4,679,582 $7,780,000 $10,000,000 $9,441,272 $5,000,000 $6,104,000

FY2025 FY2023 FY2021 FY2034 FY2020 FY2028 FY2030

$79,190 $248,062 $492,421 ($411,861 net) $1,405,682 $519,600 $1,621,213 $1,107,500 $1,668,899 $500,000 $107,841

Mun Cmplx Bond Phase 2 2016A

68

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

$6,563,000 $1,499,925 $1,589,000 $8,660,000 $0 $4,000,000 $6,104,000


Debt Service Fund Description - cont. Revenue Bond (non-voted) Debt Service: $8,674,057

77% of total expenditures

Municipal Complex Bond (Phase 2) 2016A and 2016B The bulk of the funding for the new City Hall was issued in September 2016, and split into two parts. Series 2016A are tax-exempt bonds and Series 2016B, reflective of the cost of the public parking portion of the Complex, are taxable bonds. This was done to preserve the City’s flexibility in future economic development. No principal payments are planned until Fiscal Year 2025. Municipal Complex Bond (Phase I) 2014 Funding sufficient to meet early cash flow needs of the new City Hall was obtained September 2014. Interest-only debt service is planned until Fiscal Year 2021. Capital Revenue (RZED) Bond 2010 As part of the 2009 Federal stimulus (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act), the City issued taxable Recovery Zone Economic Development (RZED) bonds, with a rebate of 45% of the taxable interest paid. Issued December 2010 the proceeds funded downtown improvements. Capital Revenue Bond 2015B For Fiscal Year 2016 the operating millage rate was increased by 5% in order to fund debt service on $12 million of capital projects including the Aquatic Complex renovations (repairing the 50 meter pool), artificial turf in Cypress Park, Gymnasium renovation, security cameras in the parks, energy efficient field lighting, Center for the Arts roof repairs, interior improvements at the Center for the Arts, roadway resurfacing, pedestrian lighting on Forest Hills Boulevard, improvements at the Wiles Road and 441 intersection, forensic analysis equipment, and other police safety and investigative equipment. Capital Revenue Note 2013 This low interest rate debt (1.95%) funded projects in Fiscal Year 2013 Capital Improvement Plan, including Aquatics upgrades, Royal Palm Entryway, technology security, various parks renovations, and police surveillance equipment. Capital Revenue Bond 2015 Originally issued August 2008 to refund two capital revenue bonds from the Florida Intergovernmental Financing Commission (FIFC 2001A and FIFC 2002B.) This debt was refunded in October 2015 at a 1.75% interest rate. Capital Revenue Note 2017 The City looks to expand by financing the purchase of property near Westside Complex and south of the City’s Fire Academy. This note is a $10 million revenue bond with a 15 year term, has a rate of 2.5%, and prepayment at no additional cost after October 1, 2019. Franchise Revenue Bond 2014 The 2004 Franchise Bonds were refunded in 2014 at a rate of 1.7%. The 2004 bond had refunded the 1994, 1996, 1998 and 1999 Series, which were issued to fund capital for Public Works, Parks, as well as infrastructure improvements. Turf Field Lease 2019 The City is upgrading 7 grass fields into turf fields at various parks using offsetting expenditures. The lease is a $6.1 million lease finance with a maturity date of October 1, 2029. The interest rate is 2.2961% and the lease is a ten year term. The first year of the debt service schedule is interest only. ERP Debt Financing The City is pursuing an upgrade of the current business software by implementing an enterprise resource planning software. A 10 year plan has been constructed to help fund the cost of the new ERP system. The City is in the process of contract negations with the selected vendor.

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Debt Management Water and Sewer Fund Debt Much of the water utility improvements identified in the City’s Water and Wastewater System Master Plan (August 2006) were funded by low-interest loans from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) State Revolving Fund (SRF). The City has seven outstanding SRF loans, each with a term of 20 years. The annual interest rate has varied from 2.50% to 3.06%. Capital Improvement Program (CIP) budgets adopted in Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013 included an additional $8.7 million in water and sewer system improvements, specifically a $6.7 million Phase 3 water plant improvement and a $2 million booster station rehabilitation. In December 2012, the City executed a 20 year bank loan of $8,745,000 at an interest rate of 2.29% to fund these improvements. In May 2015, the City issued $4,772,000 in new Water and Sewer Fund debt at a rate of 2.002% for additional capital projects including rehabilitation, replacement and improvement to the City’s water and sewer infrastructure. The estimated pledged revenue coverage ratio of the Water and Sewer Fund for Fiscal Year 2020 is 2.85. Gross Revenue

Less: Operating Expenses

Net Available Revenue

Debt Service Total

Coverage

$24,551,055

$18,250,756

$6,300,299

$2,212,382

2.85

Matures

Debt Service

Water and Sewer Debt SRF Loan: Lift Station 20A/20B Rehab

Par Value

Outstanding

$536,159

FY2029

$34,926

$303,992

SRF Loan: Sewer Rehab Phase II

$1,046,756

FY2033

$68,527

$802,021

SRF Loan: Water Treatment Plant Improvements, Phase 1 and 2

$5,431,530

FY2032

$361,943

$3,921,066

SRF Loan: Raw Water Supply Wells

$1,846,683

FY2031

$121,224

$1,229,022

SRF Loan: Transmission, Distribution, Interconnects

$3,052,141

FY2033

$203,318

$2,274,065

SRF Loan: Source and Treatment

$1,119,826

FY2032

$75,902

$809,072

SRF Loan: Forest Hills Wellfield

$2,378,188

FY2033

$151,830

$1,784,197

$1,017,671

$11,123,435

SRF Loans Total

$15,411,283

2012 Bank Loan

$8,745,000

FY2031

$609,657

$6,025,000

2015 Bank Loan

$4,772,000

FY2024

$563,223

$2,658,000

$2,190,551

$19,806,435

Water/Sewer Total Debt

70

$28,928,283

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Debt Management - cont. Debt Ratios The City’s Total Taxable Value for the Fiscal Year 2020 budget is $10,755,584,476 and the population estimate as of July 2019 is 129,067.

Fund

Debt

Debt Service

GO Bonds

$22,979,188

$2,031,182

Debt Service

Revenue Bonds

$55,745,798

Water & Sewer

SRF Loans

Water & Sewer

Revenue Bonds

TOTALS

Principal Outstanding October 1

Principal Principal Outstanding Payments

% of Taxable Value

Per Capita

$20,948,006

0.20%

$163

$5,573,785

$50,172,013

0.59%

$467

$11,820,954

$592,271

$11,123,435

0.11%

$86

$9,613,000

$930,000

$8,683,000

0.08%

$67

$100,926,454

0.98%

$784

$100,158,940

September 30

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Capital Improvement Program capital improvement program The Capital Improvement Program (CIP) is an economical and responsible financial plan to ensure quality public services today and in the future. The CIP is a separate budgeting process within the annual operating budget. Collectively, the CIP and the Five-Year Forecast serve as a road map to intelligently plan for the City’s future. The capital expenditures for Fiscal Year 2020 is programmed at $40,920,710. General Fund

$15,004,213

Fire Fund

$12,095,284

Water and Sewer

$5,495,000

Equipment Service Fund

$4,618,240

Charter School Fund

$1,293,590

Insurance Fund

$1,062,352

Stormwater Art Fund

$1,032,031

Tree Trust Fund

$210,000

Public Art Fund

$110,000

The CIP procedure is used to plan, budget, and finance the purchase and/or construction of large capital infrastructure, facilities, equipment, and other fixed assets. The City uses this process to ensure these expensive, long-lived projects are aligned with its strategic direction and that the money is prudently spent. The capital item to be undertaken or purchased, the year in which it will be started, the anticipated capital outlay each year, the estimated impact on the operating budget, and the method of financing the project are all listed in the CIP summaries. The six-year Capital Improvement Program includes Fiscal Year 2020 budget and expenditure projections for the next five years. The total capital plan for Fiscal Years 2020 through 2025 is $142,529,212.

Capital expenditure Fiscal Year 2020 Capital Expenditures Fiscal Years 2020 $40,870,710 Stormwater Fund 2.5%

Charter School Fund 3.0%

Tree Trust Fund .5% Public Art Fund 0.3%,

Insurance Fund 2.6%

General Fund 36.7%

Fire Fund 29.6%

Equipment Services Fund, 11.3%

Water and Sewer Fund, 13.4%

Capital expenditure Fiscal Years 2020-2025 Capital Expenditures Fiscal Years 2020-2025 Stormwater Fund .7%

Charter School Fund Tree Trust Fund 1.6% 0.1%

Insurance Fund 0.7%

Public Art Fund 0.1%,

Fire Fund 9.8%

General Fund 41.9% Water and Sewer Fund, 25.5%

Equipment Services Fund, 19.5%

The Capital Improvement Program provides detailed information for all CIP projects with capital outlays greater than $5,000 that the City plans to construct, improve, or purchase during Fiscal Years 2020 through 2025. The following policy guidelines are used to define a capital expenditure and steer the management of the process: • A capital expenditure is defined as a major construction, expansion, purchase, or major repair/replacement of buildings, utility systems, streets, or other physical structures or property which has an estimated total cost of $5,000 or more and generally has an expected life of at least five years. • Capital items under $5,000 are generally included in the various Fiscal Year 2020 funds’ operating budgets. • Capital improvements are programmed and scheduled based on the City’s projected financial ability to purchase and maintain the capital project. All projects are prioritized and ranked based on criteria including the strength of the linkage between the capital expenditure and the City’s strategic goals. • General Fund debt service expenditures will not exceed 12.5% of the total annual General Fund budget. • Voter-approved general obligation debt outstanding will not exceed 5.0% of the City’s total taxable assessed valuation.

72

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


CIP Selection Process The CIP is updated annually to make adjustments for changing capital needs, changes in availability and cost of funds, and to add a year of programming to replace the year just completed. The CIP process begins in early January with an evaluation of the capital budgeting process to determine if there are any changes that will make the process more user-friendly, efficient, or effective. Next, departments conduct a fixed assets inventory including an inventory of vehicles, computers, and printers. Each department submitting a capital acquisition request must complete a Project Description Form . The request includes the following information: project title, department/division, linkage to strategic goal or initiatives, expected life of equipment (when applicable), additional operating cost/savings, additional revenue or income, contingencies, project description, project update, alternatives, impact on other departments, and a justification. One of the key components in the CIP process has been the linkage of the Capital Improvement Program to the Strategic Plan. In the spring, capital requirements flowing from the adopted Strategic Plan and Business Plan are identified. Each project recommended for inclusion in the Fiscal Year 2020 capital budget is linked to the Strategic Plan as it relates to the City Commission’s five goals. The CIP also takes into consideration department needs, the Comprehensive Plan Capital Improvement element, and the Water and Wastewater Master Plan.

Prior to being included in the six-year Capital Improvement Program, each potential project is analyzed to determine its financial impact on operations, operating expenditures, and revenues. The total cost of each recommended project is identified as part of the capital budgeting process and associated operating expenses are included in the operating budget. In the CIP, the Project Description Form for each project identifies expected debt service costs, including interest rate and life expectancy assumptions, and operating and maintenance costs for new equipment. Fleet requests are accompanied by a Fleet Replacement Form identifying the vehicle type, quantity, replacement cost, vehicle identification numbers, model type, and specialty items necessary to put the vehicle in service. In addition, current status and condition of each vehicle is required as part of the justification submitted for review (e.g. mileage, life-to-date repair cost, etc). In Fiscal Year 2020, in an effort to ensure continuous funding for recurring CIP projects, the Budget office met with each department prior to budget kickoff to review and discuss all capital projects listed on their CIP plan. Those projects that were found to be non-recurring or non-essential were moved to an unfunded capital list. This list totaling over $36M is an appendix to the CIP plan and will be reference during the budget process as funding becomes available for additional projects. The City evaluates each project recommended for inclusion in the Fiscal Year 2020 capital budget through a CIP project prioritization funding exercise. The goal of this exercise is to reduce subjectivity when comparing projects and ensure that projects are prioritized on a citywide perspective- balancing needs and budget with strategic goals. The CIP Review Committee— made up of the City Manager, Deputy City Managers, and Assistant City Manager, the department requesting the capital, and staff from the Budget office—discusses all capital requests with further justification, research, and analysis during the budget meetings. If the need proves to be valid and the capital is part of the City’s overall strategic plan, the project is recommended for approval. The Senior Management Team reviews the entire list of proposed capital projects along with the funding sources and restraints. A final list of projects is recommended to the City Commission by this team for inclusion in the capital budget.

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CIP Project Categories

Computer Replacement Program contributions and expenses

Capital projects are divided into one of three primary categories: 1. Capital improvement projects: The purchase, replacement, maintenance, and repair of infrastructure and fixed assets is budgeted and accomplished through the Capital Improvement Program. 2. Fleet replacement: The entire inventory of vehicles and equipment is evaluated annually in order to prioritize replacement and repairs needed in the upcoming year, based on age, condition, maintenance cost, and expected life of each equipment. The Equipment Services Fund provides for the purchase, replacement, and maintenance of the City’s fleet and other large equipment (such as generators or tillers). This is an internal service fund in which departments are charged for the usage or depreciation of the equipment.

Planned Contributed  Fiscal Year Expenditures Depreciation 2020 $417,450           455,956 2021 $766,400           478,754 2022 $921,100           502,691 2023 $293,970           527,826 2024 $441,750           554,217 2025 $925,450           581,928 2026 $413,700           611,025 2027 $752,870           641,576 2028 $299,700           673,655 2029 $970,650           707,337 2030 $542,000           742,704

Year‐end Balance      2,001,799      1,714,153      1,295,744      1,529,600      1,642,068      1,298,546      1,495,871      1,384,576      1,758,531      1,495,219      1,695,923

This recurring source of money makes the fund selfsufficient. Existing assets are replaced on a life cycle replacement schedule. New equipment can be added through a new initiative if it can be shown to support the Strategic Plan. The table below shows the estimated replacement cost of the City’s fleet inventory for the next ten years with corresponding annual contributions required from department users of vehicles, in order to make “pay-as-you-go” fleet purchases. This annual contribution eliminates borrowing money to finance a vehicle’s replacement. In Fiscal Year 2020, the City will invest nearly $4.4M to replace vehicles and equipment that otherwise would be more costly to maintain. 3. Computer replacement: The Computer Replacement Program is used to purchase and maintain computer hardware (including scanners, laptops, and desktops) and software. This is also a self-sufficient, internal service fund. Existing computer technologies are replaced on a standardized replacement schedule that considers legacy as well as usage. The table above shows the annual investment cost to replace the existing inventory of computers.

Fleet Replacement Program contributions and expenses Fiscal Year 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030

74

Expenses $4,380,240 $5,977,939 $5,787,977 $3,217,732 $3,717,850 $4,482,349 $6,384,606 $8,211,264 $8,189,360 $7,767,413 $3,283,795

Contributed Depreciation $4,306,338 $4,495,817 $4,693,633 $4,900,153 $5,115,759 $5,340,853 $5,575,850 $5,821,188 $6,077,320 $6,344,722 $6,623,890

Intra Fund Transfer $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $0 $0 $0 $0

Estimated Interest $45,645 $46,363 $33,005 $23,392 $41,450 $56,844 $66,997 $60,579 $37,285 $16,537 $2,475

Year-End Balance $ 4,636,287 $ 3,300,527 $ 2,339,188 $ 4,145,001 $ 5,684,360 $ 6,699,708 $ 6,057,949 $ 3,728,452 $ 1,653,697 $ 247,543 $ 3,590,113

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Capital Projects Funding Funding for capital projects can be obtained from any of the following sources: General Fund, Fire Fund, and Water and Sewer Fund operating revenues—these appropriated revenues will generally be used to purchase modest, routine operating capital items. Franchise revenue bonds and capital revenue bonds—this consists of debt that is secured through the pledge of City General Fund franchise revenues and other non-ad valorem revenues.

CIP funding sources- Fiscal Year 2020 Funding Source Operating General Fund

$559,576

Fire Fund

$479,784

Water and Sewer Fund Equipment Service Fund

Water and Sewer revenue bonds—the Water and Sewer Fund is an enterprise fund supported by fees for service rather than by taxes. Revenue bonds are repaid with revenues generated from this fund, not by contributions from the General Fund. Revenue bonds are obtained to increase plant capacity and modernize the Utility system.

Equity Financing

General obligation bonds—this funding source requires voter approval and is used to finance major capital projects with an expected life of 15 to 30 years. Debt retirement is achieved through a special ad valorem debt millage separate from the General Fund ad valorem operating millage.

General Fund Loan

Variable-rate debt bonds and loans—this funding source will be used to purchase capital items through a financial institution with a contractual obligation specifying payment terms, including principal and interest to be paid over a period of time. Equity Financing— this is generally known as “pay-as-yougo” financing and involves dedicating budget surpluses that are generated in previous years to fund capital purchases. When the City equity finances some of its CIP, it reduces the amount of debt that needs to be issued.

Budget

General Fund Fire Fund Insurance Fund Equipment Service Fund Fire Fund Loan Renewal & Replacement

$335,000 $4,380,240 $2,868,000 $415,500 $1,062,352 $238,000 $6,104,000 $11,200,000 $5,160,000

Grants CDBG

$609,284

HOME Grant

$262,265

SHIP Grant Department of Transportation Tree Trust Fund Public Art Fund Stormwater Fund Charter School Fund Total Fiscal Year 2020 CIP

$167,139 $4,433,949 $210,000 $110,000 $1,032,031 $1,293,590 $40,920,710

Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) loan—this program provides low-interest loans for planning, designing, and constructing drinking water and wastewater projects. This program is also known as a State Revolving Fund (SRF) Loan. Grants—this funding source refers to giving of funds for a specific purpose. Funds may be granted from federal, state, or local sources, such as Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI), Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA), Florida Department of Transportation, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Justice Assistance Grant (JAG), Resource Recovery Board, Florida Department of Health, etc. Tax Incremental Financing (TIF)—this captures the future taxes of real estate improvements in a designated area to pay the present cost of these improvements. In summary, the six-year CIP provides the necessary components of a sound Capital Improvement Program. The table above lists the sources of financing for the capital budget in Fiscal Year 2020.

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Impact of CIP on the Operating Budget Operating Capital Operating capital is a funding source for capital requests, vehicles, and equipment that are relatively modest in cost, have a short life expectancy and/or are purchased annually or fairly regularly. Each fund allocated money to make appropriate purchases or enhancements, financed through recurring revenues. Projects funded through operating capital in Fiscal Year 2020 totals $5,754,600. Please see CIP Operating Capital- Fiscal Year 2020 table for individual project costs. General Fund The General Fund operating capital for Fiscal Year 2020 totals $559,576. The purchase of replacement equipment such as ballistic helmets and shields, tactical SWAT vests, CUTS team equipment and license plate readers for Police department will be included in the General Fund Operating Capital. Also included is canal bank clearing and the painting and carpet replacement at the Public Safety building. A full list of Fiscal Year 2020 operating funded capital can be found on the following page. Fire Fund The Fire Fund’s operating capital for Fiscal Year 2020 totals $479,784. This allocation will be used for the purchase of 5 clean cab pickup trucks, rapid intervention team bags, tactical rescue training equipment, flashover and structure burn replacement, as well as other projects that can be found on the CIP Operating Capital- Fiscal Year 2020 table following this page. Water and Sewer Fund The Water and Sewer Fund’s operating capital of $335,000 will be used for ongoing replacement of fire hydrants, continuation of force and water main valve repair and replacement program and the purchase of portable generators for lift stations and dead end water main automatic flushers . Equipment Services Fund In Fiscal Year 2020, the City is projecting a $4,380,240 in operating capital expense in the Equipment Service Fund to replace vehicles and equipment that have exceeded their useful life (refer to Fleet Assets for more information).

76

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


CIP Operating Capital- Fiscal Year 2020

Fund

Budget

Fund

Budget

Water & Sewer Fund

General Fund Health & Wellness Equipment

$4,560

Fire Hydrant Replacement Prog.

Hurricane Equipment

$20,216

Force Main Valve Repair/Repl Prog.

$100,000

Painting Public Safety Facility

$27,500

Water Main Valve Repair/Repl Prog.

$100,000

Carpet Replacement at Public Safety

$20,000

Dead End Water Main Auto. Flusher

$25,000

Ballistic Shields and Breaching Tools

$14,400

Portable EmergGen. for lift stat.

$50,000

Ballistic Helmets

$30,000

License Plate Reader

$64,000

CUTS Team Equipment

$19,400

Computer/High-Tech Forensic Analysis

$25,000

Video Forensic System

$19,500

Intelligence Software Upgrades Tactical SWAT Vests

$20,000 $220,000

Bus Shelter Solar Power Fans

$25,000

Canal Bank Clearing

$50,000

Total General Fund Operating CIP

$559,576

Total Water & Sewer Operating CIP

$60,000

$335,000

Equipment Service Fund Vehicle & Equip. Replacement

$4,380,240

Total Equipment Serv Operating CIP

$4,380,240

Fire Fund Tactical Rescue Training Equipment

$65,000

5 Vehicles

$136,360

Health & Wellness Equipment

$7,440

Tower Upgrades

$25,000

Hurricane Equipment

$32,984

Rapid Intervention Team Bags

$186,000

Structure Burn Replacement

$17,000

Flashover Replacement

$10,000

Total Fire Operating CIP Total FY 2020 Operating Capital

City of Coral Springs, Florida

$479,784 $5,754,600

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Impact of CIP on the City’s Operating Budget (cont.) Operating Expenses CIP projects can affect the City’s operating budget by increasing expenditures and offset by anticipated savings or new revenues generated by the project. Major capital projects requested for Fiscal Year 2020 are comprised mainly of rehabilitation and improvements to the water and sewer facilities, median improvements, road resurfacing and air conditioning replacements in the Public Works departments, replacement of playground equipment in Parks and Recreation and academy expansion and station renovations for Fire Department. These projects improve but do not expand the level of service the City provides. The operating impact, therefore, is either negligible or indeterminable at this time due to the early stage of the projects.

CIP impact on the operating budget FY 2020

Operating Budget $212,471,956

CIP Impact $29,499

Capital Improvement Budget $40,920,710

The operating impacts of other CIP projects are measurable and have been included in the operating budget. For example, the addition of 6 vehicles throughout the city will result in an impact on the City’s operating budget by increasing gasoline/electric and depreciation costs. The additional fuel and maintenance cost for this new fleet is estimated at $11,590 and the annual depreciation charge for the use of this equipment is projected at $24,909. The addition of 7 turf fields is projected to reduce operating costs such as chemicals, materials, field renovation and personnel costs while increasing field rental revenue. These savings offset the cost of debt service and turf depreciation in Fiscal Year 2020. The operating costs associated with the construction of a splash pad in FY2020 will be budgeted in FY2021 due to timing of construction. Some capital projects are associated with the reduction of operating expenses. For example, the Parks’ light fixture replacement program will result in approximately $7,000 in cost savings by replacing existing fixtures with new energy efficient lighting systems.

Debt Service Debt service refers to the amount of interest and principal the City will pay on its outstanding debt during a fiscal year. In Fiscal Year 2020, the City will continue repayment of a $4.7 million loan to finance capital improvements in the General Fund. The total principal and interest payment for this loan in Fiscal Year 2020 is $519,600. In FY 2016, the City borrowed $12M to finance vital capital improvements for the General Fund. The total principal and interest payment for this loan in Fiscal Year 2020 is $1,405,682. The City will also continue to budget debt service related to the Municipal Complex in FY 2020. Debt service totaling $248,062 (interest only) is budgeted for the repayment of a $10M loan for the first phase of the Municipal Complex. An additional $23M was borrowed in FY 2016 to finance the construction phase of the Municipal Complex and debt service of $1,002,190 is budgeted in FY 2020 for this 20 year borrowing. In Fiscal Year 2020, the City will continue repayment of a $10M loan related to a new Westside facility. The total budgeted principal and interest payments for this loan in Fiscal Year 2020 is $1,107,500 for this 15 year borrowing. Additionally in Fiscal Year 2020, the City will begin payment on a $6.1M loan to finance 7 turf fields within the city. Debt service of $107,841 (interest only) is budgeted in FY 2020 for this 10 year borrowing. The City has secured long term financing from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection State Revolving Fund (SRF) loan program for the improvements at the Water Treatment Plant as well as throughout the entire water and sewer system. The interest rate for this financing is 60% of the market rate, resulting in low-cost financing for these improvements over a term of 20 years. Approximately $15 million in SRF financing has been obtained and the projects have been completed (i.e. replacement of existing wells, construction of new raw water supply, and improvements at lift stations). In Fiscal Year 2020, debt service totaling $990,480 is allocated in the Water and Sewer fund for the repayment of existing SRF loans.

78

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Impact of CIP on the City’s Operating Budget (cont.) The City will also continue repayment of an $8.7 million bank loan secured in Fiscal Year 2013 for the rehabilitation of booster stations and improvements on the water and sewer system. The interest rate for this loan is 2.29%. Principal and interest repayment for Fiscal Year 2020 is programmed at $607,689. In 2015, the City borrowed an additional $4.7 million to continue rehabilitation of booster stations and perform other necessary improvements to the water and sewer system. In FY 2020, $564,213 is allocated for the repayment of this 2.002% 10 year loan.

Fleet Assets Replacement of vehicles and fleet equipment is funded in the Equipment Services Fund. This internal service fund provides for the operating and maintenance costs of the City’s vehicles and major equipment. Fuel, maintenance and depreciation expenses are determined on a full-recovery basis for each fleet asset type. The allocated amount for each department in the City is budgeted taking into account the expected life of the vehicle/equipment, the type of equipment, fuel and maintenance cost, purchase price, and inflation.

Vehicle Chargeback General Fund

Water & Sewer Fund

Stormwater Fund

$126,349

$367,763 $738,247

The City’s entire inventory of vehicles is inspected annually followed by a complete analysis of each fleet item, including mileage, life-to-date repair and maintenance cost, operational condition and life expectancy. This evaluation helps prioritize replacements and repairs for inclusion in the upcoming budget year. As a result, some vehicles originally scheduled for replacement are found to be in good condition. Therefore, replacement is not necessary. Instead, funding is placed in the budget to fund repairs, thereby extending their useful life. This strategy has resulted in annual cost savings to the General Fund, Fire Fund, Water and Sewer Fund and Stormwater Fund operating budgets by reducing the “chargeback” or annual allocation transfer to the Equipment Service Fund. Chargeback is a term used to describe the method to reimburse the Equipment Service Fund for the usage of an asset over its expected useful life (also known as funded depreciation) rather than borrowing money to buy the asset at the beginning of its useful life. Depreciation fees collected from a department are held in the fleet replacement fund until the money is needed to purchase fleet items. The total chargeback allocation for Fiscal Year 2020 is $4,306,338 of which $3,073,979 impacts the General Fund, $738,247 is charged to the Fire Fund, $367,763 is allocated to the Water and Sewer Fund, and $126,349 is allocated to the Stormwater Fund.

Fire Fund

$3,073,979

Vehicle Maintenance & Gas General Fund

Fire Fund

$256,403

Water & Sewer Fund

Stormwater

$81,960

$418,600

$2,698,432

Vehicle maintenance expenses and gasoline costs are also funded by the Equipment Replacement Fund. This expense is also collected from all applicable departments via interfund transfers. The fuel and maintenance budget for Fiscal Year 2020 totals $3,455,395. The impact to the City’s general operating fund is $2,698,432. The Fire Fund allocation for Fiscal Year 2020 is $418,600, Water and Sewer Fund’s portion $256,403 and the Stormwater Fund allocation is $81,960.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

79


Impact of CIP on the City’s Operating Budget (cont.) Grants The City of Coral Springs is continually seeking grant opportunities to help finance projects that support its five strategic goals and link to Business Plan initiatives. Grants from Federal, Local, and State sources are researched and applied for with the ultimate goal of funding specific projects that meet our customers’ needs while lowering departmental operating costs. For Fiscal Year 2020, the City projects $5,472,637 in grants to assist with funding of necessary capital projects, as described in the table below. The City of Coral Springs is an entitlement recipient of federal funds and receives an annual allocation from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) under the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program. The City is projected to receive an approximate allocation of $609,284. The purpose of these funds is to provide decent housing, a suitable living environment and better economic opportunities for low-to-moderate-income residents. The CDBG budget identifies the proposed projects for FY 2020 federal funding. This year’s total grant funds impact the City’s operating budget by supplementing 13.4% of the total capital expenditure for Fiscal Year 2020.

FY2020 Capital Projects Financed Via Grants Source of Grant

Project Housing Rehabilitation Lions Park Lighting Project

CDBG

$40,043 $100,000

NW 24th Street Sidewalk Project

$60,000

Castlewood Park Replacement

$85,000

NW 28th Street Sidewalk Project

$120,000

NW 27th Street Sidewalk Project

$70,000

Ramblewood ADA Sidewalk Study

$20,000

Youth scholarships

$50,000

Senior recreational activities & Therapeutical Activity

$64,241

HOME Grant

Housing Rehabilitation

$262,265

SHIP Grant

Housing Rehabilitation

$167,139

Rock Island Bike Lanes

$2,717,000

Turtle Creek Bike Lanes

$1,716,949

Department of Transportation

80

Allocation

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Capital Improvement Summary by Fund Fund

FY 2020

Name Fire Fund General Fund Public Art Fund Tree Trust Fund Water and Sewer Fund Equipment Services Fund Charter School Fund Solid Waste Fund Insurance fund Stormwater Fund Total

9/24/2019

2:02 PM

Adopted $12,095,284 15,004,213 110,000 210,000 5,495,000 4,618,240 1,293,590 0 1,062,352 1,032,031 $40,920,710

FY 2021 Plan $389,000 4,291,382 20,000 0 6,590,000 5,977,939 515,653 0 0 0 $17,783,974

FY 2022 Plan $381,000 26,033,382 0 0 6,590,000 5,787,977 486,092 0 0 0 $39,278,451

FY 2023 Plan $349,000 4,071,382 0 0 6,490,000 3,217,732 0 0 0 0 $14,128,114

City of Coral Springs, Florida

FY 2024 Plan $349,000 6,328,382 0 0 5,590,000 3,717,850 0 0 0 0 $15,985,232

FY 2025 Plan $349,000 4,011,382 0 0 5,590,000 4,482,349 0 0 0 0 $14,432,731

Total Cost FY 2020-2025 $13,912,284 59,740,123 130,000 210,000 36,345,000 27,802,087 2,295,335 0 1,062,352 1,032,031 $142,529,212

81


CIP Budget by Funding Source - All Funds Funding Source Operating General Fund Fire Fund W&S Fund Solid Waste Fund Equipment Services Fund Total Operating

FY 2019 Budget

FY 2020 Adopted

FY 2021 Plan

FY 2022 Plan

FY 2023 Plan

FY 2024 Plan

FY 2025 Plan

Total Cost FY 2020-2025

$697,765 829,930 287,100 29,000 4,915,770 6,759,565

$559,576 479,784 335,000 0 4,380,240 5,754,600

$0 40,000 430,000 0 5,977,939 6,447,939

$0 32,000 430,000 0 5,787,977 6,249,977

$0 0 1,030,000 0 3,217,732 4,247,732

$0 0 430,000 0 3,717,850 4,147,850

$0 0 430,000 0 4,482,349 4,912,349

559,576 551,784 3,085,000 0 27,564,087 31,760,447

2,579,582 0 0 0 383,507 2,963,089

2,868,000 415,500 1,062,352 0 238,000 4,583,852

3,216,800 349,000 0 0 0 3,565,800

3,201,800 349,000 0 0 0 3,550,800

2,996,800 349,000 0 0 0 3,345,800

3,341,800 349,000 0 0 0 3,690,800

2,996,800 349,000 0 0 0 3,345,800

18,622,000 2,160,500 1,062,352 0 238,000 22,082,852

Reserves General Fund Facilities

175,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0 0

Total Reserves

175,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Grants CDBG Grant FDOT Justice Assistance Grant SHIP Grant FEMA AFG Dept of Environ Protection Grant Dept of Transportation TAP Grant HOME Grant Grant Dependent Total Grants

616,152 0 0 583,033 0 0 0 0 195,748 194,000 1,588,933

609,284 0 0 167,139 0 0 4,433,949 0 262,265 0 5,472,637

229,284 0 0 583,033 0 0 0 0 262,265 0 1,074,582

169,284 0 0 583,033 0 0 21,817,000 0 262,265 0 22,831,582

229,284 0 0 583,033 0 0 0 0 262,265 0 1,074,582

169,284 1,972,000 0 583,033 0 0 0 0 262,265 0 2,986,582

169,284 0 0 583,033 0 0 0 0 262,265 0 1,014,582

1,575,704 1,972,000 0 3,082,304 0 0 26,250,949 0 1,573,590 0 34,454,547

Renewal and Replacement Renewal and Replacement Total R&R Fund

4,410,000 4,410,000

5,160,000 5,160,000

6,160,000 6,160,000

6,160,000 6,160,000

4,060,000 4,060,000

3,760,000 3,760,000

3,760,000 3,760,000

29,060,000 29,060,000

140,000 0 0 0 0 0 140,000

6,104,000 0 11,200,000 0 0 0 17,304,000

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 1,400,000 0 0 0 0 1,400,000

0 1,400,000 0 0 0 0 1,400,000

0 1,400,000 0 0 0 0 1,400,000

6,104,000 4,200,000 11,200,000 0 0 0 21,504,000

0 2,050,000 2,050,000

1,032,031 1,293,590 2,325,621

0 515,653 515,653

0 486,092 486,092

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

1,032,031 2,295,335 3,327,366

Tree Trust Fund Tree Trust Fund Total Tree Trust Fund

415,000 415,000

210,000 210,000

0 0

0 0

0

0

0

210,000 210,000

Public Art Fund Public Art Fund Total Public Art Fund

110,000 110,000

110,000 110,000

20,000 20,000

0 0

0

0

0

130,000 130,000

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

$18,611,587

$40,920,710

$17,783,974

$39,278,451

$14,128,114

$15,985,232

$14,432,732

$142,529,213

Equity Financing General Fund Fire Fund Insurance Fund Solid Waste Fund Equipment Services Fund Total Equity Financing

Debt Service Loan (General Fund) Revenue Bond (W&S) Loan (Fire Fund) Potential Loan (Equip Fund) Potential Loan (General Fund) General Obligation Bond Total Debt Service Other Funds Stormwater Fund Charter School Fund Total Other Funds

CRA Funded CRA Funded Total CRA Funded Total CIP

82

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


General Fund CIP Summary by Funding Source Funding Source Operating—General Fund Emergency Medical Services Police Transportation Operating—General Fund Total Equity Financing Aquatic Complex Emergency Medical Services Information Services Parks and Recreation Police Public Works Transportation Sportsplex Equity Financing Total CDBG Grant Aquatics- Cypress Pool Development Services Parks and Recreation Transportation CDBG Grant Total Loan Parks and Recreation Sportsplex Loan Total HOME Grant Development Services HOME Grant Total SHIP Grant Development Services SHIP Grant Total Department of Transportation Transportation Department of Transportation Total FDOT Transportation FDOT Total Equity Financing Insurance Information Services City Manager Equity Financing Insurance Total Total General Fund CIP

FY 2020 Adopted

FY 2021 Plan

FY 2022 Plan

FY 2023 Plan

FY 2024 Plan

FY 2025 Plan

Total Cost FY 2020-2025

24,776 459,800 75,000 559,576

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

24,776 459,800 75,000 559,576

76,600 107,300 480,000 823,100 99,000 320,000 832,000 85,000 2,868,000

100,000 139,300 480,000 705,000 200,500 417,000 1,175,000 0 3,216,800

100,000 139,300 480,000 705,000 200,500 417,000 1,160,000 0 3,201,800

100,000 139,300 480,000 705,000 200,500 417,000 955,000 0 2,996,800

100,000 139,300 480,000 705,000 200,500 417,000 1,300,000 0 3,341,800

100,000 139,300 480,000 705,000 200,500 417,000 955,000 0 2,996,800

576,600 803,800 2,880,000 4,348,100 1,101,500 2,405,000 6,377,000 85,000 18,622,000

40,000 40,043 259,241 270,000 609,284

40,000 115,043 74,241 0 229,284

40,000 55,043 74,241 0 169,284

40,000 115,043 74,241 0 229,284

40,000 55,043 74,241 0 169,284

40,000 55,043 74,241 0 169,284

240,000 435,260 630,445 270,000 1,575,704

5,232,000 872,000 6,104,000

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

5,232,000 872,000 6,104,000

262,265 262,265

262,265 262,265

262,265 262,265

262,265 262,265

262,265 262,265

262,265 262,265

1,573,590 1,573,590

167,139 167,139

583,033 583,033

583,033 583,033

583,033 583,033

583,033 583,033

583,033 583,033

3,082,304 3,082,304

4,433,949 4,433,949

0 0

21,817,000 21,817,000

0 0

0 0

0 0

26,250,949 26,250,949

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

1,972,000 1,972,000

0 0

1,972,000 1,972,000

480,000 582,352 1,062,352

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

480,000 582,352 1,062,352

$16,066,565

$4,291,382

$26,033,382

$4,071,382

$6,328,382

$4,011,382

$60,802,475

City of Coral Springs, Florida

83


Major Capital Projects Major Capital Projects by Department by Department Department/Fund City Manager's Office Development Services Public Works

Transportation

Parks & Recreation

Capital Project

FY 2020 Budget

Funding Source

City Security Improvements

$547,352 Insurance Fund Equity

Housing Rehabilitation

$262,265 HOME Grant

Housing Rehabilitation

$167,139 SHIP Grant

Air Conditioning Repairs and Improvements

$150,000 Equity

Roof Repair & Replacement

$170,000 Equity

Turtle Creek bike lanes

$1,716,949 Department of Transportation

Rock Island Bike Lane Project

$2,717,000 Department of Transportation

NW 28th Street Sidewalk Replacement

$120,000 CDBG Grant

Curbing on Sample

$100,000 Equity

Road Resurfacing Program

$500,000 Equity

15-year Playground Replacement

$205,000 Equity

Light Fixture Replacement Program

$268,100 Equity

Lions Park Lighting Project Turf Fields

$100,000 CDBG Grant $5,232,000 Loan

Splash Pad

$250,000 Equity

Sportsplex

Turf Fields

$872,000 Loan

Police

Tactical (SWAT) Vests

$220,000 Equity

Network/Internet Infrastructure

$250,000 Equity

DNS, DHCP and IP (DD) Management Tool

$140,000 Insurance Fund Equity

Virtual Infrastructure Growth

$490,000 General/ Insurance Fund Equity

Information Services

Equipment Services

Water and Sewer Fund

Shop Equipment-Public Safety/Public Works Campus

$4,327,240 Equipment Fund Operating

Infiltration/Inflow Correction Program

$1,000,000 Renewal and Replacement

Lift Station Rehab Program

$1,400,000 Renewal and Replacement

Force Main Valve Repair/Repl Programs

$100,000 W & S Fund Operating

Force Main Integrity Evaluation

$100,000 Renewal and Replacement

Water and Wastewater Pumps

$150,000 Renewal and Replacement

Water Main Valve Repair/Repl. Program

$100,000 W & S Fund Operating

Galvanized Water Service Replacement Program

Fire Fund

$200,000 Equipment Fund Equity

Vehicle and Equipment Replacement

$450,000 Renewal and Replacement

Cast Iron Water Main Replacement

$1,000,000 Renewal and Replacement

Force Main System Improvements

$750,000 Renewal and Replacement

Water Wells Rehabilitation Services

$250,000 Renewal and Replacement

Fire Stations Painting & Improvements

$130,000 Fire Fund Equity

5 Pickup Truck Vehicles

$136,360 Fire Fund Operating

Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) Bags

$186,000 Fire Fund Operating

Academy Expansion

$7,000,000 Fire Fund Loan

Station 64

$4,200,000 Fire Fund Loan

Charter School Fund

Air Conditioning Replacement

$1,293,590 Charter School Fund

Stormwater Fund

Corporate Park Stormwater Improvements

$1,032,031 Stormwater Fund

Tree Trust Fund

Median Improvements

$210,000 Tree Trust Fund

Public Art Fund

Artwalk Sculpture

$110,000 Public Art Fund

*Major capital projects listed are those $ 100,000 and greater

84

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Major Capital Projects by Location Capital Projects Citywide Infiltration/inflow correction program Lift Station Rehab Program Water Main Valve Repair/Repl. Program Galvanized Water Service Replacement Program Water Well Rehabilitation Services Light Fixture Replacement Program Tactical (SWAT) Vests Virtual Infrastructure Growth 5 Adds to Fire Fleet

4150 Bldg

Housing Rehabilitation Air Conditioning Repairs and Improv. Water and Wastewater Pumps Vehicle and Equipment Replacement Road Resurfacing Program Cast Iron Water Main Replacement Network/Internet Infrastructure Force Main Valve Repair/Repl Programs Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) Bags

Median Improvements Roof Repairs & Replacement City Security Improvements Artwalk Sculptures Force Main System Improvements Fire Station Painting and Improvements DNS, DHCP and IP (DD) Management Tool Force Main Integrity Evaluation

North Community Park

Betti Stradling Park

Turf Fields

Splash Pad Fitness Area Replacement

Shop Equipment

40th Street/ Riverside Drive Road Resurfacing Program Lions Park

Fire Training

Lighting

Expansion Turtle Creek Bike Lane Project

Corporate Park Stormwater Improvements

Rock Island Road Bike Lane Project

Sportsplex Turf Fields

Charter School Air Conditioning Replacement

Cypress Park

Sample Road

Turf Fields

Curbing 28th Street Sidewalk Replacement

Mullins Park Turf Fields

Station 64 Renovation

Playground Canopies

Facility Street name Capital project

City of Coral Springs, Florida

85


Introduction The Strategy Behind the Plan The Business Plan outlines how City resources will be applied within our five Strategic Goal areas to achieve the objectives determined by the Strategic Plan. This Business Plan represents the second year in the current strategic planning process. Our strategic planning delivers a mission and a set of strategic goals that provide vision and direction for the City. While it has evolved over the years, true to the spirit of continuous improvement, it is still the linchpin in linking our day-to-day activities with the mission that we aspire to achieve. We often say the Business Plan gives “feet” to our goals and Key Performance Indicators, as well as establishes a structure for resource allocation. With the strategic goals set and appropriate outcomes identified, the operations of the City are reviewed and redeployed to bring the strategic vision to life. Specific initiatives are developed in response to the priorities identified in the Strategic Plan. This Business Plan is an outgrowth of the strategic goals, capturing the City’s vision in a specific, directed, and quantifiable form. The Market Environment section is the result of an environmental scan performed prior to the strategic planning process. It is presented in its complete form in the Strategic Planning Workbook, and then updated and summarized here in the Business Plan. We look at local demographic and economic forces to identify emerging issues and items of concern to our residents. Direct customer feedback is solicited through surveys, focus groups, and town meetings (Slice of the Springs), which becomes the basis for the Commission’s strategic planning. Our Service and Operations Strategy is organized by strategic goal to document the steps we are taking to achieve the intended outcomes for each of the goal areas. Key Performance Indicators, set by the Commission, are the measurable results we intend to achieve.

Why Are We Here?

Data Analysis

Citizen Input Strategic Plan Policy Business Plan Budget

Output to Citizens

86

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

Operations


Market Environment Overview The Florida economy has shown growth over the past six years, however, the economy shows signs of slowing from a previously more rapid pace of growth. Even with a cooling in growth, Florida’s economy continues to post numbers above the national average Gross Domestic Product, the Unemployment Rate, Personal Income and Population Growth. Due to population playing a large roll in local governmental funding, the City must take precaution of a slowing population and the long term impacts. The City’s financial status remains positive as seen through the high investment grade “AAA” bond rating with Fitch and Standard & Poor’s, and Aa1 rating with Moody’s rating agency. In the current housing market, sellers of single-family homes and condos in Coral Springs continue to enjoy a strong market where the single-family homes market value increased 7% and condos increased 6.5%. As of now the City shows sustained growth in the commercial sector with new businesses such as Air Adventure, Outback Steakhouse, WAWA and Athletica Health and Fitness among others occupying the existing commercial space. The Economic Development Office (EDO) highly impacts the growth of the City’s local economic goal and focuses on the efforts of business expansion, retention, redevelopment, workforce development as well as improving the local business climate. In April 2019, the City embarked on a development strategic plan developing a road map of establishing a sustainable economic and diverse commercial tax base. The City of Coral Springs and the Coral Springs Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) work together on establishing a vibrant and sustainable downtown in which businesses, inhabitants as well as visitors can work, live, shop and entertain. Through its commercial enhancement program, the CRA encourages existing tenants and building owners to improve the building’s aesthetics and safety throughout the building. The City faces both new and old challenges and issues that influence our capacity to give the citizens the level of service we strive to provide. With concentration on controlling expenses to ensure a sustainable future, the City will continue to focus on areas such as the increasing cost of technology, attracting and retaining the City’s workforce, employee wellbeing programs and mental health support. The City continues to rely on our planning process to determine the most efficient available resources, identify priorities, and then allocate our resources accordingly. The City’s revamped Strategic Plan for years 2018-2023-2033 provide for where we are today, where we will be in 5 years, and a vision for what to look for in 15 years. In the Fiscal Year 2020 Business Plan, outlined here are the market conditions and trends impacting the City of Coral Springs.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

87


Real Estate Trends $12.0 $10.0 $8.0

3.8%

FY09

FY10

FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14

$10.76

1.0%

$10.28

‐2.0%

$9.69

$7.75

‐11.5%

$9.06

$7.47

‐13.1%

$8.54

$7.40

‐5.5%

$7.75

$7.55

$4.0

$8.53

$6.0 $9.82

$ Billions

Ad valorem property taxes, which are based on assessed values, make up 45% of the City’s total revenues. Growth in this singularly important revenue mainly comes from value increases in the commercial, retail and industrial sectors, new development, and millage rate increases. A majority of the City’s residential properties are protected by the Save Our Homes (SOH) cap, a Florida law that limits the increase on homesteaded property values to the lesser of the rate of inflation or 3%.

Total Taxable Assessed Values

7.0%

6.1%

4.6%*

FY18

FY19

FY20

$2.0 $0.0

4.9% FY15

5.0% FY16

6.1% FY17

Source: July 1, 2019, values from FL Department of Revenue form DR-420. This percentage change in taxable value * This Percentage Change in Taxable Value compares today’s June 1 TTAV to last year’s July 1 TTAV  compares today’s July 1 TTAV to last year’s July 1 TTAV.

Housing Market Healthy • Single-family home sellers enjoy a strong market. Data for May 2019 shows the average sales price in Coral Springs remains very high at 98% of the listing price, with a median 26 days on the market (Miami Association of Realtors, June 2019). • Broward County has seen a 14% increase in active listings of single-family homes from May 2018 to May 2019; the inventory for condos increased by 11.6% (Miami Association of Realtors, June 2019). • Median sales prices in Coral Springs in May 2019 were $420,000 for single-family homes and $147,000 for condos, an increase of 7% and 6.5% from a year ago, respectively. In Broward County, median sales prices of single-family homes reached $370,000 in May 2019, an increase of 2.7% from the previous year. The median sales price of condos in Broward County was $180,000, an increase of 9% from the previous year (Miami Association of Realtors, June 2019). • The number of foreclosures since 2010 remained at a 91% decrease; roughly 500 in May 2019 which is down from a peak of 5,500 in May 2010 (CoreLogic, June 2019). The number of cases in all phases of foreclosure (lis pendens, oral judgments, REOs) is slightly declining. Commercial Sector Shows Sustained Growth • Cruise Planners relocated to the recently renovated University Place office building. Its modern, fun workspace houses over 125 employees. The Bristol Group invested significant capital into the building and continues to recruit new tenants. • Other new businesses absorbing existing commercial space include Athletica Health and Fitness, Young Chefs Academy, Air Adventure Park, John the Baker, Wild Fork, Outback Steakhouse, Petco and Costco. • Developers are also investing within the 442-acre Corporate Park of Coral Springs. Exeter Group Property continues its multimillion dollar renovation and development, which will lead to a total of 569,000 square feet of desirable industrial warehouse buildings to attract the City’s targeted industries and high-wage jobs. • The Corporate Park welcomed Aldora Aluminum and Glass, Grace Roofing, Emser Tile and Decimal Engineering and saw existing businesses Comfort Medical, D’Agostino Roofing, First Data/Fiserv and KB Electronics grow. • Business development continues to grow with 367 new business tax receipts issued during the first three quarters of FY2019.

88

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Economic Development The Economic Development Office directly impacts the City’s Growing Local Economy Strategic Goal. The City embarked on an economic development strategic planning process in April 2019 to create a road map for a sustainable economic environment . The EDO continues to focus its efforts on business retention and expansion, redevelopment, workforce development and enhancing the local business climate. Business Retention, Expansion and Attraction (BRE) Created robust BRE program to reach out to local companies to discuss business climate and resources. Made over 90 retention/expansion visits since FY19 began. Approved Project Rockefeller for the QTI incentive and will bring 135 net new jobs to the city. Presented the 2019 Business Excellence Awards on March 20, 2019 to six companies. Categories were created this year to provide the program with parameters. Marketing and Communications created a video for the winners and the event. Successfully retained Air Sponge, a local air filter manufacturer in danger of moving out of the city due to losing its leased space in the industrial park. Sponsor of the Coral Springs Regional Chamber of Commerce Biz Academy from October 2018 to April 2019 providing seminars to the local business community on topics including social media, customer loyalty, branding and cybersecurity. Implemented a CRM system for tracking and reporting of economic development activities. Provided support and assistance to developers, contractors, and business owners. Serve as a liaison with City departments, County and State agencies. Awarded a $2.8M EDA grant for stormwater improvements in the industrial park. Applied to the Florida Job Growth Grant Fund for additional improvements to the industrial park including signage, landscaping and roads. Social Media, Marketing and Branding Engaging on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram including documenting BRE activities on social media and tagging appropriate businesses and partner organizations. Increased posts and followers on all platforms significantly. In FY18, the EDO had increased its social media followers from 184 to 260 (41%). In Q1-Q3 FY2019, the EDO increased its social media followers from 260 to 820 (215%). There were 42 social media posts in FY 2018 and 132 in Q1-Q3 of FY2019 (an 214% increase). Created a video and campaign for the 2019 Florida Economic Development Week in February to engage the Commission as well as local businesses. The video was an educational piece on the impact of local economic development. Website improvements include new photos added (actual Coral Springs businesses) with updated content and data. Sponsor of the 2019 IEDC Leadership Conference in Fort Lauderdale and 2019 FEDC Annual Conference in Palm Coast to network with peers and partner agencies and stay abreast of industry changes. Launching the inaugural “Savor the Springs” Restaurant Week October 11-20, 2019. Economic Development Strategic Plan The City is working with Camoin Associates as the consultants for the six-month process. The scope of work includes indepth analysis of existing zoning and codes as well as targeted industries and existing industry base. The plan will also identify opportunities for growth and suggestions for economic development branding.

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Downtown Coral Springs The City of Coral Springs and the Coral Springs Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) are creating a vibrant and sustainable downtown in which residents, businesses, and visitors can live, work, shop and entertain. Efforts include redevelopment opportunities and programs to enhance the downtown. Events In an effort to bring more residents and visitors to the downtown, the CRA hosts several events. Sunset Yoga is held every Saturday at the Art Walk. Innovate Downtown, held in February 2020, is in its third year and features presentations by “Creators “in a Shark Tank-like pitch competition. A seasonal Farmers Market takes place on Sundays from 9-1 p.m. at the Old City Hall site from October to April. CRA Commercial Enhancement Grant Program The Commercial Enhancement Grant Program was implemented to encourage existing building owners and tenants located in the CRA to improve the aesthetics of commercial buildings and enhance safety in the rear of the buildings. For approved projects, the program will pay for 50% of the hard costs for the improvements. Commercial buildings may receive up to $25,000. Signs, painting, awnings/canopies, exterior windows/doors/storefronts, lighting, landscaping, enclosures are allowable projects. Eden Sample LLC and Santa Barbara Paints took advantage of the program in FY19. Downtown Mixed-Use Zoning District The Downtown Mixed-Use (DT-MU) Zoning District was established in January 2018 to create a zoning framework that requires all new development within the District to be pedestrian-friendly and mixed-use with an emphasis on the creation of places with an identity to transform Downtown Coral Springs. This mirrors downtown redevelopment trends and allows the City to be more economically competitive and attractive to a diverse demographic. Downtown Urban Design Guidelines The City Commission approved new guidelines within the CRA in March 2019. They are intended to supplement the standards in the DT-MU and foster a pattern/form of development consistent with the City’s and Community’s shared vision for the future of Downtown Coral Springs. The guidelines include but are not limited to architecture such as Art Deco and South Florida Contemporary as well as wall, window, awning and other signage. Wayfinding Signs The Commission approved a sign design package in March 2019 to allow for directional signage downtown. The aesthetically pleasing signage will be installed in 2019 and 2020. The signs will direct pedestrians and vehicular traffic to City Hall, the Art Walk, public parking and Broward Health in addition to other downtown facilities. New Landscaping The CRA has removed the existing landscaping along Sample Road from Coral Hills Drive to 99th and replaced it with attractive, native landscaping. Sample Road Lighting Replacement Broward County is replacing the existing light poles in the CRA with new, LED lights to improve visibility and enhance the safety of the area. Redevelopment Opportunities The Financial Plaza building is scheduled to be demolished in 2020 and replaced with a new mixed-use development. Cornerstone at Downtown Coral Springs includes approximately 350 residential units, restaurants, office space, entertainment and retail. Village Square, on the Northwest corner of Sample and University, is slated for a mixed-use development as well.

90

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Technology The City of Coral Springs Information Technology strategic plan is a comprehensive blueprint that defines how technology will be envisioned, architected, and delivered to all City departments. The strategic plan will enable Information Technology (IT) to meet its mission by defining a strategy that adheres to best practices, governance, and supports the initiatives and vision of the City’s strategic plan. Defining this fundamental IT best practice favorably positions the City to take full advantage of future solutions and technologies we pursue.

Network Infrastructure The City’s network infrastructure was designed to provide data and voice redundancy shared across multiple data centers in the City. This foundation provides stability, bandwidth, and survivability to the critical systems that are necessary to run critical City operations. To ensure the availability of data, an enterprise class virtualized server and storage network was implemented. This technology provides a robust application layer, which is capable of handling the latest in software applications, as well as allowing for future platform growth. Enterprise Software Application The City has completed the Request for Proposal process and is currently in negotiations with Tyler Technology for a new Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system. Combining multiple data elements into a seamless platform is necessary to meet the growing demands of the City, and to meet the expectations of our customers. In an effort to integrate the numerous work-flow processes that are now being done by multiple disparate platforms, or in many cases shadow systems, an ERP project will be necessary to create uniformity and up-to-date functionality. The ERP solution will also allow the City to take advantage of electronic document delivery, as well as drastically minimize many of the manual processes that are done today. Software Sustainability The City maintains a comprehensive inventory of the software products deployed across the environment. With the use of integrated tools such as Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM), we have the ability to conduct real-time inventories of all of the software in use on all City devices. In addition to maintaining software inventory, the City also maintains Enterprise License Agreements (ELA) with Microsoft, our largest software provider. In accordance to the ELA, the IT department maintains appropriate license levels, and keeps products on their latest versions and patch levels. The addition of the OneStop Shop to City Hall now provides a single location for citizens and contractors to interact with staff regarding Building Permits, Code Compliance, Business License, Planning Zoning, and Utility Billing needs. The Community Development software, TRAKiT, provides an additional toolset for our employees in the OneStop Shop to assist the citizens as efficiently as possible. IT Standardization The IT department maintains a change management practice modeled after industry standard protocols outlined by the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) governance body. ITIL governance dictates how changes to production systems are handled, documented, and communicated. Detailed logs of the regular weekly Change Advisory Board (CAB) meetings are kept, and changes must pass through the CAB before implementation. The IT department also follows the industry standards set for Project Management based on the Project Management Book of Knowledge (PMBOK). Currently the IT department has two certified Project Management Professionals (PMP) on staff.

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On-Line Services and Registration Currently the City utilizes several online or web-based solutions to serve our residents. Our customers can pay water bills online, register and pay for parks and recreation classes or events, and enroll in our Fire Academy courses, and now utilize eTRAKiT, which provides the ability to access all Development services. Additionally, several of the City’s applications are hosted in the cloud when available and depending on the nature of the data. Online services provide the City with an added reach to our programs and payment options, which allow us to focus on our residents’ needs. Green Information Technology & Document Management/Imaging The IT department continues to invest in energy compliance by reducing our data center footprint and purchasing energy star compliant devices. Taking advantage of virtualized technology allows the IT department to maintain powerful systems that require less cooling and power than conventional server infrastructures. This reduction directly relates to data center efficiency and provides flexible architectures that can be deployed in smaller more efficient locations. The IT department also maintains a digital document management system that aims at reducing the physical paper products produced, which must be stored in costly offsite locations. Public Safety Technology Initiatives Public Safety is paramount to the integrity and security of the residents of Coral Springs. Our Police and Fire Departments are outfitted with the latest CAD E911 applications and state-of-the-art Motorola GPS enabled two-way radios. The IT department recently wrapped up a major upgrade to the infrastructure of the dispatch center that services all of fire and police. This upgrade brings our dispatch center up to the latest technology available, ensuring stability and reliability. In addition, IT implemented the Fireworks software to help firefighter’s better plan for and respond to events. Geospatial Integration GIS (Geographic Information System) is a framework to organize, communicate and understand the science of our world. Rooted in the science of geography, GIS integrates many types of data. It analyzes spatial location and organizes layers of information into visualizations using maps and 3D scenes. With this unique capability, GIS reveals deeper insights into data, such as patterns, relationships, and situations-helping users make smarter decisions. The City is involved in an extended process to review and optimize the City’s geospatial data, upgrade the GIS server and client software and expand the use of GIS technology within the organization. A review of current business applications and procedures will move forward to make utility maintenance, community development, dispatch operations and EOC activities easily accessible, transparent and customer focused. Attention is focused on optimizing the access and use of geospatial data by integrating it into business applications and processes.

Legislative Issues The City is concerned about legislation that will weaken its home rule authority or impose mandates without a corresponding funding source. The following issues reflect legislative challenges that require attention and clear direction to staff through the Strategic and Business Plans. State Appropriations With an initial surplus expected in the State 2019-2020 budget, a host of special local funding requests were submitted to State legislators and the City of Coral Springs was no exception, submitting over $7.5 million in appropriations requests for special projects. The final adopted pre-veto budget totaled approximately $91.3 billion. One of the nine special projects submitted by the City of Coral Springs made it to the pre-veto budget but ended up being vetoed in the final session. School Safety Pointing to recommendations by a commission created after last year’s mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, lawmakers passed a wide-ranging bill designed to bolster school safety. The bill included issues such as improving mental-health services, but almost all of the debate focused on a controversial provision that would expand the school “guardian” program to allow armed classroom teachers.

92

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Workforce Analysis The following issues will be the focus of the City’s Human Resource Department in Fiscal Year 2020. Attracting and Retaining the City’s Workforce Our City has benefited from high levels of employee engagement and very low turnover for the last few decades. Many staff who joined Coral Springs at our peak growth in the early 1990s have remained with the City and built a lasting career. During the next five (5) years, it is anticipated that a large number of employees will make the decision to retire. In preparation for the inevitable organizational change, Human Resources is developing a new compensation and talent management strategy to attract our future workforce and support internal promotion/transfer opportunities. Turnover can result in new opportunities for others to advance within the organization and our Leadership Development Program is a key component to prepare our employees for professional growth. The Human Resources department will also recommend new workplace policies that address topics such flexible work arrangements and family friendly programs to further retain top talent in the organization. Delivering Wellbeing Programs including Mental Health Support The City recognizes the significant role that mental well-being plays in the overall health of its employees. With behavioral health issues accounting for a large amount of the health plan claims and increased rates of depression and other behavioral health issues, programming must support the evolving needs of the workforce. The tragedy at Marjory Stoneman Douglas affected all City employees as well as the entire community. We recognize the need to support employees that will continue to experience the effects of such trauma in the days, months and even years after the incident. The City’s mental well-being programming includes access to free confidential onsite health coaching, no copays associated with behavioral health care, peer support programs, and free weekly yoga, meditation and fitness classes. The HR department will continue to develop meaningful programs to support a healthy workforce.

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Maximizing Workforce Productivity and Embracing Innovation In 2019, the City introduced INNOVATION as one of our new core values. This new value will gain momentum in the year ahead as we encourage employees to submit their ideas for process or service improvements. All innovative ideas are submitted to an employee led review panel, and once evaluated, select projects are recommended for immediate funding. Additionally, employees who successfully implement an innovative project are recognized for their efforts. Soon the City will invest in a new Enterprise Resource Platform (ERP) that will dramatically improve internal operations and enable greater workforce productivity. The use of contemporary tools and technology in the workplace will require employees to adapt and evolve which in the long term will produce increased productivity. Our overall service delivery model will improve with greater workflow capabilities, self-service options and process transparency. To support the use of emerging technology within our organization; employees will continue to have access to our self-directed learning platform. Continuous learning will continue to be a top priority for employees and will help grow our collective knowledge base.

Emerging Issues The following issues may affect our ability to provide the level and type of service our customers expect. Community Engagement Community engagement is both a priority and a challenge for local government leaders. People engage with what they feel part of and value what they help to build. Engaging citizens and local communities is indispensable when it comes to developing a sense of ownership in local decision-making and service delivery. Thanks to the explosion and availability of affordable digital technologies, proactive agencies such as the City are poised to drive significant change in the way they interact with their communities. The City will do this by leveraging social media, video, mobile messaging and other tools to communicate with citizens in a way that is more engaging, interactive and personalized than ever before. Census 2020 The U.S. Census counts every resident in the United States. It is mandated by Article I, Section 2 of the Constitution and takes place every 10 years. The data collected by the decennial census determine the number of seats each state has in the U.S. House of Representatives (a process called apportionment) and is also used to distribute more than $400 billion in federal funds to local communities spent on infrastructure, programs, and services. The next Census in 2020 will require counting an increasingly diverse and growing population of around 330 million people in more than 140 million housing units. To get an accurate count, the Census Bureau must build an accurate address list of every housing unit, maximize self-response to the Census, and efficiently follow up with those who do not respond. The 2020 Census will be the second attempt to move away from paper in follow-up operations as the original plan for the 2010 Census was to use custom handheld devices for follow-up with non-responders. City staff has already begun working on this effort by ensuring addresses are accurate for the upcoming Census. Medical Marijuana On November 8, 2016, Florida voters approved amendment 2 to Florida Constitution which calls for legalizing medical marijuana for individuals with specific debilitating diseases or conditions as determined by a licensed state physician. It is also designed to require the Department of Health to register and regulate marijuana production and distribution centers. At the direction of the commission, staff brought forward an Ordinance repealing Ordinance 2017-124 and creating regulations permitting medical marijuana dispensing facilities within the city. Ordinance 2019-104 repeals Ordinance 2017-124 in its entirety and amends multiple Sections of Chapter 25 of the Land Development Code pertaining to Pharmacies, Medical Marijuana Dispensing Facilities, Medical Marijuana Processing Facilities, and Medical Marijuana Cultivation Facilities. Cybersecurity In recent years, cybersecurity has become the number one priority for state and local governments. Cyber-attacks continue to evolve in scope and sophistication. By 2020, according to the leading research and advisory company Gartner, a quarter of identified enterprise attacks will involve internet-connected devices. Lack of expertise, visibility and control, limited budgets, outdated/aging infrastructure, legacy systems and spending priorities are big factors causing state and local municipalities to fall victim to cyber-attacks. To combat the evolving cyber-threats facing government entities today, local governments must ensure they have an integrated approach to cybersecurity, tailored to address the broad scope of security needs. IT departments are focused like never before on comprehensive protection keeping their networks and data secure.

94

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Occupational Cancer Legislation The Florida Senate voted unanimously to entitle firefighters to cancer coverage as part of doing their jobs. SB426 establishes cancer as an occupational hazard tied to firefighting granting certain benefits to a firefighter upon receiving a diagnosis of cancer if certain conditions are met. SB426 also requires an employer to make certain disability payments to a firefighter in the event of a total and permanent disability, to provide for death benefits to a firefighter’s beneficiary if a firefighter dies as a result of cancer or cancer treatments, and to adjust the allocation of funds to provide line-of-duty death benefits for members in the investment plan of the Florida Retirement System. Regionalization of Dispatch Since February 14, 2018, the Cities of Parkland and Coral Springs, along with the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department, Broward Sheriff’s Office, the Coral Springs Police Department and the Broward County Office of Regional Communications and Technology, have worked together to improve communications and interoperability between agencies in the northwest section of Broward County. There has been much discussion of regionalization, having all dispatch in Broward County under one umbrella of service, or even in one location. The fact is, in Broward County interoperability is a far better solution and a practiced method used by public safety nationwide. In the event one system fails, the standing dispatch center may continue operating. Interoperability simply means that agencies can communicate with one another via radio and Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) systems. Improvements have been made between ORCAT, BSO, and Coral Springs to ensure effective interoperability. The City of Coral Springs is in the final stages of selecting the best options for making the CADs between the Coral Springs PSAP and the Regional PSAP fully interoperable. The options that have been explored thus far include interfacing the two current CADs together or purchasing a new Motorola P1 CAD for the Coral Springs PSAP and then linking the two CADs. The Cities of Parkland and Coral Springs, along with the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department, Broward Sheriff’s Office, the Coral Springs Police Department and the Broward County Office of Regional Communications and Technology, continue to work together to ensure the highest level of service possible is provided to the communities for which we are responsible. Interaction with Other Agencies Local governments are finding the need to coordinate with external stakeholders through an intergovernmental liaison in order to enhance communication and partnership with other local agencies, county organizations and state representatives, as well as a variety of external partners. The goal is to foster a better understanding of programs, policies, rules and decisions, facilitate a better exchange of information and communication and promote cooperation and coordination amongst agencies.

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96

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Environmental Scan Demographic Trends

Decennial Census and American Community Survey

The U.S. Census Bureau’s Decennial Census provides actual counts of population and housing units every ten years, with the most recent one conducted in 2010. The 2010 Decennial Census still remains the best source for reporting basic demographic data, such as population counts, age and race/ethnicity, along with housing unit counts, occupancy and tenure. While the Decennial Census Survey provided an array of other socioeconomic data in the past, that practice was discontinued after the 2000 Census and replaced in 2005 by an annual survey called the American Community Survey (ACS). While the ACS does provide more timely data, it has a reduced sample size and greater sampling error. The ACS collects annual survey information continuously nearly every day of the year through a questionnaire mailed to a sample of households, and then aggregates the results over a specific time period. The ACS data is provided as 1-year, 3-year and 5-year estimates. The 5-year estimate is considered the most reliable socio-economic/demographic dataset. The analysis below uses the best available data for each category. Where appropriate, trending was done using the Census data for 1990, 2000 and 2010, along with the 2012-2016 ACS 5-year estimates (most recent estimates available from the ACS). A number of trends are worth monitoring as they may indicate the need for a new mix of services. Some trends include the increase in the proportion of residents over the age of 50, the decrease in proportion of school age residents, and the growing number of multi-lingual residents. Coral Springs has a majority minority population meaning the white non-hispanic population (44%) is less than half of the City’s total population.

Population age

Population • Coral Springs is still a “young” community, with 26% of population under 18 • Population under 18 has seen a decrease in its share of the total population by 16% in 1990 • There has been some “aging” in the past 20 years • Median Age reported by the Census increased from 31.7 in 1990 (37.6 for Broward County) to 36.4 in 2012-16 (40.0 for Broward County) • Age group 50-64 increased its share of the population significantly, 87% since 1990 • The trend of aging population will continue through 2030 as Baby Boomers age.

Population trends

The City is still a “young” community but the population is aging in place. There will be a continued need for youth and senior programs in the next 5 to 10year period.

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Growing Hispanic Population • Coral Springs has a Majority Minority population, according to the 2012-2016 ACS 5-year estimates. Majority Minority means the White Non-Hispanic population comprises less than 50% of the population. • Based on the racial and ethnic diversity of Miami-Dade and Broward Counties, the current trends will continue as a more racially/ ethnically diverse population continues to move from Miami-Dade into Broward (and Coral Springs).

Place of birth • Foreign-born population in the City has increased its share of the total population from roughly 1/5 to almost 30% since 1990. • The majority of foreign born residents come from the Caribbean/West Indies, Central America, and South America. Percentage of Native Born 100% 80%

Percentage of Foreign Born

21%

25%

28%

79%

75%

72%

2000 Census

2005‐2009 ACS

2012‐2016 ACS

City of Coral Springs (ACS 2012‐2016) Percent of Total  Place of Birth Estimate Foreign Born Haiti 5854 16.2% Jamaica 4922 13.6% Colombia 4220 11.7% Dominican Republic 1773 4.9% Peru 1656 4.6% Mexico 1466 4.1% Cuba 1449 4% India 1408 3.9% Trinidad and Tobago 1261 3.5% Venezuela 1102 3.1%

60% 40% 20% 0%

Language spoken at home

• The share of City’s population speaking another language at home has increased significantly, from 25% in 2000 to 37% in 20122016. • Roughly 1 in 8 residents speak English less than “very well” as reported by the 2012-2016 ACS. 100%

English only

Spanish or Spanish Creole

Other languages

90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20%

As the foreign born population increases from areas other than English speaking countries, there will be a future need to provide pertinent City information in other languages, and provide information in social media and other outlets to get information to the younger age groups.

10% 0% 2000 Census

98

2005‐2009 ACS

2012‐2016 ACS

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Income • Residents’ Median Household Income is 28% higher than the County and 22% higher than the U.S. • Residents’ Median Family Income is 18% higher than the County and 9% higher than the U.S. $90,000 $80,000

The City’s reputation as a place to raise a family will continue to attract young families with higher incomes as compared to Broward County and the U.S.

$77,629 $70,768

$70,000

$65,596

$60,000

$54,895

$70,850

$57,652

$50,000 $40,000 $30,000

Coral Springs

Broward County

United States

Coral Springs

Broward County

United States

$20,000 $10,000

$0

Median Household Income

Median Family Income

A household consists of all people who occupy a housing unit regardless of relationship. A household may consist of a person living alone or multiple unrelated individuals or families living together. Median family income is typically higher than median household income because of the composition of households.

Population below poverty level • The percent of residents living below poverty level in the City is lower than the County and the State. • Poverty has doubled from 1990 (5.2%).

14.40%

15.10%

10.30%

Coral Springs

Broward County

Although lower than the County and the U.S., this data does not include those living below the median household and median family income levels. These families continue to struggle to make ends meet. The fate of funding for Federal programs (HOME/CDBG and other HUD programs) has a direct impact on this population.

United States

City of Coral Springs, Florida

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Financial Strategy Financial Strategy Introduction

Operating Millage Rate Comparison

Operating Millage Rate Comparison FY2019 Actual

$10

FY2020 Proposed

$9

4.1193

$2

4.1193

5.6270

5.6270

5.6736

5.6736

5.6361

$3

5.6875

5.8000

5.8000

5.8732

5.8732

6.1267

6.0018

6.0543

$4

6.0543

$5

7.1172

$6

7.1172

$7

7.4665

$8

7.4665

The City’s healthy financial position can be attributed to our long-term financial planning that identifies emerging issues which may affect our ability to provide the level and type of service our customers expect. We were able to achieve a structural balance between expenditures and revenues for Fiscal Year 2020 by relying on sound financial practices. Appropriations have been utilized for one-time capital projects when fund balance requirements are surpassed and a cost benefit exists to mitigate further exponential costs.

$1 $0

Hollywood

Miramar

Sunrise

Deerfield Beach Coral Springs

Plantation

Pompano Beach*

Pembroke Pines

Davie

Ft Lauderdale

* Pompano Beach includes a separate EMS millage of 0.5000

Structural balance has been achieved through: Maintaining operating millage rate of $5.8732 in Fiscal Year 2020; Decreasing the Debt Service millage rate from $0.2652 to $0.2534; Reducing Merit Pool Actively monitoring vacancies Establishing a new revenue source, Stormwater Assessment of a rate of 1 ERU = $115.66 Increasing Water and Sewer rates 3.5%, in accordance with the 2013 Water and Wastewater Rate Study; Increasing the residential Solid Waste Special Assessment from $260.00 to $290.00 per single-family household; Increasing the Fire Special Assessment Fee from $200.00 to $227.82 per single-family household; Increasing the Fire Special Assessment Fee from $215.00 to $227.82 per multi-family household; Health Fund expenditure increases; however, establishing an employee health clinic are expected to keep expenses lower. Use of Surpluses One important component of our long-term planning is utilizing all identified surpluses in all funds to pay for the following years needed capital items. Each year we carefully analyze all our funds to determine if any surpluses exist. Instead of leaving those funds idle, or spending them on on-going operating expenses which should be budgeted for, we invest them in needed capital improvements. As surpluses are declining it is more important than ever that future surpluses, beyond satisfying the appropriate financial reserve policy, be earmarked to provide a funding source for future capital expenditures, foregoing the need to borrow or issue additional debt, thereby avoiding future interest expense. Due to Hurricane Irma in FY2017, the majority of the cost of debris was paid in FY2018 yeilding zero surplus. Minimal surplus is expected for Fiscal Year 2019. Depreciation Funding depreciation of vehicles, computers, and parks (turf fields and 50 meter aquatic pool) is another vital component of our financial strategy. The “pay-as-you-go” approach allows the City to avoid debt service for vehicle replacement and for computer replacement. In 2017, the City set up a parks replacement plan for larger parks capital items such as the turf fields and 50 meter aquatic pool. The City will continue to fund vehicle, computer, and parks depreciation plans on an annual basis to ensure we can replace our vehicles, technology, and large park items when necessary, thereby avoiding the issuance of additional debt.

100

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Fostering Commercial Development A key component to building a stronger, more vibrant future for the City of Coral Springs is the expansion of our commercial tax base. Over 46% of the City’s revenue comes from property taxes which are the City’s single largest revenue source. Property taxes are determined by the assessed value of real property within the City limits. In other words, increasing assessed values is vital to increasing revenue. As shown in the table below, the City has recovered to the pre-recession level from 2008. After several years of declining property values, the City’s Total Taxable Assessed Values, after Value Board adjustments, have reached a new height. The tax base is expected to continue to grow due to new commercial entities as well as key residential development projects currently underway. We welcome Costco, Athletica Health and Fitness, Young Chefs Academy, Air Adventure Park, John the Baker, Wild Fork, Aldora Aluminum and Glass, Grace Roofing, Emser Tile and Decimal Engineering. With a healthy housing market, new residential development is underway, and an energized commercial sector, developing growing and further diversifying the economic base will provide a more solid foundation to withstand future economic downturns. The City’s contribution to build a new Municipal Complex to serve as a catalyst for redevelopment of Downtown Coral Springs is in progress with the old Financial Plaza scheduled to be demolished and the Cornerstone project will begin the next fiscal year. Just as we leaned on these methods to exit the great recession on sound financial footing, we will rely on our Core Values and solid principles of financial management to guide our journey toward long-term financial sustainability. Moreover, this strategy will allow the City to continue to provide the same quality of services our customers have come to expect and preserve our community’s quality of life. The Impact of Hurricane Irma Hurricane Irma impacted the City of Coral Springs beginning on Saturday, September 9th, 2017 and continuing through Sunday, September 10th, 2017, with an incident period of September 7th – September 15th. The storm approached the State of Florida as a catastrophic category 5 hurricane. Realizing the threat, the City of Coral Springs took prudent and responsible action to prepare for a potential landfall on the southeast coast of Florida. Consistent prediction anticipated an east coast landfall, but ultimately the storm tracked to the west, saving the City from the most dangerous winds. Thankfully, damage to residences and buildings was limited with vegetative debris representing the greatest impact from the storm. The total cost from Hurricane Irma is approximately $12.7 million. Because of Irma’s timing, the staffing costs were expenses in FY2017. Much of the cost for debris related work and damage to City property was accounted for in Fiscal Year 2018 because it occurred after October 1, 2017. As a result, the City’s took a conservative approach in FY2018 and all surplus and a majority of additional unassigned reserves was used to fund the storm. The City’s stabilization fund maintained its reserve target of 17% without having to issue debt. While approximately $800,000 of the $9.2million funds have been reimbursed by FEMA. The remaining balance has been obligated by the State, however, the funds have not been wired. It should be noted that these numbers are subject to change until all costs are verified, paid and reimbursement is received from FEMA, the State and the City’s insurance carrier. In the meantime another hurricane season is upon us. The City has secured an open line of credit of $10M to last through this year’s hurricane season.

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General Fund Revenue Outlook General Fund Revenues

The primary source of revenue for the City is ad valorem property taxes, which comprise 45% of total budgeted revenues for the General Fund. The City receives another 16% of its General Fund revenues from other State-imposed taxes and utility fees. The remaining 39% comes from a wide variety of smaller intergovernmental and other demand-driven sources. The Fiscal Year 2020 Budget includes a increase of 4.60% in the ad valorem revenue driven by the increase in property values.

39%

45%

Ad Valorem Property Tax State Imposed Taxes Local Fees, Fines

As part of the Five-Year Forecast, we have made several assumptions about future revenue growth that have a major impact on the resources that we can plan to use. The following is an explanation of some of these assumptions.

16%

Ad Valorem (Property Tax) Revenue The primary source of revenue for the City is ad valorem property taxes levied against the taxable value of real and personal property. The City sets the rate (“millage”) for this tax each year prior to October 1, which is applied to each property’s taxable assessed value as determined by the Broward County Property Appraiser. In Fiscal Year 2015, ad valorem property tax revenue made up about 34% of the City’s General Fund revenues. In Fiscal Year 2018 the City approved a millage rate increase of 22% changing this proportion to 45%. This increase in the millage rate, from $4.7982 to $5.8732, enabled the ad Forecast of Ad ValoremAd Valorem Taxes (Property Tax) Revenues valorem property tax revenue toward funding nearly half  $80.00 of the City’s daily operations.  $70.00

Homesteaded properties are protected by the Save Our Homes legislation and will only see an assessed value increase of 1.9% over last year. Overall the total taxable values for the City grew 4.60% for Fiscal Year 2020. Forecasts are for a conservative 4% property value growth each year.

$60.00

$ Millions

$50.00  $40.00  $30.00  $20.00  $10.00

State-Imposed Taxes, Utility Taxes and Fees Two of the City’s major State revenues, Half-cent Sales Tax, State Shared Revenues, are distributed based upon each city’s share of the County population. Coral Springs is a built-out city, with little room for new development, however other cities within Broward County continue to grow. As these other cities grow, Coral Springs’ proportionate share of these revenues decreases. Utility taxes, franchise fees, and demand-driven revenues fluctuate with the economy or are based upon sources that are declining due to cultural shifts or advancements in technology. With little to no growth in these revenues, the City has to increase its reliance on Ad Valorem (Property Tax) revenue.

102

2024

2023

2022

2021

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

$‐

In 2017 the Florida legislature passed a bill that allowed voters to expand the homestead exemption to $75,000 from $50,000 for homes worth at least $100,000. The proposed constitutional amendment was voted on in November 2018 and the amendment did not pass.

Major General Fund Revenues

Fiscal Year 2019 Budget

Fiscal Year 2020 % Change Budget

Electric Utility Service Tax

$9.65 million

$9.4 million

Half-cent Sales Tax

$8.86 million $8.9 million

.36%

Electric Franchise Fee

$7.05 million

$7.00 million

-.71%

Solid Waste Franchise Fee

$5.32 million

$5.46 million

2.71%

State Shared Revenues

$4.80 million $4.80 million

Communication Service Tax

$3.7 million

$3.2 million

-13.5%

Total General Fund Revenues

$128.57 million

$133.59 million

3.91%

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

-2.59%

0%


Shared Revenues Forecast of State Shared Revenues  $10.00

$9.00

$9.00

$8.00

$8.00

$7.00

$7.00

$6.00

$6.00  $5.00

2024

2023

2022

2021

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2007

2024

2023

2022

2021

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

$‐

2010

$1.00

$‐ 2009

$2.00

$1.00

2008

$3.00

$2.00

2011

$4.00

$3.00

2010

$4.00

2009

$5.00

2008

$ Millions

$10.00

2007

$ Millions

Forecast of Half-Cent Sales Tax Revenues 1/2 Cent Sales Tax

The Half-Cent Sales Tax generates the largest amount of revenue for local governments among the state-shared revenues currently authorized. With the economic recovery this revenue grew 6% in Fiscal Years 2013 and 2014, but has since started a downward slide, missing State forecast estimates the past two years. The State forecasts increases related to tourism, motor vehicles, business purchases, and household goods. The hope is that an improving economy will continue to grow the overall sales taxes collected to make up for Coral Springs’ diminishing portion. We are forecasting a modest 2% annual growth over the next five years. State shared revenues are comprised of revenues from the state sales tax and the municipal fuel tax. As the economy continues to expand, the City predicts this revenue source will grow however Coral Springs’ share, same as for the Half-Cent Sales Tax, will shrink. A conservative 2% is forecast due to the drag of lower gas prices and the shrinking share of this blended revenue. Communications Services Tax (CST) has a State and local component; this data reflects only the local tax rate of 5.22% on retail sales of communications services. Going forward, the State is estimating negative growth rates for wireless service and a decline in landlines, which we reflect with an annual 2% decline in this revenue. The City levies a 10% utility service tax on all electricity payments made within the City, through FPL. Electricity charges are made up of a base rate and a fuel rate. The City receives no tax on fuel rate increases, only on the base rate. Because this tax is based on the consumption of electricity, the City expects low growth as complete build-out and full occupancy is reached. This revenue is conservatively forecast to increase 1% annually. The City authorizes FPL to provide electrical service in exchange for a franchise fee for use of rights-of-way and other public services. FPL bills each customer a portion of their total electric usage. As FPL rates increase and consumption of electricity grows, this revenue will increase. FPL increased base rates as of January 2017. With continuing low fuel prices, this revenue forecast for a slow increase (1%) in the growth of this revenue over the next five years.

Forecast of Electric Utility Service Tax Revenues Electric Utility Service Tax

Forecast of Electric Franchise Fee Revenues Electric Franchise Fees (6%)

$11.00

$10.00

$10.00

$9.00

$9.00

$8.00

$8.00

$7.00  $6.00 $ Millions

$6.00  $5.00  $4.00

$5.00  $4.00  $3.00

$3.00

$2.00

$2.00

$1.00

$1.00

City of Coral Springs, Florida

2024

2023

2022

2021

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2024

2023

2022

2021

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

$‐

$‐ 2007

$ Millions

$7.00

103


Local Fees, Fines The City exercises its sovereign function to impose fees and fines, capturing revenue from licenses, permits, fines, and direct charges to use a service. These revenues are meant to recoup the cost to provide the service. A non-recurring revenue from Code Compliance activities was providing a larger than normal boost to the City in the last four years, but is budgeted to decrease nearly $250,000 for Fiscal Year 2020. The five year forecast is projecting a modest increase of 2% for this revenue. Overall, the ad valorem revenues will be the workhorse of the City’s budget going forward. As property values are expected to rise for the short term, the increased millage rate will keep the budget in balance. Further ahead when a real estate downturn occurs, other measures will need to be explored.

Millions

Forecast of Code Compliance Revenues $4.50 $4.00 $3.50 $3.00 $2.50 $2.00 $1.50 $1.00 $0.50

104

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

2024

2023

2022

2021

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

$0.00


General Fund Five-Year Forecast The General Fund Five-Year Forecast is an integral part of planning the City’s future fiscal position. It is an important tool used to determine a longer-range picture of the City’s financial horizon for financial stability. This tool is used to evaluate the level of risk the City could face over time if operational costs and expenditure decisions are higher than revenue growth. This model is the framework to peer into the near future to identify the deficits that might await us if we were to take no action. It helps City staff to conservatively quantify our financial outlook so we can adequately plan and be prepared to meet these challenges. As we forecast our financial and operating strategies, we use the model to determine the potential impact of decisions, focusing on long-term solutions rather than short-term “fixes,” which could lead to negative financial impacts in future years. This financial outlook provides an opportunity to both avoid future budget problems and maintain financial stability. The forecast integrates projections of the major drivers of the City’s annual budget, new programs, and the anticipated revenues over the forecast period. Preparing the FY2020 Budget, the City utilized the existing five-year forecast process for the General Operating Fund and incorporated a consultant to broaden the time horizon to 10-years, incorporating capital and the stabilization fund to test multiple permutations of future recommendations in a dynamic sustainability model for decision making. Actions and Recommendations: In Fiscal Year 2018, the City Commission approved a millage increase from $4.7982 to $5.8732 to provide funding for existing and for new business plan initiatives. Although national and state economies are improving at a slow but steady pace, local governments are still experiencing slowly recovering revenues, which was making it difficult to provide both essential services to the community and the much needed infrastructure improvements. For FY2020, we are proposing to maintain the current millage rate of $5.8732. The five-year forecast includes implementing the following recommendations: Slow cost escalation • FY2020: Reducing Merit Pool to 3% for General Employees and Police (Fire under contract) • FY2020: Continue the planned increase cost share of health care with employees • FY2020: Evaluating vacancies through attrition • FY2020: Adopt a Stormwater Assessment as many Broward Cities levy Diversify Revenue Options • FY2022: Begin a series of millage increases to keep up with inflation in future years If recommendations are implemented and no unfunded mandated or sudden change in forecasting, the General Fund will continue to operate with stable operations providing exceptional level of service to our community . Our success to date has been largely dependent upon planning ahead for the financial realities we project in coming years.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

105


106

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

Surplus/(Deficit)

Total Expenditures

Expenditures/Financing Uses City Commission City Manager's Office Human Resources Financial Services Information Technology City Attorney's Office Police Department Emergency Medical Services Development Services Public Works Parks and Recreation Non-Departmental Interfund Transfers Capital Financing

Total Revenues

Revenues/Financing Sources Ad Valorem Taxes Solid Waste Special Assessment Utility Franchise Fees Utility Service Taxes Intergovernmental Revenues Licenses and Permits Charges for Services Fines and Forfeitures Miscellaneous Interfund Transfers

$160,126

$128,572,207

$374,914 4,833,278 2,258,503 2,945,653 4,253,429 1,144,891 53,705,971 11,018,929 7,111,938 7,748,262 14,989,105 3,659,222 3,447,330 11,080,782

$128,732,333

$57,370,852 2,189,175 10,301,000 11,886,781 20,304,815 4,237,926 15,341,865 2,798,426 4,163,579 137,913

Adopted Fiscal Year 2019

($0)

$133,595,003

$381,247 $5,562,868 $2,472,245 $2,989,796 $4,666,238 $1,219,261 $54,939,564 $11,842,637 $7,144,124 $6,608,263 $15,580,598 $3,860,487 $4,806,236 $11,521,439

$133,595,003

$60,011,214 $2,189,175 $10,415,000 $11,608,966 $19,736,074 $4,409,005 $17,626,216 $2,548,735 $4,194,979 $855,639

Projected Fiscal Year 2020 $62,411,662 2,189,175 10,447,750 11,725,056 19,963,230 4,576,793 18,133,815 2,606,613 4,143,587 140,671

Projected Fiscal Year 2021

$112,763

$394,923 5,743,129 2,551,509 3,084,342 5,083,721 1,258,275 57,164,931 12,387,730 7,377,679 6,829,225 16,084,665 3,937,810 4,942,318 9,385,332

3.9% $136,225,590

1.7% 15.1% 9.5% 1.5% 9.7% 6.5% 2.3% 7.5% 0.5% -14.7% 3.9% 5.5% 39.4% 4.0%

3.8% $136,338,353

4.6% 0.0% 1.1% -2.3% -2.8% 4.0% 14.9% -8.9% 0.8% 520.4%

D

%

2.0%

3.6% 3.2% 3.2% 3.2% 8.9% 3.2% 4.1% 4.6% 3.3% 3.3% 3.2% 2.0% 2.8% -18.5%

2.1%

4.0% 0.0% 0.3% 1.0% 1.2% 3.8% 2.9% 2.3% -1.2% -83.6%

D

%

$729,479

$140,922,204

$407,377 5,920,902 2,628,731 3,176,819 5,520,446 1,296,906 58,786,088 12,936,551 7,600,474 6,968,761 16,578,620 4,430,702 5,088,606 9,581,221

$141,651,683

$66,565,866 2,189,175 10,480,828 11,842,307 20,197,320 4,752,452 18,624,768 2,666,455 4,189,027 143,485

Projected Fiscal Year 2022

3.4%

3.2% 3.1% 3.0% 3.0% 8.6% 3.1% 2.8% 4.4% 3.0% 2.0% 3.1% 12.5% 3.0% 2.1%

3.9%

6.7% 0.0% 0.3% 1.0% 1.2% 3.8% 2.7% 2.3% 1.1% 2.0%

D

%

4.0% 0.0% 0.3% 1.0% 1.2% 3.6% 2.9% 2.3% 1.9% 2.0%

D

%

$829,635

2.9% 3.0% 2.9% 2.9% 8.3% 3.0% 2.7% 4.3% 2.9% 3.2% 3.0% -6.6% 3.1% -0.1%

$144,726,575 2.7%

$419,142 6,098,512 2,705,394 3,267,394 5,980,029 1,335,688 60,389,757 13,496,864 7,818,361 7,192,036 17,071,209 4,138,065 5,245,867 9,568,256

$145,556,210 2.8%

$69,228,500 2,189,175 10,514,236 11,960,730 20,438,434 4,923,131 19,159,220 2,728,330 4,268,100 146,354

Projected Fiscal Year 2023 6.6% 0.0% 0.3% 1.0% 1.2% 3.6% 2.7% 2.3% 1.9% 2.0%

D

%

$76,742,274 2,189,175 10,582,058 12,201,140 20,942,093 5,290,517 20,209,016 2,858,463 4,362,976 152,275

Projected Fiscal Year 2025

$1,912,601

3.6% 3.3% 3.2% 3.3% 8.4% 3.2% 3.0% 4.6% 3.3% 3.4% 3.3% 2.7% 3.2% -0.2%

$1,253,119

$450,362 6,504,881 2,883,624 3,485,643 7,001,026 1,423,155 64,276,719 14,756,341 8,345,384 7,688,455 18,207,980 4,365,481 5,596,654 9,291,164

$149,453,874 3.3% $154,276,868

$434,413 6,298,081 2,792,896 3,374,445 6,479,647 1,378,666 62,212,981 14,122,990 8,076,844 7,435,830 17,629,138 4,249,596 5,414,921 9,553,428

$151,366,475 4.0% $155,529,988

$73,790,648 2,189,175 10,547,978 12,080,337 20,686,660 5,102,344 19,677,092 2,792,308 4,350,642 149,289

Projected Fiscal Year 2024

General Fund Five-Year Forecast Summary

3.2%

3.7% 3.3% 3.2% 3.3% 8.0% 3.2% 3.3% 4.5% 3.3% 3.4% 3.3% 2.7% 3.4% -2.7%

2.8%

4.0% 0.0% 0.3% 1.0% 1.2% 3.7% 2.7% 2.4% 0.3% 2.0%

D

%


Fiscal Year 2020 Capital Improvement Program The Capital Improvement Program (CIP) is a long-range plan for the timely replacement and maintenance of the City’s equipment and facilities. Financing options for capital needs are examined to determine the best source for each project including operating fund balances, capital reserves, grants, outstanding debt, and rating agency criteria for borrowing. In Fiscal Year 2020, Budget staff worked with each department prior to budget kickoff to review their capital plan and determine which projects were essential or recurring and which projects were considered nonessential or one-time requests. The goal of this exercise was to determine how much capital funding was required on an annual basis for crucial projects. Those projects that were found to be nonessential were placed on an appendix of unfunded projects to the capital plan and referenced during the budget process. Decisions about which requests to fund in the upcoming year’s capital budget were made based on a project prioritization funding exercise conducted by senior management. The highest priority projects are proposed for funding in the capital budget. Those are projects that satisfy a regulatory requirement, are tied to a new initiative, achieve the City’s strategic goals and objectives, contribute to the enhancement of aesthetic value, or maintenance programs that protect the City’s infrastructure. This evaluation resulted in adopted capital expenditures for Fiscal Year 2020 of $40.8 million, of which approximately $15 million is proposed for projects in the General Fund. The Water and Sewer Fund is budgeting $5.4 million in improvements to the water and wastewater infrastructure, the Fire Fund is budgeting $12 million in capital improvements and the Equipment Service Fund is budgeting $4.6 million for the replacement of vehicles in Fiscal Year 2020. This allocation also includes funding to perform repairs and preventive maintenance on vehicles and equipment to extend their useful life, the purchase of new fleet vehicle and funding for shop equipment in the 4150 Building, the future location of the Public Safety and Public Works Campus. The City has applied for various federal, state and local grants such as CDBG (Community Development Block Grants), Department of Transportation grants, and HOME/SHIP grants. These funds supplement $5.4 million of the total capital investment for the upcoming year. Other financing sources include operating capital supported by revenues, and equity. In Fiscal Year 2020, operating capital is estimated at $559,576 for the General Fund, $479,784 for the Fire Fund, $4,380,240 for the Equipment Services Fund and $335,000 for the Utilities Fund. Public Art Fund projects total $110,000, Charter School Fund projects total $1,243,590 and Tree Trust Fund projects total $210,000. Equity from the General Fund ($2,868,000), Insurance fund ($1,062,352), Fire fund ($415,500) and Equipment Service Fund ($238,000) and will be used for improvement and construction projects.

Fire Fund The Coral Springs Fire Department is adding three firefighter/paramedics. These adds to staff will ensure adequate staffing levels given the changing demands for service. Fire Stations 43 and 95 were recently rebuilt, funded by the 2015 General Obligation Bonds, to meet the recommended safety requirements for the staff who live in the stations. The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department is rated an “ISO Class 1” fire department by the Insurance Service Organization. It is the highest rating a fire department can attain for fire protection services in the United States.

Fire Assessment Comparison

Coral Springs has one of the lowest fire assessment rates for a single-family home in the area.

Fire Assessment rate comparison Fiscal Year 2020 local cities with full service fire departments $450 $400

$398.23

$350

*ISO 1 Fire Departments $350.00

$300

$311.00

$300.00

$250

$285.00

$282.38 $235.00

$200

$229.50

$227.82

$220.00

$206.00

$150 $100 $50 $0

*Miramar

*Tamarac

*Ft Lauderdale

*Margate

*Hollywood *Pembroke *Deerfield Pines Beach (BSO)

Sunrise

City of Coral Springs, Florida

*Coral Springs *Pompano Beach

Davie

107


Water and Sewer Fund The City’s water and sewer infrastructure requires ongoing repair and maintenance to ensure the safe, efficient operation of the utility. To meet these capital requirements, the City secured long-term financing from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection State Revolving Fund (SRF) for improvements at the Water Treatment Plant as well as throughout the entire system. The interest rate for this financing is 60% of the market rate, resulting in low-cost financing for a term of 20 years. Over $15 million in financing has been obtained for the replacement of existing wells, construction of new raw water supply wells, installation of wellheads and transmission lines, and improvements at lift stations. In Fiscal Year 2020, debt service totaling $990,480 is allocated in the Water and Sewer Fund for repayment of SRF loans. In Fiscal Year 2014, the City began repayment of an $8.7 million bank loan secured during 2012 to continue rehabilitation of booster stations and complete Phase III of water treatment plant improvements. The interest rate for this loan is 2.29% with a debt service of $607,689 for Fiscal Year 2020. In Fiscal Year 2015, the City secured a $4.7 million low interest bank loan to finance the continued rehabilitation of the East and West booster stations as well as other system improvements. The interest rate for this loan is 2.002% with a debt service of $564,213 which has been budgeted in Fiscal Year 2020. Operating capital funds will be used for ongoing inspection, repair, and maintenance of water and force main valves ensuring all components of the sanitary system will perform as needed during times of emergencies, ongoing replacement of fire hydrants, and installation of automatic flushing systems at dead end streets to ensure water quality. The City will also continue to replace portable generators for lift stations in FY 2020.

Water and Sewer Fund forecasted debt service Revenue Bonds

SRF

$2,500,000 $2,000,000 $1,500,000

$1,171,902 $1,146,144 $1,145,137 $579,959 $1,141,879 $$1,145,865

$578,624

$1,000,000 $990,478

$500,000

$992,566

$1,017,671

$1,017,671

$1,017,671 $1,017,671 $1,017,671

2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026

108

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Solid Waste Fund Solid Waste enterprise fund was established in Fiscal Year 2014 to collect the residential solid waste assessment and directly pay collection and disposal costs for residential waste and recycling. This process provides the City a clear picture of the costs involved in providing garbage service to residents. As of January 1, 2014 the City engaged Waste Pro as the City’s exclusive hauler of residential solid waste and recyclables, as well as commercial garbage hauler, ending a 15 year relationship with Waste Management. With this overhaul, residents continue to receive a low solid waste assessment, less than $25 per month, at $269.00 for FY 2020. Litter Control Litter continues to be an environmental concern among City residents. In February 2008 the Streets division of Public Works implemented a litter control program which currently consists of six part-time crew members and one part-time Lead Neighborhood Service Worker, which oversees the crew. The crew operates from John Deer Gators, a golf cart type vehicle, to quickly traverse public right of ways to pick up litter. Over the last eight years a total of 1,897 cubic yards of litter has been collected. This crew can de-litter about 159 miles of public land in 5 working days. Thanks to this program, resident complaints about litter are down.

Residential Solid Waste Assessment Rate

$243.72 $243.00

$220.92

$233.64 $250.20

$227.16

$225.84

$234.75

$248.00 $239.75

City of Coral Springs, Florida

$290.00

$260.00

109


Customer Requirements Analysis Overview In an effort to closely align the City’s limited resources with the needs and expectations of our residents, we use a number of “listening devices” to gather credible and useful data. This customer input is a critical piece of the Strategic Planning process. Our business model demands that we know our customers’ needs and expectations. Through citizen and business surveys, SWOC analyses, Slice of the Springs meetings and good, old-fashioned customer contact, we gain an understanding of our customers views.

Residential Survey Summary Purpose and Methodology

ETC Institute administered surveys to residents in the City of Coral Springs during February and March of 2019. The purpose of the surveys was to assess satisfaction with the quality of City services and to gather input about priorities for the community. A seven-page survey was mailed to a random sample of households in the City of Coral Springs. Approximately seven days after the surveys were mailed, residents who received the survey were contacted by phone. Those who indicated that they had not returned the survey were given the option of completing it by phone or over the Internet (www.CoralSpringsSurvey.org). A total of 1,246 completed surveys. The results for the random sample of 1,246 households have a precision of at least +/-2.8% at the 95% level of confidence. There were no statistically significant differences in the results of the survey based on the method of administration (mail vs. online vs. phone). In order to understand how well services are being delivered in different areas of the City, ETC Institute geocoded the home address of respondents to the survey. A minimum of 200 surveys were completed in each of six areas of the City. The results for each area have a precision of at least +/- 6.9% at the 95% level of confidence.

Survey respondents by general location

Source: ETC Institute Coral Springs Resident Satisfaction Survey

110

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Overall Satisfaction:

Major Findings The major City services that were rated best include: the quality of fire services (91%), the quality of emergency medical services (89%), the quality of police services (86%), and quality of City parks and recreation programs (81%). Residents were least satisfied with Code Compliance Division (53%). Areas in need of greater emphasis over the next two years

The major City services that residents thought should be emphasized most over the next two years were: (1) police services, (2) maintaining the quality of neighborhoods in the City, (3) parks and recreation programs, and (4) the code compliance division. Public Safety

“The City of Coral Springs in once again setting the standard with regard to the overall quality of City services.”

the

72% of residents surveyed are satisfied with the overall quality of services compared to a national average of 50% and a Florida average of 49%. Public Safety Response Time Satisfaction Comparison

The public safety services that were rated best included: how quickly EMS personnel respond to emergencies (85%), how quickly fire personnel respond to emergencies (82%), and how quickly police respond to emergencies (81%). Residents were least satisfied with police social media outreach (57%). The public safety services that residents thought were most important to emphasize over the next two years were: (1) the City’s efforts to prevent crimes and (2) patrolling in the city. Parks and Recreation Services

The areas of parks and recreation that were rated best included: the maintenance and appearance of City parks (84%), outdoor athletic facilities/fields (83%), and Coral Springs aquatic/pool facilities (76%). The parks and recreation services that residents thought were most important to emphasize over the next two years were: (1) the maintenance and appearance of City parks, (2) availability of information about recreation programs, (3) outdoor athletic facilities/fields, and (4) the quality of recreation programs for youth. Public Works/Utilities The areas of infrastructure/maintenance that were rated best included: bulk trash pick-up (79%), curbside recycling services (79%), residential trash collection services (77%), yard waste collection services (76%), and condition of major streets (75%). Residents were least satisfied with bike lane availability on major streets (50%). The areas of maintenance that residents thought were most important to emphasize over the next two years were: (1) the condition of major City streets, (2) the adequacy of street lighting on major streets, and (3) the condition of neighborhood streets. City Communications

Seventy-five percent (75%) of the residents surveyed who had an opinion were satisfied (rating of 4 or 5 on a 5-point scale) with the quality of the Coral Springs News Magazine; 68% were satisfied with the City’s website (CoralSprings.org), and 64% were satisfied with the availability of information about City services.

City Communications Rating Comparison

Customer Service Over two-thirds of residents were satisfied with all five areas of customer service that were rated. The areas that were rated the best included: the courteousness of City staff (78%), the accuracy of the information received from staff (74%), and how easy the City was to contact (72%).

City of Coral Springs, Florida

111


How Coral Springs Compares to Other Communities Overall Satisfaction

The City of Coral Springs is once again setting the standard with regard to the overall quality of City services. Seventy-three percent (73%) of the residents surveyed in the City of Coral Springs were satisfied (ratings of 4 or 5 on a 5-point scale) with the overall quality of City services, compared to a national average of just 50% and a Florida average of 49%. Coral Springs rates above the U.S. Average in 47 of the 53 areas that were assessed on the survey. Coral Springs is setting the standard for service delivery in 21 areas (rating 15% or more above the national average). Listed below are the comparisons for all 53 areas: Service

Coral Springs Aquatic/Pool Facilities Public Works Condition of major City streets Customer service by City employees Bulk trash pickup service Quality of services provided by the City Condition on of neighborhood streets Condition/appearance of medians Availability of information about City services City efforts to prevent crimes Parks & recreation How quickly police responds to emergencies As a place to live Outdoor athletic facilities/fields Police services How well your issues are handled City communication with residents How easy they were to contact Maintenance & appearance of City parks City efforts to keep you informed on local issues Enforcement of exterior maintenance of residential prop. Sidewalk maintenance in your neighborhood Adequacy of City street lighting of major streets As a City that is moving in the right direction As a place to raise children How well the City is planning for the future Litter collection on City streets Quality of recreation programs for youth As a place to work Courteousness of City staff How quickly they responded to your request Yardwaste collection services Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Curbside recycling services City's website: CoralSprings.org Enforcement of exterior maintenance of commercial prop. Accuracy of the information you received Fire services Frequency that Police officers patrol your neighborhood Value for City taxes and fees How quickly EMS personnel respond to emergencies Overall aesthetics of the City Enforcement of local traffic laws Hazardous waste drop-off Residential trash collection services Quality of recreation programs for adults Quality of life How quickly fire personnel respond to emergencies Code Compliance Walking and biking paths in the City City's social media outreach Fire prevention/education programs provided by the City As a place to retire

112

Coral Springs 76% 74% 75% 72% 79% 73% 70% 74% 64% 74% 82% 81% 87% 83% 86% 68% 64% 72% 84% 60% 58% 56% 70% 67% 84% 60% 75% 72% 65% 78% 70% 76% 89% 79% 68% 60% 74% 91% 66% 45% 85% 68% 68% 68% 77% 55% 76% 82% 53% 58% 52% 60% 53%

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

U.S . Average 35% 41% 48% 45% 53% 50% 48% 52% 45% 54% 63% 64% 70% 68% 70% 51% 48% 58% 70% 45% 42% 41% 56% 51% 70% 47% 61% 61% 53% 69% 60% 67% 81% 70% 60% 51% 65% 83% 59% 38% 79% 63% 64% 64% 75% 54% 75% 82% 54% 59% 55% 65% 58%

Variance 41% 33% 27% 27% 26% 23% 22% 22% 19% 20% 19% 17% 17% 15% 16% 17% 16% 14% 14% 15% 16% 15% 14% 16% 14% 13% 14% 11% 12% 9% 10% 9% 8% 9% 8% 9% 9% 8% 7% 7% 6% 5% 4% 4% 2% 1% 1% 0% -1% -1% -3% -5% -5%


Other Findings • Eighty-seven percent (87%) of residents feel Coral Springs is an “excellent” or “good” place to live; only 4% gave a rating of “below average” or “poor”. Eighty-four percent (84%) feel Coral Springs is an “excellent” or “good” place to raise children; only 5% gave a rating of “below average” or “poor”.

Coral Springs as a place to live & raise children

• Ninety-two percent (92%) of residents feel safe walking alone in their neighborhood during the day; 89% feel safe in business areas during the day, and 84% feel safe walking alone in their neighborhood in general. • Sixty-nine percent (68%) of residents were “very satisfied” or “satisfied” with the quality of downtown events; only 7% were “dissatisfied” or “very dissatisfied”. • The most frequently mentioned ways that residents get information about the City were: the City website (49%), Coral Springs Forum Newspaper (48%), and social media generated by the City (37%). • Eighty percent (80%) of residents reported they read the Coral Springs’ magazine “all the time” or “sometimes”; 17% reported they read the magazine “seldom” or “never” and 3% did not know. • The City services or facilities that were used most often were: MyCoralSprings on website, CoralSprings.org (45%), the Coral Springs Center for the Performing Arts (40%), Police services (32%), and City Hall in the Mall (31%). • The top four reasons residents indicated they originally made the decision to move to Coral Springs were: the nice neighborhoods (64%), housing (52%), the quality education system (50%) and the location (50%). • Fifty-one percent (51%) of residents, who had an opinion, were “very satisfied” or “satisfied” with the overall effectiveness of the City’s efforts to address public school issues; 28% were “neutral” and 21% were “dissatisfied” or “very dissatisfied”. • Nearly half (43%) of residents felt they had a good understanding of the important issues facing the City of Coral Springs; 29% did not, and 28% did not know. • Sixty-six percent (64%) of residents think the City of Coral Springs is continually improving as a place to live; 20% disagreed, and 16% did not know.

Opportunities for Improvement In order to help the City identify opportunities for improvement, ETC Institute conducted a Importance-Satisfaction (I-S) Priorities Analysis. This analysis examined the importance that residents placed on each City service and the level of satisfaction with each service. By identifying services of big importance and low satisfaction, the analysis identified which services will have the most impact on overall satisfaction with City services over the next two years. If the City wants to improve its overall satisfaction rating, the City should prioritize improvements in services with the highest Importance Satisfaction ratings. Based on the results of the Importance-Satisfaction Priorities Analysis, ETC Institute recommends the following:

Efforts to maintain quality neighborhoods

• Efforts to maintain quality neighborhoods • Code Compliance Division

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The second level of analysis reviewed the importance of, and satisfaction of services within departments and specific service areas. This analysis was conducted to help departmental managers set priorities for their department. Based on the results of this analysis, the services that are recommended as the top priorities within each department over the next two years are listed below: • Public Safety: City efforts to prevent crimes and patrolling in the City • Parks and Recreation: quality of recreation programs for seniors and the availability of information about recreation programs • Maintenance: drainage maintenance in neighborhoods and condition of major City streets

Trends: Significant Increases and Decrease from last Survey in 2017 The significant increases and decreases among all of the items that were assessed from 2017 to 2019 on the survey are listed below (ratings of 3, 4 or 5 on a 5-point scale); changes of 3% or more were considered significant. The significant increases from 2017 to 2019 are listed below:

114

Service Area

2019

2017

Variance

Frequency that police officers patrol neighborhood Police Department Records Request Emergency Medical Services Public Works and Utilities Hazardous waste drop-off Bulk trash pick up City Hall Reception/Information Desk Value for City taxes & fees Walking and biking paths in the City Community bus service City senior center How well City is planning for future City Clerk's Records Request

88% 90% 98% 93% 92% 91% 96% 78% 83% 87% 88% 88% 90%

75% 87% 94% 89% 90% 88% 93% 84% 87% 93% 91% 91% 94%

13% 3% 4% 4% 2% 3% 3% -6% -4% -6% -3% -3% -4%

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Business Survey Summary

Business Survey: Bottom line up front

Purpose and Methodology During the winter of 2018, ETC Institute administered a survey to businesses in the City of Coral Springs. The purpose of the survey was to gather feedback from Coral Springs business owners and senior managers to identify ways improve the quality of City services. The survey was administered by phone, mail and internet to a random sample of 405 businesses in the City of Coral Springs. The overall results of the survey have a precision of at least +/-4.8% at the 95% level of confidence.

Perceptions of the City are very positive and continue to improve Overall satisfaction with City services remains high and stayed about the same 94% of businesses would recommend Coral Springs as a place to do business The top two reasons businesses plan to stay in Coral Springs are: (1) the City’s low crime rate and (2) ease of travel by car on major City streets

Major Findings Overall Satisfaction with City Services Thirty-nine percent (39%) of the businesses surveyed felt the quality of City services was higher than their expectations; more than half (55%) of the businesses surveyed felt the quality of City services was meeting their expectations and only 6% felt the quality of City services was below their expectations. Satisfaction with Specific City Services, Departments, or Programs

Eighty-two percent (82%) or more of the businesses surveyed were “satisfied” or “neutral” with all 16 of the City services, departments or programs assessed on the survey. The City services, departments, or programs that businesses were most satisfied with, based upon the combined percent of businesses who were “very satisfied,” “satisfied” or “neutral” were:

94% of businesses were satisfied with the quality of City services

• Emergency Paramedics (100%) • Fire Inspection (97%) • Police Department (96%) • Building Inspections (92%) • Building Division Call Canter (92%) Satisfaction with City Customer Service

Most (94%) of the businesses surveyed rated the City’s customer service as “very good” or “good;” only 6% of businesses rated the Overall Ratings of the City’s Customer City’s customer service as “poor.”

Overall ratings of customer service

Service

Satisfaction with City Efforts to Improve Coral Springs

By percentage of respondents (excluding don’t know/not sure)

Businesses were asked how satisfied they were with the City’s efforts to improve various aspects of the Coral Springs. Items that businesses were most satisfied with, based upon a combination of “very satisfied,” “satisfied” or “neutral” responses were: • Clean city streets and public areas (98%) • Litter collection on city streets (97%) • City efforts at maintaining the quality of neighborhoods (94%) • Provide lighting in commercial areas (91%)

Very Good 40% 39% 34% 37% 37%

Good

2018 2016 2014 2012

57%

2008

4% 3% 5% 3% 3%

Poor

Very Poor

56% 61% 57% 61%

3% 1% 0% 0%

10%

95% 94% 94% 98% 97%

Total: Very Good + Good 0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

Customer service ratings remain very high

100%

• Support the availability of customer parking (90%)

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Satisfaction with City Codes and Regulations The City codes and regulations that businesses were most satisfied with, based upon a combination of “very satisfied,” “satisfied” or “neutral” responses, were: • Paint color regulations (92%) • Trash disposal regulations (90%) • Requirements for proper business appearance maintenance (90%) • Business parking regulations (90%) Importance of City Services The three City services, departments, or programs that businesses felt were most important to their organization were: • Police Department (45%) • Fire Inspection (28%) • Emergency Paramedics (24%) Overall Perceptions of the City Businesses were asked to indicate how satisfied they were with various items that may influence their perceptions of the City. The items that businesses were most satisfied with, based upon a combination of “very satisfied,” “satisfied” or “neutral” responses, were: • Overall quality of life (99%) • Overall image of the City (98%)

Overall perceptions of CoralofSprings Current Perceptions Coral Springs

• Overall feeling of safety (97%)

by percentages of respondents who rated the item as a 1 to 5 on a 5-point scale

Ratings of the Physical Appearance of the City Eighty-two percent (82%) of the businesses surveyed rated the physical appearance of the area where their business is located as “excellent” or “good;” 17% rated it as “average,” and only 2% rated it as “poor.” (does not equal 100% due to rounding)

Overall image of the City

45%

Overall quality of life

46%

Overall feeling of safety

Reasons for Moving to Coral Springs When asked to indicated which issues they felt were most important in their decision to locate their business in Coral Springs, the items that businesses identified as most important, based upon the combined percentage of “extremely important,” “very important” and “important” responses, were: • Telecommunications/utilities/other infrastructure (93%)

38%

Quality of new development in the City

35%

Quality of public education

35%

Very Satisfied (5)

Satisfied (4)

35% Neutral (3)

• Overall image of the City (90%) • Access to Sawgrass Expressway (89%) • Attitude of local government toward business (88%) Reasons Business Will Stay in Coral Springs for the Next 10 Years The top reasons businesses indicated that they would stay in Coral Springs for the next 10 years were:

• Overall image of the City (26%)

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Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

42%

35%

• Ease of travel by car on major City streets (92%)

• Ease of travel by car on major City streets (33%)

13%

11%

43%

• Low crime rate (92%)

• Low crime rate (37%)

40%

18%

24%

21%

Dissatisfied (1/2)

Column1


Reasons Why Businesses Decide to Locate to Likelihood of Recommending the City as a Business Location Most (94%) of the businesses surveyed were “very likely,” “likely” or “somewhat likely” to recommend Coral Springs as a business location to friends, family and coworkers; only 6% were “not likely” or “not likely at all” to recommend Coral Springs as a business location. Ratings of the City’s Business Atmosphere Compared to Two Years Ago Nearly half (41%) of the businesses surveyed felt the City’s business atmosphere was “better” compared to two years ago; 49% of the businesses surveyed felt the City’s business atmosphere was the same compared to two years ago but felt it was “good,” 6% felt it was the same compared to two years ago but that it was “poor” and 5% felt it was “worse” compared to two years ago(does not equal 100% due to rounding).

Reasons Businesses Decide to Locate Here Coral Springs

By percentage of business respondents who rated the item as a 3, 4 or 5 on a 5-point scale

Low crime rate Overall image of the City Attitude of local government toward business

Extremely Important (5) Very Important (4)

Access to Sawgrass Expressway

Important (3)

Telecommunications/utilities/other infrastructure Proximity of important businesses Level of taxation Quality of schools

0%

20%

40%

60%

80% 100%

Ratings of the Labor Pool in Coral Springs When asked to rate the labor pool in Coral Springs, the items that showed the highest positive ratings, based upon a combined percentage of “excellent,” “good” or “average” responses, were: • Productivity of the workforce (91%)

Overall Quality of Services Provided by Overall Business Atmosphere Rating the City

• Quality of labor (91%)

By percentage of respondents (excluding don’t know/not sure)

• Stability of the City’s labor force (91%)

9%

Significantly higher than your expectations

11% 14%

8%

27%

Higher than your expectations 18%

Communication

30% 32% 53% 50%

Expectations met

Use of the City’s Website Forty-eight percent (48%) of the businesses surveyed indicated their organization had used the City’s website, 45% of businesses had not used the City’s website and 7% did not remember.

60%

2016

68%

2014

2%

Significantly below your expectations

2012

5% 4% 6%

Below your expectations

2008

2%

1% 1% 1%

96%

94% 96% 94%

Total: Higher/Meeting Expectations

Satisfaction with Various Communication Services

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

The communication related services that businesses were most satisfied with, based upon a combination of “very satisfied,” “satisfied” or “neutral” responses, were: • City’s website: www.CoralSprings.org (97%) • Under the Sun magazine (96%) • Availability of information about city programs/services (96%) Best Ways to Communicate With Businesses The top three ways that respondents felt it would best for the City to communicate with businesses were: emails (55%), direct mail (53%), and personal calls (20%).

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Overall Ratings of City Communication Eighty-one percent (81%) of the businesses surveyed rated the City’s communication with businesses owners and managers as “very good” or “good;” 14% rated the City’s communication with business owners and managers as “poor” and 5% rated it as “very poor.”

Property Taxes How Property Taxes Compare to Surrounding Communities Thirty-two percent (32%) of businesses felt the City’s property taxes were “about the same” compared to surrounding communities; 38% felt property taxes were higher compared to surrounding communities, 2% felt they were lower and 28% did not know.

Best Ways for for the City Communicate with Best Ways the to City to Communicate Businesses with Businesses By percentage of respondents

Emails Direct Mail Personal calls Social Media Newsletters City Website Brochures Business Forums City TV Workshops e HelpDesk

58% 53% 29% 21% 19% 13% 9%

Email and Direct Mail are the preferred methods of communication with the City

5% 4% 4% 4%

0%

20%

40%

60%

Ratings of the Amount of Property Taxes Businesses were asked to indicate their agreement with various statements regarding the amount of property taxes they were paying in relation to the quality of City services they were receiving. The results are provided below: • 46% of businesses surveyed felt property taxes were just right for the amount and quality of City services they were receiving. • 31% of businesses felt property taxes were too high for the quality of City services they were receiving. • 23% of businesses felt property taxes were high but felt the City was providing more services at a higher quality than expected. • 1% of businesses felt property taxes were too low for the amount and quality of City services they were receiving.

Ratings of CityTaxes Property Ratings of City Property ComparedTaxes to OtherCompared Communities to Other Communities By percentage of respondents

36% 37%

About the same 25%

45%

35%

Higher

29%

2016

33%

2014

43%

2012

3%

4% 6% 4%

Lower

2008 26%

Don't know/ Not sure

21%

0%

118

10%

20%

26%

29%

30%

40%

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

50%


Other Findings The City services, departments or programs that businesses used most often were: • Fire Inspection (73%) • Business Tax (47%)

Ratings of City Taxes Taxes Ratings of Property City Property By percentage of respondents (excluding don’t know)

58%

Property taxes are just right for the amount and quality of City services received

53% 57% 41%

17%

Property taxes are high but, the City's is providing more services at a higher quality than expected

• Trash Collection Services (43%)

22% 19% 20%

• The Police Department (43%)

Nearly two-thirds (64%) of the businesses surveyed reported that they would know who to call or where to go if they had a complaint or comment about City services, 26% did not and 10% were unsure.

Property taxes are low for the amount and quality of City services received

2014 2012

22%

Property taxes are too high for the quality of services received

• Water Billing (36%)

2016

2008

24% 24% 38%

4%

1% 0% 1%

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

Over half (53%) of the businesses surveyed indicated they presently have a recycling program; 42% do not have a recycling program, and 5% were not sure. Most (86%) of the businesses surveyed did not feel that they had workforce training needs that were not being met; only 2% did have workforce training needs that were not being met and 12% were not sure.

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Service and Operations Strategy The purpose of the Business Plan is to set out detailed actions the City intends to undertake in the coming fiscal year to help achieve our Strategic Goals. The five goals identified by the City Commission set the agenda for this Business Plan, namely: • Responsible City Government • City Investment in Today and Future • Downtown Becoming Vibrant • Growing Local Economy • Premier Community in South Florida While the Strategic Plan sets out the vision, the Business Plan outlines tangible plans for making the vision a reality. In each of the goal areas, department directors have developed initiatives that will direct the way the City operates in order to address our five goals and implement the vision expressed in the Strategic Plan. A Word About Existing Services and Ongoing Initiatives

In some sections, we have highlighted initiatives that were in previous Business Plans that are still being implemented in Fiscal Year 2020. Generally, if an initiative is fully operational and integrated into our service package, it will not be mentioned. The emphasis is on multiyear implementation and the evolution of existing initiatives. For more detail about the services we provide and the performance indicators we use to manage those services, please reference the departmental sections of the Annual Budget. Our New Initiatives

Initiatives are developed that will assist us in achieving our Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). We include those we feel are significant contributors to supporting our strategic goals or put additional demands on our resources. In this way, we identify the most significant actions we plan to take next year. Wherever applicable, operating expenditures have been identified for the first year only. Capital expenditures also reflect only the first year of the project, and do not include capital carrying costs.

City of Coral Springs’ Business Model

Citizen Input

Data Analysis

Strategic Plan Business Plan Budgets Output to Citizens

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Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Responsible City government

Financially Sound city providing exceptional services New Initiatives Hiring of Part-Time Grant Coordinator Lead Department: Budget & Strategy

Operating Expenses: $21,516

Capital Expenses: $2,450

Grant funding has made a significant impact on various departments throughout the City of Coral Springs over the last five years with our Grant Manager. As the City continues to research additional grant opportunities, an additional Grant Coordinator (parttime) to support designated departments will be beneficial to develop additional competitive grant proposals, increasing the opportunity to bring in more grant funding to the City.

Grant Research and Management Software Lead Department: Budget & Strategy

Operating Expenses: $19,000

Grant management has always been a tedious but important process for the City. The implementation of a grant research and management software tool enables cities to identify, analyze and summarize thousands of grant opportunities as well as centralize and streamline the grants management process. The use of this software will provide access to more grants and assist in tracking grant expenditures, reporting requirements and ensuring compliance resulting in more grant funding to the City.

Federal Lobbyist Lead Department: City Manager’s Office

Operating Expenses: $70,000

A federal lobbyist may help the City develop funding strategies for important projects, coordinate with federal agencies and Congress, and actively monitor, update, and advocate on our behalf regarding legislation impacting the City. These projects include areas such as transportation, infrastructure, housing, public safety/emergency management, and water resources.

Health and Wellness Equipment Lead Department: Fire/EMS

Capital Expenses: $12,000

Physical fitness for first responders is the highest importance and is imperative to the safety of our personnel. A physically fit firefighter is less likely to incur an injury while performing their job functions both around the stations and while on emergency calls. The addition of this equipment will enhance the firefighter’s ability to stay fit while on duty in a safe manner.

Census 2020 Outreach Lead Department: Development Services/ Comm. & Marketing Operating Expenses: $65,000 2020 marks the next decennial census nationwide. An accurate count in the 2020 Census is vitally important to the future of Coral Springs as census data is used to determine how nearly $675 billion is annually distributed for Federal funds annually to states, counties, and communities to support resources such as schools, hospitals, and fire departments. Census 2020 marks the first year that forms will not be mailed to residents. Instead, they will complete their questions online. Staff is recommending the creation of a Complete Count Committee to help coordinate outreach efforts to residents. This Committee will be active for approximately one year and will sunset upon completion of the Census. The group will establish subcommittees to focus on areas such as Cultural and Ethnic, Hard to Enumerate, Promotions, and Interfaith relations. The Complete Count Committee will also work with long-established committees like the Multicultural, Customer Involved Government, and School Advisory Board, to promote outreach efforts. Funding will be utilized to prepare and implement a strong, local marketing plan along with reaching out to various strategic populations and/or non-profit groups to train and aid in the filling out of the questions online. Laptops or ipads may be purchased, as appropriate, for this huge effort.

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American with Disabilities Act (ADA) Compliance Support Strategy Lead Department: Human Operating Expenses: $100,000

Resources

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Standards for Accessible Design require that all electronic and information technology must be accessible to people with disabilities. The ADA standards apply to commercial and public entities that have “places of public accommodation” including resources provided via the internet. As technology continuously evolves, our methods for communicating and delivering information to the public have changed. Today our most popular methods for delivering electronic information are the City’s website and social media channels. To increase transparency and access for individuals with disabilities, the City will work with subject matter experts to identify opportunities for improvement and develop a new compliance plan that will be implemented during the next 1-3 years.

Professional Certifications Lead Department: Human Resources

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

To encourage and support a more proactive learning culture, Human Resource would modify the Tuition Assistance Policy to include work-related professional certifications. This expansion of the Tuition Assistance policy would supplement employee developmental needs that are not covered by existing department budgets. Funding work-related professional certifications will enable City departments to expand their knowledge base and grow expertise among existing employees. It will also nurture a continuous learning environment while preparing employees for future opportunities and broaden their skill set for possible promotions.

IT Specialized Technical Training Lead Department: Information Technology

Operating Expenses: $53,000

One of Information Technology’s goals is to become a leader in the implementation of business technology by developing staff capable of building and supporting solutions based on industry best practices. Specialized training in areas such as cyber security would enable staff to execute best practices for handling security incidents, employ processes and tools to identify attacks or attackers, and engage in evaluations of the city’s systems that take the perspective of an attacker to identify vulnerabilities.

Fellowship/ Summer Interns Lead Department: Human Resources

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

The Human Resources department has created a Summer Internship and Management Fellowship Program. The Management Fellowship Program was created in partnership with a local university and seeks to attract top Management in Public Administration (MPA) graduate students immediately upon graduation. The students gain valuable experience developing and leading strategic projects in support of a variety of City departments. The Summer Internship Program gives students and graduates from local high schools, colleges and universities the opportunity to build their business acumen skills and knowledge of public services. The City benefits from the infusion of fresh ideas and the students gain valuable experience while working to support the City’s strategic goals.

122

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


GIS Consulting Services Lead Department: Information Technology

Operating Expenses: $109,000

Updating and correcting the authoritative data in our geodatabase is important for all departments in the City for accurate decision making, situational awareness and improved customer service to the public. Improved data will streamline the implementation of solution templates for utilities, public safety, community development, and economic development. Information Technology would engage GIS consulting services in order to assist with the revision of GIS data to account for mobile editing, version editing workflows and integration with other GIS enabled software in order to configure new GIS software tools and functionality. A redesigned geodatabase will better serve in the flow of data updates to those who need current and/or realtime data.

ESRI Enterprise Advantage Program (EEAP) Lead Department: Information Technology

Operating Expenses: $89,000

Esri Enterprise Advantage Program (EEAP) provides enterprise wide visioning and geospatial enablement through technical advisory and access to a combination of consulting and training services. GIS is a powerful platform for innovations around spatial and non-spatial data. Expansion plans by the GIS team will result in more employees with access to GIS tools and functionality to perform data exploration and analysis which will improve the operations and efficiency of the City.

Emergency Services Leadership Institute Lead Department: Fire Department

Operating Expenses: $36,000

The professional development of our members has been and will continue to be one of the priorities of the Fire Department. The Emergency Services Leadership Institute (ESLI) program is sponsored and hosted by the Florida Fire Chief’s Association in the interest of addressing contemporary leadership issues that affect mid-level (Lieutenant and Captain) and Chief Fire Officers. The professional development curriculum consists of 6 courses, each individual course is designed to stand alone as a specific educational experience. This training will enhance the leadership of our personal and assist them when making decisions pertaining to their position. Successful completion of the six courses will meet the requirements for graduation from the Emergency Service Leadership Institute.

Employee Health Clinic Lead Department: Human Resources

Operating Expenses: $727,950

A near-site clinic has the potential to strategically impact a variety of employee wellness issues including: preventative and sick care, disease management (health coach), prescription (Rx), compliance, improve employee attendance due to illness and reduce overall health care costs. To improve the sustainability of the City’s Health Fund, we need to evaluate opportunities to decrease overall health care costs. Providing an integrated employee health program strategically addresses the gaps and limitations of a standard health insurance model. By implementing a Near-site Employee Clinic, the City will have a strategic opportunity to address our gaps in care, under-utilization of health-services, prescription medication compliance and disease management needs by leveraging an external health provider who focuses 100% on our employee population. Once implemented the clinic can deliver a variety of scalable services catering to the City’s employees, their dependents and potentially offer services to local retirees. This model has been successfully implemented in other local cities and has provided a return on investment by effective managing and reducing health care costs. The initial operating expense of $727,950 includes $150,000 of startup costs (non-recurring).

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Well Being Strategy Lead Department: Human Resources Operating Expenses: $10,000 The City has a strong commitment to the wellbeing of our employees and develops timely programming to meet the ongoing needs of our employees and their dependents. Each year the Human Resources Department utilizes input from our Wellness Committee and Onsite Health Coach to enhance wellbeing programs with an emphasis on preventive care, chronic health conditions, disease management and improving mental wellness. Overall wellbeing engagement improves through increased education, expansion of online tools, in-person workshops and rewards that recognize employees who make their total health a priority. Our goal is to continue offering leading edge programs to support employees on their wellbeing journey.

Public Education Enhancement Lead Department: Fire Department

Operating Expenses: $23,000

Currently, there is limited public training on the proper initial response to a fire emergency. The proper initial response to an incipient fire is critical to achieving a positive outcome. This initiative includes various devices and items that simulate activating a fire alarm for fire department and occupant notification for person in the building, calling 911, as well as the proper use of a fire extinguisher. All these items can be used indoors and is intended for use in high density business and residential occupancies. There is also the option to use these props during the numerous special events that we participate in.

Cyber Security Insurance Lead Department: Information Risk Management

Operating Expenses: TBD

Cybersecurity insurance is designed to mitigate losses from a variety of cyber incidents, including data breaches, business interruption, and network damage. When the average cost of a cyber-attack is millions of dollars, and the subsequent risks associated with offline services are immeasurable (E-mail, Internet, Phone Systems, etc), having cyber-insurance is one more step that the City of Coral Springs can take to protect citizens and assets. By instituting a Cyber Security Insurance, the City will achieve the final layer in our layered plan of protection against today’s cybercriminal and inadvertent/unintentional internal breaches and attacks, protecting both the internal assets of the city and infrastructure and its’ citizens personal/financial data.

Senior Programming (Enhancement) Lead Department: Parks and Recreation

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

Today’s mature resident is seeking opportunities for continued education and lifelong health and fitness. This has led to an increased demand on the City’s senior programing. Currently we offer a variety of health, fitness, and education classes free of charge to Coral Springs seniors. We are one of the few cities that offer 100% free classes. Tai Chi, yoga, as well as a variety of other fitness classes are among the most popular offerings. Many of these classes reach capacity, with seniors signing up on a waiting list to attend. With the senior population growing, residents are asking for new activities.

Disaster Recovery Site Lead Department: Information Technology

Operating Expenses: $50,000

A disaster recovery site assures the ability to restore essential hardware, applications, vital data and recovery-time objectives to meet the time-sensitive business needs and functions of the city’s dependency on IT resources. A disaster recovery site will protect the city’s business data, systems and their backups providing restorative service to the critical business systems resulting in shorter recovery time. Policy driven directives ensure a controlled and staged return to operations by simplifying the process of action for granular management facing today’s emerging threats. All City departments will benefit from a disaster recovery site through its dedicated continuity of the City polices on uptime, disaster prevention an restoration using structures and strategic approach to threats from internal and external means.

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Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Civil Engineer Lead Department: Water & Sewer Administration

Operating Expenses: $92,429

The addition of a Civil Engineer to the Utilities Division will improve the quality of the engineering services the City provides. This includes engineering design, inspections, and construction management all related to Capital Improvement Projects. This alleviates the expense of hiring an outside engineering consultant for routine engineering design and allows the current Civil Engineer to direct more attention to other time-sensitive projects within the City.

Fire Department 50th Lead Department:

Fire Department

Operating Expenses: $50,000

In 2020, the Fire Department will be celebrating its 50th Anniversary (1970-2020). This is a milestone not only for the Fire Department but also for the City of Coral Springs. This impact will draw in recognition for the fire department and the city through marketing and advertisement throughout the community . Through this connection with the community, we will be able to showcase all of the strengths of our department and the services that the Fire Department provides. This anniversary will take place in 2020 with various events and initiatives which include: A 50th Anniversary logo design, official documents, uniforms, commemorative items for City Staff, Historical photo albums and video, Annual Awards Ceremony, Formal Dinner Celebration to Commemorate the 50th, and an Extravaganza which is open to the public.

Online Performance Management System Lead Department: Human Resources Operating Expenses: Existing Funds The Human Resources department is Implementing an online performance management solution that will improve the efficiency of the employee performance feedback process. Human Resources will be evaluating several best of breed solutions that can support the City’s ongoing need to deliver meaningful performance feedback to our employees. Consideration will be given to existing selfservice portals utilized by the Human Resources department when evaluating which options will strengthen the HR Service delivery model and streamline the delivery of feedback. Employee and Supervisor focus groups will be utilized to support the setup and testing of the new performance feedback system prior to implementing.

City Security Improvements Lead Department: Emergency Management

Operating Expenses: $547,352

The City’s current disparate security systems do not integrate to one another. There is no central viewing or management system. There is no operational panic, or lock down features at City Hall, Charter School, or at the Fire Academy. It is costly for us to hire contractors to work on our access system, and we do not currently have one vendor to work on these systems. This project will allow our city to bring existing systems into working order under the management of a new city wide security contractor. This will also bring our existing systems on line, provides improvement for our analog camera systems, and purchases servers for installment at key infrastructure. This combined approach ensures that our security will operate effectively while providing a platform for future sustainment.

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Ongoing Initiatives Hiring of Grant Consultant (2019-2020) Lead Department: Budget & Strategy

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

One of the City’s goals is to increase grant funding awarded to the City. Currently, there is a Grant Coordinator on staff to develop all of the city’s competitive grant proposals. The addition of grant consultants will assist the grant coordinator and city departments in crafting more competitive grant proposals. City departments would have access to subject matter experts who can provide the professional guidance needed to develop competitive grant proposals to funders which will in turn increase the amount of grant funding that is awarded to the City.

Open Smart City- Strategic Planning Online Platform (2019-2020) Lead Department: Budget & Strategy

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

Recent events have led to a growing lack of confidence in our City. This lack of trust is not only directed at Coral Springs. Public trust in government remains near historic lows; with only 18% of Americans today saying they can trust the government to do what is right. The City’s current performance management system is failing and there are companies in the market which combine performance management and performance indicators into a scorecard for internal/external tracking and reporting. Exploring the use of an online platform to frequently update progress in the community will improve public perception and give our community a sense that they are able to track the new initiatives and reference the City’s strategic direction.

Linkedin Learning Subscriptions (2019-2020) Lead Department: City Manager’s Office

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

Linkedin Learning is an online platform that provides a multitude of online courses which would be available to all City employees. Training will be readily available to staff, no longer requiring users to register online or travel off-site. Training can be completed from the user’s desk at their most convenient time. Offering online courses to city employees will meet the City’s goal to “hire, develop and retain a top quality City workforce”.

Virtual Slice of the Springs Meeting (2017-2020) Lead Departments: Development Services, Communications and Marketing

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

Since 1995, the City of Coral Springs has held a series of “Slice of the Springs” neighborhood meetings, conducted in different sections or slices of the City – Southeast/Southwest, Town Center/Center West and Northside/Northeast. At each Slice meeting, City staff provides an annual update to the community and discusses relevant issues or concerns with the residents. The meetings are a chance for the residents to interact directly with staff members from all departments of the City, including Police, Fire, Community Development, Code Compliance, Building, Public Works and Parks and Recreation. After a decrease in attendance in 2014-2015, the three-meeting series held in 2015-2016 saw a significant increase in attendance. The attendance was boosted by the advertising efforts of the City’s Communications and Marketing Department through the City’s social media platforms. The goal of this ongoing initiative is to increase the number of participants in Slice meetings by including residents who would like to attend the meeting in person but are unable to do so. A “virtual” option allows people to attend “live” via their computer or mobile device. Attendees have the opportunity to attend the meeting in person at City Hall, or virtually via Facebook Live. Communications and Marketing and the Development Services departments conducted the first “Virtual Slice of the Springs” on April 20, 2017, again on April 12, 2018. and May 9, 2019. A panel of eight staff members answered questions from the public as they were submitted on Facebook while streaming live. This first Virtual Slice was a great success with over 250 questions or comments submitted and over 2,000 views during the 45-minute broadcast—and over 15,000 views to date.

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Innovation Incentive Recognition Program (2019-2020) Lead Department: City Manager’s Office

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

To encourage greater innovation within the City, an emphasis will be placed on creative thinking to help drive operational improvements in all areas of the organization. A new rewards philosophy will be promoted for employees to embrace the idea of innovation and launch a framework supporting innovative practices. Many of the new core values, established by the City Commission during recent Strategic Planning sessions, encourage higher levels of engagement among employees forming a stronger organization and greater retention of high-performing employees. This program is expected to yield productivity gains and monetary savings by replacing outdated practices. As of March 2019, the City received 26 ideas and have conducted 6 interviews, with finalist pending.

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City Investment in Today and Future

Upgrades to city infrastructure, facilities and parks New Initiatives Park Summit Left Turn Lane Lead Department: Fire/EMS

Operating Expenses: $62,000

In order to provide emergency responses for the residents in the community, the Fire Department is proposing to add a left turn lane of the development of Park Summit. This left turn lane will provide left turn movement access to the west driveway into Park Summit Condominium by reducing but maintaining the exiting turn lane into Palm Village, the residential development just west of Park Summit. The addition of this turn lane is necessary to not only reduce the response times of emergency responders but also increase the safety of the first responders and the citizens by eliminating the need to perform a U-turn. The area in question prevents a U turn from being performed in one motion and opens the responding service providers to side impact accidents that are detrimental to all involved.

Pickleball Courts Lead Department: Parks and Recreation Operating Expense: $2,000 Capital Expenses: $85,000 The Parks and Recreation Department will construct 4 permanent, lighted outdoor pickleball courts at the Tennis Complex at Sportsplex. Pickleball is the fastest growing sport and is especially attractive to seniors but will be used by all ages. These courts will allow us to offer new programming at the Tennis Complex, which should result in higher membership for the facilities. We will also be able to offer Pickleball lessons and tournaments. Work will be completed by a contractor, which we will find through a competitive bid process.

Bus Shelter Solar Powered Fans Lead Department: Public Works

Capital Expense: $25,000

Staff is researching the feasibility of installing a solar or electrically powered box fan in the three existing and nine Kaleidoscope shelters to be furnished and installed by Broward County. The Kaleidoscope manufacturer, Landscape forms, has offered the assistance of their engineer to design a fan that can be retrofitted onto the shelter. A prototype would be proposed for the existing Kaleidoscope shelter located on the NE corner of Sample and Coral Hills Drive. Since this bus shelter accessory does not currently exist as an option from the manufacturer, there would be a design and custom fabrication period followed by installation and monitoring of performance. If the fan proved reliable and effective after a 3 to 6 month test period, then it could be expanded to the remaining 11 Kaleidoscope shelters in the inventory. Staff has estimated that 60 of the green Tolar shelters have reached the end of their useful life, showing signs of rust, and have proposed replacing them with the Kaleidoscope model in future years.

Turf Fields Lead Department: Parks and Recreation

Operating Expense: Existing Funds

Seven artificial turf athletic fields will be installed throughout the City in the following parks: 2 fields at North Community Park, 2 fields at Cypress Park, 2 Fields at Mullins Park and stadium field at Sportsplex. Artificial turf will eliminate the need to resod or regrade athletic fields which causes the field to be closed 2 to 3 months each year. Artificial turf fields are available year round which will allow for the hosting of more tournaments, generating economic impact to the City.

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Splash Pad Lead Department: Parks and Recreation

Operating Expense: Existing Funds Capital Expense: $250,000

As one of the ways to continue to provide for the residents, the City has decided to move forward with the project to construct a splash pad at a desired location within the City. The Splash Pad would include fountains and other spray equipment that would be open to the public free of charge. From the community engagement of Virtual Slice Meetings, Visioning Summits and City Surveys the City was informed that this was a project residents would like to see in the community.

Curbing on Sample Lead Department: Public Works

Capital Expense: $100,000

Sample Road is one of the main entryways to the City. A portion of the median between the Sawgrass Expressway and NW 120 Ave is uncurbed, encouraging illegal U-turns, causing deep ruts on the lawn and damage to shrubs and groundcovers which does not contribute towards the sustainability of the landscape, and reflects poorly on the aesthetics and maintenance of the City. Public Works is proposing to curb 1,200 linear feet of roadway to have this first median into the City completely curbed, which will prevent the ongoing damage to the lawn and will allow us to use trees with larger canopies, resulting in increased aesthetics.

Landscape Operation Enhancement Lead Department: Public Works

Operating Expense: $130,000

Currently, the arbor and horticultural activities on medians, right-of-ways and public buildings are being managed solely by the Horticulture Contract Coordinator. In order to complete landscape projects, the coordinator has to rely on other departments. The success of landscape beautification projects relies mainly on the proper water availability right after installation and during the dry season. Currently, we depend on the availability of the City’s Irrigation staff to assist with watering needs, but they cannot always accommodate our needs because they have other commitments or are under-staffed. The Public Works Department is proposing to contract out the inspections, repairs, and improvements of the irrigation system on areas that are under their responsibility, and to hire one part time consultant to assist as a Landscape Inspector. Having a person assist with landscape inspections, will ensure that all areas are being maintained as required on the contract, deficiencies are addressed in a timely manner, vertical clearance is maintained in all roads, unsafe situations are identified and corrected, and landscape installations and tree maintenance is conducted following best management practices.

Ongoing Initiatives Facilities/ Streets Cityworks Software (2019-2020) Lead Department: Public Works

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

In Fiscal Year 2017, the Utilities Division procured a software program called Cityworks, which is based on Public Works operations. It serves as an asset management program designed to achieve maximum life and usefulness of infrastructure improvements, as well as document total work order cost of labor, material, equipment and GIS. This project, which will be included in the ERP contract is a continuation of the city’s proactive approach to asset management empowering staff at all levels which should enact process improvements and operating efficiencies.

Landscape Improvement of Arterial Roads (2019-2020) Lead Department: Public Works

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

Landscape improvements along University Drive and additional arterial roads such as Coral Ridge Drive, Coral Springs Drive, Royal Palm Blvd, Atlantic Blvd, Sample Road as well as master parking, will improve traffic visibility, allow improved growth and appearance of plants and create a themed more uniform corridor. University Drive will be the first to be completed, bringing the road up to current FDOT Landscape Design standards which will have a positive impact on safety aspects of the road, and also improve the appearance by beautifying this main corridor with fresh and adequate landscape material. Following approval of plans, the bidding process will begin followed by the issuance of contract and construction term which will extend into FY2020. This project will make a positive impact on drivers who use the road as well as business located along these roads.

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New Shop Equipment (2019-2020) Lead Department: Public Works/Equipment Services

Capital Outlay: $200,000

Public Works Equipment Services repair facility will be relocated to the newly purchased Public Safety and Public Works building located at 4150 NW 120 Ave. This new facility is currently not equipped for Equipment Services to perform routine maintenance repairs on the city’ vehicles and equipment fleet. New equipment will be procured and installed into the new facility so that Equipment Services can continue to maintain the City’s fleet. Examples of equipment to be procured and installed include stationary above ground automotive lifts, portable heavy duty wheel lifts for medium & heavy duty trucks, overhead hose reels, bulk fluid storage tanks, automated bulk fluid delivery & recovery systems, compressed air system, automotive alignment rack, automotive exhaust extrication system, air circulators, lighting, (2) commercial hand wash stations, tire equipment, and overhead fall restraint system for fire truck bays.

Roadway Resurfacing (2001-2020) Lead Department: Public Works Capital Outlay: $500,000 The life expectancy of an asphalt road is about 20 to 25 years depending on vehicle volume. Effective pavement management calls for streets to be resurfaced approximately every 25 years. Beyond 25 years, the aggregate in the road base rises to the surface leading to the recurring formation of potholes. The goal is to resurface the road before there is deterioration of the road base; if not, the existing road has to be demolished and a new road reconstructed in its place. If roads are not resurfaced based on the planned timeline, the City could incur greater expenses in the future. The areas targeted in Fiscal Year 2018 include Pine Ridge North and Westview Drive, and University to Riverside Drive. For roads within the City’s utility service area, the resurfacing plan is linked to the Utilities Division cast iron water main replacement program. The water mains will be replaced in advance of the roadway resurfacing project. In Fiscal Year 2019, areas to be resurfaced include the North Springs subdivision. In Fiscal Year 2020, areas will include the Hills subdivision and Riverside Drive north of Wiles Road.

Maintain and Protect City Trees (2017-2020) Lead Department: Parks and Recreation

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

The City invested heavily in restoring the tree canopy after the devastation wrought by Hurricane Wilma, trying to reach at least a 30% three canopy coverage citywide. At this level, additional benefits are realized, such as reduction of heat islands, increased rainfall interception, reduced flooding, and increased oxygen production. As the City’s tree canopy continues to grow and mature, the need for tree trimming is increasing. Proper maintenance of City trees will help them withstand future storms. The City employs a tree trimming crew that applies specialized attention and care to the City’s tree inventory, which is essential in limiting losses in the event of another hurricane.

CDBG Action Plan (2019-2020) Lead Department: Development Services

FY 2020 CDBG Allocation: $761,605

Each year, the City is required to complete an Action Plan as a part of the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program, provided through the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The plan describes specific projects and activities the City will undertake in the coming year to address priority needs identified in the 2015-2020 Consolidated Plan. These priorities include providing a suitable living environment, providing decent and affordable housing, and expanding economic opportunities. The City’s five-year Consolidated Plan has the framework for the City’s annual Action Plan to identify housing, homelessness, community and economic development needs and resources, and then tailor a strategic plan to meet those needs.

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The program allows the City to utilize grant funds for capital improvement projects in the City’s low- to moderate-income areas which otherwise would have to be paid through the City’s Capital Improvement Program and allows 15% of the funding for public services (senior and youth programs). The following projects are listed in the Fiscal Year 2019/2020 Action Plan: • NW 28th Street Sidewalk Replacement: $120,000 • Lion Park Lighting Project: $100,000 • Castlewood Park Replacement: $85,000 • NW 27th Street Sidewalk Replacement: $70,000 • NW 24th Street Sidewalk Replacement: $60,000 • Youth Scholarship Program: $50,000 • Home Repair: $40,043 • Senior Recreation and Functional Training: $40,000 • Senior Recreation and Therapeutic Program: $24,241 • Ramblewood ADA Sidewalk Study: $20,000 • Planning and Administration: $152,321

Traffic Signal Intersection: Coral Ridge Drive and NW 41st Street (2019-2020) Lead Department: Fire

Capital Outlay: Existing Funds

This project involves the installation of a traffic signal at the intersection of Coral Ridge Drive and 41st street in conjunction with Broward County and the transit authorities. The exit point onto major roadways pose visibility challenges for emergency responders and distracted drivers only compound the problem for emergency responders trying to leave the fire station. Emergency responders deserve safe, ready access to roadways adjacent to the fire station. The signal will not only ensure safe passage for emergency responders, but will create safer and more efficient traffic patterns at an intersection that host a large number of commuters who are employed at any of the commercial businesses located in the corporate park.

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Traffic Management (2010-2020) Lead Department: Development Services, Public Works

Capital Outlay: $45,000

The Transportation Improvement Plan for Fiscal Year 2020 shows the efforts planned or underway to ensure acceptable levels of service and safe driving conditions are maintained in the City. The City’s Traffic Management Team meets monthly to address issues pertaining to the safe and efficient use of the roadway network. Projects include traffic calming, road resurfacing, turn lanes at intersections, as well as pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure improvements. The TMT will investigate a pilot project to allow dockless scooters within the city limits. In Fiscal Year 2020, the City will work with Broward County and the Broward Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) to maximize the delivery of transportation infrastructure projects provided through the Transportation Surtax passed by voters in November 2018. In addition, with the completion of the Downtown Coral Springs Mobility Hub Master Plan, the City will work with the MPO to identify and seek funding for infrastructure projects for the Downtown Local Activity Center. The City will continue working with Broward County on pedestrian signal improvements to enhance mobility and connectivity, including the installation of audible pedestrian detectors at three intersections with high levels of pedestrian activity. Broward County is planning several improvements including updated traffic signal synchronization and the installation of new mast arms with pedestrian countdown signals. City staff will work with the MPO and the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) on the following efforts: •

Implement projects that improve regional connectivity, including the initiative to build the Sawgrass Expressway Connector to I-95

Expand University Drive to six lanes north of NW 40th Street

Widen Wiles Road east of University Drive to six lanes

Advance multi-modal initiatives along Rock Island Road, Coral Ridge Drive, and Turtle Creek Drive

City staff will continue to monitor development within the Downtown LAC (Local Activity Center) to determine traffic impacts of new development as well as the ongoing development within the “Wedge” area of Parkland. Also in Fiscal Year 2020, $33,000 is being requested where $22,000 will be used to replace two temporary rubber speed cushions with concrete on Shadow Wood Boulevard. Additional funding is requested for the repair of speed cushions and maintaining the thermoplastic pavement markings and signage to improve the safety and visibility of all traffic calming locations throughout the City.

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1. University Drive/Sample Road - Add SB, EB and WB right turn lanes 2. University Drive/Wiles Road - Add NB, SB, EB, and WB left turn lanes - Add NB and SB through lanes 3. Sample Road/Coral Springs Drive - Add EB and WB right turn lanes 4. Sample Road/Riverside Drive - Add EB right turn lanes Add NB and SB left turn lanes 5. Sawgrass Expressway 6 lanes to 10 lanes 6. Coral Hills Drive - Sample Road to NW 29th Street Widen to provide a 3-lane cross section 7. NW 33rd Street - Coral Hills Drive to NW 99th Way Widen to provide a 3-lane cross section 8. University Drive - NW 40th Street to Sawgrass Widen from 4 to 6 lanes 9. Wiles Road - University Drive to Riverside Drive Widen from 4 to 6 lanes 10. Multi-Modal Improvements (2040 LRTP, Comp Plan) 11. Proposed Transit Center in Downtown DRI 12. Proposed Diverging Diamond Interchange 13. Future Sidewalks

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Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) Area

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Downtown Becoming Vibrant

Creating a Sense of place and a destination New Initiatives Implementation of Economic Development Customer Relationship Management (CRM) system Lead Department: Economic Development

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

In Fiscal Year 2019, the Economic Development Office purchased Cloud Nine, a Customer Relationship Management software specifically designed for economic development activities. This allows the office to track projects, retention visits and prospects. The CRM system requires significant data entry and the EDO is working diligently to input the backlog of information by the end of the fiscal year.

Form Village Square Plan with Developer Lead Department: Economic Development

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

The Economic Development Office (EDO) is working with the Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA), Development Services and the developer of Village Square to ensure that the project fits the Downtown Mixed-Use Zoning approved in January 2018. The development will include retail, restaurants and office space on the northwest corner of University Drive and Sample Road.

Infrastructure Improvements in Downtown Lead Department: Economic Development

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

The CRA is working with the county to install new LED lights within the Downtown for enhanced visibility and safety. The Commercial Enhancement Matching Grant program is expanding to include the entire CRA and the funding allowance will increase to $25,000 to allow for more businesses to make improvements to their property. The CRA is also installing new landscaping between 99th and Coral Hills Drive.

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Continue City Outreach on Business Retention, Expansion and Attraction Lead Department: Economic Development

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

The Economic Development Office meets with existing businesses in the City to identify challenges and opportunities and to provide connections to resources within the city, region and state. Staff also assists businesses interested in relocating to the city including site selection and demographic research

Develop Retail Strategy Lead Department: Economic Development Existing

Operating Expenses:

The City has a significant amount of retail leakage. To alleviate this issue, the EDO is developing a retail recruitment strategy. Staff is working with Retail Strategies to identify retail gaps and potential opportunities to fill those gaps. Finding the right retail mix and density is essential for a community seeking to create a sense of place for residents, businesses and visitors.

Enhanced Downtown Events/Entertainment Lead Department: Economic Development

Operating Expenses: Existing

The Community Redevelopment Agency is supporting community activities to create a sense of place in Downtown Coral Springs. Working with Communications & Marketing, the CRA will participate in and fund events such as Bites ‘n’ Sips, Seasonal Farmers Market, Innovate Downtown and Unplugged in an effort to bring people Downtown for entertainment and community engagement.

Ongoing Initiatives Design Guidelines for Downtown (2019-2020) Lead Department: CRA/Development Services

CRA Expenses: Existing Funds

In Fiscal Year 2019, the City approved design guidelines for the downtown that provide direction for developers and existing businesses regarding landscaping, signage, architecture and street furniture, etc. The CRA is working with Economic Development and Development Services to educate and inform about the changes and to encourage the utilization of the Commercial Enhancing Matching Grant program to implement the updates designs.

Development Agreement for the Cornerstone Project (2019-2020) Lead Department: CRA, Economic Development

CRA Expenses: Existing Funds

In 2018, a private developer acquired the Financial Plaza building and parking lot on the corner of University Drive and Sample Road and is working on developing a large mixed-use project called Cornerstone. The project, a component of the City’s vision for a walkable downtown, will serve as a catalyst for additional redevelopment in the CRA. The City and the CRA are negotiating with the Developer to provide a tax increment incentive; the final terms of the project components, requirements and aesthetics as well as compliance regarding the tax incentive will be memorialized in a Development Agreement between the City, CRA and Developer.

Innovate Downtown (2018-2020) Lead Department: Communications and Marketing, CRA

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

Innovate Downtown was launched in 2018 and takes place over two days. Friday night begins with 10 innovators competing in a “SharkTank” pitch contest to a panel of judges. The following night, the innovators showcase their products to the public at the City’s UnPlugged event. Two cash prizes are awarded – one to the crowd favorite, the other to the judges’ choice. The City hopes to expand this event in 2020.

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Growing local economy

Increased business investment and jobs New Initiatives Implement a DNS, DHCP, and IP (DDI) Management Tool Lead Department: Information Technology

Capital Outlay: $140,000

Given the rapid emergence of new technological infrastructure such as visualization, cloud, SDN, and more, the City is executing the security measures to match. This comes in the form of implementing a management tool that will monitor the network detection access to new devices (DHCP), manage what these devices are accessing (DNS) and provide visibility of the entire network through the IP address management tool (IPAM). This will improve the detection time for modern threats and add a necessary layer of security and visibility for the City’s network.

User Cyber Awareness Training Lead Department: Information Technology

Operating Expenses: $15,000

Victims of cyber attacks are in the news nearly every day. Security awareness training can familiarize employees with the techniques commonly used by attackers, including what to look for in unsolicited emails, visits, and phone calls. Regular training will help to reinforce this, as well as providing reminders to avoid providing personal or corporate information and what to do when employees suspect the legitimacy of a contact.

Ongoing Initiatives Retention of Marketing Firm (2019-2020) Lead Department: Economic Development

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

Following development of the detailed Economic Development Strategic plan and Marketing Strategic Plan, staff will assess how best to work with an outside firm to execute the goals set forth in the plans. This may include assisting with decisions to place advertisements, attend trade shows, contact brokers and site selectors, provide familiarization tours, and develop marketing collateral. In addition, we will strive to present easily accessible and compelling data and information needed for a business to make a determination as to whether Coral Springs is the right location for them.

Economic Development Strategic Plan Implementation (2019-2020) Lead Department: Economic Development

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

In FY 2019, the City engaged a firm to conduct an in depth economic development strategic planning process. This work entailed an analysis of market, demographic, and business data to create a strategy for how the City may best deploy its resources to obtain a maximum return on investment for business attraction, retention and expansion efforts. The development of the strategic plan included community stakeholder engagement and visioning for what the business community will look for in the future. The implementation of the strategic plan supports the business plan goal of growing our local economy to increase business investment within the City and the creation of economic opportunity.

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Quarterly Economic Development Reports (2019-2020) Lead Department: Economic Development

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

In FY2019, staff purchased a CRM software to track and document its business retention, expansion and attraction efforts. The CRM system creates customized reports related to retention visits, project management and case management as well as incentive compliance and site selection. EDO staff inputs data and pull reports on a quarterly basis.

Corporate Park Improvements (2017-2020) Lead Department: Economic Development Office (EDO)

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

The City and Property Owners of the Coral Springs Corporate Park Association have created a stronger dialogue, working cooperatively to address long-standing issues in the Corporate Park. City staff, the Association, the Coral Springs Regional Chamber, and Sunshine Water Control District continue to meet on a quarterly basis to discuss areas of concern. The City has also explored grant funding to address the drainage issues in the Park. The City will continue building solid, productive relationships and partnerships with existing and new companies in the Corporate Park to make it a better place to work and do business.

Economic Development Marketing and Branding (2016-2020) Lead Department: Economic Development Office (EDO)

Operating Expenses: Existing

Economic Development marketing efforts include a revamped website, increased social media outreach and rebranding. EDO staff is exploring the retention of a marketing firm to enhance its outreach and visibility through logo redesign, collateral materials and targeted business attraction efforts. The website, www.CoralSpringsEDO.com, provides more interactive, engaging content including video and photos of visits with local businesses. GIS software offers up-to-date demographic and labor force information as well as an online database of available industrial, retail, and office spaces. A live-chat feature will be implemented, and SEO will increase the number of visitors to the site.

Coral Springs Regional Chamber Business Academy (2017-2020) Lead Department: Economic Development Office (EDO)

Operating Expenses: Existing

Now in the fifth year, the Coral Springs Regional Chamber Business Academy continues to grow. Sponsored by the City of Coral Springs and FPL and led by experts focused on a specific topic or discipline, local small business owners seeking to grow their businesses have the opportunity to improve communication skills, gain expert knowledge, network with other businesses and expand resources to help their business succeed. The series of six classes begins in November and ends in April. A nominal fee will be charged to attend.

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Premier Community in South Florida

The Place for Families to Live in Great Neighborhoods New Initiatives Body Worn Cameras and In-Car LPR Lead Department: Police

Operating Expenses: $495,840 (forfeiture funds)

Currently, the City of Coral Springs is one of the two cities in Broward County which do not utilize some type of camera system in relation to policing. The need to document incidents via body worn or in-car cameras has become increasingly standardized. Due to this, the State’s Attorney Office is beginning to rely heavily on body worn cameras video to obtain convictions. Additionally, the need to convey an accurate account of police related activity to the public has become vital. It is the duty of the City of Coral Springs to provide its residents with accurate and detailed descriptions of incidents which take place within the jurisdictional limits of the City of Coral Springs. Body worn camera systems will provide a more in-depth approach to managing investigations related to the Coral Springs Police Department.

Educational Guides for Residents and Businesses Lead Department: Development Services

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

In an attempt to have property owners, residents and business owners comply with the City codes and regulations, two of the City’s departments Development Services and the Communications & Marketing Department will work together to provide guidance. Guides will assist residents, businesses, property owners, and tenants to understand the most common issues and how to rectify the issues.

Additional (3) Firefighter/ Paramedics Lead Department: Fire/EMS

Operating Expenses: $186,627 Fire Fund/$114,384 General Fund

Capital Outlay Fire: $12,000

The Coral Springs Fire department currently maintains a staff of 153 shift based personnel, fifty (50) per shift. These personnel are responsible for the staffing of eight (8) fire stations located in the cities of Coral Springs and Parkland. The department is requesting three (3) additional firefighters in the Fiscal Year 2020 budget. The additional personnel would add one (1) firefighter/ paramedic to each of the three (3) fire department shifts. The benefits to the department and the City are as follows: Increase the amount of personnel on particular units such as the busier units that are running a heavy amount of calls for service. This would also decrease the need for some of the busiest ladder and engine companies having to respond to medical calls for additional staffing. Having the suppression companies remain available will allow faster and more efficient responses in their respective response zones. One (1) additional person per shift will allow additional personnel to utilize their allotted accrued leave time for both vacation and comp time at a more consistent rate, which would greatly improve morale and efficiency within the fire department. Currently the fire department rely on their staff member to work overtime so that an individual can take their earned vacation or personal time.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

139


Community Involvement Liaison Part-time to Full-time Lead Department: Police

Operating Expenses: $32,548

The Community Involvement Unit is the face of the Police Department and many times the City. The unit conducts numerous community events and partners with the community to provide excellent service and a positive message from the Police Department and City. In the past, the Community Involvement Unit has always relied on assistance from personnel in the Youth Liaison Unit to accomplish its mission. However, due to recent events, the flexibility of our School Resource Officers to assist with related projects has been extremely limited, making it more difficult to accomplish the Units missions. With the upgrade of this liaison position from part-time to full-time, the department will have the much needed coverage working with the citizens. The Community Involvement Liaison will take the lead in coordinating the City’s Summer Breakspot, Summer Camp, Safety Town, Special Needs Database, Angel Tree gifting program, Holiday Programs, Shop with a Cop and Special Olympics.

Rapid Intervention Team Bags Lead Department: Fire

Capital Outlay: $186,000

A RIT (Rapid Intervention Team) is an OSHA mandated group that is mobilized anytime firefighters are working in a hazardous structure. RIT bags are a critical piece of equipment used to rescue a firefighter if they were to become injured or trapped during an operation. Our deployment of this tool allows us not only to have the necessary care on hand for our firefighters, but also allows us to seamlessly overlap with other municipalities that also utilize these vital assets.

Civil Unrest Team (CUTS) Lead Department: Police

Operating Expenses: $12,500

Capital Outlay:$19,400

The Civil Unrest Team (CUTS) was originally established in 2016 to protect the City from civil unrest. Capital funding was used for the initial purchase of equipment to operate and outfit 100 officers should need arise to protect the City from civil unrest. Since then, the City sees the benefit in creating a permanent place for this team within the City. This initiative will serve to give officers both the equipment and training to effectively de-escalate an incident.

Emergency Operations Center Upgrades Lead Department: Emergency Management

Capital Expenses: $35,000

The Emergency Operations Center (EOC) is a central hub for widespread incidents throughout the City. As technology improves, our EOC is unable to integrate. The upgrades will include improvements on the technology and infrastructure aspects of the building. These improvements will convert all technology to HDMI, improving our ability to broadcast directly to Blue Stream, and provides an audio visual solution with a complete management system for the devices located on the network.

Clean Cab Vehicles Lead Department: Fire

Capital Expenses: $136,360

A clean cab apparatus is an apparatus designed to facilitate a clean, healthy, and safe environment by reducing the exposure to contaminates associated with occupational exposures found in firefighting activities. Through this inititative, the front line operations emergency response vehicles will all be converted to clean cab. The purchase of five pickup trucks will provide the inspector/investigator with a clean cab environment and a separate area for all equipment that was utilized in any immediately dangerous to life and health (IDLH) environment. This initiative will provide a healthier environment for our members on a daily basis.

140

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Ongoing Initiatives Police Hire Incentive (2019-2020) Lead Department: Police

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

The City is offering an incentive to attract quality sworn experienced law enforcement candidates. The incentive will award a $5,000 bonus for experienced Florida State certified law enforcement officer candidates who meet the requirements of holding a current certification as a Law Enforcement Officer in the State of Florida and have a minimum of one year full-time sworn, law enforcement experience (not limited to the State of Florida). Also, existing employees that recommend a sworn candidate that converts to a hire will receive a $500 bonus once the hire completes FTO. Through the City’s recruitment system, promotion of the incentive has been implemented.

Historic Preservation (2019-2020) Lead Department: Development Services

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

The County Commission is considering a change to its Historic preservation ordinance which will require cities to obtain Certified Local Government (CLG) status with the state of Florida. Designation as a Certified Local government makes historic preservation a public policy through passage of a historic preservation ordinance. The proposed ordinance establishes a historic preservation Board to develop and oversee the functions of its historic preservation program. Should the City chose not to become a CLG, designation and oversight of Historic Structures and districts within the City will be determined by the County Commission upon recommendation by County Historic Preservation Board. As many of the buildings in the city have just reached fifty years old within the last few years, an inventory of potential historic structures needs to be conducted. Master Site Files need to be created for potential historic structures, which includes research of builders, architects of records, historically significant events, architectural styles, etc. This research and creation of Master Site files will need to be conducted by a consultant with expertise in the area of historic preservation. Historic Preservation Design Guidelines will need to be developed and a Historic preservation Ordinance will need to be created and adopted in order to establish the program requirements within the City. The County’s proposed amendments were deferred by the Broward County Planning Council in April, 2019. The County Commission’s consideration is expected this summer. The City staff will engage in an historic preservation expert to begin site files should the amendment move forward.

Summer Breakspot Program (2017-2020) Lead Department: Police

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

During the summer of 2017 the Community Services division of the Police Department coordinated the facilitation of a “Summer Breakspot” juvenile feeding and outreach program in conjunction with Florida Impact. This 6 week program not only provided nourishment to at-risk children (ages 6-14) within our community, but also provided enrichment through daily safety presentations, reading and mentoring, arts and crafts, and sports activities. Coral Springs Police personnel staffed and operated the program, coordinating volunteers, providing educational and recreational components, sports activities, and food distribution. High school students and community volunteers were also recruited to assist with the daily operations. This year’s 2019 program will be held at James Hunt Elementary School. Seeking to reinstitute the “Summer Breakspot” program this coming summer and years ahead, a dedicated funding source would help with the continuance and possible expansion of the “Summer Breakspot” program.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

141


Community Paramedic Program (2015-2020) Lead Department: Fire/EMS

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds (General Fund and Fire Fund)

Increasingly, 911 emergency services are being accessed by individuals with low acuity medical issues, the chronically ill, those with no access to primary care, and those with behavioral health needs who find themselves in crisis with no other way to access appropriate care. Invariably, many of these patients are transported by rescue to a hospital’s ER even though it may not be the most appropriate way to meet their needs. In March 2015, the Coral Springs Fire Department launched a pilot of a Community Paramedic program, based on best practices from several agencies across the nation. An existing, experienced paramedic was temporarily moved from the traditional 24 hour on and 48 hour off, to an eight hour a day, five days per week schedule to run the program. Based on the proven success of the interventions made to date, the City created a permanent Community Paramedic position in Fiscal Year 2017. This paramedic will continue the program on a permanent basis, conducting house visits to patients who traditionally have used the 911 system for non-medical emergencies, or as their primary source of healthcare. This paramedic will assist these patients in meeting their non-medical needs, helping them obtain resources directly, instead of through the already taxed 911 system. A community paramedic helps our citizens make better use of available emergency services and find solutions to problems that are not typically related to emergency medical care (transportation, follow up care, medication management, food, housing, utilities, etc.). These patients are being directly assisted or referred to agencies that can assist them.

Enterprise Software (2013-2020) Lead Department: Information Technology

Operating Expenses: $86,000

Capital Outlay: TBD

The City will need to invest in standardization of its core business processes through the implementation of a new Enterprise Resource Planning system (ERP). Disparate systems and processes will be replaced with a more integrated approach to managing core processes in Finance, Budget, Purchasing, Payroll, Human Resources, Fleet Facilities and Asset Management. Implementation of a ERP solution will also enable the City to provide online service tools such as self-service for employees, online solicitation tools for vendors and standardized eGovernment tools for constituants. The implementation of the new ERP platform will be a phased process involving Finance, Budget, Human Resources, Information Technology, and representatives from key using departments across the City. Considerable time and effort is needed to ensure the preservation of existing data and the uninterrupted functionality of these key internal services.

FEMA Appeals Consultant (2018-2020) Lead Department: Finance

Operating Expenses: Existing Funds

For the past five fiscal years, the City has utilized the services of two firms to assist with ongoing FEMA appeals processes related to Hurricane Wilma: O’Briens Response Management and the Washington, DC office of the Baker Donelson law firm. This assistance needs to continue until we receive a final decision on the one outstanding appeal. The City’s use of these firms over the past four years has resulted in successful appeals of over $2,000,000. The remaining appeal is the result of an error on the part of FEMA and the State but the best course of action was to file an appeal.

142

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Drowning Prevention/Water Safety (2007-2020) Lead Departments: Fire/EMS, Communications and Marketing Operating Expenses: Existing Funds Drowning is a leading cause of death among all children, and in Florida it is the number one cause of death in children under age four, with Broward County leading in this tragic statistic. Due to our close proximity to all forms of water and our high population of children, the City has made it a priority to heighten community awareness and focus on prevention efforts. One of the most significant prevention strategies we employ is our partnerships with local agencies and schools to bring swimming lessons to children and families in the community, offering free swimming lesson vouchers for children under four years of age, and recently began partnering to offer adult swim lesson vouchers. The Coral Springs Fire Department, together with our local partners, administers a program called “Watch Your Kid, You’ll Be Glad You Did�. This local community drowning prevention effort has become an action model for other cities in Broward County. The community team of agencies provides regular drowning prevention information and presents educational sessions to a wide range of community groups to raise awareness and provide pool safety instruction. The Police Department and Aquatics staff work together to support the message as part of their community outreach efforts. As part our overall Life Safety education initiative, CPR training mannequins are brought to most community events to educate the public on CPR training techniques, which also supports our Pulse Point initiative in improving both the response to drowning as well as cardiac emergencies. Many other programs, such as Sleep Safe and Car Seat Safety Installations, are utilized to further drowning prevention efforts. This efforts have resulted in a major shift in survivability for local children who do have a drowning event, with seven out of nine making full recoveries.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

143


Summary of Fiscal Year 2020 Initiatives

Responsible City Government Hiring of PT Grant Coordinator Budget & Strategy Grant Research and Management Software Budget & Strategy Federal Lobbyist City Manager’s Office Health and Wellness Equipment Fire/EMS Census 2020 Outreach Development Services/Comm&Mktg American with Disabilities Act Compliance Support Strategy Human Resources Professional Certifications Human Resources IT Specialized Technical Training Information Technology Fellowship / Summer Interns Human Resources GIS Consulting Services Information Technology ESRI Enterprise Advantage Program (EEAP) Information Technology Emergency Services Leadership Institute Fire Department Employee Health Clinic Human Resources Well Being Strategy Human Resources Public Education Enhancement Fire Department Cyber Security Insurance Risk Management Senior Programming (Enhancement) Parks and Recreation Disaster Recovery Site Information Technology Civil Engineer Water & Sewer Administration Fire Department 50th Fire Department Online Performance Management System Human Resources City Security Improvements Emergency Management Hiring of Grant Consultant (Ongoing) Budget & Strategy Open Smart City- Strategic Planning Online Platform (Ongoing) Budget & Strategy Linkedin Learning Subscriptions (Ongoing) City Manager’s Office Virtual Slice of the Springs Meeting (Ongoing) Development Services/Comm&Mktg Innovation Incentive Recognition Program (Ongoing) City Manager’s Office City Investment in Today and Future Park Summit Left Turn Lane Fire/EMS Pickelball Courts Parks and Recreation Bus Shelter Solar Powered Fans Public Works Turf Fields Parks and Recreation Splash Pad Parks and Recreation Curbing on Sample Public Works Landscape Operation Enhancement Public Works Facilities / Street Cityworks software (Ongoing) Public Works Landscape Improvement of Arterial Roads (Ongoing) Public Works New Shop Equipment (Ongoing) Public Works/Equipment Services Roadway Resurfacing (Ongoing) Public Works Maintain and Protect City Trees (Ongoing) Parks and Recreation Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget 144


Summary of Fiscal Year 2020 Initiatives CDBG Action Plan (Ongoing) Traffic Signal Intersection: Coral Ridge Drive and NW 41st St Traffic Management (Ongoing) Downtown Becoming Vibrant Implementation of Economic Development Customer Relationship Management (CRM) System Form Village Square Plan with Developer Infrastructure Improvements in Downtown Cont. City Outreach on Business Retention, Expansion & Attraction Develop Retail Strategy Enhanced Downtown Events/Entertainment Design Guidelines for Downtown (Ongoing) Development Agreement for the Cornerstone Project (Ongoing) Innovate Downtown (Ongoing) Growing Local Economy Implement a DNS, DHP, and IP (DDI) Management Tool User Cyber Security Awareness Training Retention of Marketing Firm (Ongoing) Economic Development Strategic Plan Implementation (Ongoing) Quarterly Economic Development Reports (Ongoing) Corporate Park Improvements (Ongoing) Economic Development Marketing and Branding (Ongoing) Coral Springs Regional Chamber Business Academy (Ongoing) Premier Community in South Florida Body Worn Cameras and In-Car LPR Educational Guides for Residents and Businesses Additional (3) Firefighter/Paramedics Fire Station 64 Replacement and Fire Training Academy Expansion Community Involvement Liaison Part-time to Full-time Rapid Intervention Team Bags Civil Unrest Team (CUTS) Emergency Operations Center Upgrades Clean Cab Vehicles Police Hire Incentive (Ongoing) Historic Preservation (Ongoing) Summer Breakspot Program (Ongoing) Community Paramedic Program (Ongoing) Enterprise Software (Ongoing) FEMA Appeals Consultant (Ongoing) Drowning Prevention/Water Safety (Ongoing) City of Coral Springs, Florida

Development Services Fire Development Services, PW Economic Development Economic Development Economic Development Economic Development Economic Development Economic Development/CRA CRA/Development Services CRA, Economic Development Comm. & Marketing,CRA Information Technology Information Technology Economic Development Economic Development Economic Development Economic Development Economic Development Economic Development Police Development Services Fire/EMS Fire Police Fire Police Emergency Management Fire Police Development Services Police Fire/EMS Information Technology Finance Fire/EMS, C&M

145


Department Scorecard

Performance Management Summary City‐Wide Scorecard: Results as of 3rd Quarter Goal On  Targ Responsible City Government et

Measure Type

Effectiveness Effectiveness Impact Impact Impact Effectiveness Effectiveness

Cau City Investment in Today and Future tion

KPI Belo w Plan Cau tion On  Targ On  Targ Cau tion On  Targ et Cau tion

Demand

Cau Growing Local Economy tion

Effectiveness Effectiveness Effectiveness Effectiveness

On Targ Premier Community in South Florida et

Effectiveness Effectiveness Effectiveness Effectiveness Effectiveness Effectiveness

95%

92%

81%

81%

95%

90%

On Targ On  Targ On  Targ et Belo w  Plan Belo w  Plan On  Targ et On  Targ et On  Targ et On  Targ et Cau tion Belo w  Plan

95%

92%

93%

92%

95%

92%

91%

92%

AAA

AAA

AAA

AAA

AAA

AAA

AAA

Maintain AAA bond ratings (Fitch)

AAA

AAA

AAA

AAA

AAA

AAA

AAA

Maintain AAA bond ratings (Moody's)

AAA

Aa1

AAA

Aa1

AAA

Aa1

AAA

Ratings of value for tax dollars and fees (Res. & Biz  Surveys)

75%

84%

65%

70%

75%

78%

65%

Ratings of customer service (Res. & Biz Surveys)

95%

93%

95%

95%

95%

94%

95%

95%

92%

95%

92%

95%

95%

95%

Rating of quantity of recreation programs for Youth  (Revised 2019) (Res. Survey)

95%

92%

95%

92%

90%

95%

90%

Rating of quantity of recreation programs for Adults  (Revised 2019) (Res. Survey)

95%

92%

95%

92%

85%

87%

85%

Rating of quantity of recreation programs for  Seniors (Revised 2019) (Res. Survey) Athletic league participation Rating of condition/appearance of medians (Res.  Survey)

95%

92%

95%

92%

85%

86%

85%

8,100

8,056

8,100

7,539

8,100

4,203

   7,500

90%

91%

90%

91%

90%

91%

90%

87%

97%

87%

90%

90%

Attendance at Downtown Events (New for 2019)

4%

12.40%

12,000

14,500

12,000

Increase in CRA Tax Revenue (New for 2019)

95%

97%

4%

6%

4%

0.15%

4%

Business rating of the image of the City (Biz Survey)

2.24%

0.25%

97%

97.53%

97%

98%

97%

Net New Taxable Value as % of Total Taxable  Assessed Value (BCPA) (4‐Yr Avg)

12.40%

6.50%

1.31%

Non‐residential tax base growth (5‐Yr Avg)

4.10%

4%

6.80%

3.60%

4.60%

3.40%

5.35%

Coral Springs' June unemployment rate (*Goal is to  be below State Avg.)

2,500

2,075

3.80%

3.60%

3.50%

3.10%

*

City crime rate (crimes/100,000 resident‐Calendar  Year)

92%

93%

2,500

2,243

2,500

Resident rating of City efforts to prevent crime  (Res. Survey)

92%

97%

92%

93%

92%

94%

92%

City Government respects religious & ethnic  diversity (Res. Survey)

96%

94%

92%

97%

94%

98%

94%

Ratings of Quality of Life (Res. & Biz Surveys)

95%

99%

96%

98%

96%

94%

96%

0%

2.64%

0%

85%

82%

85%

1.44%

Maintain zero‐growth in roadway crashes ( Goal:  avgr over the previous 3 FYs)  (New for FY2019)

Cau Ratings of City efforts at maintaining quality of  tion neighborhoods (Res. & Biz Surveys)

85%

Reference Key On target/Above target Within 5% of target/At risk of not meeting target Did not meet Goal/At Risk of not meeting Goal  Discussion Needed No update available at this time

146

FY2018 FY2018  FY2019  FY2019  FY2020  FY2020  Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual

Maintain AAA bond ratings (S&P)

Ratings of litter collection from major streets  (Revised 2019) (Res. & Biz Surveys)

Effectiveness

Effectiveness

FY2017 Actual

Employee satisfaction rating (Employee Survey)

Cau Resident rating of appearance of Parks and Rec.  Effectiveness tion facilities (Res. Survey) On  Demand Targ et On  Demand Targ et On  Demand Targ et Belo Demand w  On  Effectiveness Targ et

On Downtown Becoming Vibrant Targ

Satisfaction ratings with City communications (Res.  & Biz Surveys)

FY2017 Target

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

84%

85%

94%

0.47%

2500


Departmental Scorecard: Results as of 3rd Quarter Scorecard

City Attorney

Budget &  Strategy

Goals On Tar Responsible City Government get On  Tar get On  Tar On  Tar On  Tar get On 

Responsible City Government

Responsible City Government Responsible City Government

Tar Responsible City Government get On  Tar Responsible City Government get On  Tar Responsible City Government get On  Tar Responsible City Government get On 

Tar Responsible City Government get On  Tar Responsible City Government Communications  get & Marketing On  Tar Responsible City Government get On 

Tar Responsible City Government get On  Responsible City Government Tar On  Responsible City Government Tar City Clerk's Office get On 

Development Services

99%

99%

100%

99%

100%

99%

49

51

49

14

49

49

68%

47%

64%

47%

47%

Internal customer satisfaction rating Effectiveness On  Facilitate or support cross‐functional process improvement  Effectiveness Tar teams # per year get On  Grant measures (New beginning FY2018): Grant  Effectiveness Tar Applications Submitted get On  Effectiveness Tar Grant measures (New beginning FY2018): Grants Awarded get On  Grant measures (New beginning FY2018): Active Grants  Effectiveness Tar worked during FY get On 

95%

96%

95%

97%

98%

2

3

2

5

2

4

2%

39

20

32

21

33

21

9

11

12

11

12

11

63

40

53

40

40

40

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

2%

0%

2%

2%

2%

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

95%

98%

95%

98%

95%

85%

87%

85%

Tar Receive the GFOA Distinguished Budget Presentation award Effectiveness get On  Payroll regular salaries adopted budget versus actual, net of  Efficiency Tar policy changes get On  Produce monthly financial statements within seven  Efficiency Tar business days of period close get Customer satisfaction with communications (Internal  Effectiveness Survey) Cau Awareness of Coral Springs magazine by new residents  tion (Res. Survey) Cau tion On  Tar get On  Tar

Effectiveness

85%

87%

Number of PIO engagements with local & national media  (New beginning FY2020)

Effectiveness

9,300

17,161

New promotional/informational campaigns produced  (Social media and City TV)

Effectiveness

60

99

Timely disposal of eligible paper records Host an annual training session for public record liaisons  (Revised for FY2019)

98%

2%

Yes

Cau tion On Tar get On 

Yes 95%

84%

85% 50

60

89

60

62

60

Efficiency

320

453

360

Effectiveness

Yes

Yes

Present at all scheduled Onboarding sessions on the topic of  Effectiveness public records (NEW for FY2020)

On Department customer satisfaction rating (Composite) Tar Traffic to the Building Division's interactive online map  Responsible City Government (New beginning FY2020) Bel Cycle time for small permits by the Zoning Division (Building  Growing Local Economy ow  Plan Review) (Days) Pla On  Cycle time for sign permits by the Zoning Division (Building  Cau Growing Local Economy Tar tion Plan Review) (Days) get Cau Cau Cycle time for plan reviews (new and major/minor) by the  Growing Local Economy tion tion Zoning Division (Development Review Committee) (Days) On  Avg. number of days from the receipt of the resident's  Cau Growing Local Economy Tar tion application for rehabilitation assistance to  approval get On  Bel Timeliness ratio of CDBG spending: annual CDBG allocation  Tar Premier Community in South Florida ow  available by July 31 get Pla On  On  Number of trees planted within the City Premier Community in South Florida Tar Tar On  On  Number of formal and informal neighborhood partnerships  Tar Premier Community in South Florida Tar each year get get On  QTRAC Data (12 Minute wait times) (New beginning  Cau Growing Local Economy Tar tion FY2019) get On  "Building" Records Requests within 10 business days (New  Cau Growing Local Economy Tar tion beginning FY2019) get Cau On  Requested inspections completed within one day Growing Local Economy tion Tar On  Cau Growing Local Economy Tar Percent of plan reviews completed within 15 working days tion get Cau Cau Percent of code cases brought into voluntary compliance  Growing Local Economy tion tion prior to administrative/judicial process

Cau Growing Local Economy tion Cau Growing Local Economy tion

99%

47%

Responsible City Government

Cau Growing Local Economy tion

Effectiveness

FY2017 FY2017 FY2018 FY2018  FY2019  FY2019  FY2020  FY2020  Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual

Effectiveness

On Premier Community in South Florida Tar Coral Springs Charter School graduation rate get Number of employees using LinkedIn Learning (New  Responsible City Government beginning FY2020)

Cau Growing Local Economy tion

Measure Type

Effectiveness

Percentage of subrogation eligible dollars recovered

Responsible City Government

Cau Growing Local Economy tion

Economic Development

On Preparation of Legislation within 10 workdays of request  Tar accompanied by backup material get Number of days lost from on the job injuries (Per 100  employees)

Responsible City Government

Tar Responsible City Government get On  Tar Responsible City Government get On 

Tar get On Tar City Manager's  get On  Office Tar get On  Tar On  Tar get Cau tion

KPI

Effectiveness

Yes

95%

99%

95%

99%

95%

100%

Demand Effectiveness

95% 300

95%

98%

95%

96%

95%

99%

Demand

95%    1,500

Effectiveness

2

2

2

2

2

1.96

2

Effectiveness

2

2

2

1

2

1.47

2

Effectiveness

8

8

8

8

8

8.33

8

Effectiveness

45

38

45

30

45

38.33

45

Efficiency

1.50

1.48

1.50

1.38

1.50

2.10

2

Effectiveness

1,000

3,195

1,000

2,365

1,000

2,570

   1,000

Effectiveness

10

4

10

6

10

6

10

30

9.22

12

Effectiveness

90%

96%

90%

Effectiveness

95%

100%

95%

100%

95%

100%

95%

Effectiveness

90%

96%

90%

89%

90%

96%

90%

Effectiveness

75%

80%

75%

81%

75%

62%

75%

Percent of respondents satisfied with City efforts at  Effectiveness maintaining the quality of their neighborhoods (Res. Survey)

84%

85%

84%

85%

85%

82%

85%

Percent of survey respondents satisfied with the City's  efforts to support quality neighborhoods (Biz Survey)

87%

95%

87%

94%

87%

94%

87%

Retain businesses who received a retention visit (New for  Tar 2019) get On  Increase in traffic to the Economic Development website  Tar (New for 2019) get Bel Increase social media followers for EDO (New for 2019) ow 

Effectiveness

Effectiveness Effectiveness

70%

Effectiveness

20%

50%

20%

Effectiveness

20%

236%

20%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

70%

147


Scorecard

Emergency Management

Goals

KPI

FY2017 FY2017 FY2018 FY2018  FY2019  FY2019  FY2020  FY2020  Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual

Responsible City Government

Community Outreach Events (New beginning FY2020)

Effectiveness

10

Responsible City Government

Enrollment in "Alert Coral Springs" (New beginning FY2020)

Effectiveness

2000

Responsible City Government

Effectiveness

20

On Tar Responsible City Government get On 

Effectiveness

94%

98%

94%

98%

94%

Effectiveness

88%

80%

88%

85%

88%

Effectiveness

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Effectiveness

3%

1%

3%

1%

3%

0.81%

3%

Effectiveness

0

0

0

0

0

0

0%

Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Usage (New beginning  FY2020) On  Internal customer satisfaction rating (Financial Services  Tar Internal Survey) get Bel Percentage of purchase requisitions under $10,000  ow  Tar Responsible City Government processed within 24 hours get Pla On  On  Receive the GFOA Certificate of Achievement for Excellence  Tar Responsible City Government Tar in Financial Reporting award get get On  On  Financial Services Water billings past due more than 180 days as percentage  Tar Responsible City Government Tar of outstanding bills get get On  On  Number of repeat items in management letters prepared  Tar Responsible City Government Tar by the City's external auditors get get On  Cau Percentage of invoices paid within 30 days Responsible City Government Tar tion On  On  Out of stock level of the total inventory at Central Stores Responsible City Government Tar Tar On  On  Response time in 8 minutes or less, 90% of time of all  Tar Premier Community in South Florida Tar emergency Fire/EMS calls get get On  On  A minimum of 14 firefighters on scene within 10 minutes,  Tar Premier Community in South Florida Tar 90% of time for all structural fires get get On  On  Provide inspection report to customer within 12 days from  Tar Responsible City Government Tar inspection (revised FY17) get get On  On  Perform annual fire inspections (commercial properties &  Responsible City Government Tar Tar applicable multi‐family residential units) get get On  On  Provide public education programs to residents ages 5‐11 Responsible City Government Tar Tar On  Bel Provide a minimum number of classes at the Fire Academy:  ow  Tar Responsible City Government FL Firefighter Minimum Standards classes get Pla On  Bel Provide a minimum number of classes at the Fire Academy:  Fire/EMS ow  Tar Responsible City Government EMT classes get Pla On  On  Provide a minimum number of classes at the Fire Academy:  Tar Responsible City Government Tar Specialty classes get get On  Bel Provide a minimum number of classes at the Fire Academy:  ow  Tar Responsible City Government Paramedic class get Pla On  On  Percent of customers who are satisfied with the quality of  Tar Responsible City Government Tar the Fire Department (Res. Survey) get get On  On  Percent of customers satisfied with the quality of the  Tar Responsible City Government Tar emergency paramedics (Biz. Survey) get get On  On  Maintain Community Emergency Response Team (CERT)  Tar Responsible City Government Tar force get get On  On  Maintain Fire Explorers program participation Responsible City Government Tar Tar On  On  Percentage of employees who would recommend working  Tar Responsible City Government Tar for the City to a friend get get On  On  Employee engagement index Responsible City Government Tar Tar On  On  Percentage of employees that are satisfied with wellness  Tar Responsible City Government Tar activities get get On  Cau Percentage of employees that value Employee Benefits  Tar Responsible City Government tion Package get On  On  Percentage of employees satisfied with Volunteer Services  Tar Responsible City Government Tar Human Resources (New beginning FY2019) get get On  Percentage of employees satisfied with the Onboarding  Tar Responsible City Government process with the City (New  beginning FY2019) get On  On  Percent of employees satisfied with a culture of  Tar Responsible City Government Tar learning/innovation (New beginning FY2020) get get On  On  Employees satisfied with the Culture of  Tar Responsible City Government Tar Inclusiveness/Belonging (New beginning FY2019) get get Bel On  Respond to customer requests within 2 days (City‐wide  ow  Tar Responsible City Government helpdesk) (Revised for FY20) get Pla On  On  IT Development Projects implemented (In accordance with  Tar Responsible City Government Tar City’s Business Plan and IT Work Program) get get On  On  Customer satisfaction rating from survey of Information  Tar Responsible City Government Tar Technology get get On  On  Information  Responsible City Government Meet service level agreement regarding network availability Tar Tar Technology get get On  On  Meet service level agreement regarding application  Tar Responsible City Government Tar availability get get On  On  Meet service level agreement regarding server availability Responsible City Government Tar Tar

148

Measure Type

94%

82.59%

85% Yes

Effectiveness

90%

96%

90%

94%

95%

94%

95%

Efficiency

2.50%

1.30%

2.50%

1%

2.50%

0.82%

2.50%

Effectiveness

90%

97%

90%

97%

90%

97%

90%

Effectiveness

90%

100%

90%

100%

90%

100%

90%

Effectiveness

95%

98%

90%

100%

90%

93%

90%

Effectiveness

6,400

5,890

6,400

6,596

6,400

4,905

   6,500

Effectiveness

4,000

8,210

4,000

9,865

4,000

7,964

4000

Effectiveness

7

7

7

10

7

4

7

Effectiveness

4

6

7

7

6

3

6

Effectiveness

50

101

50

77

70

67

70

Effectiveness

1

3

4

5

6

2

5

Effectiveness

95%

99%

95%

99%

95%

99%

95%

Effectiveness

99%

100%

90%

100%

90%

99%

95%

Effectiveness

100

82

60

75

60

50

60

Impact

40

30

40

20

25

68

25

Effectiveness

90%

93%

90%

95%

90%

90%

92%

Effectiveness

90%

89%

90%

91%

85%

87%

85%

Effectiveness

90%

94%

90%

91%

90%

91%

90%

Effectiveness

90%

88%

90%

88%

90%

88%

90%

Effectiveness

85%

99%

85%

Effectiveness

85%

85%

Effectiveness

90%

Effectiveness

85%

94%

85%

Effectiveness

95%

95%

95%

89%

95%

90%

90%

Effectiveness

10

7

9

35

8

25

8

Effectiveness

95%

99%

95%

100%

95%

100%

95%

Effectiveness 99.50%

100%

99.5% 99.90% 99.5% 99.82%

99.5%

Effectiveness

98%

99.90%

98%

99.90%

99%

99.97%

99%

Effectiveness

99%

99.90%

99%

99.90%

99%

100%

99%

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Scorecard

Parks &  Recreation

Police

Public Works

Goals

KPI

Cau On Customer service rating of summer recreation program City Investment in Today and Future tion Tar Cau On  Number of Senior Classes (New beginning FY2019) City Investment in Today and Future tion Tar On  Increase members and reduce member turnover: Aquatic  Cau City Investment in Today and Future Tar tion Complex membership get On  Increase members and reduce member turnover: Aquatic  Cau City Investment in Today and Future Tar tion Complex membership turnover get Cau On  Maintain customer service ratings at the Tennis Center City Investment in Today and Future tion Tar Cau On  Membership turnover at the Tennis Center City Investment in Today and Future tion Tar Cau Cau Customer service rating for court maintenance at the  City Investment in Today and Future tion tion Tennis Center Cau On  Number of tennis special events City Investment in Today and Future tion Tar Cau Bel Sports Commission: Number of room nights Growing Local Economy tion ow  On  Maintenance & appearance of City parks (Revised 2019)  Tar Responsible City Government (Res. Survey) get On  On  Customer service rating for parks and recreation staff (Res.  Tar Responsible City Government Tar Survey) get get On  On  Safety rating of City parks (Res. Survey) Responsible City Government Tar Tar On  On  Cost recovery ratio for the Recreation Division Responsible City Government Tar Tar On  On  The combined cost recovery for the Aquatic Complex  Tar Responsible City Government Tar Division: get get On  On  Police Department's overall quality rating (Res. Survey) Premier Community in South Florida Tar Tar On  On  Residents who feel that Coral Springs has remained or  Tar Premier Community in South Florida Tar become a safer place to live (Res. Survey) get get On  On  Average Police response time (from time of call to arrival) ‐  Premier Community in South Florida Tar Tar (Previous year) get get On  On  Stabilize the burglary rate at a 0% increase adjusted for  Tar Premier Community in South Florida Tar population (Uniform Crime Report) (Previous year) get get On  On  Maintain 0% increase in crime rate as adjusted for  Tar Premier Community in South Florida Tar population (Uniform Crime Report) (Previous year) get get On  On  Clearance rate for crimes (Uniform Crime Report) (Previous  Tar Premier Community in South Florida Tar year) get get On  On  Reduce or maintain percent change in number of robberies  Tar Premier Community in South Florida Tar (Uniform Crime Report) (Previous year) get get On  On  Traffic crashes per 1,000 citizens (Previous year) Premier Community in South Florida Tar Tar On  On  Number of high school students that are awarded safe  Tar Premier Community in South Florida Tar driving certificates at graduation get get On  On  Police Department's Satisfaction rating by businesses (Biz  Tar Downtown Becoming Vibrant Tar Survey) get get On  Cau Safety rating by businesses (Biz Survey) Downtown Becoming Vibrant Tar tion On  On  Public Works & Utilities Satisfaction Rating (Revised 2019)  Tar Responsible City Government Tar (Res. Survey) get get On  On  City Hall internal customer satisfaction rating for janitorial  Tar Responsible City Government Tar services get get On  On  Availability rate of all vehicles/equipment for all  Tar Responsible City Government Tar departments get get On  On  Facilities routine work orders completed within 15 working  Tar Responsible City Government Tar days get get On  On  Pot hole repair response time (Days) Premier Community in South Florida Tar Tar On  Bel Complete litter removal of 159 miles of road rights‐of‐way  Tar Premier Community in South Florida ow  in ten working days (Days) get Pla On  On  Storm drains vactored per year (New beginning FY2020) Premier Community in South Florida Tar Tar On  Bel Fire hydrants serviced (Revised for FY 2018) Premier Community in South Florida Tar ow  On  Bel Tar Premier Community in South Florida ow  Miles of street sweeping per year to meet NPDES standards get Pla On  Length of sanitary sewer pipe liner rehabilitated (Linear  Cau City Investment in Today and Future Tar tion Feet) (New beginning FY2018) get Cau On  Number of serviced valves per year City Investment in Today and Future tion Tar Cau Bel Percent of "unaccounted for" water City Investment in Today and Future tion ow 

Measure Type Impact

FY2017 FY2017 FY2018 FY2018  FY2019  FY2019  FY2020  FY2020  Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual 95%

97%

95%

100%

Impact

95%

95%

1,250

1,226

1250

Demand

4,000

4,087

4,000

4,169

4,000

3,990

4000

Demand

50%

42%

50%

37%

50%

32.82%

50%

Effectiveness

90%

94%

90%

94%

95%

Demand

30%

15%

30%

20%

30%

Effectiveness

90%

87%

90%

87%

90%

Impact

30

52

30

62

35

40

45

Demand

3,600

2,060

3,600

4,909

3,000

3,710

3600

Effectiveness

95%

92%

95%

92%

95%

95%

95%

Impact

95%

94%

95%

94%

95%

95%

95%

Effectiveness

90%

91%

90%

91%

90%

91.90%

90%

Impact

60%

58%

60%

59%

60%

84.79%

60%

90%

15.10%

30% 90%

Impact

65%

78%

65%

76%

65%

76.43%

65%

Effectiveness

95%

95%

95%

95%

95%

96%

95%

Effectiveness

75%

78%

75%

78%

75%

78%

76%

5:00

4.42

5:00

Effectiveness Effectiveness

0%

‐36.50%

0%

‐32%

0%

0%

Effectiveness

0%

‐4.80%

0%

‐14%

0%

0%

32%

30%

33%

30%

30%

Effectiveness 30.00% Effectiveness

0%

11.90%

0%

‐13.0%

0%

0%

Effectiveness

31

32

31

31

31

31

Impact

200

401

200

334

200

250

Effectiveness

92%

96%

92%

95.90%

92%

96%

93%

Effectiveness

96%

96%

97%

95.80%

97%

95.80%

94%

Effectiveness

89%

89%

89%

89%

90%

93%

90%

Effectiveness

90%

99%

90%

100%

90%

Effectiveness

94%

95%

93%

97%

94%

99.33%

96%

Effectiveness

90%

98%

90%

99%

90%

90.93%

90%

Effectiveness

2

1

2

1

2

1

2

Effectiveness

5

12.90

10

5.93

5

6.99

10

90%

Effectiveness

14,000 15,131

Effectiveness

1,418

1,155

1,167

1,155

598

   1,155

1,000

1,330

1,000

989

1,000

960

   1,000

8,000

11,541

8,000

Effectiveness

1,000

1,004

1,000

1,392

1,000

790

   1,000

Effectiveness

10%

9%

10%

10%

10%

11.12%

10%

Effectiveness Effectiveness

City of Coral Springs, Florida

60

10,977    8,000

149


Initiative Analysis: Results as of 3rd Quarter Goal Responsible City  Government Responsible City  Government Responsible City  Government Responsible City  Government Responsible City  Government Responsible City  Government

Initiative

Department

Comprehensive Compensation Study

Human Resources

Dispatch Improvements (2018‐2019) Ongoing

Police

Education Grants (2016‐2019) Ongoing

CMO

Electric Utility Vehicle

Public Works

Analysis 23 cities surveyed, 18 responded, 83 job classifications covered Electrical work will start on July 8th for last two consoles. The two consoles  will be installed on July 11th and 12th. Funds for this initiative are being re‐purposed for a community outreach pop‐ up party. The event is scheduled to take place on the 7th of August.

Hiring of Grant Consultant

Budget & Strategy

Responsible City  Government

Improving Human Resource Service Quality

Human Resources

Responsible City  Government

Innovation Incentive Recognition Program

CMO

Responsible City  Government

Linkedin Learning Subscriptions

CMO

Responsible City  Government

LiveU Equipment Purchase

Communications & Marketing

Responsible City  Government

Multi‐cultural Events (1995‐2019) Ongoing

Human Resources

Responsible City  Government

Open Smart City‐ Strategic Planning Online Platform

Budget & Strategy

Responsible City  Government

Tightrope Cablecast Upgrade for City TV

Responsible City  Government

Virtual Slice of the Springs Meeting (2017‐2019) Ongoing

Responsible City  Government

Youth Programs (2008‐2019) Ongoing

City Investment in Today  and Future

40%

0%

Postponed indefinitely due to changes in manpower needed in other areas. The event working group has been fully established and is working together  on all Special  Events. They have been doing an excellent job. A grant consultant was hired to assist with the writing of two grants for the  Police Department: Prosecuting cold cases using DNA and Body worn  camera grant. Both grants will be submitted by June 5, 2019. Continuing to work with the vendor to perfect the City's vision for enhancing  the recruitment and on‐boarding process. The innovation recognition program has been deployed based on the  incentives amounts determined by the innovation steering committee. The  shark tank panel members sever pre‐determined terms, and are  compensated for their participation. To date, the panel has brought 4 major  innovative programs forward for funding and continue to be involved in the  evaluation of future innovative projects. LinkedIn Learning has been fully deployed and user invitations sent via email  distribution. As the program gathers momentum, the enrollment count  continues to grow to the max license count of 800 users. Staff will monitor  enrollment throughout the initial year to determine if the application meets  the needs of the City. The LiveU Equipment was used for the first time during the opening of the  Temple of time. Completed events went as planned with the exception of CommuniTea  which the City eliminated per the new Special Events guidelines.  International Dinner dance is upcoming on Sept. 28th.

Event Management Process (2016‐2019) Ongoing

90%

10%

Police

Responsible City  Government

100%

Vehicle to be purchased during the 4th quarter.

Enhance Strategic Enforcement Team (2018‐2019) Ongoing

Communications & Marketing

Time Percent  Budget Status Complete

100% 80% 75%

100%

100%

100% 90%

A new Performance Management software application (ClearPoint Strategy)  was implemented and went live July 1st.  This new system is allowing us to  track the operational performance of departmental and City‐wide Key  performance indicators. The work to begin the design and implementation  of a new public facing dashboard will begin in August 2019.

60%

The project is complete.

100%

Slice of the Springs meeting was held on 5/9/19.  Meeting was held both  virtually & in‐person at City Hall.

75%

Human Resources

Everything went as planned.

100%

25 Meter Pool Linear Upgrade

Parks & Recreation

20%

City Investment in Today  and Future

Project went out to bid and we received 3 bids.  2 of the bids had to be  thrown out because they did not include bonds as required in the  specifications.  The 3rd bid had to be thrown out because they did not  include lining the gutters as required in the specifications.  As a result the  project is going back out to bid.  We hope to receive some good bids and get  the job done in November.

Air Conditioning Technician

Public Works

Air conditioning technician reported to work on Jan. 14, 2019.

100%

City Investment in Today  and Future

CDBG Action Plan

Development Services

60%

City Investment in Today  and Future

Senior and Youth Programs are completed.  Capital Improvement projects  have undergone the bid process and construction is underway.  Home Repair  applicants have been income verified and construction has begun.

Cultural Facilities Grant for Museum Renovations

Development Services

Completion of AC installation and last invoice was completed in June 2019.

100%

City Investment in Today  and Future

Facilities/Streets Cityworks software

Public Works

0%

City Investment in Today  and Future

Cityworks, or work order management software,  has been transferred to  I.T. where it will be procured as part of the ERP package. No funds have been  expended to date.  Tentative timeline is FY 2022 for completion given the  forecast from I.T.

Inflow and Infiltration Rehabilitation

Public Works

10,353 LF of sanitary sewer has been lined to date.

100%

City Investment in Today  and Future

Landscape Improvement of Arterial Roads

Public Works

10%

City Investment in Today  and Future

Landscape design, including a request for variance to retain some trees,  have been submitted to FDOT for review. Comments due back 4th quarter.    Process of design and FDOT review has resulted in bidding and construction  not occurring until FY 20.

Light Fixture Replacement ‐ Aiello Field

Parks & Recreation

Lights were completed in early July.  Field is ready for use.

100%

City Investment in Today  and Future

Maintain and Protect City Trees

Parks & Recreation

City Investment in Today  Mullins Park Playground replacement and Future City Investment in Today  New Entrance for Sherwood Forest Park (2018‐2019) Ongoing and Future City Investment in Today  New Shop Equipment and Future

150

Communications & Marketing Development  Services/ Communications  & Marketing

Parks & Recreation

The tree crew has been trimming trees throughout the year.  Through 3  Quarters of the year they have trimmed 1,072 trees throughout the City.   845 Shade trees and 227 palm trees. Quarter 1 ‐ 251 shade trees and 10 palm trees Quarter 2 ‐ 154 shade trees and 79 palm trees Quarter 3 ‐ 440 shade trees and 138 palm trees Project was completed in early May.  Playground is up and running.  Project  was completed within the allocated budget and on schedule.

75%

100%

Public Works

Project is complete.

100%

Public Works

Procurement is on hold pending build out of the 4150 building.  Staff will  work with existing budget when building is ready for furnishing.

0%

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Goal

Initiative

Department

Analysis A depreciation fund was set up for replacement of large capital projects.   There were no replacement projects in this years budget.  In future years a  recurring capital fund will be established for lighting replacement,  playground replacement, fitness equipment replacement and asphalt  pathway improvements.  Funds will also be set up in a depreciation fund for  replacement of the artificial turf field carpet replacement. In addition we have funding in our operating budget for on going  improvements within the park.  We had over $500,000 in fiscal year  2019/20.  All the identified projects for this year have been completed.  We  have some remaining funds that we are using to do some additional  projects.  One example is the resurfacing of the track at Sportsplex.  That job  will be completed in August.  We are also going to replace some parking lot  lights at Cypress Park with LED fixtures. Plans for the FY 19 Roadway Resurfacing program are in the Purchasing  division awaiting bid.  Award of bid is likely in 4th quarter with work  beginning 1st quarter of FY 20. In the 3rd quarter issues that were discussed included speed bumps on  private property, University Drive Expansion project, Turtle Run Decorative  Signpost Replacement, Speed Table specification, NW 110 Avenue Traffic  Calming Plan, parking garage circulation, Forest Hills Elementary School  traffic, Royal Palm Boulevard bike lane proposal, and the Transportation  Surtax.  Eleven traffic studies were completed.  On July 30, 2019, there will  be a presentation on traffic calming to the Commission.

Time Percent  Budget Status Complete

City Investment in Today  and Future

Parks Replacement CIP Projects

Parks & Recreation

City Investment in Today  and Future

Roadway Resurfacing

Public Works

City Investment in Today  and Future

Traffic Management

Development Services/Public Works

Turtle Run Park Left Turn Lane

Public Works

Project is complete.

100%

Public Works

Broward County has completed the project.

100%

City Investment in Today  and Future City Investment in Today  and Future City Investment in Today  and Future

Wiles Road and 441 Entry Improvements Wireless Telecommunications Master Plan

Consultant met with staff to go over findings.  Will be delivering completed  Master Plan Q4. The Design Guidelines have been approved and need to be codified. The CRA  and EDO are creating a handout for local businesses to inform them of the  Economic Development/CRA changes and let them know about the Commercial Enhancement Matching  Grant that can be utilized for the changes. The agreement has been in process and both the CRA attorney and the  Economic Development/  developer's attorney have commented and provided edits. The agreement  CRA should be finalized in July and go to the CRA board for approval in Q4. On April 22nd, the CRA Board voted to not move forward with the  decorative street lights on Sample Road due to high cost. Broward County  Public Works/CRA will install the standard aluminum pole with the LED fixture in FY20. The new  lights will improve visibility and enhance safety. Innovate Downtown was held on March 1st with 12 creators presenting to 4  judges. Charles Schwartz emceed the event and gave the Ted Talk. Two  Communications  Degrees won the judges award and Strawfish won the audience award.  & Marketing/CRA Need diversity on judges and applicants next year. Open it up to the state to  get additional funding for winners. FY 19 program consisted of making intersections on Royal Palm Blvd west of  Public Works University ADA compliant.  Project is complete. There is still no funding in place for the Master Parking improvements. We  could explore bonding the project, but the CRA would have to borrow from  Public Works/CRA the City. There needs to be some discussion about how we move forward  and if this is still an active initiative. Development Services

Downtown Becoming  Vibrant

Design Guidelines for Downtown

Downtown Becoming  Vibrant

Development Agreement for the Cornerstone project

Downtown Becoming  Vibrant

Downtown Decorative Street Lights

Downtown Becoming  Vibrant

Innovate Downtown

Downtown Becoming  Vibrant

Intersection Approaches Upgraded to ADA Compliance

Downtown Becoming  Vibrant

Sample Road Master Parking Comprehensive Plan

Growing Local Economy

Building Permit Fee Study

Development Services

Growing Local Economy

Code Compliance Operational Review and Training

Development Services

Growing Local Economy

Coral Springs Regional Chamber Business Academy

Economic Development

Growing Local Economy

Corporate Park Improvements

Economic Development

Growing Local Economy

Economic Development Marketing ‐ Website Redesign

Economic Development

Growing Local Economy

Economic Development Strategic Plan

Economic Development

Growing Local Economy

Electric Vehicles and Charging Stations (2017‐2019) Ongoing

Public Works

Growing Local Economy New Quarterly Economic Development and Marketing Report

Economic Development

Growing Local Economy

Real Estate Summit

Economic Development

Growing Local Economy

Residential Realtor’s Event

Economic Development

Staff is completing the review of the draft study. Field Training Officer attended the LIAF annual conference presented by the  Landscape Inspectors’ Association of Florida and Training on the 4th  Amendment and Code Inspections.Supervisor and Officer attended the  annual conference for FACE (Florida Association of Code Enforcement)  attending training on a variety of relevant topics. Administrator and  Supervisors attended a half‐day in‐house session on coaching  employees.Officers attended local GCASE training on a variety of local  issues.In‐house training conducted with the assistance of the Human  Resources Department. The EDO supports the Coral Springs Regional Chamber of Commerce Biz  Academy from October 2018 to April 2019 providing seminars to the local  business community on topics including social media, customer loyalty,  branding and cybersecurity. Program increases visibility of the EDO office  and enhances relationships with business community. Attendance increased  monthly. The EDA grant continues to move forward and we are confident that it will  be funded. Notification is anticipated in July. The JGGF was funded by the  state at $40M. We have spoken with our lobbyists and distributed a one  pager for them to reach out to DEO and the Governor's office. We continue to add photos of our retention visits to the site. We are also  hiring a consultant to do a website audit and to rewrite some of the content.  Had meetings with GIS Planning and requested numerous updates that have  yet to be implemented. Going to research other providers to see if they are  more responsive than existing provider. Camoin Associates had its first site visit on April 15‐16 and met with the  working group as well as stakeholders. The second site visit was June 3‐4;  they met with the Commissioners, Corporate Park reps, CRA businesses and  held a joint EDAC/CRA focus group. Presented preliminary data to working  group and EDAC/CRA. Next visit is August 29th. Installation of charging stations at City Hall Public Garage is completed. The Cloud Nine CRM system is in place and staff is adding businesses and  retention visits to the database. Process slow as there are 7 months of data  to input. Should have Q3 report in August. We will be inviting Commercial Realtors to the Camoin EDSP Community  Event on August 29th. We are going to invite Residential Realtors to the Community Event for the  EDSP on August 29th.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

100%

10%

75%

75%

90%

25%

0%

100%

100%

0% 80%

90%

100%

20%

50%

50%

100% 50% 0% 0%

151


Goal

Initiative

Department

Analysis

Time Budget Status

Percent Complete

Growing Local Economy

Retention of Marketing Firm

Economic Development

Camoin Associates will make recommendations regarding marketing and  branding of the city. We may retain a marketing firm to assist with our  rebrand from the Business is Brighter logo to something more applicable. This  will likely be in FY20. The process was delayed due to the delay in hiring  Camoin. Engaging the EDSP consultants was put on hold due to staff changes  in the EDO , CMO and Purchasing.

Growing Local Economy

Venture Lab and/or Co‐working Space Downtown

Economic Development/CRA

The CRA could potentially offer subsidized rent to an incubator, but there isn't  any available space at this time. St. Andrews Church and University Place  (both outside of the CRA) are looking into getting a coworking space.

Premier Community in  South Florida

Adding Radio Authentication to All Public Safety Radios

Police

Premier Community in  South Florida

Additional (3) Firefighter/Paramedics

Fire/EMS

Premier Community in  South Florida

Additional (4) School Resource Officers

Police

Premier Community in  South Florida

Additional Senior Programming

Parks & Recreation

Premier Community in  South Florida

City‐wide Day of Service

Human Resources

Premier Community in  South Florida

Community Paramedic Program (2015‐2019) Ongoing

Fire/EMS

Premier Community in  South Florida

Emergency Traffic Signal

Fire

Premier Community in  South Florida

Enterprise Software (Procurement)

IT

Premier Community in  South Florida

Health & Wellbeing Strategy

Human Resources

Premier Community in  South Florida

Historic Preservation

Development Services

Premier Community in  South Florida

Incentive to hire Police Officers

Police

Premier Community in  South Florida

Interactive OnLine Mapping

Development Services

This initiative has been completed.  Interactive map in now available online.   Visit: https://csbuilding.org/

100%

Premier Community in  South Florida

Logistics Captain

Fire/EMS

100%

Premier Community in  South Florida

The Logistics Captain position has been hired and filled.  Captain Roseboom  has begun his work in this new position.   Captain Roseboom has already  started with several new initiatives to improve and streamline the logistics  section of our department.

Principal Office Assistant Part‐time to Full‐time

Fire/EMS

This is complete.

100%

Premier Community in  South Florida

Senior Outreach Newsletter

Communications & Marketing

Premier Community in  South Florida

Stormwater Assessment Implementation (2014‐2019) Ongoing

Public Works

Premier Community in  South Florida

Stryker Powerload Stretcher Restraint and Lifting Systems

Fire/EMS

Premier Community in  South Florida

Summer Breakspot Program (2017‐2019) Ongoing

Police

Premier Community in  South Florida

SWAT Sniper Rifle Replacement

Police

Purchase has been completed. Code plug to initiate authentication has been  received electronically. Work should begin in August, but will not be usable  until County moves over to their new radio system. All vacancies have been filled be select candidates.  Their start date is mid  March. This initiative has been completed. We have assigned an additional SRO to  Coral Glades High School, Coral Springs High School, JP Taravella High School,  as well as Coral Springs Charter. During the third quarter we added 3 Zumba Gold Classes, 4 Technology  classes, a Line Dancing Class and Additional Fitness classes. For this year we had multiple avenues for employees and residents to get  involved and give back to the community. Events included Thanksgiving  baskets, Downtown in December, Holiday Parade, holiday giving initiatives,  school supply drive, and Keep Coral Springs beautiful as well as other  engaging events. The Community Paramedic program continues to operate at a very high  efficiency rate.  CP Toolan continues to receive vital follow‐up information  from the crews and conducts patient evaluations shortly after the referral.    CP Toolan is helping a large number of at‐risk patients and ensuring that they  get proper care in a variety of areas. This project is currently in the permitting phase with Broward County and the  City of Coral Springs.  No further progress can be made until this step is  complete. Initial presentations to the CMO have yielded further discussions related to  the funding and the addition of Energov (TRAKiT replacement). Upon approval  from the CMO, the statement of work will be finalized and contract  negotations will commence while Finance secures the debt service. This is an ongoing process of incremental implementation as we progress  through the year. Broward County Planning Council forwarded recommendation of approval to  County Commission on 6/27/19.  City staff is working with consultant to  identify locations for surveys within the City. Since the recent reinstatement of the law enforcement sworn hiring incentive  program two hires met the eligibility requirements of the program. The  incentive is prominently posted on the police employment page of the City’s  website and is also highlighted on the job bulletin. The program was initially  communicated via Facebook/Workplace and via a department‐wide email  blast for purposes of obtaining employee referrals. It should be noted that  there has not been a need for aggressive recruitment measures in the last few  months as all vacancies were accounted for with existing applicants. However,  it will be a critical tool going forward in light of hiring initiatives on the  horizon.

0%

50% 100% 100% 100%

100%

100%

30%

94%

75% 10%

100%

Communications and Marketing, in partnership with Parks and Recreation,  has been producing the Forever Young quarterly newsletter that is mailed to  residents 62 years and older. The number of issues mailed is approximately  12,000. With the July issue of the publication, we are offering the option for  seniors to opt‐in to receive the publication digitally. To date, we have 150  recipients of the digital version of the newsletter. The final issue of the fiscal year will be distributed in September. Presentations to Commission have been completed.  Ordinance approved in  December.  Assessment is subject to Commission consideration for FY 2020  budget. This project is in the purchasing phase.  No further progress can be made until  this phase is complete. The first day of Summer Breakspot was June 18th at James Hunt Elementary  School. There are 145 children enrolled and the hours have been extended to  9am‐2pm, Tuesday‐Thursday. We have approximately 40 high school  volunteers per day assisting with activities. This initiative is on track for  completion.

100%

Rifles have arrived. Rifle barrels and actions need to be conditioned and then  they will be assigned to personnel. This initiative is on target for completion.

95%

Reference Key On target/Above target Within 5% of target/At risk of not meeting target Did not meet Goal/At Risk of not meeting Goal  Discussion Needed No update available at this time/Undefined

152

0%

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

75%

50%

85%


City of Coral Springs, Florida

153


City of Coral Springs Strategic Planning & Performance Management Process Map January 2020 January

February

March

Workbooks compiled and "Hot  topics" identified

Commission Workshop

April

May

June

Res/Biz Survey       (As Scheduled)

Strategic Plan

SWOC Analysis

Strategic Plan Final  Draft 

Environmental Scan Strategic Plan  Report

Business Plan

Strategic Plan  Report

Dept. Budget  Packages  Distributed for  Business Plan,  Staffing,  Operating  Budget,  Performance  Management,  CIP &  Replacement  Programs

Environmental Scan

Budget Client  Feedback

Packages returned

Select Initiatives

CMO/Dept Meetings

Staffing & Capital

Five‐Year Forecast

Line Item Review

Operating Budget &  Performance  Management

Review/Create KPIs

Performance Management  Report

Capital Budget

Fleet Process  Review

Performance Management  Report

Replacement Programs  Distributed &  Conduct Fleet  Budget Meetings

Replacement Programs Updated

New Capital  Requests

Fixed Asset  Inventory  Distributed

Note: The Strategic Plan is a multi‐year plan. In certain years the Business Plan Environmental Scan is the first element. 

154

Business Plan  Workshop

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

Prioritize Capital  Funding


July

August

September

Strategic Plan  Report

October

November

December

Elections

New Commission  Orientation

Strategic Plan  Report

Business Plan  Presentation

Fund Summaries  Balanced

Proposed Budget  Prepared

1st Budget Hearing

2nd Budget  Hearing  Budget Adopted

Performance Management  Report

Prepare Adopted Budget  Book

Adopted Budget  Published

Yearly PM Reports

Proposed CIP  Prepared

Budgeted Purchases

Adopted CIP  Published

Fixed Asset  Inventory Updated

Fiscal Year Ends

City of Coral Springs, Florida

155


Department Budgets Overview Understanding Departmental Performance Budgets The department’s budget is separated into the following components: Mission Statement—The statement must identify the particular purpose for the department and how it relates to the City’s overall mission. Core Processes—A listing of the fundamental business processes that the department is designed to provide. Outputs— Indicate the volume, frequency or level of service provided. New Initiatives—New services or the removal of existing services as they relate to the Strategic Plan. A list of the new initiatives follows. Organization Charts—Outline of program structure within the department. Program/Expenditure Summary—The budget for the department, summarized by program, if applicable, and by major category of expenditure: • Personal Services—salaries, overtime and other pay including vacation payment incentive, holiday pay, temporary wages. • Benefits—FICA, retirement contributions, health and other benefits. • Other Expenses—supplies, repairs, utilities, services and other costs. • Capital—departmental machinery and equipment under $5,000. Objectives and Key Performance Indicators—The objectives focus on particular program accomplishments that will be attained within the current year. All objectives are measurable by the performance indicators supplied. Each performance indicator includes explicit links showing how program objectives and their performance are directly related to the strategic goal(s) they support.

156

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Sample Department Budgets Page jTitle

oRevenues and Expenditures

Indicates the department.

A summary of the budgeted departmental revenues and expenditures.

kMission

pPerformance Linkage

Developed by the department, this is a statement that identifies the particular purpose for the department.

The Strategic Goals and Directional Statement that support the department’s performance.

lCore Processes and Outputs qKey Performance Indicators A listing of the fundamental processes and the outputs for the department.

The actual historical operational performance and future targets for the department.

mOrganization Chart An organization chart showing the breakdown of programs, divisions and personnel.

nNew Initiatives Business Plan Initiatives for this department, if available.

j k

o

y ttorne City A

tation presen legal re ty timely Ci tive and mission and ents m esg ide effec reprin rm ly fo To prov e to the City Co zealo us er cegh-P is committed vic e, Hi is offi and ad atino Thtiv .va and y of torney m strIn on An rove s rsies mission’s polic ntes coen ad y:ini City At rit aliv fect ty Com bilit y. Efleg ty in gic Prio e pe Ty Ci :ementing the Ci d potential lia Strate mentth an pl s re re im e, su su to nanc Mea ng expo ns, ordi nied minimizi solutio compa

n M issio

acn d (re re: slation stswehesna ees Measu ation of Legi cqu of re Psro ar kday 0 1) Prep 10 Cwoorre s per 10 ) within b injurie ts jo l u e ia orders th er on up mat O ulotp st from red by back days retycove sel of rs r un lla Co Ci be , d do an ible 2) Num s igCo mmission boards and elty Research ation Ci ee ned og bres ent the employ rtaining of supr d all assig entage • Re ministration, an at ters of law pe m 3) Perc ad

l

FY2015 tual City Ac

Goal

99%

99%

FY2016 tu ice Offal sAc l ney' ttor GAoa 99%

nd 37 nce Fu ral Insura 49 Gene 2.5 % (8801) /

47%

52

inator nt Coord nageme Risk Ma t k Assistan

m

FY2017 tual Ac Goal

49 47%

99%

99%

99%

49 Litigation Outside

ey .85 orn95 City Att 5.75 (2502) / %

47%

66

51

68%

99% 49 47%

75)* orney (0.

t City Att

9 $915,43 9 $915,43

2 $869,17 2 $869,17

0 $587,58 212,935 111,142 3,782 9 $915,43 5.75

FTE's

FY 2015 Actual

FY 2014 Actual

98 $3,322,8 22,610 188,984 92 $3,534,4

79 $3,176,3 21,443 71,792 14 $3,269,6

Total

tor l Prosecu Municipa

6 $607,62 225,159 189,724 532 41 $1,023,0 5.75

30

$1,060,5

70 $1,325,7 1 1,837,31

01 $3,624,5 25,000 85,000 01 $3,734,5

97 $1,526,1 8 2,096,03 112,266 01 $3,734,5

N ew In

it

nses:

n

s iative

p

City of Coral Springs, Florida

0.0%

0.00 ge from % Chan dget FY16 Bu

ge from $ Chan dget FY16 Bu

6.62% 0.00% 47.06% 7.50%

5 0

$239,95

56 $3,864,4 25,000 125,000 56 4,4 $4,01

nt) Ris ees in all 5 ary Expe Equivale Div. 60 01 221,602 tant (2) committ cial duties. ission 1,812,37 m Summ sation nd v. 88 01 ll-Tim e ve Assis ) Comm 83 offi Progra we r Fu nce Fu nd Di Es (Fu er ** Executi (163,168 Compen an d Se er of FT to their $3,384,6 s for City ura es Partn / Nu mb ; 25 % Wa ter General Ins Workers' 37 al service ents. Resourc mber) * 02 9 ide leg $2,709,7 00 ; 50 ion Nu Human Div. 25 Property $136,59 • Prov erating departm rdinate nt/ Divis Ci ty Attorn ey urces Di v. 10 bo me su d 1 y so (D ep art split 75% and op Casualt 35,662 man Re 1,018,87 ission an n $1 Hu m itio % m os 1 *P lit 50 7 City Co Total 2,579,03 ition sp 570,521 $108,97 **Pos ntracts • At tend meetings. 01 gory ions, co 78,500 out By Cate lut 589,290 th $3,734,5 2,6 n. y so wi ar agency re hio s. ce s, fas ce Summ mplian 11,470 dinance ts in a timely co ,384,683 ordinan or 2,0 ct $3 l 50 ra na are d nt 2.50 an en Perso • Prep sure co lutions docum en ,709,737 r so to $2 he re fits e 0 ot 1.50 Bene and ly 10 e fram penses oximate or test tim Other Ex 1.50 are appr in the sh • Prep ts with Total reemen ses. s and ag and lea cts contract ntracts, Contra co are E's ts, ep FT ors reemen w and pr e. Indic at ly 20 0 ag • Revie inconvenienc oximate rmance vendor w appr Perfo or revie ion : Key KPI are and/ Prosecut • Prep reca rd olation tion. Vi l co ga S pa liti request unici handle  workdays of  ty. n and M ters and of the Ci Goals ation within 10 Litigatio behalf tory mat On  Preparation of Legisl tu on t sta rial ur co e on ackup mate Scorecard r 100  by b Federal ied   (Pe • Advis Tar d ries pan an accom On   the job inju rnment . ar in State risk. s lost from on get sible City Gove inquiries • Appe limiting Tar Respon Number of day staff. citizen ches to ond to dates to approa • Resp vered ployees) get entive legal up eco em ent ev rs r On  ing pr rnm olla t inu igible d ty Gove abou at ters. ent cont Responsible Ci  subrogation el • Bring ative m and pres Ac t. City Attorney Tar Percentage of dministr rfeiture cipate in ent ment/a get and Fo • Parti ty Governm employ sualt y) e Ci On  Contrab in sibl Ca a d pon ate rid Res cip er ty an the Flo • Parti Tar year. ion, Prop enforce pensat current fiscal rkers’ essively rs’ Com • Aggr s for wo quarter of the ty (Worke as of the 3rd program y, and proper nce Fund urance * Results are lit l Insura City ’s ins l, vehicle liabi in Genera ta main siona ster and ation , profes Admini ation, general Organiz ns forming compe . gh-Per ative, Hi ce ngoing) rages. insuran An Innov rsion (o ce cove ve Di an r ur s. s. im im eano ure ins to all cla ation cla Misdem gs, • Proc spond mpens meetin rkers’ co w and re mmittee s all wo • Revie ation Co mittee. proces fet y Evalu ive and e Com ilitate Sa cidents to th • Rece fac d an and ac dinate idents • Coor ng all inc reporti . t policies ement agemen manag k Risk Man ris ty ’s inister Ci • Adm

2.38% 2.86% 0.06% 4.14% 2.06%

$14,468 6,431 106 22 $21,027

4 $622,09 231,590 189,830 554 68 $1,044,0 5.75

FY 2017 Budget

FY 2016 Budget

2.06% 2.06%

$21,027 $21,027

68 $1,044,0 68 $1,044,0

41 $1,023,0 41 $1,023,0

0.00% 0.00%

$0 $0

$30,000 $30,000

$30,000 $30,000

$29,035 $29,035

$18,453 $18,453

0 $507,07 183,104 178,498 500 2 $869,17 6.00

nd ance Fu l Insur Genera : es Revenu s Transfer ome Inc Interest ries Recove

orney City Att Deputy Assistan

FY2018 Goal

torney City At es: Revenu torney City At l ta To itures: ary Expend m Summ Progra torney City At Total ry Catego ary By Summ l Persona Benefits nses pe Other Ex n Litigatio Total

FY 2016 Budget

FY 2015 Actual

FY 2014 Actual

ge from % Chan dget FY16 Bu

ge from $ Chan dget FY16 Bu

FY 2017 Budget

40,000 5 $279,95

10.56% 1.66% 74.97% 7.50%

0 $161,10 34,694 84,161 5 $279,95

97 $1,687,2 2 2,130,73 196,427 56 $4,014,4 4 $130,22 0 1,034,94 2 2,849,29 56 $4,014,4

($6,375) 16,069 270,261 5 $279,95

-4.67% 1.58% 10.48% 7.50% 0.0%

0.00

2.50

020   FY2020  FY2 019  FY2019 ual   FY2018  FY2 Target Act 017 FY2018 ual Target Actual FY2017 FY2 Act get Tar Measure  get Actual % 99% Tar 100 e 99% Typ % 99% 100 99% 99% 49 Effectiveness 49 14 51 49 49 47% Effectiveness 47% 64% 68% 47% eness 47%

q

Effectiv

157


Department Budgets City Attorney

City Attorney

CITY ATTORNEY Mission

To provide effective and timely legal representation and advice to the City Commission and City ney administration. This office zealously represents the City in legal controversies and is committed Priority: An Innovative, High-Performing to implementing the City Commission’s policy of minimizing exposures and potential liability. ment Type: Effectiveness FY2015 FY2016 FY2017 Core Processes and Outputs Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Actual tion of Legislation (resolutions, ordinance, Research and Counsel when accompanied hin 10 workdays of request 99% 99% 99% 99% 99% 99% material• Represent the City Commission, City administration, and all assigned boards and committees of days lost from on the jobpertaining injuries per 100official duties. in all matters of law to their 49 37 49 95.85 49 51 • Provide legal services for City Commission and operating departments. 47% 52% 47% 66% 47% 68% age of subrogation eligible dollars recovered • Attend City Commission and subordinate agency meetings. • Prepare ordinances, resolutions, contracts and other documents in a City Attorney’s Office timely fashion. • Prepare approximately 100 resolutions and 50 ordinances. Contracts • Review and prepare contracts and agreements within the shortest time frame to ensure contract compliance without vendor inconvenience. • Prepare and/or review approximately 200 agreements, contracts, and leases. Litigation and Municipal Violation Prosecution • Advise on statutory matters and handle litigation. • Appear in State and Federal court on behalf of the City. • Respond to citizen inquiries. • Bring about preventive approaches to limiting risk. • Participate in and present continuing legal updates to staff. • Participate in employment/administrative matters. • Aggressively enforce the Florida Contraband Forfeiture Act.

New Initiatives Responsible City Government • Cyber Security Insurance

General Insurance Fund (Workers’ Compensation, Property and Casualty) Administer and maintain City’s insurance programs for workers’ compensation, general, professional, vehicle liability, and property insurance. • Procure insurance coverages. • Review and respond to all claims. • Receive and process all workers’ compensation claims. • Coordinate and facilitate Safety Evaluation Committee meetings, reporting all incidents and accidents to the Committee. Risk Management • Administer City’s risk management policies.

158

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

FY20 Go

99%

49

47%


Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category

FY 2017 Actuals

City Attorney Revenues: City Attorney Total Expenditures: Program Summary City Attorney Total Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Litigation Capital Total

FY 2018 Actuals

Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Total FTE's

$ Change from FY19 Budget

% Change from FY19 Budget

$29,298 $29,298

$30,000 $30,000

$30,000 $30,000

$0 $0

0.00% 0.00%

$1,055,461 $1,055,461

$1,073,204 $1,073,204

$1,144,891 $1,144,891

$1,219,261 $1,219,261

$74,370 $74,370

6.50% 6.50%

$668,552 233,633 149,296 3,980

$706,846 237,533 97,466 2,538

$704,537 243,867 195,933 554

$764,041 254,815 199,851 554

$1,055,461

$1,044,383

$1,144,891

$1,219,261

$59,504 $10,948 $3,918 $0 $0 $74,370

8.45% 4.49% 2.00% 0.00% n/a 6.50%

5.75

5.75

5.75

5.75

0.00

0.0%

FY 2017 Actuals

Expenses: Program Summary Workers' Compensation Property Casualty Total

FY 2020 Budget

$28,413 $28,413

FTE's

General Insurance Fund Revenues: Transfers Interest Income Recoveries Total

FY 2019 Budget

FY 2018 Actuals

FY 2019 Budget

FY 2020 Budget

$ Change from FY19 Budget

% Change from FY19 Budget

$3,864,457 41,952 232,648 $4,139,057

$4,282,770 67,940 249,638 $4,600,348

$4,670,515 25,000 140,000 $4,835,515

$5,087,784 1,405,352 140,000 $6,633,136

$417,269 $1,380,352 $0 $1,797,621

8.93% 5521.41% 0.00% 37.18%

$1,576,992 2,037,027 224,836 $3,838,855

$1,778,868 2,109,194 334,227 $4,222,289

$2,007,459 2,529,903 298,153 $4,835,515

$2,092,563 3,181,743 296,478 $5,570,784

$85,104 $651,840 ($1,675) $735,269

4.24% 25.77% -0.56% 15.21%

$127,190 937,347 2,774,318

$131,200 1,079,379 3,011,710

$134,485 1,153,323 3,547,707

$160,201 1,191,449 4,219,134

$3,838,855

$4,222,289

$4,835,515

$5,570,784

$25,716 $38,126 $671,427 $0 $735,269

19.12% 3.31% 18.93% n/a 15.21%

2.50

2.50

2.50

2.50

0.00

0.0%

Scorecard: Key Performance Indicators Scorecard

City Attorney

Goals

KPI

On Tar Responsible City Government get On 

On Preparation of Legislation within 10 workdays of request  Tar accompanied by backup material get Number of days lost from on the job injuries (Per 100  employees)

Tar Responsible City Government get On  Responsible City Government Tar

Percentage of subrogation eligible dollars recovered

Measure Type

FY2017 FY2017 FY2018 FY2018  FY2019  FY2019  FY2020  FY2020  Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual

Effectiveness

99%

99%

99%

100%

99%

100%

Effectiveness

49

51

49

14

49

49

Effectiveness

47%

68%

47%

64%

47%

47%

99%

* Results are as of the 3rd quarter of the current fiscal year.

Reference Key On target/Above target Within 5% of target/At risk of not meeting target Did not meet Goal/At Risk of not meeting Goal  Discussion Needed No update available at this time

City of Coral Springs, Florida

159


City Commission

City Commission

CITY COMMISSION Mission To create the Premier Community by providing Customer Driven, Exceptional City Services in a Financially Responsible Manner while Engaging Our Community.

City Commission

Responsible City Government – Financially sound city providing exceptional services

City Commission 6 (0100) 1

City investment in today and future – Upgraded city infrastructure, facilities and parks

Executive Asssistant to the City Commission

Downtown becoming vibrant - Creating a sense of place and a destination Growing local economy – increased business investment and jobs

1

Mayor (0100) 0

Vice-Mayor 1 (0100) 0

Commissioner 3 (0100) 0

Left Number = Number of Positions Right Number = Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent) Center Number = Department/Division Number

Premier community in South Florida – the place for families to live in great neighborhoods

Left Number = Number of Positions Right Number = Number of FTE's (Full-Time Equivalent) Center Number = Department/Division Number

Core Processes • Provide policy direction for City operations.

• Promote public participation in government through regular and special City Commission meetings, public hearings and workshops. • Encourage partnerships with the private and nonprofit sectors to resolve local issues.

Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category

City Commission Expenditures: Program Summary City Commission Total Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Total FTE's

FY 2017 Actuals

FY 2018 Actuals

FY 2019 Budget

FY 2020 Budget

$ Change from FY19 Budget

% Change from FY19 Budget

$332,801 $332,801

$343,834 $343,834

$374,914 $374,914

$381,247 $381,247

$6,333 $6,333

1.69% 1.69%

$134,958 118,489 79,354 $332,801

$138,242 115,331 90,261 $343,834

$142,345 115,145 117,424 $374,914

$144,942 115,631 120,674 $381,247

$2,597 $486 $3,250 $6,333

1.82% 0.42% 2.77% 1.69%

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

0.00

0.0%

(Department/Division Number) / Number of (a)Position split 50% City Manager's Office (b)Position split 91% CRA Div. 3200; 0.09%

160

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


City Manager’s Office

City Manager’s Office

CITY managers office Mission To provide support and systems that empower City departments to anticipate and meet customer expectations and carry out City Commission policy initiatives.

Core Processes and Outputs City Manager’s Office Organize and mobilize City departments to address the five Strategic Goals established by the City Commission. • Complete strategic activities for the City Commission’s five Strategic Goals. • Provide overall management of all City operations in a way that empowers employees to exceed customer expectations. • Provide effective communication between the City Commission, staff, residents and other customers. • Continue to attract quality businesses to the City of Coral Springs.

City Manager’s Office

FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent) Div. 0501; 50% Water and Sewer Fund Div. 6001 % Economic Development Div. 0502

City of Coral Springs, Florida

161


City Manager’s Office (continued) Budget and Strategy Monitor City’s financial condition and provide financial strategies to ensure fiscal solvency. • Monitor the budget through monthly financial reports.

New Initiatives Responsible City Government • Hiring of PT Grant Coordinator

Prepare Strategic Plan, annual Business Plan, Annual Budget document, and Capital Improvement Program.

• Grant Research and Management Software

• Produce the City’s Business Plan, Budget document and Capital Improvement Program.

• City Security Improvements

• Process Strategic Plan including the Environmental Scan, the SWOC Analysis and the Strategic Planning Workshop Presentation. • Maintain Performance Management System. • Aggressively seek grants on behalf of the City and oversee administration of grant funding. • Collaborate with Police and Fire pension boards, Charter School Advisory Committee, Financial Advisory Committee, and other committees. Communications and Marketing Communicate public information in an effective, creative manner. • Publish three editions of Coral Springs magazine, Annual State of the City Report, and other informational publications. • Provide writing, design, photography and other graphic services for print, digital and video formats. • Provide multimedia, video and photographic support, and produce public service announcements and programming for use by the broadcast media. • Develop and manage the City’s social media accounts and websites, including coralsprings.org and playcoralsprings.org. • Produce programming and manage the City’s TV station, Channel 25. • Provide City PIO function and manages media relations. • Produce programming and schedule the City’s radio station, 1670 AM. • Manage the concept, creation, planning and execution of Downtown Coral Springs events. City Clerk Serve as “Secretary” of the City. • Oversee City Commission agenda process which includes creation of bimonthly agendas, coordination of over 500 agenda memoranda, duplication and distribution of agenda material to interested parties, and continue to encourage the City’s “paperless agenda” environment. • Inform citizenry of public hearings by advertising pursuant to Florida law. Provide public notice for approximately 350 public meetings annually. • Manage codification and distribution to subscribers of the Municipal Code, both the general volume and Land Development Code. • Attend and prepare minute summaries for advisory boards and committees Serve as the City’s records custodian by preserving the integrity of the City’s official records, which encompasses business transactions, law and policy making, and property matters. • Maintain a historical database of over five million document images Citywide from 1963 to the present and respond to public records requests.

162

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

• Federal Lobbyist • Hiring of Grant Consultant (Ongoing) • Open Smart City- Strategic Planning Online Platform (Ongoing) • Linkedin Learning Subscriptions (Ongoing) • Innovation Incentive Recognition Program (Ongoing)

Downtown Becoming Vibrant

• Implementation of Economic Development Customer Relationship Management (CRM) System • Form Village Square Plan with Developer • Infrastructure Improvements in Downtown • Cont. City Outreach on Business Retention, Expansion & Attraction • Develop Retail Strategy • Development Agreement for the Cornerstone Project (Ongoing) - With CRA • Innovate Downtown (Ongoing) - With CRA

Growing Local Economy

• Retention of Marketing Firm (Ongoing) • Economic Development Strategic Plan Implementation (Ongoing) • Venture Lab and/or co-working space downtown (Ongoing) • Quarterly Economic Development Reports (Ongoing) • Corporate Park Improvements (Ongoing) • Economic Development Marketing and Branding (Ongoing) • Coral Springs Regional Chamber Business Academy (Ongoing)

Premier Community in South Florida • Emergency Operations Center Upgrades


• Maintain a database of public meetings via audio tapes, CD-ROMs and summaries of the meeting proceedings, and respond to more than 1,500 customer requests for information annually. • Provide for records disposal to the fullest extent permissible by Florida law, and the cost effective, legal maintenance of permanent records for all City departments. Serve as the director of municipal elections as required by the City Charter and Florida Statutes. Economic Development Promote absorption of existing vacant commercial, industrial and retail space by continuing to maintain and develop relationships with the top real estate experts in Broward County. Set the stage for new development as well as redevelopment while the economy improves and our proactive approach sparks opportunities in selected target industry sectors. • Implement Economic Development Strategic Plan. • Inventory industrial, commercial and retail properties in the City (owner-occupied/lease rates/comparison) • Market city on local, regional, state and national level through marketing and branding (explore retaining marketing firm) • Assist, support, and grow businesses in Coral Springs. • Continue to increase local property values through key tenant improvement projects. • Maximize the potential of the Coral Springs Corporate Park. • Maintain a competitive business environment. • Attract high-value industries and businesses. • Implement Downtown infrastructure improvements on the City Center Planning as catalysts for Downtown Redevelopment. Emergency Management To reduce the loss of life, property and protect our residents. • Develop policies, procedures and plans necessary to direct the emergency management functions of the City of Coral Springs. • Coordinate exercises and trainings aimed at preparing the City for a wider variety of hazardous events. • Establish partnerships with local businesses by focusing on business continuity and resilience planning. • Identify process improvements, grant opportunities, and implement processes to improve financial tracking, management, and responsible budgeting practices.

Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category City Manager's Office Revenues: City Clerk Total

FY 2017 Actuals

FY 2018 Actuals

FY 2019 Budget

FY 2020 Budget

$ Change from FY19 Budget

% Change from FY19 Budget

$8,400 $8,400

$17,700 $17,700

$22,235 $22,235

$18,015 $18,015

($4,220) ($4,220)

-18.98% -18.98%

Expenditures: Program Summary Administration Economic Development Management & Budget Office Communications & Marketing CRA City Clerk Emergency Management Total

$1,417,883 265,839 686,000 1,145,699 0 712,225 98,197 $4,325,843

$1,150,034 281,485 694,496 1,243,351 86,655 765,349 112,831 $4,334,201

$1,094,120 580,909 836,286 1,311,909 85,061 805,831 119,162 $4,833,278

$1,293,684 677,658 955,258 1,505,182 0 899,203 231,883 $5,562,868

$199,564 $96,749 $118,972 $193,273 ($85,061) $93,372 $112,721 $729,590

18.24% 16.65% 14.23% 14.73% -100.00% 11.59% 94.59% 15.10%

Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Total

$2,571,110 889,090 753,764 1,679 $4,215,643

$2,441,133 850,429 812,199 1,577 $4,105,338

2,759,729.00 918,741 1,154,808 0 4,833,278

3,246,079.00 1,067,882 1,246,457 2,450 5,562,868.00

486,350.00 149,141.00 91,649.00 2,450.00 729,590

17.62% 16.23% 7.94% n/a 15.10%

26.50

27.50

25.50

25.50

0.00

0.0%

FTE's

City of Coral Springs, Florida

163


Scorecards: Key Performance Indicators Scorecard On Tar City Manager's  get Office On  Tar get On  Tar get On  Tar get On  Tar get On  Tar Budget &  get Strategy On  Tar get On  Tar get On  Tar get On  Tar get On  Tar get On  Tar Communications  get & Marketing On  Tar get On  Tar get On  Tar get On  City Clerk's Office Tar get On  Tar get

Goals

On Premier Community in South Florida Tar Coral Springs Charter School graduation rate get

Measure Type Effectiveness

95%

99%

95%

99%

95%

100%

95%

Number of employees using LinkedIn Learning (New  beginning FY2020)

Responsible City Government

Internal customer satisfaction rating

Effectiveness

95%

96%

95%

97%

98%

Facilitate or support cross‐functional process  improvement teams # per year

Effectiveness

2

3

2

5

2

4

2%

Grant measures (New beginning FY2018): Grant  Applications Submitted

Effectiveness

39

20

32

21

33

21

Grant measures (New beginning FY2018): Grants  Awarded

Effectiveness

9

11

12

11

12

11

Grant measures (New beginning FY2018): Active  Grants worked during FY

Effectiveness

63

40

53

40

40

40

Receive the GFOA Distinguished Budget  Presentation award

Effectiveness

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Payroll regular salaries adopted budget versus  actual, net of policy changes

Efficiency

2%

0%

2%

2%

2%

Produce monthly financial statements within seven  business days of period close

Efficiency

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Customer satisfaction with communications  (Internal Survey)

Effectiveness

95%

98%

95%

98%

95%

Awareness of Coral Springs magazine by new  residents (Res. Survey)

Effectiveness

85%

87%

85%

87%

85%

Number of PIO engagements with local & national  media (New beginning FY2020)

Effectiveness

9,300

17,161

New promotional/informational campaigns  produced (Social media and City TV)

Effectiveness

60

99

Responsible City Government

Responsible City Government

Responsible City Government

Responsible City Government

Responsible City Government

Responsible City Government

Responsible City Government

On Tar get On  Tar get On  Tar get On  Tar get On  Tar get On  Tar get On  Tar get

Responsible City Government

Responsible City Government

Responsible City Government

Responsible City Government

Responsible City Government

Ca uti on Ca uti on On Tar get On  Tar get

Timely disposal of eligible paper records

Demand

Yes

Yes

95%

84%

85%

50

Efficiency

320

453

360

Effectiveness

Yes

Responsible City Government

Present at all scheduled Onboarding sessions on the  Effectiveness topic of public records (NEW for FY2020)

Responsible City Government

2%

60

Host an annual training session for public record  liaisons (Revised for FY2019)

Responsible City Government

98%

62

Responsible City Government

Community Outreach Events (New beginning  FY2020) Enrollment in "Alert Coral Springs" (New beginning  FY2020) Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Usage (New  beginning FY2020)

300

60

60

89

Yes

Yes

Effectiveness

10

Effectiveness

2000

Effectiveness

20

* Results are as of the 3rd quarter of the current fiscal year.

Reference Key On target/Above target Within 5% of target/At risk of not meeting target Did not meet Goal/At Risk of not meeting Goal  Discussion Needed No update available at this time

164

FY2017 FY2017 FY2018 FY2018  FY2019  FY2019  FY2020  FY2020  Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual

Responsible City Government

Responsible City Government Emergency  Management

KPI

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Development Services

Development Services

development services Mission Promotes safety, livability and economic growth for our residential and business communities through collaboration and efficiency.

Core Processes and Outputs Community Development Provide technically-sound, professional recommendations to the City Commission, Boards/ Committees, and customers to facilitate land development actions citywide. • Maintain the City’s recertification of its Comprehensive Plan. • Maintain department customer satisfaction rating at 95% Coordinate and implement innovative neighborhood revitalization and enhancement efforts through continued interaction with residents and other government agencies. • Conduct in-person and virtual Slice of the Springs meetings and ensure 95% of attendees find the neighborhood meetings productive. • Collaborate on 10 neighborhood partnerships (formal and informal). Responsibly implement local state and federal regulations (CDBG, HOME, SHIP opportunities). • Screen applicants for home repair programs resulting in 20 grants being awarded each year.

Development Services

City of Coral Springs, Florida

165


Development Services (continued) Assist the public (residential and commercial) with general zoning information and aesthetic issues. • Maintain cycle time for new DRC plan reviews at 8 days by the Zoning Division. • Conduct 1,500 zoning inspections. • Maintain cycle time for sign permits and small permits at two days by the Zoning Division. • Continue to process designer and monument signs in two days to increase the aesthetic appeal while staying business­ focused. • Continue to provide accurate plan review to ensure compliance with land development regulations and architectural design guidelines in order to encourage an attractive and quality aesthetically pleasing community. • Administratively review 50 Development Review Committee and Architectural Review Committee projects. • Process 15 petitions for various land development actions, including newly established Administrative Zoning Review Committee. • Process 800 paint approval forms. • Census 2020 -Provide demographic information, act as liaison to Broward County Committees and establish a Complete Count Committee. Manage and improve the sustainability of the City’s urban forest through the Neighborhood and Environmental Committee, regular inspections, exotic species removal, general preventive maintenance, and environmental monitoring. Provide dedicated technical support to various City departments, including the Community Redevelopment Agency effort in conjunction with Downtown Coral Springs. Research and apply for various grants that support department objectives and improve mobility and connectivity within the City. Oversee operations of the Coral Springs Museum of Art and the Public Art Program to collaborate and create innovative artwork and programming. Utilize TRAKiT, particularly ProjectTRAK, to provide exceptional customer service. Building Process building permits with exceptional customer service, to ensure compliance with the Florida Building Code. • Continue to serve our walk-in customers via our innovative and convenient One Stop Shop. • Provide responsible plan reviews in 15 business days or less, 90% of the time. • Provide plan reviews and issue approximately 10,000 building permits. • Conduct approximately 25,000 building inspections. • Process 15,000 contractor license insurance information requests. • Conduct Pre-Construction/Pre-Submittal meetings for all large development projects to ensure they meet scheduled completion time. • Complete requested inspections within one day 95% of the time. • Process approximately 3,000 open permit search requests within three business days. • Process 1,000 record requests within 5 days 90% of the time. • Issue 10,000 notification postcards indicating approval to permit holders and property owners. • Respond to 45,000 incoming calls for Building Division via the dedicated Customer Call Center. • Utilize PermitTRAK and other innovative forms of technology, including improved on line services, to provide exceptional customer service. • Process approximately 200 building code cases • Process 40 Year Certifications as required by Broward County.

166

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Development Services (continued) Code Compliance Provide exceptional service to internal and external customer requests, questions, emergencies, and complaints seven days a week. Utilize TRAKiT, particularly Code and LicenseTRAK, to provide exceptional customer service.

New Initiatives Responsible City Government

• Census 2020 Outreach - With Comm. & Marketing

Engage and educate the public on the City’s Code of Ordinances in order to achieve compliance with the code to preserve and enhance aesthetics and ensure safety citywide.

• Virtual Slice of the Springs Meeting (Ongoing) - With Comm. & Marketing

• Deliver consistent information on City codes and ordinances.

• CDBG Action Plan (Ongoing)

• Coordinate and implement innovative programs on code compliance issues in conjunction with other agencies and departments. • Administer registration and inspection programs for properties to enhance property values and neighborhood safety. • Provide friendly and accurate service within the newly established One Stop Shop. • Provide training to staff and volunteers to allow them to maintain a consistent high level of service. This training will enable the entire staff to stay up-to-date with industry best practices. Promote voluntary compliance through collaboration with property owners, property managers/associations, residents, business owners, and neighborhoods.

City Investment in Today and Future • Traffic Management (Ongoing) - With PW

Downtown Becoming Vibrant • Design Guildelines for Downtown (Ongoing) - With CRA

Premier Community in South Florida • Educational Guides for Residents and Businesses • Historic Preservation (Ongoing)

• Responsibly perform over 25,000 business and property inspections. • Identify and provide creative options for challenging properties, such as outreach for Home Repair, NPP Support business development in the City by educating business owners and outside agencies on various regulations and coordinating options based on their needs. • Process new Business Tax applications within 7 business days, 85% of the time Process the following: •

3,500 Lien inquiries.

3,500 Public Stuff inquiries

6,000 Business Tax receipts

6,500 Landlord Registrations

100 Public Records requests per year

5,000 One Stop Shop customers

8,000 phone calls received in the Call Center

Collect 7,000 Temporary Signs

City of Coral Springs, Florida

167


Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category Development Services Revenues: Community Development Building Code Compliance* Engineering Total

FY 2017 Actuals

FY 2018 Actuals

$137,976 3,960,013 5,820,284

FY 2019 Budget

FY 2020 Budget

$105,000 2,984,836 3,223,795

$120,000 3,102,915 2,569,695

$9,918,273

$217,980 3,383,018 4,249,359 0 $7,850,357

$6,313,631

$538,295 1,096,960

$559,181 1,169,861

2,686,257 1,930,105 $6,251,617

$ Change from FY19 Budget

% Change from FY19 Budget

$5,792,610

$15,000 118,079 ($654,100) 0 ($521,021)

14.29% 3.96% -20.29% n/a -8.25%

$581,236 1,323,304

$587,888 1,417,310

$6,652 $94,006

1.14% 7.10%

2,710,251 1,925,500 $6,364,793

2,923,237 2,284,161 $7,111,938

2,922,010 2,216,916 $7,144,124

($1,227) ($67,245) $32,186

-0.04% -2.94% 0.45%

$3,866,739 1,763,231 610,745 5,911 4,991

$3,883,493 1,786,230 686,669 0 8,401

$4,418,282 1,863,045 812,634 1,300 16,677

$4,490,235 1,829,939 805,973 1,300 16,677

$6,251,617

$6,364,793

$7,111,938

$7,144,124

$71,953 ($33,106) ($6,661) $0 $0 $0 $32,186

1.63% -1.78% -0.82% 0.00% 0.00% n/a 0.45%

66.00

68.00

68.00

65.00

(3.00)

-4.4%

*Includes Business Tax revenue Expenditures: Program Summary Development Services Community Development Building Code Compliance Total Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Grants and Aids Interfund Transfers Total FTE's

168

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Scorecard: Key Performance Indicators Scorecard

Goals On Responsible City Government Tar On  Tar Responsible City Government get Cau Growing Local Economy tion

Development Services

Measure Type

KPI

On Department customer satisfaction rating (Composite) Tar Traffic to the Building Division's interactive online map  (New beginning FY2020) Bel Cycle time for small permits by the Zoning Division (Building  ow  Plan Review) (Days) Pla On  Cycle time for sign permits by the Zoning Division (Building  Cau Growing Local Economy Tar tion Plan Review) (Days) get Cau Cau Cycle time for plan reviews (new and major/minor) by the  Growing Local Economy tion tion Zoning Division (Development Review Committee) (Days) On  Avg. number of days from the receipt of the resident's  Cau Growing Local Economy Tar tion application for rehabilitation assistance to  approval get On  Bel Timeliness ratio of CDBG spending: annual CDBG allocation  Tar Premier Community in South Florida ow  available by July 31 get Pla On  On  Number of trees planted within the City Premier Community in South Florida Tar Tar On  On  Number of formal and informal neighborhood partnerships  Tar Premier Community in South Florida Tar each year get get On  QTRAC Data (12 Minute wait times) (New beginning  Cau Growing Local Economy Tar tion FY2019) get On  "Building" Records Requests within 10 business days (New  Cau Growing Local Economy Tar tion beginning FY2019) get Cau On  Requested inspections completed within one day Growing Local Economy tion Tar On  Cau Growing Local Economy Tar Percent of plan reviews completed within 15 working days tion get Cau Cau Percent of code cases brought into voluntary compliance  Growing Local Economy tion tion prior to administrative/judicial process Cau Growing Local Economy tion Cau Growing Local Economy tion

* Results are as of the 3rd quarter of the current fiscal year.

Cau tion On Tar get

Effectiveness

FY2017 FY2017 FY2018 FY2018  FY2019  FY2019  FY2020  FY2020  Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual 95%

98%

95%

96%

95%

99%

Demand

95%    1,500

Effectiveness

2

2

2

2

2

1.96

2

Effectiveness

2

2

2

1

2

1.47

2

Effectiveness

8

8

8

8

8

8.33

8

Effectiveness

45

38

45

30

45

38.33

45

Efficiency

1.50

1.48

1.50

1.38

1.50

2.10

2

Effectiveness

1,000

3,195

1,000

2,365

1,000

2,570

   1,000

Effectiveness

10

4

10

6

10

6

10

Effectiveness

30

9.22

12

Effectiveness

90%

96%

90%

Effectiveness

95%

100%

95%

100%

95%

100%

95%

Effectiveness

90%

96%

90%

89%

90%

96%

90%

Effectiveness

75%

80%

75%

81%

75%

62%

75%

Percent of respondents satisfied with City efforts at  Effectiveness maintaining the quality of their neighborhoods (Res. Survey)

84%

85%

84%

85%

85%

82%

85%

Percent of survey respondents satisfied with the City's  efforts to support quality neighborhoods (Biz Survey)

87%

95%

87%

94%

87%

94%

87%

Effectiveness

Reference Key On target/Above target Within 5% of target/At risk of not meeting target Did not meet Goal/At Risk of not meeting Goal  Discussion Needed No update available at this time

City of Coral Springs, Florida

169


Financial Services

Financial Services

financial services Mission Financial Services To preserve the City’s strong financial condition by creating responsible financial strategies, effectively managing the City’s resources, and providing analysis and recommendations that ensure optimal economic outcomes. Center for the Arts To provide a diverse schedule of programming for all residents, reduce the deficit of the venue, and deliver high quality customer service to all.

Core Processes and Outputs Financial Services Provide financial policy, cash management, debt management, accounting, payroll, accounts payable, purchasing, central stores, and utility billing for the City. • Produce the City’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report. • Process over 9,000 accounts payable checks and prepare over 30,000 payroll checks. • Reconcile and track over 40 different funds. • Process over 2,500 purchase orders. • Purchase over $32 million in goods and services. • Refinance and restructure City’s outstanding debt. Monitor City’s financial condition and provide financial strategies to ensure fiscal solvency. Maintain all water and wastewater customer accounts. • Process over 150,000 utility bills including standby.

Financial Services Director of Financial Services* (1501) / 2.25 (a) Senior Office Assistant (1501)

Assistant Director Financial Services (1501) / 0.50 (b)

Accounting Services (1601) / 8

Senior Accountant (3) Payroll Coordinator (2) Senior Accounting Assistant Accountant (2)

Assistant Director Financial Services (1701)

Revenue & Collection (1602) / 6

Water Billing Representative (3) Accounting Assistant Billing Operations Technician Team Leader/Supervisor

Administration (1701) / 6

Purchasing Agent II (3) Purchasing Agent Contract Administrator Coordinator Project Support Specialist Central Stores (1702) / 4

(Department/ Division Number) / Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent) (a)Position split 75% Financial Services Adm. Div. 1501; 25% Water and Sewer Fund Div. 6001 (b)Position split 50% Financial Services Adm. Div. 1501; 50% Water and Sewer Fund Div. 6001

170

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

Warehouse Supervisor Purchasing Assistant (2) Assistant Central Stores Coordinator


Financial Services (continued) Center for the Arts

New Initiatives

Coordinate event management and production. Program national tours. Provide theater and meeting room rentals.

Premier Community in South Florida

• Host 365 meetings.

• FEMA Appeals Consultant (ongoing)

• Accommodate over 122,000 theater attendants. Facilitate Museum exhibitions, programming, and events. • Museum hosts 105 events and 190 classes. • Accommodate over 35,000 museum attendees. Box Office services. Catering services and concessions.

Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category Financial Services Revenues: Revenue and Collection/ Lien Search Purchasing Total Expenditures: Program Summary Administration Museum Accounting Utility Billing Sub-Total Purchasing Administration Central Stores Sub-Total

FY 2017 Actuals

FY 2018 Actuals

FY 2019 Budget

FY 2020 Budget

$297,300

$285,140

$300,000

$300,000

$297,300

$285,140

$300,000

$300,000

$452,931

$496,791

$493,689

638,017 555,136 $1,646,084

$376,523 0 710,497 612,193 $1,699,213

782,968 653,496 $1,933,255

$516,576 311,793 $828,369

$625,966 408,861 $1,034,827

$680,545 331,853 $1,012,398

$ Change from FY19 Budget

% Change from FY19 Budget

$0 0 $0

0.00% n/a 0.00%

792,985 649,328 $1,936,002

($3,102) $0 $10,017 ($4,168) $2,747

-0.62% n/a 1.28% -0.64% 0.14%

$719,354 334,440 $1,053,794

$38,809 $2,587 $41,396

5.70% 0.78% 4.09%

Total

$2,474,453

$2,734,040

$2,945,653

$2,989,796

$44,143

1.50%

Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Total

$1,521,170 662,901 289,788 594 $2,474,453

$1,659,733 702,019 368,770 3,518 $2,734,040

$1,850,535 726,262 366,656 2,200 $2,945,653

$1,902,367 728,463 356,766 2,200 $2,989,796

$51,832 $2,201 ($9,890) $0 $44,143

2.80% 0.30% -2.70% 0.00% 1.50%

24.25

26.25

26.25

26.25

0.00

0.0%

FTE's

City of Coral Springs, Florida

171


Scorecard: Key Performance Indicators Scorecard

Goals On Tar Responsible City Government get On 

Financial Services

Tar Responsible City Government get On  Tar Responsible City Government get On 

Tar Responsible City Government get On  Tar Responsible City Government get On  Responsible City Government Tar On  Responsible City Government Tar * Results are as of the 3rd quarter of the current fiscal year.

Measure Type

KPI On Internal customer satisfaction rating (Financial Services  Tar Internal Survey) get Bel Percentage of purchase requisitions under $10,000  ow  processed within 24 hours Pla On  Receive the GFOA Certificate of Achievement for Excellence  Tar in Financial Reporting award get On  Water billings past due more than 180 days as percentage  Tar of outstanding bills get On  Number of repeat items in management letters prepared  Tar by the City's external auditors get Cau Percentage of invoices paid within 30 days tion On  Out of stock level of the total inventory at Central Stores Tar

Effectiveness

94%

98%

94%

98%

94%

Effectiveness

88%

80%

88%

85%

88%

Effectiveness

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Effectiveness

3%

1%

3%

1%

3%

94%

82.59%

85% Yes

0.81%

3%

Effectiveness

0

0

0

0

0

0

0%

Effectiveness

90%

96%

90%

94%

95%

94%

95%

Efficiency

2.50%

1.30%

2.50%

1%

2.50%

0.82%

2.50%

Reference Key On target/Above target Within 5% of target/At risk of not meeting target Did not meet Goal/At Risk of not meeting Goal  Discussion Needed No update available at this time

172

FY2017 FY2017 FY2018 FY2018  FY2019  FY2019  FY2020  FY2020  Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Fire/EMS

Fire/EMS

fire/ems Mission To preserve life and property through emergency medical services, fire suppression, community risk reduction, public education, and community partnerships.

Core Processes and Outputs Administration Manage and administer the fire department’s budget, policies, and procedures while providing department-wide leadership and direction. Responsible for the direction and development of approximately 400 members of the organization. • Personnel include nine full-time fire administrative staff, 147 shift personnel, five fire academy administrative staff, 10 full-time fire community risk reduction staff, 100 emergency service instructors, and 100 Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) members. Oversee the daily operations pertaining to Risk Reduction, Prevention, Suppression, Emergency Medical Services (EMS), and Training. • Provide contractual Fire/EMS service to the City of Parkland and provide Fire/EMS to unincorporated Broward County. • Provide automatic aid to the cities of Margate, Coconut Creek, and Tamarac. Provide additional mutual aid response in accordance with federal, state, and local agreements. Commit to continuous involvement in major organizations and committees on a national, state and local level that affect the delivery of emergency services, safety, health and wellness of first responders. Fire Suppression and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Respond to all types of fire-related emergencies within the City. Provide basic and advanced emergency medical care to victims of illness or injury. • Respond to a projected 16,000 calls for service. • Maintain a response time of 8 minutes or less at least 90% of the time to emergency incidents. • Provide treatment and transport approximately 9,500 patients to area hospitals. • Provide inter-facility transport services to the community. • Continue to acquire and utilize state of the art equipment to ensure the highest level of care to the community • Provide a Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) medic program to support local police departments. • Provide a specialty water rescue unit. • Maintain a ready fleet of apparatus consisting of 8 front line ALS transport units, 3 reserve ALS transport units, 6 front line advanced life support (ALS) pumpers, 1 ALS aerial apparatus, 2 reserve ALS pumpers, and 2 reserve ALS aerial apparatus. • Maintain a ready fleet of support service apparatus to include a mobile air support unit, a dive rescue boat, a special events cart, and an incident support trailer. Provide Community Paramedic program to help residents make better use of available emergency services and find solutions to problems that are not typically related to emergency medical care. Training Provide comprehensive training programs to enhance the skills of firefighters and their ability to deliver the highest level of service while safely responding to emergency incidents. Provide required medical, fire, and inspection related recertification training in accordance with national, state, and local regulations for members of the Coral Springs Fire Department.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

173


Fire/EMS (continued) Deliver entry level, recertification, and advanced level courses in fire, EMS, and technical rescue to Firefighters / EMS personnel nationally and internationally. Provide various levels of training to military, federal, state, and local law enforcement personnel.

New Initiatives Responsible City Government • Health and Wellness Equipment

• Emergency Services Leadership Institute • Public Education Enhancement

Provide training and education to the residents and businesses within the community.

• Fire Department 50th

Research and evaluate the newest technology and procedures in the fire and EMS fields to enhance the delivery of services to the public.

• Park Summit Left Turn Lane

Organize the Fire Explorer Program, a career development program geared towards high school students who are interested in a career in the firerescue profession. Community Risk Reduction Perform approximately 6,600 annual fire inspections and approximately, 600 re-inspections on all commercial properties and applicable multifamily residential units. Perform fire and life safety inspections of all public and private schools. Perform approximately 1,100 permit inspections and review approximately 1,300 sets of plans annually. Provide annual fire safety and prevention education through Safety Town and various educational programs to the community. Provide hands-on fire extinguisher training to the public.

City Investment in Today & Future • Traffic Signal Intersection: Coral Ridge Drive and NW 41st St

Premier Community in South Florida • Additional (3) Firefighter/Paramedics

• Fire Station 64 Replacement and Fire Training Academy Expansion • Rapid Intervention Team Bags • Clean Cab Vehicles • Community Paramedic Program (Ongoing) • Drowning Prevention/Water Safety (Ongoing) - With Comm. & Marketing

Conduct fire investigations on all fire related incidents to determine origin and cause while working closely with local law enforcement and the Florida State Fire Marshal’s Office.

174

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


City of Coral Springs, Florida

175

(a)All positions are split 50% FireAdm. Div. 4601; 50% EMS Div. 4702

(b)All positions are split 23% Comm.Svc. Div. 4602; 77% EMS Comm.Svc. Div 4703

(c)All positions are split (d) Most positions are split 38% EMS Div. 4702; 62% Fire-Supression Div. 4801 62% Fire-Suppression Div. 4801; 38% EMS Div. 4702 **Position split 50% EMS Div. 4702; 50% FireAdm. Div. 4601

(e)All positions are split 77% EMS Comm.Svc. Div 4703; 23% CommSvc. Div. 4602

Fire/EMS

(f)Position split 62% Fire-Inspection Div. 4901; 38% EMS Div. 4702


Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category Fire/EMS Revenues: Fire Fund Fire Fund Special Assessment Intergovernmental Revenue Charges for Services Miscellaneous Revenues Fines and Forfeitures Partial Year Assessment Doubtful Accounts Other Financing Sources Appropriated Fund Balance Capital Reserve Grants (Matthew and Maria) Sub-Total EMS-General Fund Emergency Medical Services Contract Services Training Sub-Total Total Revenues

FY 2017 Actuals

FY 2018 Actuals

FY 2019 Budget

FY 2020 Budget

$12,636,751 6,086,885 3,263,139 54,082 25,894 108,257 0 0 0 0 86,769 $22,261,777

$14,029,856 6,419,496 3,848,549 55,000 17,518 39,893 0 0 0 0 0 $24,410,312

$16,434,793 6,213,615 3,855,456 55,000 25,000 70,895 0 0 0 0 0 $26,654,759

$2,404,937 ($205,881) $6,907 $0 $7,482 $31,002 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $2,244,447

17.14% -3.21% 0.18% 0.00% 42.71% 77.71% n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 9.19%

$2,603,943 1,751 0 $2,605,694

$2,264,132 1,751 0 $2,265,883

$2,614,211 1,751 0 $2,615,962

$2,868,379 0

$254,168 ($1,751) $0 $252,417

9.72% -100.00% n/a 9.65%

$22,997,255

$24,432,105

$27,026,274

$29,523,138

$708,232 128,031 13,348,163 1,864,694

$749,895 131,211 14,366,676 2,145,857

$924,846 162,127 14,947,755 2,729,026

$908,685 165,416 16,190,913 2,685,426

$2,868,379

1,345,531

1,552,432

1,626,381

1,752,325

466,542 282,860 320,450 2,092,522 $20,557,025

531,585 282,860 404,108 2,109,224 $22,273,848

829,930 404,852 380,786 2,404,609 $24,410,312

EMS-General Fund Emergency Medical Services Communication Services Training Sub-Total

$9,164,325 414,066 225,782 $9,804,173

$9,775,031 416,753 250,330 $10,442,114

$30,361,198

10,413,069.00 3,681,869 1,435,019 466,542 1,864,693

Summary by Category Fire Fund Personal Services Benefits Other Operating Expenses Capital Training Capital Reserve (Budget Amendment) Non-Departmental Interfund Transfers Debt Service

EMS-General Fund Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Sub-Total Total Fire EMS Total FTE's

176

% Change from FY19 Budget

$11,673,025 5,719,224 2,891,534 43,214 15,524 49,040 0 0 0 0 0 $20,391,561

Expenditures: Program Summary Fire Fund Administration Communication Services Suppression Training Volunteers Inspection Contract Services (Parkland) Prevention Capital Debt Service Interfund Transfers Non-Departmental Sub-Total

Total Expenditures

$ Change from FY19 Budget

$2,496,864

9.24%

479,784 448,985 830,693 3,192,532 $26,654,759

($16,161) $3,289 $1,243,158 ($43,600) $0 $125,944 $0 $0 ($350,146) $44,133 $449,907 $787,923 $2,244,447

-1.75% 2.03% 8.32% -1.60% n/a 7.74% n/a n/a -42.19% 10.90% 118.15% 32.77% 9.19%

$10,336,054 463,464 219,410 $11,018,928

$11,141,537 475,499 225,601 $11,842,637

$805,483 $12,035 $6,191 $823,709

7.79% 2.60% 2.82% 7.48%

$32,715,962

$35,429,240

$38,497,396

$3,068,156

8.66%

$11,114,845 4,727,001 1,819,263 829,930 2,729,026

$12,161,639 4,765,902 2,241,109 479,784 2,685,426

2,092,522 320,450 282,860 20,557,024.00

$10,728,497 4,428,289 1,617,849 531,585 2,145,857 0 2,109,224 404,108 282,860 $21,988,143

2,404,609 380,786 404,852 $24,410,312

$6,492,351 2,294,302 1,004,609 12,911 $9,804,173

$6,680,960 2,647,588 1,113,566 0 $10,442,114

$30,361,197 111.34 68.66 180.00

3,192,532 830,693 448,985 $26,806,070

$1,046,794 $38,901 $421,846 ($350,146) ($43,600) $0 $787,923 $449,907 $44,133 $2,395,758

9.42% 0.82% 23.19% -42.19% -1.60% n/a 32.77% 118.15% 10.90% 9.81%

$7,019,838 2,804,808 1,181,266 13,016 $11,018,928

$7,579,627 2,871,608 1,378,386 13,016 $11,842,637

$559,789 $66,800 $197,120 $0 $823,709

7.97% 2.38% 16.69% 0.00% 7.48%

$32,430,257

$35,429,240

$38,648,707

$3,219,467

9.09%

115.20 69.80 185.00

118.44 71.56 190.00

124.76 76.24 201.00

6.32 4.68 11.00

5.3% 6.5% 5.8%

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Scorecard: Key Performance Indicators Scorecard

Goals On On  Tar Premier Community in South Florida Tar get get On  On  Tar Premier Community in South Florida Tar get get On  On 

Fire/EMS

Tar get On Tar get On  Tar On  Tar get On 

Responsible City Government Responsible City Government

Responsible City Government Responsible City Government

Tar Responsible City Government get On  Tar Responsible City Government get On  Tar Responsible City Government get On  Tar Responsible City Government get On 

Tar Responsible City Government get On  Tar Responsible City Government get On  Responsible City Government Tar * Results are as of the 3rd quarter of the current fiscal year.

Measure Type

KPI

FY2017 FY2017 FY2018 FY2018  FY2019  FY2019  FY2020  FY2020  Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual

Response time in 8 minutes or less, 90% of time of all  emergency Fire/EMS calls

Effectiveness

90%

97%

90%

97%

90%

97%

90%

A minimum of 14 firefighters on scene within 10 minutes,  90% of time for all structural fires

Effectiveness

90%

100%

90%

100%

90%

100%

90%

Effectiveness

95%

98%

90%

100%

90%

93%

90%

Effectiveness

6,400

5,890

6,400

6,596

6,400

4,905

   6,500

Effectiveness

4,000

8,210

4,000

9,865

4,000

7,964

4000

Effectiveness

7

7

7

10

7

4

7

Effectiveness

4

6

7

7

6

3

6

Effectiveness

50

101

50

77

70

67

70

Effectiveness

1

3

4

5

6

2

5

Effectiveness

95%

99%

95%

99%

95%

99%

95%

Effectiveness

99%

100%

90%

100%

90%

99%

95%

Effectiveness

100

82

60

75

60

50

60

Impact

40

30

40

20

25

68

25

Provide inspection report to customer within 12 days from  Tar inspection (revised FY17) get On  Perform annual fire inspections (commercial properties &  Tar applicable multi‐family residential units) get On  Provide public education programs to residents ages 5‐11 Tar Bel Provide a minimum number of classes at the Fire Academy:  ow  FL Firefighter Minimum Standards classes Pla Bel Provide a minimum number of classes at the Fire Academy:  ow  EMT classes Pla On  Provide a minimum number of classes at the Fire Academy:  Tar Specialty classes get Bel Provide a minimum number of classes at the Fire Academy:  ow  Paramedic class Pla On  Percent of customers who are satisfied with the quality of  Tar the Fire Department (Res. Survey) get On  Percent of customers satisfied with the quality of the  Tar emergency paramedics (Biz. Survey) get On  Maintain Community Emergency Response Team (CERT)  Tar force get On  Maintain Fire Explorers program participation Tar

Reference Key On target/Above target Within 5% of target/At risk of not meeting target Did not meet Goal/At Risk of not meeting Goal  Discussion Needed No update available at this time

City of Coral Springs, Florida

177


Human Resources

Human Resources

human resources Mission Human Resources Serving employees, volunteers and the community by providing an inclusive environment supported by passionate, innovative and creative people. Health Fund To provide Coral Springs employees and their families with a competitive benefits package consisting of a comprehensive, yet cost effective program for health, life, and long-term disability benefits.

Core Processes and Outputs Recruitment Recruit top talent by coordinating advertising, screening, interviewing, testing, selection, employee database management. • Timely processing of job applications to identify the most qualified candidates. Employee Development Provide training and development opportunities in the areas of compliance, customer service, leadership development and other topics identified through needs analysis. • Offer training through a variety of methods including instructor-led, e-learning, webinars, forums, mentoring, shadowing, books, and articles. • Develop leadership training programs and other professional development options in support of the City’s succession planning process. Compensation and Classification Support the development and maintenance of the Citywide broad band classification system, preparation and maintenance of classification specifications, preparation and maintenance of job descriptions, and completion of salary surveys. • Perform a comprehensive review of the City’s classification and compensation system to ensure competitive salaries to enable the City to hire and retain the best qualified employees. • Timely and accurate processing of payroll change authorizations. Compliance/Safety Coordinate Citywide safety programs. • Provide effective methods to ensure a safe work environment including safety training, committee meetings, library, events and programs. Employee Relations Partner with departments to provide guidance and consultation on human resource matters. • Develop, communicate and implement policies. • Discretely manage employee relations issues. • Effectively manage collective bargaining negotiations.

178

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Human Resources (continued) Benefits Administration

New Initiatives

• Administer Police and Fire retirement plans. • Provide administrative support for general employee retirement plan, self-insured comprehensive medical and dental plan, and fully insured vision plan. Ensure that the aggregate and specific reinsurance coverage is maintained. • Limit health care costs to less than the medical inflation rate. • Provide fully insured basic life insurance, employee paid supplemental group life, long-term disability coverage, and wellness programs to all eligible employees. Community Relations/Citizens Services/City Hall in the Mall • Act as a clearinghouse for citizen requests for information and service via the City’s Help Desk.

Responsible City Government

• American with Disabilities Act Compliance Support Strategy • Professional Certifications • Fellowship / Summer Interns • Employee Health Clinic • Well Being Strategy • Online Performance Management System

• Provide an added level of service and convenience by coordinating various new and existing city, county, state and federal programs and services at our City Hall in the Mall satellite location. • Human Resources staff serve as liaisons on the MLK Committee, Multicultural Advisory Committee, and the CustomerInvolved Government Committee. • Plan and organize community, multi-cultural and education-related events, including the Martin Luther King, Jr. weekend Celebration, State of the City Reception, Unitown, Uniteens, Unikids, Teen Political Forum, National Day of Prayer, International Dinner Dance, Worldfest, and other ethnic festivals. Quality Feedback Initiatives Provide strategic direction and support for the City’s internal quality initiatives and coordinate the annual support services survey, organization survey, and department director/supervisor 360-degree assessments. • Coordinate the City’s Sterling/Baldrige efforts including coordination of the Citywide survey.

Human Resources

City of Coral Springs, Florida

179


Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category

Human Resources Revenues: City Hall In The Mall Total

FY 2017 Actuals

FY 2018 Actuals

FY 2019 Budget

FY 2020 Budget

$ Change from FY19 Budget $54,429 $54,429

% Change from FY19 Budget

$949,447 $949,447

$1,068,727 $1,068,727

$1,088,592 $1,088,592

$1,143,021 $1,143,021

5.00% 5.00%

Expenditures: Program Summary Human Resources

$1,129,818

$1,225,874

$1,278,613

$1,367,051

88,438

6.92%

Community Relations Volunteer Services* City Hall In The Mall Total

287,391 139,413 412,121 $1,968,743

291,886 143,823 477,728 $2,139,311

360,319 169,937 449,634 $2,258,503

466,430 173,833 464,931 $2,472,245

106,111 3,896 15,297 $213,742

29.45% 2.29% 3.40% 9.46%

$1,234,074 455,273 275,844 $3,552 $1,968,743

$1,352,588 497,596 283,277 5,850 $2,139,311

$1,411,066 481,427 363,010 3,000 $2,258,503

$1,593,745 511,315 364,185 3,000 $2,472,245

$182,679 $29,888 $1,175 $0 $213,742

12.95% 6.21% 0.32% 0.00% 9.46%

14.25

14.25

16.25

16.25

0.00

0.0%

*Division transferred from the Police Department Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Total FTE's

FY 2018 Actuals

FY 2019 Budget

FY 2020 Budget

$12,970,607 29,633 1,805,858 0 $14,806,098

$12,757,648 47,430 2,194,421 0 $14,999,499

$12,676,955 20,000 2,528,025 0 $15,224,980

$12,678,315 30,000 3,328,062 737,950 $16,774,328

$1,360 $10,000 $800,037 $737,950 $1,549,348

0.01% 50.00% 31.65% n/a 10.18%

Expenses: Program Summary Health-Dental Long Term Disability Contingency Life Insurance Total

$13,739,461 188,107 0 137,802 $14,065,370

$14,631,019 194,305 0 117,086 $14,942,410

$14,887,950 200,000 27,030 110,000 $15,224,980

$16,424,271 215,000 17,557 117,500 $16,774,328

$14,887,950 $15,000 ($9,473) $7,500 $1,549,348

100.00% 7.50% -35.05% 6.82% 10.18%

Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Transfers Subtotal

$208,845 11,859,191 1,997,333 0 $14,065,369

$213,887 12,857,030 1,861,493 10,000 $14,942,410

$204,367 12,793,409 2,227,204 0 $15,224,980

$215,860 13,511,277 2,319,241 0 $16,046,378

$11,493 $717,868 $92,037 $0 $821,398

5.62% 5.61% 4.13% n/a 5.40%

Non-Departmental Total FTE's

$0 $14,065,369 2.25

$0 $14,942,410 2.25

$0 $15,224,980 2.25

$727,950 $16,774,328 2.25

$727,950 $1,549,348 0.00

n/a 10.18% 0.0%

Health Fund Revenues: Transfers Interest Income Recoveries Appropriated Fund Balance Total

180

FY 2017 Actuals

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

$ Change from FY19 Budget

% Change from FY19 Budget


Scorecard: Key Performance Indicators Scorecard

Goals On Tar Responsible City Government get On  Responsible City Government Tar On  Tar Responsible City Government get On 

On Tar get On  Tar On  Tar get Cau tion On  Tar get

Tar Responsible City Government get On  Tar Responsible City Government Human Resources get On  Tar Responsible City Government get On  Tar Responsible City Government get On 

Tar Responsible City Government get On  Tar Responsible City Government get * Results are as of the 3rd quarter of the current fiscal year.

KPI

Measure Type

Percentage of employees who would recommend working  for the City to a friend

Effectiveness

90%

93%

90%

95%

90%

90%

92%

Employee engagement index

Effectiveness

90%

89%

90%

91%

85%

87%

85%

Percentage of employees that are satisfied with wellness  activities

Effectiveness

90%

94%

90%

91%

90%

91%

90%

Percentage of employees that value Employee Benefits  Package

Effectiveness

90%

88%

90%

88%

90%

88%

90%

Percentage of employees satisfied with Volunteer Services  (New beginning FY2019)

Effectiveness

85%

99%

85%

Percentage of employees satisfied with the Onboarding  process with the City (New  beginning FY2019)

Effectiveness

85%

On Percent of employees satisfied with a culture of  Tar learning/innovation (New beginning FY2020) get On  Employees satisfied with the Culture of  Tar Inclusiveness/Belonging (New beginning FY2019) get Bel Respond to customer requests within 2 days (City‐wide  ow  helpdesk) (Revised for FY20) Pla

FY2017 FY2017 FY2018 FY2018  FY2019  FY2019  FY2020  FY2020  Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual

85%

Effectiveness

90%

Effectiveness Effectiveness

95%

95%

95%

89%

85%

94%

85%

95%

90%

90%

Reference Key On target/Above target Within 5% of target/At risk of not meeting target Did not meet Goal/At Risk of not meeting Goal  Discussion Needed No update available at this time

City of Coral Springs, Florida

181


Information Technology

Information Technology

information technology Mission To successfully integrate people, process and technology that foster partnerships and consistently delivering solutions that serve as the foundation of City operations.

Core Processes and Outputs The Information Technology department provides voice and data services to over 1,000 staff at 35 locations. The network includes over 275 mobiles devices and over 900 wired devices. The data network consists of systems that can access a full suite of general purpose software tools, as well as 142 business applications and services. Elements of the data network consist of computing platforms, local area networks (LAN), the wide area network (WAN), and a wireless infrastructure. Computing platforms in the network include AS/400, file servers, and application servers. Access to a computing platform from most locations is accommodated via LAN, which, in turn, is interconnected to form the City’s WAN.

Information Technology

Department/Division Number) / Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent) )Position split 75% Information Technology Div. 2001; 25% Public Works-Utilities-Adm. Div 6001

182

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Information Technology (continued) Application Development and Integration Develop and maintain business applications, integrating them with the production computing environment. • Maintain, administer, and upgrade three AS/400 computing systems and the 35 HTE integrated applications that are operational on this platform. • Maintain and administer 125 servers and 125 applications that are server based.

New Initiatives Responsible City Government • IT Specialized Technical Training • GIS Consulting Services • ESRI Enterprise Advantage Program (EEAP) • Disaster Recovery Site

Infrastructure Management Plan, manage, and maintain a production environment (platforms, LANs, and WAN) in accordance with service level agreements related to security, reliability, availability, and performance of voice and data services. • Maintain and administer the City’s WAN, consisting of CISCO routers and switches at all City locations. Provide and support desktop access to general purpose software tools, business applications and data across multiple computing platforms, and external services, data, or applications.

Premier Community in South Florida • Implement a DNS, DHP, and IP (DDI) Management Tool

• User Cyber Security Awareness Training

Premier Community in South Florida • Enterprise Software (Ongoing)

• Maintain and administer the fully integrated voice and data network that consists of over 900 voice and data drops. The network serves all City locations with technology from CISCO systems. • Maintain, administer, and upgrade the City’s mobile computing environment for Police, Fire, Code Compliance, and Fleet Management. • Maintain, administer, and upgrade the GIS and AutoCADD computing platforms and applications serving departmental needs City-wide. • Maintain, administer and provide information relative to the City’s library of plat maps, as-builts, and design drawings. Customer Service Provide “on demand” service and support for system and security administration, problem resolution or coordination, acquisition research and assistance, and information requests relative to tools, data, and applications. • Respond to over 8,100 requests for service per year. Project Management Provide project governance based on sound project management methodologies, utilizing industry standard project management guidelines, the IT organization will manage the initiating, planning, executing, monitoring, controlling and closing of all technology projects..

City of Coral Springs, Florida

183


Scorecard: Key Performance Indicators Scorecard

Goals On Tar Responsible City Government get On 

Information Technology

Tar Responsible City Government get On  Tar Responsible City Government get On 

Tar Responsible City Government get On  Responsible City Government Tar * Results are as of the 3rd quarter of the current fiscal year.

KPI On IT Development Projects implemented (In accordance with  Tar City’s Business Plan and IT Work Program) get On  Customer satisfaction rating from survey of Information  Tar Technology get On 

Tar get On Tar get On  Tar

Measure Type

FY2017 FY2017 FY2018 FY2018  FY2019  FY2019  FY2020  FY2020  Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual

Effectiveness

10

7

9

35

8

25

8

Effectiveness

95%

99%

95%

100%

95%

100%

95%

Meet service level agreement regarding network availability Effectiveness 99.50%

100%

99.5% 99.90% 99.5% 99.82%

99.5%

Meet service level agreement regarding application  availability

Effectiveness

98%

99.90%

98%

99.90%

99%

99.97%

99%

Meet service level agreement regarding server availability

Effectiveness

99%

99.90%

99%

99.90%

99%

100%

99%

Reference Key On target/Above target Within 5% of target/At risk of not meeting target Did not meet Goal/At Risk of not meeting Goal  Discussion Needed No update available at this time

Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category Information Technology Revenues: Information Technology Total

FY 2017 Actuals

FY 2018 Actuals

FY 2019 Budget

FY 2020 Budget

$ Change from FY19 Budget

% Change from FY19 Budget

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $0

$0

$0 $0

Expenditures: Program Summary Computer Services Total

$3,367,163 $3,367,163

$3,925,979 $3,925,979

$4,253,429 $4,253,429

$4,666,238 $4,666,238

$412,809 $412,809

9.71% 9.71%

Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Total

$1,623,315 635,217 1,087,170 21,461 $3,367,163

$1,782,169 644,772 1,436,132 62,906 $3,925,979

$1,911,044 673,846 1,667,039 1,500 $4,253,429

$1,850,829 633,962 2,179,947 1,500 $4,666,238

($60,215) ($39,884) $512,908 $0 $412,809

-3.15% -5.92% 30.77% 0.00% 9.71%

21.50

21.50

21.50

20.50

(1.00)

-4.7%

FTE's

184

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

n/a n/a


Parks and Recreation

Parks and Recreation

parks and recreation Mission To serve as a sports and entertainment destination to the residents of Coral Springs and northwest Broward County by providing exceptional leisure opportunities, beautification of the City, and support in reaching the City Commission’s strategic goals. We are focused on exceeding customer expectations through a philosophy of providing quality services, well-maintained facilities, and customer-friendly and attentive staff.

Core Processes and Outputs Maintenance Coordinate overall management of Parks and Recreation divisions. • Maintain quality athletic fields and courts for over 1,150 organized sports teams. • Maintain 49 parks totaling 768 acres including buildings, structures, landscaping, irrigation and equipment. • Maintain safe and clean tennis facilities at Tennis Center, Cypress Park Tennis Center, other City parks, and two middle schools. • Maintain ten pools, a 7,500 square foot fitness center, a full-service swim shop, and three concession venues. Landscape and Irrigation Install, repair, and maintain irrigation systems, landscaping, and athletic turf in parks, medians, and all public buildings, facilities and grounds. Recreational Programming Provide programming for seniors, teens, special needs populations, preschoolers, after-school, summer recreation, and at-risk youth among others. • Conduct 32,000 swim classes annually to over 4,000 participants through three different Learn to Swim programs. Administrative Services Manage new park construction and existing facility enhancements. Develop, implement, and monitor the budget and strategic plan for Parks and Recreation. City representative to sports groups, Kreul Classic, Sports Coalition Committee, and Sports Commission. Negotiate reciprocal use agreements with schools, both public and private. Prepare grants and inter-local, reciprocal use, and lease agreements. Revenue collection for permits, rentals, clinics, summer recreation and other programs. • Generate over $270,000 in tennis lesson revenue and over $400,000 in gross sales at the Swim Shop. Coordinate and secure sponsorships and advertising. Negotiate and administer contracts of third-party contractors providing a variety of services to facility customers.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

185


Parks and Recreation (continued) Scheduling Provide field and court permits for 12 City-recognized sports programs, independent leagues and organizations, and drop-in groups. • Accommodate over 4,000,000 park visitors to all sites. • Accommodate 500,000 Aquatic Complex participants and visitors. • Host 118,000 tennis players. Transportation Provide community and senior bus service.

New Initiatives Responsible City Government

• Senior Programming (Enhancement)

City Investment in Today and Future • Pickelball Courts • Turf Fields • Splash Pad • Maintain and Protect City Trees (Ongoing)

186

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Parks and Recreation

(Department/Division Number) / Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent)

City of Coral Springs, Florida

187


Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category Parks and Recreation Revenues: Parks Cypress Park Mullins Park North Community Park Neighborhood Parks Sub-Total

FY 2017 Actuals

FY 2018 Actuals

FY 2019 Budget

FY 2020 Budget

$ Change from FY19 Budget

% Change from FY19 Budget

$116,169 278,442 28,945 90,814 $514,370

$106,778 304,533 33,399 109,100 $553,810

$127,889 259,830 47,477 116,388 $551,584

$230,447 315,027 148,426 118,715 $812,615

$102,558 $55,197 $100,949 $2,327 $261,031

80.19% 21.24% 212.63% 2.00% 47.32%

$43,672 20,495 481,614 156,164 449,782 $1,151,727

$61,451 19,031 416,791 148,792 462,735 $1,108,800

$46,023 18,946 510,000 163,033 475,262 $1,213,264

$46,944 19,325 520,200 153,794 484,768 $1,225,031

$921 $379 $10,200 ($9,239) $9,506 $11,767

2.00% 2.00% 2.00% -5.67% 2.00% 0.97%

$359,613 19,348 95,103 321,654 $795,718

$445,918 34,274 106,887 292,584 $879,663

$318,000 28,862 129,187 344,387 $820,436

$318,060 29,440 131,771 356,802 $836,073

$60 $578 $2,584 $12,415 $15,637

0.02% 2.00% 2.00% 3.60% 1.91%

$50,613 58,622 1,374,661 $1,483,896

$84,308 52,678 1,487,396 $1,624,382

$131,971 69,348 1,557,428 $1,758,747

$134,609 70,735 1,588,576 $1,793,920

$2,638 $1,387 $31,148 $35,173

2.00% 2.00% 2.00% 2.00%

$3,945,711

$4,166,655

$4,344,031

$4,667,639

$323,608

7.45%

$1,258,518 1,641,141 814,503 1,538,554 1,204,958 1,470,166 614,049

$1,388,534 1,592,713 989,916 1,785,300 605,472 690,228 635,726

$1,454,631 1,628,550 1,157,222 1,784,679 568,438 505,239 679,422

$1,564,307 1,636,624 1,226,028 1,898,972 756,044 509,949 636,903

225,376 $8,767,265

244,751 $7,932,640

263,711 $8,041,892

Recreation Activity Center Recreation Services Summer Recreation Transportation Services Gymnasium Sub-Total

$132,288 443,331 534,786 378,409 438,011 $1,926,825

$145,650 463,267 449,796 391,389 444,570 $1,894,672

Sportsplex/Tennis Sportsplex Athletic Complex Cypress Tennis Tennis Center Sub-Total

$290,182 546,784 194,161 678,050 $1,709,177

Aquatics Services Cypress Pool Mullins Pool Aquatics Complex Sub-Total

Recreation Mullins Activity Center Recreation Center Summer Recreation Transportation Services* Gymnasium Sub-Total *Includes Community Bus Program Revenues Sportsplex/Tennis Sportsplex Athletic Complex Cypress Tennis Tennis Center Sub-Total Aquatics Services Cypress Pool Mullins Pool Aquatics Complex Sub-Total Total Revenues Expenditures: Program Summary

Parks Cypress Park Mullins Park North Community Park Neighborhood Parks Beautification Landscape Irrigation Honda Classic* Environmentally Sensitive Land Sub-Total

Total Expenditures

188

273,809 $8,502,636

$109,676 $8,074 $68,806 $114,293 $187,606 $4,710 ($42,519) $0 $10,098 $460,744

7.54% 0.50% 5.95% 6.40% 33.00% 0.93% -6.26% n/a 3.83% 5.73%

$146,066 496,293 560,597 461,380 418,360 $2,082,696

$156,409 496,067 566,658 451,572 451,603 $2,122,309

$10,343 ($226) $6,061 ($9,808) $33,243 $39,613

7.08% -0.05% 1.08% -2.13% 7.95% 1.90%

$243,739 652,295 194,930 690,589 $1,781,553

$282,955 722,278 223,719 803,622 $2,032,574

$289,358 688,099 198,448 815,712 $1,991,617

$6,403 ($34,179) ($25,271) $12,090 ($40,957)

2.26% -4.73% -11.30% 1.50% -2.02%

$401,084 291,924 1,773,316 $2,466,324

$428,847 316,048 1,995,737 $2,740,632

$496,434 280,547 2,054,962 $2,831,943

$577,447 238,418 2,148,171 $2,964,036

$81,013 ($42,129) $93,209 $132,093

16.32% -15.02% 4.54% 4.66%

$14,869,591

$14,349,497

$14,989,105

$15,580,598

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget

$591,493

3.95%


Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category Parks and Recreation (continued) Expenditures: Summary By Category Parks Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Sub-Total

FY 2017 Actuals

FY 2018 Actuals

FY 2019 Budget

FY 2020 Budget

$ Change from FY19 Budget

% Change from FY19 Budget

3,174,937.00 1,747,082 3,726,424 118,822 $8,767,265

$2,965,856 1,682,010 2,896,144 388,630 $7,932,640

3,003,371.00 1,681,217 2,980,079 377,225 $8,041,892

3,177,829.00 1,526,984 3,420,598 377,225 $8,502,636

174,458.00 (154,233.00) 440,519.00 $460,744

5.81% -9.17% 14.78% 0.00% 5.73%

771,884.00 231,284 923,657 0 $1,926,825

$736,848 227,061 930,763 0 $1,894,672

844,025.00 248,471 990,200 0 $2,082,696

872,738.00 252,753 996,818 $2,122,309

28,713.00 4,282.00 6,618.00 $39,613

3.40% 1.72% 0.67% n/a 1.90%

Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Sub-Total

635,407.00 249,388 817,308 7,074 $1,709,177

$654,988 246,059 795,539 84,967 $1,781,553

767,506.00 310,335 867,840 86,893 $2,032,574

706,945.00 268,134 929,645 86,893 $1,991,617

(60,561.00) (42,201.00) 61,805.00 ($40,957)

-7.89% -13.60% 7.12% 0.00% -2.02%

Aquatic Services Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Sub-Total

985,353.00 399,557 1,081,414 0 $2,466,324

$1,086,958 399,293 1,151,275 103,106 $2,740,632

1,111,552.00 412,402 1,207,989 100,000 $2,831,943

1,228,283.00 420,508 1,215,245 100,000 $2,964,036

116,731.00 8,106.00 7,256.00 $132,093

10.50% 1.97% 0.60% 0.00% 4.66%

$14,869,591

$14,349,497

$14,989,105

$15,580,598

$591,493

3.95%

$5,567,581 2,627,311 6,548,803 125,896 $14,869,591

$5,444,650 2,554,423 5,773,721 576,703 $14,349,497

$5,726,454 2,652,425 6,046,108 564,118 $14,989,105

$5,985,795 2,468,379 6,562,306 564,118 $15,580,598

$259,341 ($184,046) $516,198 $0 $591,493

4.53% -6.94% 8.54% 0.00% 3.95%

73.00 8.00 9.00 16.00 106.00

70.00 8.00 11.00 16.00 105.00

70.00 8.00 11.00 16.00 105.00

61.00 8.00 10.00 16.00 95.00

(9.00) 0.00 (1.00) 0.00 (10.00)

-12.86% 0.00% -9.09% 0.00% -9.52%

Recreation Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Sub-Total Sportsplex/Tennis

Total Expenditures Expenditures - All Divisions Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Total Expenditures

FTE's Parks Recreation Sportsplex/Tennis Aquatic Services Total FTE's

City of Coral Springs, Florida

189


Scorecard: Key Performance Indicators Scorecard

Goals

KPI

Cau On Customer service rating of summer recreation program City Investment in Today and Future tion Tar Cau On  Number of Senior Classes (New beginning FY2019) City Investment in Today and Future tion Tar On  Increase members and reduce member turnover: Aquatic  Cau City Investment in Today and Future Tar tion Complex membership get On  Increase members and reduce member turnover: Aquatic  Cau City Investment in Today and Future Tar tion Complex membership turnover get Cau On  Maintain customer service ratings at the Tennis Center City Investment in Today and Future tion Tar Cau On  Membership turnover at the Tennis Center City Investment in Today and Future tion Tar Cau Cau Customer service rating for court maintenance at the  City Investment in Today and Future tion tion Tennis Center Parks &  Cau On  Recreation Number of tennis special events City Investment in Today and Future tion Tar Cau Bel Sports Commission: Number of room nights Growing Local Economy tion ow  On  Maintenance & appearance of City parks (Revised 2019)  Tar Responsible City Government (Res. Survey) get On  On  Customer service rating for parks and recreation staff (Res.  Tar Responsible City Government Tar Survey) get get On  On  Safety rating of City parks (Res. Survey) Responsible City Government Tar Tar On  On  Cost recovery ratio for the Recreation Division Responsible City Government Tar Tar On  On  The combined cost recovery for the Aquatic Complex  Tar Responsible City Government Tar Division: get get * Results are as of the 3rd quarter of the current fiscal year.

Measure Type Impact

95%

97%

95%

100%

Impact

95%

95%

1,250

1,226

1250

Demand

4,000

4,087

4,000

4,169

4,000

3,990

4000

32.82%

50%

Demand

50%

42%

50%

37%

50%

Effectiveness

90%

94%

90%

94%

95%

Demand

30%

15%

30%

20%

30%

Effectiveness

90%

87%

90%

87%

90%

Impact

30

52

30

62

35

40

45

Demand

3,600

2,060

3,600

4,909

3,000

3,710

3600

Effectiveness

95%

92%

95%

92%

95%

95%

95%

90%

15.10%

30% 90%

Impact

95%

94%

95%

94%

95%

95%

95%

Effectiveness

90%

91%

90%

91%

90%

91.90%

90%

Impact

60%

58%

60%

59%

60%

84.79%

60%

Impact

65%

78%

65%

76%

65%

76.43%

65%

Reference Key On target/Above target Within 5% of target/At risk of not meeting target Did not meet Goal/At Risk of not meeting Goal  Discussion Needed No update available at this time

190

FY2017 FY2017 FY2018 FY2018  FY2019  FY2019  FY2020  FY2020  Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


City of Coral Springs, Florida

191


Police

Police

police Mission To provide professional, high quality and innovative police service in partnership with the community.

Core Processes and Outputs Administration Administer the financial, operational and capital budgets of the department. Manage the overall working of the Police Department to provide a safe and secure community environment. Provide public informational services. Identify specific training needs of department personnel.

Police

192

(Department/Division Number) / Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent) *No full-time staff assigned to these divisions

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Investigations Investigate property crimes such as burglaries, thefts etc., and violent crimes such as batteries, assaults, domestic violence, child abuse (physical, sexual, and neglect), elderly abuse, adult sex crimes, homicide, and aggravated battery. Patrol

New Initiatives Premier Community in South Florida • Body Worn Cameras and In-Car LPR

• Community Involvement Liaison Part-time to Full-time

Receive, process, and dispatch both emergency and non-emergency calls for Police and Fire Rescue.

• Civil Unrest Team (CUTS)

• Respond to 170,000 projected calls for service and incident response.

• Summer Breakspot Program (Ongoing)

• Police Hire Incentive (Ongoing)

Support Functions Process all external and internal requests for reports and information. Coordinate fleet and facility maintenance. Juvenile Operate the School Resource Officer program and present educational program at all grade levels. Coordinate court-ordered community service hours program for juveniles and adults.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

193


Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category Police Revenues: Office of the Chief Off-Duty Detail Total

FY 2017 Actuals

FY 2018 Actuals

FY 2019 Budget

FY 2020 Budget

$ Change from FY19 Budget

% Change from FY19 Budget

$2,370,370 525,086 $2,895,456

$2,743,362 843,067 $3,586,429

$2,639,282 502,033 $3,141,315

$2,780,649 802,115 $3,582,764

$141,367 $300,082 $441,449

5.36% 59.77% 14.05%

$311,879 2,543,035 314,450 556,054 3,064,356 929,682 250,822 $7,970,278

$225,970 2,533,411 313,631 742,842 2,869,909 999,826 290,500 $7,976,089

$438,343 2,671,778 314,197 353,233 3,071,242 988,439 302,278 $8,139,510

$395,763 2,710,124 326,969 635,854 3,187,772 1,005,214 294,019 $8,555,715

($42,580) $38,346 $12,772 $282,621 $116,530 $16,775 ($8,259) $416,205

-9.71% 1.44% 4.06% 80.01% 3.79% 1.70% -2.73% 5.11%

3,588,921

3,570,710

4,432,075

4,621,522

$189,447

4.27%

276,757 802,862

372,689 772,710 0 708,188 440,652 639,406 $6,504,355

462,750 851,167

516,752 858,163

592,715 466,768 647,430 $7,452,905

584,249 497,879 731,366 $7,809,931

54,002 6,996 0 (8,466) 31,111 83,936 $357,026

11.67% 0.82% n/a -1.43% 6.67% 12.96% 4.79% n/a

$14,480,444

$15,592,415

$16,365,646

$773,231

4.96%

$352,261 $352,261

$367,188 $367,188

$374,384 $374,384

$381,883 $381,883

$7,499 $7,499

2.00% 2.00%

$18,869,219

$19,727,178

$20,716,993

$21,014,665

$297,672

1.44%

129,651

152,592

179,014

184,102

$5,088

2.84%

1,944,901 $20,943,771

2,096,247 $21,976,017

2,222,457 $23,118,464

2,110,166 $23,308,933

($112,291) $190,469

-5.05% 0.82%

Special Operations Strategic Enforcement Team Humane Unit K-9 Street Intelligence Unit Bicycle Unit BEAR Unit Sub-Total

$1,729,111 239,706 1,193,769 616,047 868,215 1,266,414 $5,913,262

$2,265,904 237,638 1,246,296 655,604 905,026 1,242,917 $6,553,385

$2,361,964 248,711 1,344,329 681,901 981,199 1,313,243 $6,931,347

$2,497,375 249,562 1,346,315 694,482 1,051,108 1,317,223 $7,156,065

$135,411 $851 $1,986 $12,581 $69,909 $3,980 $224,718

5.73% 0.34% 0.15% 1.84% 7.12% 0.30% 3.24%

Criminal Investigations General Investigations Special Investigations Crime Scene Investigations Dive Team Sub-Total

$3,299,895 2,628,388 1,179,892 11,031 $7,119,206

$3,478,218 2,692,016 1,190,906 13,268 $7,374,408

$3,642,001 2,761,676 1,270,919 14,765 $7,689,361

$3,619,846 2,733,602 1,336,151 14,938 $7,704,537

($22,155) ($28,074) $65,232 $173 $15,176

-0.61% -1.02% 5.13% 1.17% 0.20%

Expenditures: Program Summary Administration Office of the Chief Vice/Intelligence Human Resources Off-Duty Detail Communications Center Fiscal Management SWAT Sub-Total Administration-Community Services Youth Liaison Community Involvement Training Volunteer Services* Central Records Crossing Guards Building and Fleet Maintenance Sub-Total

558,577 416,427 544,042 $6,187,586

Sub-total Administration $14,157,864 *Division transferred to Human Resources in FY 2015 Office of Professional Standards Office of Professional Standards Sub-Total Operations Support Patrol Unit Special Events Traffic Unit Sub-Total

Sub-Total Operations Total Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Total Positions FTE's

194

$33,976,239

$35,903,810

$37,739,172

$38,169,535

$430,363

$48,486,364

$50,751,442

$53,705,971

$54,917,064

$1,211,093

1.14% n/a 2.26%

27,000,718.00 15,806,967 5,649,349 29,330 $48,486,364

$27,237,789 17,352,167 5,990,679 170,807 $50,751,442

28,133,036.00 18,741,090 6,750,326 81,519 $53,705,971

29,459,318.00 18,469,335 6,939,242 71,669 $54,939,564

1,326,282.00 (271,755.00) 188,916.00 (9,850.00) $1,233,593 $0

4.71% -1.45% 2.80% -12.08% 2.30% n/a

302.00 301.63

309.00 308.63

311.00 311.00

311.00 311.00

0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00%

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Scorecard: Key Performance Indicators Scorecard

Goals

KPI

On On  Police Department's overall quality rating (Res. Survey) Premier Community in South Florida Tar Tar On  On  Residents who feel that Coral Springs has remained or  Tar Premier Community in South Florida Tar become a safer place to live (Res. Survey) get get On  On  Average Police response time (from time of call to arrival) ‐  Tar Premier Community in South Florida Tar (Previous year) get get On  On  Stabilize the burglary rate at a 0% increase adjusted for  Tar Premier Community in South Florida Tar population (Uniform Crime Report) (Previous year) get get On  On  Maintain 0% increase in crime rate as adjusted for  Tar Premier Community in South Florida Tar population (Uniform Crime Report) (Previous year) get get On  On  Clearance rate for crimes (Uniform Crime Report) (Previous  Police Tar Premier Community in South Florida Tar year) get get On  On  Reduce or maintain percent change in number of robberies  Tar Premier Community in South Florida Tar (Uniform Crime Report) (Previous year) get get On  On  Traffic crashes per 1,000 citizens (Previous year) Premier Community in South Florida Tar Tar On  On  Number of high school students that are awarded safe  Tar Premier Community in South Florida Tar driving certificates at graduation get get On  On  Police Department's Satisfaction rating by businesses (Biz  Tar Downtown Becoming Vibrant Tar Survey) get get On  Cau Safety rating by businesses (Biz Survey) Downtown Becoming Vibrant Tar tion * Results are as of the 3rd quarter of the current fiscal year.

Measure Type

FY2017 FY2017 FY2018 FY2018  FY2019  FY2019  FY2020  FY2020  Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual

Effectiveness

95%

95%

95%

95%

95%

96%

95%

Effectiveness

75%

78%

75%

78%

75%

78%

76%

5:00

4.42

5:00

Effectiveness

0%

‐36.50%

Effectiveness

0%

Effectiveness

30.00%

Effectiveness

0%

Effectiveness

0%

‐32%

0%

‐4.80%

0%

‐14%

0%

0%

32%

30%

33%

30%

30%

11.90%

0%

‐13.0%

0%

0%

0%

Effectiveness

31

32

31

31

31

31

Impact

200

401

200

334

200

250

Effectiveness

92%

96%

92%

95.90%

92%

96%

93%

Effectiveness

96%

96%

97%

95.80%

97%

95.80%

94%

Reference Key On target/Above target Within 5% of target/At risk of not meeting target Did not meet Goal/At Risk of not meeting Goal  Discussion Needed No update available at this time

City of Coral Springs, Florida

195


Public Works

Public Works

public works Mission Public Works To support Coral Springs in becoming the premier community in which to live, work, and raise a family by providing quality facilities, well maintained neighborhood infrastructure, beautiful City entrances and corridors, safe drinking water, reliable solid waste service, Engineering and Construction management, and an operationally efficient Fleet. Utilities and Engineering Division To provide the City utilities service area with safe drinking water, reliable water pressure for fire protection, and wastewater collection and disposal in accordance with County, State and National regulations and standards. To provide Engineering services by reviewing engineering plans for compliance with City engineering standards, including right of way permits for engineering improvements, and inspection services for Capital Projects.

Public Works

(Department/Division Number) / Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent):

196

a. Position split 50% Public Works Div. 5501; 50% Utilities Adm. Div. 6001 b. Position split 50% Public Works Div. 5501; 50% Facilities Mgmt. Div. 5502 c. Position split 25% Public Works Div. 5502; 75% Streets Div. 5601 d. Total FTE also includes the following position split: 50% Director of Public Works (5501), 25% Director of Financial Services (1501), 50% City Controller (1501), and 25% Assistant City Attorney (2502)

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Public Works (continued) Equipment Services

New Initiatives

To support all City Departments by writing vehicle and equipment specifications that meet operational needs, preparing for service, providing quality maintenance to maximize useful life, and disposition from Fleet.

Responsible City Government

Core Processes and Outputs

• Bus Shelter Solar Powered Fans

Civil Engineer

Premier Community in South Florida • Curbing on Sample

Public Works Administration • Coordinate overall department management, administration, and budget. • Oversee the contractual responsibilities of the solid waste franchise holder. • Manage median landscape and maintenance contract.

• Landscape Operation Enhancement

Streets

• New Shop Equipment (Ongoing)

Perform repair and maintenance of City-owned streets, bike paths, rights of way and parking areas.

• Roadway Resurfacing (Ongoing)

• • • •

• Facilities / Street Cityworks software (Ongoing) • Landscape Improvement of Arterial Roads (Ongoing)

Maintain 96.5 miles of bike paths and sidewalks. Maintain 224 center lane miles of City streets. Inspect 8 miles of state roads and 32 miles of county roads. Clean and maintain over 6,500 drains.

Facilities Perform in-house or contract for maintenance, repair, and minor construction of all City buildings. • Maintain 662,170 square feet of City facilities. Horticulture Plan, plant, establish and manage public trees and associated vegetation on public medians, right-of-ways, cul-de-sacs, City’s entry signs, public buildings and facilities. • • • • • • •

Maintain landscaped medians on 42 City, County, and State owned roads Maintain 49 cul-de-sacs and landscaped islands Maintain 19 City buildings and properties Maintain 23 public right-of-ways and canal banks Maintain 23 City entry and corporate signs Maintain 8,318 linear feet of Master Parking Maintain 40 lift stations, water treatment facilities, and transfer station

Utilities and Engineering Perform management, administration, and support for the daily operation of water treatment, water plant maintenance, water distribution, wastewater collection, and wastewater treatment. • Produce an average of 6.13 million gallons per day of treated water. Equipment Services Repair and maintain all City vehicles including fire, police, and small engine equipment. • • • • •

Maintain 767 vehicles/equipment, 497 pieces of small engine equipment, and 91 generators. Prepare specifications for new equipment and vehicle purchases. Provide specialized equipment installation for public safety vehicles and general fleet. Repair and service motorcycles for the City of Margate. Repair and maintain City of Parkland fire apparatus.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

197


Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category Public Works Revenues: Administrative Services Streets Engineering Total

FY 2017 Actuals

FY 2018 Actuals

FY 2019 Budget

FY 2020 Budget

$ Change from FY19 Budget

% Change from FY19 Budget

250,517 60,258 0 $310,775

$168,876 72,781 34 $241,691

$28,222 72,777 0 $100,999

$17,400 72,777 0 $90,177

($10,822) $0 $0 ($10,822)

-38.35% 0.00% n/a -10.71%

$273,082 44,957 $318,039

$387,506 86,641 $474,147

$388,853 54,738 $443,591

$319,988 27,460 $347,448

Engineering Streets Facilities Management Arbor & Horticulture Total

225,987 $3,867,592 741,963 0 $5,153,581

135,971 $5,428,331 1,167,254 0 $7,205,703

238,276 $5,777,571 1,288,824 0 $7,748,262

250,236 $2,862,445 1,440,165 1,707,969 $6,608,263

(68,865) (27,278) ($96,143) $0 11,960 (2,915,126) 151,341 1,707,969 ($1,139,999)

-17.71% -49.83% -21.67% n/a 5.02% -50.46% 11.74% n/a -14.71%

Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Total

$1,656,342 735,639 2,756,981 4,619 $5,153,581

$1,870,958 812,384 4,499,976 22,385 $7,205,703

$2,099,172 911,761 4,728,790 8,539 $7,748,262

$1,646,236 677,470 4,276,018 8,539 $6,608,263

($452,936) ($234,291) ($452,772) $0 ($1,139,999)

-21.58% -25.70% -9.57% 0.00% -14.71%

28.75

34.75

36.25

26.70

(9.55)

-26.3%

Expenditures: Program Summary Administrative Services Solid Waste Recycling Sub-Total

FTE's

FY 2017 Equipment Services Actuals Revenues: Fuel/Maint/Chargeback Transfers $6,313,663 Fleet Services to other entities: City of Parkland 42,367 City of Margate/Coconut Creek 5,943 Interest Income 58,532 Financial Strategy 0 Appropriated Fund Balance / Equipment Purchases3,205,949 Auction 517,986 Total $10,144,440

FY 2018 Actuals

FY 2019 Budget

FY 2020 Budget

$ Change from FY19 Budget

% Change from FY19 Budget

$6,829,323

$7,414,284

$7,761,733

$347,449

44,039 8,002 82,539 24,090 3,788,288 160,548 $10,936,829

32,000 3,500 50,000 170,381 4,915,770 200,000 $12,785,935

35,000 5,500 50,000 0 4,380,240 200,000 $12,432,473

3,000 2,000 0

4.69% n/a 9.38% 57.14% 0.00%

(535,530) 39,452 ($353,462)

-10.89% 19.73% -2.76%

Expenses: Program Summary Equipment Maintenance Total

$9,534,220 $9,534,220

$10,936,829 $10,936,829

$12,785,935 $12,785,935

$12,432,473 $12,432,473

($353,462) ($12,785,935)

-2.76% -100.00%

Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Depreciation Interfund Transfers Equipment Purchases Total

$890,163 392,378 1,518,548 3,328,442 198,740 3,205,949 $9,534,220

$874,495 385,240 1,751,714 3,694,862 442,230 3,788,288 $10,936,829

$949,162 394,254 2,019,834 4,123,408 383,507 4,915,770 $12,785,935

$974,988 401,210 2,131,697 4,306,338 238,000 4,380,240 $12,432,473

$25,826 $6,956 $111,863 $182,930 ($145,507) ($535,530) ($353,462)

2.72% 1.76% 5.54% 4.44% -37.94% -10.89% -2.76%

15.00

15.00

15.00

15.00

0.00

0.00%

n/a FTE's

198

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category Water and Sewer Fund Utilities Revenues: Water Wastewater Private Fire Line Fee Meter Sales Backflow Recertification Adm. Fee Misc. Income Charges for Service Appropriated Fund Balance Interest Income

FY 2017 Actuals

Total Expenses: Program Summary Administration Water Distribution Water Treatment Wastewater Treatment Wastewater Collection Sub-Total Non-Departmental Total Summary By Category Personal Benefits Other Expenses Capital Sub-Total Non-Departmental Total FTE's

Solid Waste Fund Revenues: Program Summary Solid Waste Non Franchise Interfund Transfer (from General Fund) Total Expenditures: Summary By Category Personal Benefits Operating Expenses Interfund Transfers Total Positions FTE's

FY 2018 Actuals

$9,063,534 13,083,232 27,077 13,085 22,945 (5,631) 337,613 0 54,907

FY 2019 Budget

FY 2020 Budget

$ Change from FY19 Budget

% Change from FY19 Budget

$9,318,618 13,652,366 28,097 36,955 38,750 5,314 318,081 1,383,256 77,481

$9,378,788 14,058,830 27,171 10,609 19,675 10,000 217,514 641,570 31,632

$9,707,045 14,550,889 27,986 10,927 19,871 10,300 224,037 1,375,448 31,632

$328,257 $492,059 $815 $318 $196 $300 $6,523 $733,878 $0

3.50% 3.50% 3.00% 3.00% 1.00% 3.00% 3.00% 114.39% 0.00%

$22,596,762

$24,858,918

$24,395,789

$25,958,135

$1,562,346

$996,087 $1,016,341 $2,619,045 $5,353,580 $1,161,659 $11,146,712

$1,038,984 $1,007,687 $2,672,466 $6,025,105 $1,222,129 $11,966,371

$1,180,365 $1,135,182 $3,162,150 $6,671,731 $1,336,717 $13,486,145

$1,300,251 $1,172,993 $3,243,445 $7,005,318 $1,347,067 $14,069,074

6.40% n/a n/a n/a 10.16% 3.33% 2.57% 5.00% 0.77% 4.32% n/a 8.98%

$11,200,579

$12,892,547

$10,909,644

$11,889,064

$119,886 $37,811 $81,295 $333,587 $10,350 $582,929 $0 $979,420

$22,347,291

$24,858,918

$24,395,789

$25,958,135

$1,562,346

6.40%

$2,408,977 1,066,455 7,660,701 245,637 $11,381,770

$2,394,695 1,047,641 1,395,704 22,890 $4,860,930

$2,567,770 1,072,038 9,827,926 253,411 $13,721,145

$2,743,293 1,113,189 3,186,813 20,461 $7,063,756

6.84% 3.84% -67.57% -91.93% -48.52%

$10,965,521 $22,347,291

$19,997,988 $24,858,918

$10,674,644 $24,395,789

$18,894,382 $25,958,135

$175,523 $41,151 ($6,641,113) ($232,950) ($6,657,389) $0 $8,219,738 $1,562,346

40.50

40.50

40.00

41.00

1.00

2.50%

FY 2017 Actuals

FY 2018 Actuals

FY 2019 Budget

FY 2020 Budget

$ Change from FY19 Budget

77.00% 6.40%

% Change from FY19 Budget

$4,415,912 $0 $4,415,912

$4,619,530 $0 $4,619,530

$4,947,273 $0 $4,947,273

$5,729,635

$782,362

15.81%

$5,729,635

$782,362

15.81%

$44,135 19,571 4,279,828 0 $4,343,534

$61,686 54,251 4,346,830 0 $4,462,767

$100,350 61,550 4,756,373 29,000 $4,947,273

$112,694 62,720 5,554,221 0 $5,729,635

$12,344 $1,170 $797,848 ($29,000) $782,362

12.30% 1.90% 16.77% -100.00% 15.81%

0.75

2.75

2.75

2.75

0.00 0.00

n/a 0.0%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

199


Scorecard: Key Performance Indicators Scorecard

Goals On Tar Responsible City Government get On  Tar Responsible City Government get On  Tar Responsible City Government get On 

Tar Responsible City Government get On  Premier Community in South Florida Tar On  Public Works Tar Premier Community in South Florida get On  Premier Community in South Florida Tar On  Premier Community in South Florida Tar On  Tar Premier Community in South Florida get Cau City Investment in Today and Future tion Cau City Investment in Today and Future tion Cau City Investment in Today and Future tion * Results are as of the 3rd quarter of the current fiscal year.

KPI On Public Works & Utilities Satisfaction Rating (Revised 2019)  Tar (Res. Survey) get On  City Hall internal customer satisfaction rating for janitorial  Tar services get On  Availability rate of all vehicles/equipment for all  Tar departments get On  Facilities routine work orders completed within 15 working  Tar days get On  Pot hole repair response time (Days) Tar Bel Complete litter removal of 159 miles of road rights‐of‐way  ow  in ten working days (Days) Pla On  Storm drains vactored per year (New beginning FY2020) Tar Bel Fire hydrants serviced (Revised for FY 2018) ow  Bel ow  Miles of street sweeping per year to meet NPDES standards Pla On  Length of sanitary sewer pipe liner rehabilitated (Linear  Tar Feet) (New beginning FY2018) get On  Number of serviced valves per year Tar Bel Percent of "unaccounted for" water ow 

Measure Type Effectiveness

89%

89%

89%

89%

90%

Effectiveness

90%

99%

90%

100%

90%

Effectiveness

94%

95%

93%

97%

94%

99.33%

96%

Effectiveness

90%

98%

90%

99%

90%

90.93%

90%

Effectiveness

2

1

2

1

2

1

2

5

12.90

10

5.93

5

6.99

10

Effectiveness Effectiveness

Effectiveness

93%

1,000

90% 90%

14,000 15,131

Effectiveness

60

1,418

1,155

1,167

1,155

598

   1,155

1,330

1,000

989

1,000

960

   1,000

8,000

11,541

8,000

10,977

   8,000

Effectiveness Effectiveness

1,000

1,004

1,000

1,392

1,000

790

   1,000

Effectiveness

10%

9%

10%

10%

10%

11.12%

10%

Reference Key On target/Above target Within 5% of target/At risk of not meeting target Did not meet Goal/At Risk of not meeting Goal  Discussion Needed No update available at this time

200

FY2017 FY2017 FY2018 FY2018  FY2019  FY2019  FY2020  FY2020  Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual Target Actual

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


Summary of Fleet Purchases 2020 Summary of Fleet Purchases 2020 Department/Fund Financial Services

Division/Program Name Water Billing

Div # 1602

Traffic Unit

4202

Youth Liaison

4303 4305

General Investigations

Emergency Medical Services Fire/EMS

4301

4702

Suppression

4801

Inspections

4901

Administration

4601

Code Compliance

5403

Buidling

5301

Sportsplex/Tennis

8409

Mullins Park

8102

Neighborhood Parks

8116

Beautification/ Landscape

8118

North Community Park

8103

Irrigation

8119

Cypress Park

8101

Development Services

Sportsplex/ Tennis

Parks & Recreation

Vehicle/Equipment Type Van, 7 Passenger Mini Patrol Vehicle, Full Size- rplcd w Tahoe Patrol Vehicle, Full Size- rplcd w Tahoe Patrol Vehicle, Full Size- rplcd w Tahoe Patrol Vehicle, Full Size- rplcd w Tahoe Patrol Vehicle, Full Size- rplcd w Tahoe Patrol Vehicle, Full Size- rplcd w Tahoe Patrol Vehicle, Full Size- rplcd w Tahoe Patrol Vehicle, Full Size- rplcd w Tahoe Patrol Vehicle, Full Size- rplcd w Tahoe Patrol Vehicle, Full Size- rplcd w Tahoe Patrol Vehicle, Full Size- rplcd w Tahoe Patrol Vehicle, Full Size- rplcd w Tahoe Patrol Vehicle, Full Size- rplcd w Tahoe Patrol Vehicle, Full Size- rplcd w Tahoe Patrol Vehicle, Full Size- rplcd w Tahoe Patrol Vehicle, Full Size- rplcd w Tahoe Patrol Vehicle, Full Size- rplcd w Tahoe Patrol Vehicle, Full Size- rplcd w Tahoe Patrol Vehicle, Full Size- rplcd w Tahoe Unmarked Pursuit Interceptor Vehicle Unmarked Pursuit Interceptor Vehicle- rplcd w Charger Unmarked Pursuit Interceptor Vehicle- rplcd w Charger Patrol Vehicle- Tuarus rplcd w Charger Admin Interceptor Vehicle- rplcd w Traverse Van, 8 passenger Van, Cargo Admin Specialty Vehicle- rplcd w Durango Admin PickupTruck- rplcd w PU Admin Specialty Vehicle- rplcd w Jeep Admin Specialty Vehicle- rplcd w Jeep Admin Vehicle-rplcd w Traverse Admin Vehicle- rplcd w Explorer Admin Specialty Vehicle- rplced w PU Admin Vehicle- rplcd w Durango Admin Vehicle- rplced w Traverse Admin Specialty Vehicle- rplcd w PU Rescue Transport Vehicle Rescue Transport Vehicle Extrication Tool Escape -rplcd w PU Explorer- rplcd w PU 3/4 ton pickup Truck - replaced with Full Size PU Ford Escape Hybrid- rplcd w full size PU Ford Escape Hybrid- rplcd w full size PU Truck, pickup Ford Escape Hybrid- rplcd w Compact PU Ford Escape Hybrid- rplcd w Compact PU Truck, Pickup 1/2 Ton- rplcd w Escape Truck, Pickup 1/2 Ton- rplcd w Escape SUV-small rplcd w Escape Workman w dump body Mower, Zero Turn 5 Gang Reel Mower Tractor Toro Sand Pro Truck 1 Ton Mower, Zero turn- to be replaced with 2 trailers Tractor Paint Machine Truck with Water Tank and pump- body chasis replacement Directional Arrows, DOT Truck, Pickup 3/4 ton Workman w dump body Workman w dump body Workman Chemical Sprayer Pickup- F150 Workman with dump body Spreader LELY Mower, Zero turn- to be replaced with a lift for 2135 Mini Trencher w trailer Truck, cab & chasis w crane Skid Loader w trailer Pickup 3/4 Ton Mower, Zero turn- replaced w lely spreader

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Year 2012 2013 2014 2013 2013 2013 2014 2014 2014 2013 2014 2010 2010 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2008 2011 2013 2013 2013 2014 2011 2011 2011 2012 2012 2013 2014 2014 2015 2013 2013 2014 2010 2010 2008 2010 2010 2008 2008 2009 2013 2012 2013 2007 2014 2014 2012 2007 2008 2015 2007 2012 2013 2013 2014 2013 2013 2015 2012 2004 2014 2008 2012 2013

Item ID 5005 9346 9367 9353 9355 9357 9376 9378 9384 9360 9386 9264 9279 9315 9318 9322 9330 9332 9334 9341 8081 8313 8314 8315 8080 9997 9975 8087 8091 8089 8097 8071 8072 8074 8076 8078 8083 7732 7731 1592 7007 7004 7009 7629 7628 6637 7643 6600 6021 6020 6011 1139 1142 1245 2102 1754 2226 1143 2101 1989 2270 1185 5713 1961 1962 1956 2022 1963 1959 1954 2223 2293 2198 2275 1353

Estimate FY 2020 27,093 46,186 46,186 46,186 46,186 46,186 46,186 46,186 46,186 46,186 46,186 46,186 46,186 46,186 46,186 46,186 46,186 46,186 46,186 46,186 28,998 28,998 28,998 28,998 29,277 29,058 36,846 29,147 31,563 29,114 29,114 29,277 33,522 31,563 29,147 29,277 31,563 343,480 343,480 25,150 27,272 27,272 27,272 24,761 24,761 24,761 22,374 22,374 25,786 25,786 25,786 21,756 20,213 61,439 62,519 30,684 51,530 21,230 62,519 3,774 41,964 4,320 28,301 21,756 21,756 42,095 32,381 21,664 6,375 20,000 10,000 76,500 56,663 41,016 6,375

201


Summary of Fleet Purchases 2020 (continued) Department/Fund

Division/Program Name

Div #

Streets

5601

Facilities

5701

Equipment Maintenance

5701

Public Works

Equipment Services

Water Distribution

6002

Wastewater Collection

6005

Utilities

Vehicle/Equipment Type Backhoe Truck, Pickup 1/2 ton Truck, Pickup 1/2 ton Cab-Chasis w dump body Truck, Dump 16 yard Roller, 3 Ton Genertor, Westside 350 KW Pickup truck 1/2 ton-crew cab Van, transit Massage board Continigency Ford Escape Hybrid 1 1/2 Ton Dump Truck Truck, 1 ton Utility, Cab & Chasis w utility body Truck, 1 ton Utility, Cab & Chasis w utility body SUV Small Hybrid Sewer Jet cleaner Van Cargo 1/2 ton

Total Fleet Budget—FY 2020 * Equipment to be refurbished in FY 2020

202

Year 2010 2013 2013 2014 2006 2006 1998 2010 2014 2018

Item ID 4459 4410 4421 4412 4449 4477 Gen-57 4414 4418 5735

2010 2011 2011 2014 2011 2011 2008

5720 3337 3316 3003 3001 3336 3302

Estimate FY 2020 100,000 32,680 32,680 64,840 133,810 73,899 200,000 35,510 36,120 13,100 53,000 25,786 64,840 51,530 52,550 25,786 169,625 38,252 4,380,240

Fiscal Year 2020 Annual Budget


SER VING

WITH EXCELLENCE, INNOVATION AND INTEGRITY

ANNUAL BUDGE T CITY OF CORAL SPRINGS, FLORIDA 9500 West Sample Road Coral Springs, Florida 33065 CoralSprings.org • 954-344-1000

Profile for City of Coral Springs

City of Coral Springs Adopted Annual Budget FY 2020  

City of Coral Springs Adopted Annual Budget FY 2020

City of Coral Springs Adopted Annual Budget FY 2020  

City of Coral Springs Adopted Annual Budget FY 2020