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ANNUAL REPORT FISCAL YEAR 2019


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

CITY OF CORAL SPRINGS OFFICIALS Scott J. Brook Mayor Joy Carter Vice Mayor Larry Vignola Commissioner Joshua Simmons Commissioner Shawn Cerra Commissioner Michael Goodrum City Manager John Hearn City Attorney

CITY OF PARKLAND OFFICIALS Christine Hunschofsky Mayor Ken Cutler Vice Mayor Stacy Kagan Commissioner Bob Mayersohn Commissioner Richard Walker Commissioner Nancy Morando City Manager

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Contents Message from the Fire Chief ....................................................................................................................................3 Executive Summary ..................................................................................................................................................5 Strategic Plan ...........................................................................................................................................................6 Our Communities ....................................................................................................................................................7 Budget/Financial Data .............................................................................................................................................8 Organizational Chart................................................................................................................................................9 Performance Measures .........................................................................................................................................10 Fire ...........................................................................................................................................................................21 EMS ..........................................................................................................................................................................26 Community Paramedic………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…….33 Fire Stations …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..35 Training ....................................................................................................................................................................50 Coral Springs Regional Institute of Public Safety .................................................................................................54 Community Risk Reduction .....................................................................................................................................59 Community Emergency Response Team (CERT)…………………………………………………………………………………………………64 Safety and Health ....................................................................................................................................................66 Communications .....................................................................................................................................................72 Emergency Management………………………..…………………………………………………………………………………………………………74 Public Information Officer .......................................................................................................................................75 Hurricane Dorian …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………......77 Community Involvement.........................................................................................................................................79 The Temple of Time ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….86 South Florida Urban Search and Rescue .................................................................................................................97 Disaster Medical Assistance Team …………………………………………………………………………………………………………..………..99 Special Ops - SWAT/Tactical Paramedics…………………………………………….………………………………………..………………….100 Honor Guard…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….……………….….…..102 Pipes and Drums …………………………………………………………………………………………………….…………………………………..……103 Coral Springs Professional Firefighters Benevolent Association……………………………………………….………..…….…...…104 Metro-Broward Professional Firefighters Local 3080…………………………………………………………………….….…….….…...105 Fire Explorer Program ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….…………….……....106 Awards and Achievements……………………………………………………………………………………………………………...…….……….…108

Mission: To preserve life and property through emergency medical services, fire suppression, risk reduction, public education and community partnerships.

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Message from the Fire Chief On behalf of the men and women of the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department, I proudly present the department’s 2019 Annual Report as a reflection of the dedication, professionalism, and commitment to the safety of our citizens, visitors, and firefighters. As you will see in the following pages, there were many accomplishments and achievements that occurred in each division last year. FY2019 was a year in which we strove to continue our healing as a department and a community, after the most horrific call in this agency’s history which occurred on February 14, 2018: the tragic shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Many of our events and initiatives were born out of this one incident, and we continue to learn and grow as an organization Fire Chief Frank Babinec and a family, with the goal to keep each other safe and healthy. Our response to the tragedy at MSD landed us into a club we wish we never had to join but afforded us the opportunity to share what we learned with police, fire, and school districts across the country. Several of our members spoke at conferences nationwide to share our experience, in the hopes that it would help other agencies better prepare for a similar large-scale mass casualty incident. At every one of these conferences, we dedicate our presentation to the victims of the Stoneman Douglas shooting, their families, friends, and the first responders and medical personnel that responded. We hope that sharing our experience will help save lives the next time a tragedy occurs. As part of a $1 million-dollar art grant from the Bloomberg Foundation, the City of Coral Springs was the recipient of five art installations to help “Inspire Community Healing after Gun Violence”. The first of these installments was a wooden structure called the Temple of Time, which was ceremonially burned on May 19th. The burn was a significant event for us as the pictures in this report will show. Throughout the rest of the year, we responded to several fires and medical calls, striving always to provide our residents, businesses, and visitors with the level of service they expect and deserve, and that we promise to provide. It is both our responsibility and our honor to provide outstanding service to our communities, and we remain committed to this mission. Although Hurricane Dorian did not make landfall in our area in September, our department stood ready for the potential impact that the storm might have had, and the exercise in storm preparedness always provides for us the opportunity to learn additional best practices for next time. Our members, both sworn and civilian, continued to volunteer their time and efforts in the

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local community, as well as statewide and beyond, and several assisted after Hurricane Michael devastated the panhandle last October. I am grateful for the continued excellent working relationship the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department has with our various partners, with our hospitals, and with our elected officials and city managers. We are fortunate to have Mayor Brook in Coral Springs, and Mayor Hunschofsky in Parkland along with a group of dedicated commissioners, to oversee our two communities, and we are grateful for their support of public safety. This past year saw the expansion of Station 42 in Parkland with a Rescue apparatus purchased, and personnel scheduled to begin in the beginning of the new fiscal year. This expansion, as well as some department retirements and other changes that took place, helped fuel significant growth in our department as we brought 23 new firefighters on board, and promoted several others to Driver Engineer, Lieutenant, Captain, Battalion Chief, and Assistant Chief. Our training division has furnished our growing membership with additional opportunities to strengthen their skills and develop new ones. I am honored to be the Fire Chief of this organization of outstanding men and women, and I look forward to their continued accomplishments as we end one year and begin the next. We hope for continued healing in our communities and remain #MSDStrong.

Frank Babinec Fire Chief

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department provides vital services to the community. From the collective efforts of our firefighters and administrative staff working with city management, other city departments, neighboring fire departments, Local 3080 and the Coral Springs Professional Firefighters Benevolent Association, and the citizens of the communities we serve, we will continue to ensure that our department meets the challenges that are a part of sustaining a first-rate organization. Throughout the year, we responded to over 15,000 incidents. We conducted over 6,300 fire inspections, almost 5,000 re-inspections, and participated in over 100 public education events, either in the community or at one of our fire stations. We’ve trained our own personnel, as well as that of other agencies via contract with our Coral Springs Regional Institute of Public Safety. We’ve developed personnel to take on higher ranked positions, and trained high school students through our Explorer post. We’ve volunteered at City events, and raised funds for local and national organizations through our Benevolent organization’s Pasta Dinner as well as the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life. We prepared for the possible impact of a major hurricane, and were recognized by various organizations nationwide for several of our initiatives. The data on the following pages will show you in great detail all the incidents to which we’ve responded, for Fire, EMS, Community Risk Reduction, and others, as well as give you a breakdown by response zone and when incidents occurred, and indicate what we feel is the most important statistic: response times. How quickly we get to you when you call us, will always be our most crucial goal. In 2015, we produced a Strategic Plan for the department, shown on the next page, and we will continue to strive to meet the goals and objectives we created.

The Chief Officers of the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department Scott Nebrasky, John Whalen, Steve Frey, Stephanie Palmer, Jason Gonzalez, Juan Cardona, Frank Babinec, Michael McNally, Rob McGilloway, Bruce Bowers, Michael Caldaro, Michael Moser, Eduardo Lopez, and Michael Ferrara (not pictured: Joe Skrumbellos, and Christopher Bator)

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The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department, together with both external and internal stakeholders, developed a Strategic Plan for the years 2015 thorugh 2020. While the diagram below will give you a brief overview, the entire Strategic Plan can be viewed on our website at CoralSprings.org/fire.

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OUR COMMUNITIES The City of Coral Springs was incorporated in July 1963 and encompasses a total land area of 23.97 square miles. We are the 15th largest city in the state of Florida by population, and the 5th largest in Broward County. According to data from the BEBR (Bureau of Economic and Business Research), the City of Coral Springs is home to 128,757 residents as of 2018. Just to the north of Coral Springs, the City of Parkland has a population of 32,742, within 14.32 square miles. Of the 24 mile long Sawgrass Expressway, 11.2 miles run through the cities of Coral Springs and Parkland.

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BUDGET and FINANCIAL DATA The entire budget for the new fiscal year can be found on the City of Coral Springs website at: CoralSprings.org/annualbudget.

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PERFORMANCE MEASURES – October 2018 to September 2019 The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department (CSPFD) incidents are up 0.3% from 15,367 (FY 2018) to 15,415 (FY 2019). The first arriving unit maintained a response time of 8 minutes or less 97.0% of the time for Emergency calls (EMS and Fire), and 10 minutes or less 98% of the time for Non-Emergency calls (Other). On average, CSPFD responded to 42 calls per day.

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COMPONENTS OF RESPONSE TIME For the purpose of this report, the response time components will include the following times: Call Processing, Turnout, Travel, and Response.

Call Processing Time: The interval between receipt of the emergency alarm at the public safety answering point, and the moment when the dispatcher knows sufficient information and applicable units are notified of the emergency, defined in NFPA 1221. NFPA 1221 specifies that 95% of alarms shall be answered within 30 seconds, and in no case shall the initial call taker’s response to an alarm exceed 60 seconds.

Turnout Time: The turnout time begins when units acknowledge notification of the emergency to the beginning point of response time.

Travel time: The time interval that begins when a unit is en-route to the emergency incident and ends when the unit arrives at the scene.

Response Time: The time that begins when responding units are enroute to the emergency incident and ends when responding units arrive on scene. The objective of eight minutes (480 seconds) or less, within the 90th percentile of the time is the established response time.

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INCIDENTS BY CALL TYPE

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ALL INCIDENTS BY HOUR (In a 24-HOUR span) The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department responds to all types of incidents every day, 24 hours a day. The demand for services varies according to the day of the week, and the time of the day or night. Another factor that determines demand is the type of call (Emergency Medical Services, Fire, or Other call types).

The demand for EMS (medical calls) is relatively lower in the early hours between one and five, when people are sleeping. The busiest time begins during the morning rush hour around six, and it increases throughout the day, and into the early evening.

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Incidents related to the “other” category include calls for public service assistance, persons in distress, and animal rescues to name a few. The busiest time for these types of calls are between eight in the morning and eight at night.

Fire calls increase between lunch and dinnertime.

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PRIMARY RESPONSES BY STATION AND UNIT

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FIRE Our Core Values Life – We value and respect all life; that of the citizens we serve, as well as our members. Integrity – We are committed to the highest level of moral, ethical conduct and personal accountability. Professionalism – Through leadership, all members are committed to delivering quality service in a safe and timely manner. Compassion – We value an empathetic workforce that seeks to support, understand, and meet the needs of our community. Innovation – We are committed to developing and utilizing leading-edge techniques, procedures, and equipment through continuing education and training.

Assistant Chief Steve Frey, Battalion Chief Eduardo Lopez A Shift

Assistant Chief John Whalen, Battalion Chief Scott Nebrasky B Shift

Assistant Chief Jason Gonzalez, Battalion Chief Michael Ferrara C Shift

The department operates four primary divisions to further our mission: Fire, EMS, Training and Community Risk Reduction (CRR). Our Fire and EMS divisions work a 24 hour shift every third day. Each shift operates under the command of an Assistant Fire Chief and a Battalion Chief, who are responsible for all aspects of running a shift of approximately 55 members that include Captains, Lieutenants, Driver Engineers, and Firefighter Paramedics.

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EMS

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The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department EMS Division’s goal is to preserve the health, safety and welfare, as well as enhance the quality of life, of the residents and visitors of Coral Springs and Parkland, by providing the highest level of pre-hospital emergency medical care possible, thereby improving the outcomes of catastrophic illness and significant injury, while staying on the forefront of medical advancements through innovation, training, and technology in a workplace built on trust, opportunity and teamwork. We accomplish these objectives in a caring environment with an emphasis on the safety and professional development of all employees, and by maintaining positive relationships with our healthcare partners in the community. The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department EMS Division remains strong. Despite the tremendous impact caused by the horrific events at Marjory Stoneman Douglas over one year ago, our crews remain positive and motivated to continue to provide the care that our citizens and visitors deserve. This tragedy has caused a great impact in the lives not only of our community, but our emergency responders as well. The strong measures we had put in place for several years in terms of establishing clear protocols, procuring the necessary equipment and supplies, training with law enforcement agencies, and establishing clear communications with the area hospitals were all important factors which helped us take care of our community at such a difficult time. This year we have been able to put several new medical protocols in place, as well as update others that allow us to treat patients in ways that are more effective. Some of these protocols are related to respiratory distress, overdose, and trauma. Every department member has received protocol update training that allows them to perform these procedures. After losing one of our own to suicide in 2018, our fire department leadership team has worked extremely hard to ensure that our members have all the necessary resources that can help them deal with the stresses associated with their jobs as firefighter paramedics. This includes access to a variety of options such as clinicians, animal therapy, and yoga. We will continue to search for ways in which we can support our members in maintaining their mental well-being. This year, we were awarded the American Heart Association Mission Lifeline Gold Plus Award in recognition of our efforts to improve cardiac care for our community. Our Quality Assurance and Quality Improvement Program continues to help our firefighters sharpen their medical skills and find ways to improve our EMS protocols through documentation review. This translates into better results in the way we care for our patients. This past year we received several EMS related awards. The entire CSPFD was the recipient of both the 2018 Broward Health North Hospital and the Broward Health Medical Center Paramedic of the Year

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awards for our actions at the Parkland mass shooting. Lieutenant Lazaro Ojeda was the recipient of the 2018 Fire Chiefs Association of Broward County Dave Foster Paramedic of the Year Award. The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department continues to be recognized as a model agency for many throughout the state and the country. We fulfill many requests for assistance and collaboration with others who seek to achieve the same level of excellence.

Overview of the EMS Division The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department EMS Division ran 10,622 calls for service this past year – 52.2% of these calls resulted in transport to a healthcare facility.

The following are some of the types of calls that the EMS Division responded to this past year: • • • • • • • •

Car, motorcycle, bicycle accidents: 1,117 Cardiac arrest: 83 Drownings: 9 Strokes: 85 Falls: 1,059 Overdose related incidents: 119 Diabetic emergencies: 153 Shortness of breath: 271

Left, Lt. Michael Watts listens to an 87-year-old patient being transported after a fall. Below, Lieutenant Rob Thomas

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ROLE OF THE EMS DIVISION CHIEF Division Chief of EMS Juan Cardona serves as the administrative director of the EMS division, managing those functions that support the ability of our department to deliver the highest quality of medical/trauma patient care possible. His primary responsibility is to ensure that every fire department member has the tools necessary, in terms of resources, equipment, apparatus, training, support, etc. to ensure the wellbeing of our community. He assures department compliance with county, state and federal EMS requirements and regulations. Chief Cardona is responsible for incident emergency response including supervision of on-scene personnel, as well as command, control, and operational decision making when required. He assists in strategic planning, organizing, coordinating and administering fire suppression, emergency medical treatment, hazardous materials, community paramedic program, and other activities of the fire department, such as the paramedic internship program and standby EMS Details at high EMS Division Chief Juan Cardona school football games, and local events. Chief Cardona speaks at many EMS related conferences and workshops throughout the world.

MEDICAL DIRECTOR The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department is extremely fortunate to have the highly acclaimed and skilled physician Dr. Peter Antevy as its Medical Director. The Medical Director is responsible for establishing protocols, reviewing the latest research and evidence-based medicine findings to put in place new programs to improve medical care for the community. He is the liaison between the fire department and all health agencies. He advocates for EMS and the importance of proper prehospital care. Dr. Antevy continues to provide excellent medical direction to our crews. He continues to work on strengthening the Greater Broward EMS Medical Directors Association group so that other fire and EMS agencies from Broward and Palm Beach County can join. Dr. Antevy has been instrumental in the establishment of several new protocols and training Dr. Peter Antevy programs for all our crews. He is a sought-after speaker and presenter at many conferences, and in the last fiscal year, Dr. Antevy has traveled with Chief Babinec and others to present on our response to the Stoneman Douglas shooting. Dr. Antevy has become a driving force in EMS not only locally and at the state of Florida level, but all over the United States. He also receives recognition in many countries around the world, where his initiatives, exemplified by the protocols and practices we have put in place, are constantly being emulated by others.

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EMS CONTINUOUS QUALITY IMPROVEMENT GROUP (CQI)

Lieutenant Lazaro Ojeda oversees the development and implementation of this vital program. Under the direction of the EMS Division Chief and our Medical Director, the members of this group provide important feedback and look for training opportunities through the review of run reports. Through a partnership with area hospitals, the group has been able to cross-reference return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and survival rates. Recently, the CQI group has begun to enter data into Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES). The information obtained from this database will allow the Fire Chief to use its data to develop Market Leader-type changes to better serve our citizens.

Lieutenant Lazaro Ojeda

During fiscal year 2019 (ESO Report writing system), the CQI Group conducted 409 total reviews that included: • • • • •

74 Cardiac Arrests 58 Stroke Alerts 128 Trauma Calls 92 Cardiac Alerts 13 Drug Facilitated Intubations RSI/DSI

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Firefighter Paramedic Spencer Ginn

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COMMUNITY PARAMEDIC The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department Community Paramedic Program (CP) remains one of the most innovative and forward-thinking ideas in healthcare. Our goal is to put in place a model designed to improve the health of the population, at lower costs, and with patient satisfaction as a strong performance measure. The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department has placed one experienced paramedic in an 8 hour a day, five days per week schedule. The CSPFD Community Paramedic has been tasked with conducting house visits to patients who traditionally have used the 911 system as their primary source of healthcare or for issues that are not necessarily medical emergencies. “The goal is to help our citizens make better use of available emergency services and find ways to add value to their lives by helping them stay healthy.� Many patients simply are not aware that there are resources available to them other than an already taxed 911 system. Community Paramedic Susan Toolan The Community Paramedic program is going strong. We continue to work with our high-EMS-user population to find ways to reduce the number of calls to 911 for non-emergent issues. We also work with our residents at higher risk of falling to provide them with fall prevention education, as well as resources that can help them avoid falling and sustaining an injury. We continue to work with patients that have been discharged from the hospital after being treated for CHF, pneumonia, diabetes, hip or knee replacements, and who are at a high risk for re-admission. The goal is to help them obtain the necessary resources so that they can remain healthy and out of the hospital. We continue to get referrals from our crews and are able to assist in providing the best resource(s) for our residents. We provide community paramedic resources and assistance to over 400 patients every year. Susan, who has been with the department for 21 years, also participates in several community events throughout the year and maintains a Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/CSFDCP/

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Reaching out to our vulnerable populations registry before Hurricane Dorian

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STATIONS The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department responds to calls for service from 5 fire stations in Coral Springs, and 3 in Parkland. Each station is responsible for a designated response zone, although all stations are equipped and prepared to respond to any emergency where they are needed.

43 • 64 • 71 • 80 • 95 • 42 • 97 • 109

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CORAL SPRINGS FIRE STATIONS STATION 43 - 4550 Rock Island Road Originally named Station 1 in a former location, Station 43 opened in its current location in 1988 and is named for former member William Buchanan. The former station was torn down in June of 2016 and a new station, funded through a General Obligation bond, opened in March 2017 as a station that will house firefighters, apparatus, and equipment well into the future.

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STATION 64 – 500 Ramblewood Drive In 1977, Fire Station 2 opened to protect the southeast edge of Coral Springs. Volunteers provided service under Chief Russ Donovan. Fire Station 2 adopted its Broward County number of 64 and underwent various changes through the years, leading to a renovation in 2008. Station 64 has been located at 500 Ramblewood Drive for more than 30 years.

Station 64’s new engine participates in a traditional Wet Down ceremony for new apparatus

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STATION 71 – 11800 NW 41st Street As Coral Springs began to grow and develop in the marshy swamplands in the northwest area of the City, a third fire station was needed. Station 3, constructed at 11800 N.W. 41st Street, provided service to the expanding area. Station 3 became Station 71, its official Broward County designation, and served as a central training point for the then-volunteer Coral Springs Fire Department. In 1991, the City built a four-story training tower behind Station 71 to improve on-site fire service training. Former member Russell Cagle earned the honor of having the station named after him when he retired. Station 71 was torn down and a new station built at the same location in 2012.

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71

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Station 80 – 2825 Coral Springs Drive Coral Springs Fire Department needed to house volunteers in a central location. The building, located at 2801 Coral Springs Drive, became the home of Station 4. The building was home to the Police Department and other essential public safety services. Station 4 gave way to its Broward County designation of number 80 and became the City’s main fire station because of its location in the heart of Coral Springs. Heavy call volume and the transition from a volunteer to paid professional department placed a heavy toll on the small firehouse. The City recognized the need for an expansion. In 2010, a new era in the City began with a complete Station 80 transformation meant for career firefighters. The new Station 80 is adjacent to the renovated Public Safety Building and is the first LEED certified fire station, with solar panels on the roof. As the central station in the City, Station 80 houses a 100’ platform apparatus, an additional 107’ aerial unit, and a primary rescue, as well as the dive boat, a special events detail unit, and the shift’s Battalion Chief.

Station 80's new Rescue participates in a traditional Wet Down ceremony for new apparatus

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80

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Station 95 – 300 Coral Ridge Drive Coral Springs Fire Department opened its fifth and final fire station in 1994. Station 5 received its Broward County designation as number 95. Located in the southwest corner of the City at 300 Coral Ridge Drive, Station 95 serves as the primary unit for the Sawgrass Expressway. In June of 2016, the station was torn down and a new building, a twin to Station 43, opened in April 2017.

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95

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PARKLAND FIRE STATIONS Station 42 – 6500 Parkside Drive • STATION 97 – 6650 N. University Drive

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42

47

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STATION 109 – 11601 Hillsboro Blvd Fire Station 109 was built to serve the growing western part of Parkland. Its grand opening was in April 2015. This station houses an advanced life support suppression and transport rescue unit.

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109

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TRAINING

Division Chief Robert McGilloway

Division Chief Stephanie Palmer

Battalion Chief Michael Caldaro

The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department has striven to maintain the highest level of training and over the past year we have continued to prosper. Our philosophy of safe and functional company training has bolstered the levels of confidence of each member making them more proficient in their personal skills which is a testament to the dedication of our membership and our training division.

The training division has a multitude of responsibilities outside of the development, delivery and oversight of daily, weekly and monthly requirements for in-service training to our members. The Training Division recognized the need to restructure in order to streamline communication and define roles and responsibilities within the division. Battalion Chief Stephanie Palmer was promoted to Division Chief of In-Service Training for the department. Battalion Chief Mike Caldaro was reassigned to the department’s Training Division and the addition of two Training Officer’s special assignment positions were also added to bring consistent best practices to our members. Division Chief Robert McGilloway is responsible for the Coral Springs Regional Institute for Public Safety and promotional testing for our members. The role of the Training Officer is changing toward adding value and protection to the organization. These changes have resulted in Fire Departments seeing increased workloads that in turn require increased training demands, skill requirements, and contact hours to ensure competency and safety. Fire service training is no longer simply fire based, nor solely decided on a local level. Fire departments are now guided, in part, by national fire service standards, accreditation, certification, and continuing education requirements. There are also increased societal and financial influences with emphasis on topics of firefighter safety and health, expanded roles, large incidents, incident management, current affairs, cultural diversity, ethics, legal issues, and use of mutual aid and regionalization. The Training Division is focused on implementing the best practices. Creating a workforce that is flexible, proactive and identifies, reduces and eliminates redundancies. The Administration’s expectation is that the workforce be well trained, innovative, and ethical always. The increase of line officers (Lieutenants and Captains), Inspectors, and new employees, as well as officer training and leadership mentorship, is essential over the next five years.

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The Department is prepared to carry out the mission and values daily with readiness and training: Readiness: At any given moment we are ready to respond efficiently and effectively to change the outcome of the emergency. Training: Provides the foundation to be ready. This includes hands-on evolutions (drills) conducted regularly to support the capabilities of the department. It allows everyone to understand the capabilities of the department and what resources are needed to be brought in for additional support. This is done via company training that falls within Insurance Services Office (ISO) Guidelines and includes: • • •

Preplanning Training conducted with Community Risk Reduction State Fire Classes County wide & Regional Mutual Aid Drills

The division conducted the following training and member development: • • • • • • • • •

Fire Behavior, water supply and tactical considerations for the Company Officers. EMS training, which included Rapid Sequence Intubation, Bleeding Control, ACLS, Pit Crew CPR, Crush Injuries, Decontamination Procedures, Pediatric Emergencies and ESO Software. Division of Forestry Response Capabilities. Safety Stand Down program delivered with Health & Wellness itinerary. Forcible Entry Training: Breaching doors and increasing means of egress. Extrication & stabilization training off-site. Three (3) New Hire Orientation Programs (up to 8 weeks of training) with a total of 23 new hires Member Development Programs for Driver Engineers & Lieutenants (up to 80 hours each) Promotional Testing for Assistant Chief position

Lieutenant Officer Development participants Caroline Quevillon, Megan Robbins, Rob Thomas, and Juan Garcia with Training Division Chief Stephanie Palmer

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Supervisory program for Community Risk Reduction HazMat & Controlled Substance exposure training with CSPD New Officers Training tracking for ISO with Company Officers Executive Leadership Training with Tenzinga, Inc. Haz-Mat Awareness & Preplanning with crews

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TOTAL TRAINING HOURS: 53,810

Training Battalion Chief Michael Caldaro, EMS Division Chief Juan Cardona, Training Division Chief Stephanie Palmer, Lieutenant Johana Cinque, Captain Justin Parrinello, Office Assistant Linda Meyer, and CSRIPS Division Chief Robert McGilloway 53

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CORAL SPRINGS REGIONAL INSTITUTE OF PUBLIC SAFETY The Coral Springs Regional Institute of Public Safety (CSRIPS), formerly the Coral Springs Fire Academy, sits on approximately four acres in the Coral Springs Corporate Park. CSRIPS is licensed by the Florida Department of Education Commission for Independent Education. The EMT and Paramedic programs are approved by the Florida Department of Health and the Firefighter I & II program is approved by the Florida Bureau of Standards and Training. Additionally, the Firefighter I & II, EMT and Paramedic programs are all nationally accredited by the Council of Occupational Education and the Paramedic program is also accredited by CoAEMSP/CAAHEP. CSRIPS conducts classes year-round for individuals seeking to become a firefighter and those individuals entering the medical field. In addition to these individuals, CSRIPS conducts classes for career firefighters both onsite and throughout the region. CSRIPS has an extensive career enhancing course list. Firefighters can receive certifications in: • • • • •

Florida Urban Search and Rescue (FLUSAR) Driver/Aerial Live Fire Fire Officer Fire Investigator/Inspector

Because of our “commitment to excellence” throughout the region, we have the opportunity of being contracted by other agencies to conduct in-service training, promotional exams and new hire assessments. This service allows CSRIPS to be on the cutting edge of training while creating new partnerships to strengthen the overall fire service.

To Educate… To Facilitate… To Motivate… and prepare our students to proudly serve the community and continuously uphold our

“Commitment to Excellence”

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CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

Your local firefighters take an oath to serve the community. We at CSRIPS believe that mindset begins in the classroom. Our students in the Firefighter I & II, EMT and Paramedic programs not only strive for excellence in the classroom, they also begin their work in the community. Each graduating class takes on a relationship with a charity to give back to a worthy cause. This year saw our students give back to:

• •

Firefighter Family Fund Rally for Reagan

• •

Veterans Trust Joe DiMaggio Hospital

This academic year has brought about more milestones for CSRIPS. • • • •

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November – achieved CoAEMSP accreditation for Paramedic December – added Florida National Guard Education Duty for Dollars as part of VA benefits July – achieved COE instructional service center status for Martin County satellite location July – achieved Department of Ed approval for Martin County satellite location

FY2019 ANNUAL REPORT


CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

Number Of Classes

Grand Total

Number Of Students

326

3,994

Continuing Education

Contract Classes

Number of Classes

Number of Students

Class Name

Number of Classes

Number of Students

EVOC

9

94

Promotional

9

240

DE 1

4

91

Private Specialty

22

152

DE 2

8

104

Total

31

392

Aerial

3

37

Rope Ops

2

48

Rope Tech

2

40

Class Name

Conf Sp Ops

2

35

Conf Sp Tech

2

Trench Ops

Class Name

Accredited Programs Number of Classes

Number of Students

Firefighter I & II

7

229

35

EMT-Basic

9

197

2

32

EMT-Paramedic

8

152

Trench Tech

2

34

Total

24

578

SC Ops

3

35

SC Tech

2

24

VMR Ops

1

23

VMR Tech

1

21

Class Name

Number of Classes

Number of Students

LFTI

2

30

Open House

8

419

LFAT

2

32

Total

8

419

LFTI-R

3

22

Retention

2

19

EMR

5

77

14

62

Origin & Cause

1

15

Arson Investigation

1

24

Latent Investigation

1

12

Entrance PAT

4

261

PAT Practice

8

100

Scaffolding

2

25

201

1,845

Firefighter Safety Stand Down

6

200

Motorcycle Education

2

12

Autism Awareness

1

10

Fire Chemistry

1

8

Miscellaneous

3

9

302

3,416

Fire Officer Classes

CPR

Total

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DIVE TEAM Deputy Fire Chief Michael McNally is the commander of our Underwater Search and Rescue Dive Team, a public safety diving organization. To be a member of the dive team on dive status, candidates must demonstrate their abilities in a pool environment and be certified as either PADI Open Water or Public Safety Diver and all must be certified Dive Rescue Specialist through an internationally recognized diving organization. Candidates must also demonstrate they are comfortable in zero visibility and black water environments. Once selected, divers are provided additional training in search and rescue diving, equipment maintenance, dry suit diving, and underwater communications. Dive team operations include initiating search and rescue operations in underwater environments. The team also provides assistance to local law enforcement when requested. The dive team Deputy Chief Michael McNally conducts both land and boat-based operations in a variety of challenging bodies of water. The dive team’s primary focus on any operation is safety. Public safety diving is an exciting, challenging, and rewarding field. It is also considered to be one of the most hazardous that requires a strong commitment. Members of the dive team are highly motivated and professional and are committed to safety. The dive team is considered an elite group within the Fire Department and membership is highly competitive. In the past year, the team has conducted multiple training events, tested new equipment, and added several new members to the team. The department is in the process of replacing all the full-face masks, switching out all scuba bottle valves and critical first stage regulators and will be issuing masks to each member. The team is constantly looking for ways to be more efficient and safer when conducting these operations.

During fiscal year 2019, specialized training conducted with the Dive Rescue Team that included: • •

• • •

Quarterly training conducted on black water operations for all members Annual Watermanship and Skills Assessment test completed in accordance with National Fire Protection Association requirements New full-facemask familiarization Mutual aid training with area departments Training of new team members as Public Safety Diver and Dive Rescue Specialist

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CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

COMMUNITY RISK REDUCTION The primary mission of the Community Risk Reduction Division (CRRD) is to employ the three “E’s” of fire prevention to prevent fire incidents or personal injury before they occur. The 3 E’s are Engineering, Education, and finally, Enforcement. The CRRD staff is multi-certified and highly qualified to provide a wide range of specialized interventions, technical consultations and fire code enforcement to help ensure safety of the residents and visitors to the cities of Coral Springs and Parkland. As Fire Marshal, Division Chief Bruce Bowers oversees the Community Risk Reduction Division. Chief Bowers reports directly to Deputy Fire Chief Michael McNally. Chief Bowers is actively involved in a variety of organizations that draft additions to or amendments to the fire code at the local, state and federal level. Additionally, he sits on the City’s Development Review Committee. This committee reviews all new Fire Marshal Bruce Bowers buildings (or those that are altered) prior to building permit application submittal. This is to ensure that fire apparatus have access and can maneuver within the site, that there are ample fire hydrants and that they are properly located. He is on the City’s Traffic Management Team, which reviews all matters that have the potential to cause changes in vehicular movement, which could impact response times for first responders. Chief Bowers is also a member of the County’s Drowning Prevention Task Force as well as the Fire Code Committee of the Broward County Board of Rules and Appeals.

The CRRD provides fire inspections, building permit plan reviews, public life safety education, as well as fire-related investigation services for the residents of Coral Springs and Parkland.

Throughout the year, we perform fire and life safety inspections on over 6,369 properties. These include commercial businesses, residential properties containing three or more living units, assisted living facilities, group homes, foster homes, and home-based day care occupancies. We enforce applicable provisions of the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Life Safety Codes and Standards, Florida Fire Prevention Code, State Statutes and Administrative Codes, and the City of Coral Springs and City of Parkland Municipal Codes of Ordinances as it relates to life safety enforcement for the public.

These inspections help mitigate potential hazards that may contribute to a fire developing, a personal injury occurring, or hindrance to a rapid evacuation. In the event there are violations noted during the inspection site visit, results are noted, and a re-inspection is performed, if necessary. During Fiscal Year 2019, CRRD members conducted 4,940 re-inspections.

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While the ultimate goal is to achieve compliance with fire codes, should an owner fail to make the required life-safety repairs, the case is processed and set for a hearing in front of a Special Magistrate. At this hearing, the presiding magistrate will determine, based on the severity of the violation, a daily fine amount until the repairs are completed. During Fiscal Year 2019, a total of 94 cases were taken to Special Magistrate which resulted in $14,293 in fines and fees. The CRRD performed 1,742 architectural plan reviews prior to any new building being built and any new construction alterations to an existing occupancy. Following approval of the blueprints and issuance of a building permit, these inspections are made throughout the project to ensure the approved plan is adhered to. These inspections are performed on the structural elements, as well as a wide variety of specialized systems, which include: • • • • • • • •

Fire Sprinkler Systems Fire Alarm Systems Restaurant Hood Suppression Systems Dry Agent Systems for Computer Rooms or other high dollar loss, sensitive areas Propane Tank Installations including gas lines Fuel Tank and Piping Installations for Vehicle Fueling Stations Communication Systems Emergency Backup Power Systems

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CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT • • • • • • • •

Above ground Fuel Storage Tanks Paint Spray Booth Suppression Systems used in auto body shops Fire Hydrant Placement and Supply Piping Fire Flow Tests Smoke Detectors Smoke Evacuation Tests Hazardous Materials Storage Mobile Food Vendors

During Fiscal Year 2019, CRRD conducted 1,810 Building Permit inspections. Some special events, due to the increased number of people in attendance or the nature of the event, could pose a higher than normal risk of possible safety breaches. Therefore, our Fire Inspectors are present at these special events as well. Their main goal is to make sure exits remain readily accessible, ensure fire and life safety systems are maintained, and, should an issue arise, render the necessary aid. In addition to special events, CRRD also conducts fire watches at facilities where a required life safety system is out of service. Should emergency services be necessary, early notification to dispatch and assistance with resident and/or employee evacuation is instrumental in saving lives. During Fiscal Year 2019, CRRD participated in 133 such special events. Per fire code regulations, a fire investigation is required to determine origin and cause of the fire. Our Fire Inspectors are cross trained as fire investigators and conduct these fire investigations. They have a rotating schedule that guarantees someone is on call to perform investigations when needed. If arson is suspected, the case is turned over to the State Fire Marshal Investigators and local detectives follow through if an arrest is necessary. During Fiscal Year 2019, CRRD completed 14 fire investigations. The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department hosted the 2019 Summer Sizzle Fire & Safety Kids Camp. The Summer Sizzle is a countywide public education event that delivers fire and safety education to over 1,200 kids from summer camps throughout Broward County. Numerous fire departments take part in this interactive four-day event to share their knowledge. This year, the students were educated in: • • • • • • • • • •

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Bicycle Helmet Safety; Crossing the Street; Wheeled Sports Safety; Booster Seats; and Seat Belt Usage Water Safety Crawl Low in Smoke with a Simulated Fire Escape Plan Hurricane Safety with a Simulated Hurricane Calling 911; Smoke Alarms; Get Out, Stay Out Fire Truck Tour; Spraying the Fire Hose Meet a Firefighter and Learn about Bunker Gear Minor First Aid for Elementary age CPR; Bleeding Control for Middle and High Schoolers Fire Extinguisher Training

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CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

The Summer Sizzle was an extremely successful event with many of our residents being able to take part. Another critical mission of the CRRD is to educate the public on Fire and Life Safety issues. During Fiscal Year 2019, CRRD conducted 188 car seat installations, coordinated 49 fire apparatus appearances at schools and various community events, coordinated 22 station tours and participated in 52 Fire Safety Trailer presentations as part of the Safety Town curriculum. In addition, they completed a variety of life-safety education presentations to students at all grade levels, scout and youth groups and other community organizations. Life-Safety education areas include: • • • • • • • • • •

Basic Fire Safety Education for preschoolers Home Fire Escape Drills for elementary school children CPR Introduction Experiences for the entire community Sleep Safe and Car Seat Education for families Hurricane Season Preparation and Planning Drowning Prevention Education and Access to Swim Programs for both adults and children Fire Safety Response Training for staff at special risk community locations Safety Planning for schools and businesses Evacuation and Fire Drill Coordination at community educational and childcare locations Specialized Programs in cooperation with our Fire Academy and Police Department

During Fiscal Year 2019, CRRD recorded 34,902 public education contacts. This is 101% higher than the 17,352 contacts in FY2018. The achievement is significant considering that in September 2019, Hurricane Dorian affected the community, and several programs and events had to be cancelled.

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These CRRD programs have been recognized as “Best Practice” models in both drowning prevention and the wideranging public education arena. Public Education Officers Robert Bertone and Daniel Chavez have received many accolades in the Public Safety field. CRRD is a data driven and creative marketer of both the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department’s missions and the City of Coral Springs core values. For more information on the Coral SpringsParkland Fire Department’s Community Risk Reduction Division, as well as additional links to Fire Prevention Safety Information, please visit our website at:

http://www.coralsprings.org/government/otherdepartments-and-services/fire/community-riskreductiondivision

Left Side, top to bottom: Thomas Hayes, Kenneth Henley, Lisa Weiss, Bruno Matos, Daniel Chavez, Harold Alcalde, Lici Merritt Right Side, top to bottom: Lisa Caggiano, Ralph Troino, Jonathan Berger, Alysa Abzug, Bob Bertone, Bruce Bowers

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CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

COMMUNITY EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM (CERT) The Coral Springs-Parkland all-volunteer Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) program educates residents about disaster preparedness and how to respond to emergency situations in their community. When emergencies happen, CERT members give critical support to first responders and provide immediate assistance to victims at a disaster site. CERT members can also help with nonemergency projects that help improve the safety of the community. Using classroom and hands-on training, CERT members develop skills to assist others when professional responders are not immediately available. CERT members receive 25 hours of basic training in the areas of Small Fire Suppression, First Aid, Triage, Team Organization, Light Search and Rescue, Disaster Psychology, and Terrorism Awareness. CERT volunteers also receive CPR, AED, and Stop the Bleed training. The awardwinning Coral Springs-Parkland CERT was recognized this year by the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department with a Team Citation for all their hard work.

Coral Springs-Parkland CERT is one of the most active teams in South Florida. In the last 12 months, Coral Springs-Parkland CERT has been activated numerous times to support the police and fire departments for events such as fires, gas leaks, hazmat situations, and missing person searches. The team has responded to multiple canteen/rehab calls in neighboring cities to assist other CERTs while they assist their fire departments. Since its inception, CSPFD CERT has responded to hundreds of calls. In addition to the calls listed above, CERT has responded to SWAT activations, large brush fires, a recycling plant fire that burned for over 24 hours, and the Goodyear Blimp crash. Coral Springs-Parkland CERT is regularly called upon to help search for missing persons that may be in danger. This includes children, teens or adults with disabilities or cognitive impairments. CERT has been credited with assisting with dozens of successful searches over the years. In FY 2018-2019, the team was activated and responded 15 times. Coral Springs-Parkland CERT had a very productive year. Our volunteers accounted for over 1,700 volunteer hours. During that timeframe, CERT responded to assist in the search for 3

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CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

missing persons, 4 fires and 2 gas leaks or hazardous materials scenes. The CERT Canteen also responded to 2 incidents where rehab services were provided to first responders working at the scenes. CERT mobilized 10 members to assist first responders at the 1-year anniversary of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School tragedy.

The Regional CERT Academy Basic Training Classes, offered at the Coral Springs Regional Institute of Public Safety, continue to provide training for new CERT volunteers from across the region. Coral Springs-Parkland CERT trained 56 volunteers from Coral Springs, Parkland, and eight other neighboring cities. These trainees have gone on to volunteer in their respective communities. CERT members train continuously throughout the year. This year, members participated in a combined total of almost 450 hours of ongoing and refresher training. Training topics include triage, first aid, fire suppression (using fire extinguishers), cribbing, building markings, and more. CPR has always been a major component of CERT training. This year, 50 members were certified or recertified in CPR. Starting in January 2018, Stop the Bleed was incorporated into our training. Over 100 residents were trained this year in Stop the Bleed. Members receive the training during the CERT Academy Basic Training class, and during our annual refresher. CERT Team Leader Steve Mitchell walks the track at the American Cancer Society's Relay for Life

CERT Members regularly participate in public education events around Coral Springs and Parkland in conjunction with the Community Risk Reduction Division. Members educate the public on the basics of using a fire extinguisher, drowning prevention classes and swimming lessons, hands only CPR, and any other questions residents may have. For more information about CERT, and instructions on how to join CERT, visit www.coralspringscert.org.

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SAFETY AND HEALTH The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department continues to be a leader in the area of Safety and Health not only in our organization but around the County, State, and Nation. The Safety and Health Committee (SHC) strives to provide the safest and healthiest work environment possible for all members of the department. Now in our fourth year, the SHC has completed numerous projects and continues to work on many other new and exciting advances in the Safety and Health areas. Under the direction of the Fire Chief, the program is led by Assistant Chief John Whalen and Battalion Chief Chris Bator, as well as a very dedicated group of men and women from all areas of the organization. Each shift and each division are represented. Members include EMS Chief Juan Cardona, Battalion Chief Michael Caldaro, Captain Joe Russoniello, Captain Ronald Abou-Semaan, Captain Zachary Roseboom, Lt. Kandice Oltz, Fire Inspector Daniel Chavez, Office Assistant Karen Pietrafesa and from our Risk Management Division, Tracy Szatkowski.

The main goal of the SHC is to reduce the risk of injury and exposure to our members by providing information on several topics, and monitoring trends relating to the Health and Safety of our members and to apply the information, research, and best practices to impact the way the organization conducts itself for the better.

The SHC meets as a group at least once per quarter and promotes an agenda to improve or modify a current policy or guideline to rectify a specific issue that may arise. The committee is tasked with developing a plan to address the issue and draft a policy, procedure, training, or best practice and submit the recommendations to the Fire Chief for approval. Once approved, the information is sent out to the department for implementation. Over the past four years, and this year in particular, the SHC has made great strides in several important areas. The SHC is focused on all areas of the fire service and works very hard to exceed the current standards for Health and Safety in several areas. Some of the programs that have been completed and are currently in place are below. In the Area of Cancer Prevention and education: •

Glove and Hood Swap Program- This program was put in place in order to avoid members contaminating themselves with equipment that was exposed to an IDLH environment via

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• • • •

• • • • • • • • •

repeated use. Laundered gloves and hoods are given to all members post exposure and the contaminated equipment is sent for cleaning. Post Fire Decon or Personal Exposure Reduction- Green State Decon Kits- On all Fire Pumping apparatus to remove Carcinogens from PPE and equipment. Extractor washer/dryers- All Coral Springs Fire Stations now have an approved Extractor/Gear drying system in place Clean Cab Apparatus- We currently have 6 fully Clean Cab® suppression apparatus on the road and will have 2 more very soon. Two reserve apparatus have already completed the retrofit to Clean Cab®

2nd set of turnout gear for all combat personnel- All personnel have been issued a 2nd set of turnout gear in order to always have a “clean” set of gear to change into post exposure. Cancer prevention signage for all fire stations- All fire facilities now have signage to remind personnel about the dangers of carcinogens and how to avoid them when possible. Gross Decon post exposure SOP- All incidents involving exposure to IDLH environments now require the implementation of the Gross Decon process. Gross Decon equipment on all combat apparatus- All suppression apparatus now carry a full complement of Gross Decon equipment and storage capability. Station Design improvements- Gear Isolation Areas, ice machine locations, etc. Partnership with University of Miami Sylvester Cancer Center- Fire Investigators Study Filtration adaptors for SCBA masks for Driver Engineers, Fire Inspectors, and Chief Officers Cleanable gear bags/gear boxes for transporting turnout equipment Firefighter Cancer Initiative Annual Cancer Survey

National Recognition and winning the Telly Award for the "Our Story” video highlighting CSPFD members Driver Engineer Paul Pietrafesa, Battalion Chief Mike Caldaro, Captain Ivo Ceciliano, Driver Engineer Rich 67

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CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

Piloto and Driver Engineer James Miller, that drove the Cancer Prevention changes implemented in the CSPFD.

In the area of Mental Wellness: •

• •

Clinician Response Team (CRT) - Our CRT is a first for a program of this nature, our clinicians went through a very specialized training that gave them the necessary insight to work closely with first responders. All members of our CRT completed this training and have been a very integral part of our recovery post incidents. Peer Support Team - Our Peer Support Team led by Lt. Kandice Oltz has been a tremendous asset to our organization this past year and continues to work closely with our CRT and SHC to provide services and support to our members. The Peer Support Team has expanded to 13 members: Driver Engineer Chris Meyer, Driver Engineer Danielle Corp, Lt. Lici Merritt, Lt. John Barry, Captain Yair Soto, Battalion Chief Chris Bator, Assistant Chief John Whalen, Assistant Peer Support Team Leader Lt. Kandice Oltz Chief Joey Skrumbellos, Division Chief Stephanie Palmer and Fire Chief Frank Babinec. Mental Health services co-pays for all mental health or substance abuse removed for all members and their families - This program has been a great benefit for our members and their families who require services. Pre-Screening of mental health and substance abuse facilities - The SHC, CRT, and Peer support teams have visited and vetted multiple facilities and made important contacts with their management teams to ensure that when needed, these facilities are prepared to deal with the needs of first responders. Chaplaincy - Our Chaplain, Ron Perkins, has been a major part of our recovery and healing process after several events and continues to work with our staff and membership on a regular basis. Clinician Resource List - the Florida Firefighters Safety and Health Collaborative (FFSHC) has provided a very comprehensive Clinician Resource List for our members throughout the State and Tri-County area. This list of vetted and trained clinicians is an excellent resource for members to locate and work with a professional mental health specialist.

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CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT •

Cigna EAP - SHC has continued to work with Cigna to create a first-of-its-kind First Responder List which directs our members to these vetted clinicians when they utilize the Employee Assistance Program Post Incident follow-up and resource reminders - Our CRT and Peer support team have conducted multiple post incident follow-ups with our members and provided a multitude of resources for the members and their families. Cigna First Responder Round Table Discussion - Hosted by the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department to invite first responders from South Florida Public Safety to further discuss and share information that will benefit the health of first responders. Annual Mental Health Screenings provided during annual Lifescans.

In the area of Health and Fitness: •

• • • • •

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Lifescan Physicals- the CSPFD has continued our annual Lifescan screening process at no charge to the members, this process has been a major success and has helped many members be healthier and find possible health issues earlier. Healthy Cooking and Eating Demonstrations- in working with the City of Coral Springs Health Coach, the fire department has held several healthy eating and cooking demonstrations throughout the stations. New exercise equipment in the fire stations- fire stations that have exercise facilities have been upgraded Students learn decon procedures now while or new equipment has been provided. This taking minimum standards classes is an ongoing initiative and we will continue to upgrade the facilities. Yoga for First Responders- Introduced a 12 Week YFFR Program to provide both physical and mental resiliency Safety Stand Down workshops New fitness and injury prevention tools at all stations- Rollers, yoga mats, jump ropes, etc. Fitness training- A member of the Fitness team will be conducting station visits to review physical fitness and stretching techniques to improve health and decrease common injuries. Pre-Employment Physical forms (PEP)- All combat members have received their initial Preemployment physical forms as a baseline for their career.

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CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

In the area of Firefighter Safety: • • • • • • • • • • •

Annual Station Inspections/compliance visits Equipment/Accountability management system Thermal Imagers for each combat position Responder Safety Initiative Personal flashlight for each member Quarterly Safety Committee Meetings Accident/Injury Review New SOG related to Safety and Health introduced Ballistic helmets and vests provided for each riding position Violent Incident Response Policy Traffic Incident Management Response Policy (Pending Approval)

Chief Babinec, Chief Whalen, Chief Frey, and Chief Bator speak frequently throughout the country on Clean Cab© Design

The following are initiatives that are in progress and pending: • • •

Completing the Clean Cab© Process and implementation for the remainder of the fleet, including all inspectors, staff, and chiefs’ vehicles. No-Smoke Systems for all units Complete project for extractors/dryers at all remaining fire station and fire academy

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CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT • • • • • • •

Post Incident “Go-Bags” for clean clothes and personal items New helmet parts that are cleanable and interchangeable Employee Health Clinic VOC monitors Behavioral Health Crisis Policy and Procedure Personal Exposure Application Creation of a CSPFD Retirement Program/Association

Several members of the SHC have been honored to have been asked to present our programs around the nation on a multitude of topics. The members have received an amazing amount of recognition and positive feedback from their appearances. By presenting our policies, research, science, and best practices we have impacted thousands of firefighters and many organizations for the better. Assistant Chief John Whalen received the IAFC Safety Officer of the Year Award, Battalion Chief Chris Bator was recognized with the Senator Paul Sarbanes Safety Leadership Award for his efforts with the Florida Firefighters Safety and Health Collaborative, and Fire Chief Frank Babinec accepted the Chief Billy Goldfeder Fire Service Organizational Safety Leadership Award on behalf of the CSPFD. The Safety and Health program and Committee is committed to providing the best service to our members by being diligent in our research and training in order to provide the latest research-based information and equipment to the organization. Our overall goal is to provide every member with a long, healthy, and happy career and retirement.

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COMMUNICATIONS The Communications Unit serves the City of Coral Springs for Police, Fire and EMS for emergency and non-emergency calls for service. Service is provided 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. For emergencies, dial 9-1-1. Text to 9-1-1 is available now as well. Call if you can, text only if you can’t. For non-emergency service, call (954) 344-1800. The Coral Springs Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) consist of 38 highly trained communications professionals who use the latest technology to dispatch and track responding units.

The Coral Springs PSAP became a CALEA Accredited Communications Center in 2007. We continue to be CALEA Accredited and have earned accreditation with excellence for years 2013 and 2016. Some of the latest technology includes: • Motorola Digital P25 800MHz Trunked Radio System • Intrado Enhanced 911 System • Central Squares Public Safety ONESolution Computer Aided Dispatch System • Mapping Including LCD Displays through Central Squares ONESolution Computer Aided Dispatch System

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CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT • • •

Automatic Vehicle Location through the GPS located on Motorola Handheld Radios Central Squares Public Sector ONESolution MCT Mobile Field Reporting Application Newly upgraded Russ Bassett workstations with height-adjustable ergonomic consoles

We answered 51,364 911 calls in fiscal year 2019. Our 911 Call answer time: 10 seconds or less 90.73% of the time.

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EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT Alexander Falcone is the Emergency Manager for the City of Coral Springs. In this position, he directs the Office of Emergency Management (OEM) to prepare for, mitigate, respond to, and recover from all types of hazards. He holds a master’s degree in public administration from Florida State University with a graduate certificate in Emergency Management and Homeland Security. Alex started his career as a seasonal law enforcement officer with the Cape May City Police Department before working as a Mitigation Planner and Lead Mitigation Planner for the Florida Division of Emergency Management. His experience includes various Emergency Operations Center (EOC) activations working at both the state and local level. Alex is a Certified Floodplain Manager, working actively with the Community Rating System and mitigation projects within our municipality. Additionally, he is a member of several regional workgroups including the Regional Domestic Security Task Force, Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI), Alexander Falcone Broward County Emergency Coordinating Council, and Broward County Local Mitigation Strategy among others. Additionally, as an instructor at Barry University, Alex works to leverage his experiences to provide the next generation of emergency managers with a practical approach to the field of Emergency Management. Over the last year, the Office of Emergency Management has activated the Emergency Operations Center to support the Temple of Time Burn, and in response to Hurricane Dorian. In addition to supporting the overall response to these events, just over $9 million dollars in expenditures for Hurricane Irma response have been submitted to FEMA for reimbursement. Alex has also worked with the Florida Division of Emergency Management to close out our City’s reimbursements for Hurricane Wilma and avoid potential de-obligation of funds. OEM has also successfully secured an increase in funding from the Urban Area Securities Initiative resulting in $152,000 worth of funding for counter terrorism technology. This grant has enabled our city to make improvements to our Bear Cat vehicle, which is utilized by our SWAT team and as a rescue vehicle during high wind situations. Additionally, the Office of Emergency Management was able to install Weather Stem stations at our Public Safety Building and at Fire Stations 64, 95, 71 and 43. These stations enable our responders to safely operate equipment based upon wind speeds within our city, this grant funded project also Weather Stem at Fire Station 80 allows our residents to get localized weather in their neighborhood! Finally, OEM has worked to implement Alert Coral Springs, a new way for residents to receive emergency alerts. You can opt in for these alerts by visiting www.alertcoralsprings.org or by texting alertcs to 888-777.

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PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICER The Public Information Officer (PIO) is responsible for disseminating information to the public in regards to all aspects of the Fire Department including but not limited to emergency calls, evacuations, natural disasters, and special events. All Fire Department news and information will be released to the media through the PIO. Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department’s Public Information Officer is Division Chief Michael Moser. Chief Moser has been with the Department since 2001 and is also a member of Florida Urban Search Michael Moser & Rescue (USAR FL-TF2). Division Chief Moser is a member of the State of Florida PIO Deployment Team and attends specially designed courses regularly, thus affording him the skills and Michael Moser qualifications to provide his services to the community. Division Chief Moser has been deployed out of state as a PIO for incidents including Hurricanes Ike, Charlie, and Katrina, and most recently, Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico. The Florida Fire Chief’s Association named him the 2008 PIO of the Year.Chief Moser was also instrumental in the implementation of our Drone Program. The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department was the first fire department in Broward County to obtain a Certificate of Authorization (COA) from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This specialized authorization allows the City of Coral Springs to operate several small unmanned aerial vehicles (sUAS) within the airspace of Broward County. The sUAS’s are used for a variety of missions that include searches for missing children or adults, damage assessments after large scale incidents, or safety flights over fires or other major incidents where personnel are working. The sUAS’s, otherwise known as drones, have become an integral part of the public safety community. Just a few short years ago, this technology was not available or affordable for public safety use. Now that the drone industry has evolved, the technology is readily available for use within fire departments all across the country. The Coral SpringsParkland Fire Department has used their drones on several missions since acquiring their authorization. The drone proved to be a worthy addition to the equipment needed during an emergency. The City of Coral Springs sUAS program is a collaborative effort between the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department, the Coral Springs Police Department, and the City of Coral Springs Communications

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and Marketing Department. The Drone Program Manager is Ryan Himmel, the Senior Video Producer for the City of Coral Springs.

The drone captures a photo of the Temple of Time just before the ceremonial burn We have presented several Facebook Live events on topics such as safely deep frying a Thanksgiving Turkey, Extrication Demos at Family Fun Day, a “Live from Station 80” at our annual Pasta Dinner, and continue to use Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to send out alerts for hazardous weather conditions, road closures, Fire Prevention reminders, and more. Division Chief Moser is on-call 24 hours a day to answer calls from the media, and for all media and public inquiries, Division Chief Moser can be reached via e-mail at mmoser@coralsprings.org Follow us on social media: https://www.facebook.com/CoralSpringsFireDepartment https://twitter.com/coralspringsfd https://www.instagram.com/coralspringsfd/ and on our You Tube Channel “Coral Springs Fire Department” https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCN0GhDT6_xGPZjVOphNW5g

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HURRICANE DORIAN As Labor Day weekend approached, the members of the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department, together with city leaders, prepared for a possible impact from Hurricane Dorian, a Category 5 storm that wreaked havoc on the nearby Bahamas, but turned north without affecting South Florida. Although we were spared any damage from the storm, we prepare our personnel, stations, apparatus, and supplies for the possiblity of a major impact.

Left, Lieutenant Johana Cinque, Lieutenant Adam Schreibman, and Logistics Captain Zachary Roseboom prepare supplies.

Below, items are readied to distribute to stations and shelters

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Left, Fire Chief Frank Babinec, Incident Commander, speaks to personnel in the Emergency Operations Center as we readied for a possible storm impact

Below, extra crewmembers are assigned to each station to handle the additional response that might be needed during and after a storm

Rich Piloto, Michelle Scheller, Dakota Koch, Ivo Ceciliano June Ohlrich, Billy Partlan, Ryan Reinert, John Agostinelli, Gerald Snell, Mia Mellies, Jason Marino, and Josh Muller in Parkland

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COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT The men and women of the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department participate in several events each year and are honored to be a part of the volunteer efforts to help our local community. As the fiscal year begins, we are gearing up for our annual Pasta Dinner where we raise funds for cancer research and the Coral Springs Professional Firefighters Benevolent Association. Last year we raised over $8,000 and served over a thousand people. This yearly event features pasta with homemade sauce, sausage or homemade meatballs, a roll, and a drink, all for $5. The dinner is on the last Saturday in October, mark your calendars for next year so you can join us! When the event is over, we pack up everything that is still left and donate it to our neighbors at Saint Andrew’s Towers.

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During the month of October, department personnel wear special shirts to bring awareness to all cancers. From left to right: Bruce Bowers, Frank Babinec, Rob McGilloway, Jon Robbins, Lici Merritt, Mike Farmer, Lisa Weiss, Alysa Abzug, Estelle Tesler, Daisy Diaz, Debbie Pringle, Jarrod Hahn, Robin MacDonald, John Calloway, Mike Matz, Oscar Gomez, and Michael McNally

Residents at Saint Andrews’ Towers line up for free pasta, sauce, and salad after our annual Pasta Dinner

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RUN PAULY STRONG The third annual Run Pauly Strong 5k, 10k and 13k, took place on Sunday, October 28, 2018 in memory of of Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department Driver Engineer Paul Pietrafesa, who lost his battle with pancreatic cancer on November 23, 2016. The run takes place on the levee at the end of Atlantic Blvd.

After the October Pasta Dinner and Run with Thanksgiving right around the corner, the fire department puts in a tremendous effort to contribute to the City of Coral Springs Thanksgiving Basket Drive. This city initiative distributes baskets of food to needy families in Coral Springs, and our personnel personally contribute food, fill and decorate boxes, and more. Senior Office Assistant Robin MacDonald spearheads this drive for our department and works hard to see that as many families as possible have a Thanksgiving dinner. In 2018, we donated 440 boxes containing complete dinner fixings to families that might not otherwise have a Thanksgiving meal.

Brown Bags, ready to be filled for the Brown Bag Challenge

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Left, Robin MacDonald helps load the boxes to be delivered to families in need for Thanksgiving.

Below, Lieutenant John Atwater, Captain Kevin Sullivan, Captain Yair Soto, and Firefighter Paramedic Talia Hunter enjoy a Brown Bag Lunch knowing their dollars contribute to this important annual fundraiser

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Theresa Castro and Robin MacDonald coordinating the annual “Brown Bag Challenge” with help from Fire Academy students. Robin’s Brown Bag Challenge raises money for the annual Thanksgiving Basket Drive, a city initiative to bring dinner to those in need for the Thanksgiving holiday.

Lieutenant John Barry donated all the food for the Brown Bag Challenge so that all proceeds could go toward the Thanksgiving Baskets. Senior Office Assistant Robin MacDonald created the Brown Bag Challenge three years ago to increase the number of baskets we can provide to families in need. We are proud of our members and their efforts to serve the community in numerous ways

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As the holidays arrive, our personnel are busy volunteering their time to toy drives, visiting senior living facilities, and bringing joy to children on Santa’s Express, a fire truck that roams the community with Santa and his elves. Registration for this very special event takes place each year at our annual pasta dinner, and fills up very quickly. This event takes place thanks to the efforts of our Benevolent Association, our Fire Chief, and our members. Get into the holiday spirit by viewing our special holiday light show video on our You Tube Channel! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x5ZqszVtGow

“Santa” Dave Schneider and Elves Robin and Tiffany MacDonald volunteer their time to bring Santa Claus to families throughout Coral Springs and Parkland

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The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department is proud to recognize the children of our community who take fire safety lessons to heart and act upon what they’ve learned when a fire occurs. On April 29th, it was our honor to present Sebastien Simon with a special certificate and other gifts, for knocking on doors in his apartment complex, notifying his neighbors, after he noticed a fire on the premises.

Firefighters Joseph Caroscio, Karl Kellenberger, Kevin Olejniczak, and Kasey Easley present gifts to Sebastien for his bravery and quick action

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THE TEMPLE OF TIME On February 14, 2018 our communities of Coral Springs and Parkland were impacted by the deadliest high school shooting in our nation’s history. The tragedy that occurred at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School deeply affected our members as first responders, parents, and residents. Seventeen individuals lost their lives that day, and seventeen others were injured. In the weeks and months that followed February 14th, our department, the school, and the community began a journey toward healing. The Bloomberg Philanthropies Public Art Challenge awarded the city a $1 million grant to fund five art installations as part of the series, “Inspiring Community Healing After Gun Violence: The Power of Art”. The Temple of Time was the first of these public art installations and one that very much involved the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire department. With input from the community, Internationally acclaimed artist David Best designed a nondenominational interactive artistic temple structure entitled the Temple of Time. It was created as a place

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to pay respect and express sorrow and love for the people in Parkland and Coral Springs. Members of the community were encouraged to bring their pain and grief and leave it in the Temple. In the three months that the Temple stood, messages were written on the wood structure itself, on letters inserted into the crevices, and in the form of photos, flowers, and numerous other items.

On May 19, 2019 the Temple of Time, and the symbols of grief and sadness within, were released in a ceremonial burn. Thousands attended the event, including many family members of those whose lives were lost in the tragedy the previous year. The intent of the ceremonial burn was to release the suffering along with structure. The Temple and the subsequent burn were both very meaningful to our members.

Artist David Best Patches from neighboring agencies that responded to the tragedy adorn the center column inside the temple

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German Aristegui, David Loy, David Best, Jerome Kuketz, Steven Cross, Michael Naese on the day the temple opened, February 14, 2019

Mark Myers, Danielle Corp, Jimmy Miller, David Best, Adam Schreibman, Joe Russoniello, Richard Zino on the day of the burn, May 19, 2019

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THE BURN

Firefighters prepare for the ceremonial burn

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The Temple is ignited

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Firefighters allow the structure to burn as they keep the area safe for the thousands of spectators who came to view the event

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Each Spring, we rally again in the fight against cancer, as our department participates in the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life. In 2019, this event was held at the Coral Springs Sportsplex.

Chief Babinec and Sparky lead the Relay

Lieutenant Karl Kellenberger and Firefighter Paramedic Charles Jonker ready to walk

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Karen Pietrafesa, Rob Burns, and Oscar Gomez participate in the Soldier Rush fundraiser with friends and family

Many thanks to local Dimples Bakery for the treats! Captain Billy Morhaim, Firefighter Paramedic Kevin McCann, and Driver Engineer Jeffrey White

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In September, we remember the lives lost on 9/11 during an annual ceremony At right, members of the Coral Springs Police Department and Coral SpringsParkland Fire Department Honor Guards

At left, Coral Springs Chief of Police Clyde Parry and Fire Chief Frank Babinec, place the memorial wreath

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We were honored to attend a breakfast for first responders at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on February 14, 2019. Students prepared the meal on the first anniversary of the shooting that took the lives of 17 of their fellow students and teachers, and injured 17 others

On May 17th at 9pm, all stations parked their apparatus outside and turned on their lights for one minute in recognition of Mental Health Month, and in memory of those whose lives were lost. We remember our own, and all first responders who have been affected, as well as the families left behind

A painted rock from our garden at Fire Administration; a symbol of a day we’ll never forget

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SOUTH FLORIDA URBAN SEARCH AND RESCUE (USAR) Since 1991, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Urban Search and Rescue Florida Task Force Two (FL-TF2) has been serving the national and international community during manmade and natural disaster incidents. If a disaster event warrants national USAR support, FEMA will deploy the three closest task forces within four (4) hours of notification, and additional teams as necessary. The role of these task forces is to support state and local emergency responders' efforts to locate victims and manage recovery operations. Florida Task Force Two consists of over two-hundred and fifty members from twenty-four agencies. We currently have seventeen (17) members assigned to this team. The team is made up of various specialized divisions; rescue specialists, technical search specialists, canine search specialists, heavy rigging specialist, planning section, structural specialists, logistics specialists, technical information specialists, communication specialists, swiftwater rescue specialist, hazardous materials specialist, medical specialists, doctors, safety officers and various leadership positions. US&R task force members work in four areas of specialization: search, to find victims trapped after a disaster; rescue, which includes safely digging victims out of tons of collapsed concrete and metal; technical, made up of structural specialists who make rescues safe for the rescuers; and medical, which cares for the victims before and after a rescue. In the past year, several of our members were deployed to Mexico Beach in the Florida Panhandle to help with the aftermath of Hurricane Michael. Most recently, members were deployed or were staged for deployment following Hurricane Dorian. Each member is required to complete a set number of training and equipment familiarization sessions annually. These first responders consistently go to the front lines when America needs them most, but they are Michael McNally, Andrew Robins, Mark Myers, Anthony Gonzalez, Richard Zino, and Stephanie Palmer

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not just a national resource that can be deployed to a major disaster or structural collapse anywhere in the country. They are also the local firefighters and paramedics who answer when you call 911 in your local community. We are extremely proud of the members of the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department who have chosen to make the commitment to being part of Florida Task Force II, Urban Search and Rescue Team.

Deputy Chief and USAR member Michael McNally with Search and Rescue Dog Marley

Devastation at Mexico Beach following Hurricane Michael

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DISASTER MEDICAL ASSISTANCE TEAM (DMAT) The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department currently has one member who is part the Florida 5 Disaster Medical Assistance Team (FL-5 DMAT). The team members meet monthly for training and are on call for disaster deployment four times a year but may be called up at any time the team is needed. Bob Bertone (Safety Officer) currently serves on the team. A Disaster Medical Assistance Team (DMAT) is a group of professional and para-professional medical personnel, supported by a cadre of logistical and administrative staff, designed to provide medical care during a disaster or other event. As part of the National Disaster Medical System (NDMS), it recruits personnel for specific vacancies and coordinates the deployment of the teams who respond to state, national, and international emergencies as well as significant national events.

DMAT Member Bob Bertone

DMATs are a rapid-response element to supplement local medical care until other resources can be mobilized, or the situation is resolved. DMATs deploy to disaster sites with sufficient supplies and equipment to sustain themselves for a period of 72 hours while providing medical care at a fixed or temporary medical care site. In mass casualty incidents, their responsibilities may include triaging patients, providing high-quality medical care despite the adverse and austere environment often found at a disaster site, patient reception at staging facilities, and preparing patients for evacuation. NDMS/DMAT personnel are required to maintain appropriate certifications and licensure within their discipline. When personnel are activated as Federal employees, licensure and certification is recognized by all States. They function under the authority of the United States Department of Health and Human Services. During the last year, the FL-5 DMAT was deployed for training 2 times and placed on Alert status for possible response twice. The training included a weeklong experience at one of three US Biocontainment units, learning proper procedures to set up facilities and provide treatment for highly infectious diseases, including EBOLA. The team also completed training on Hazardous Materials and Terrorism Response. The team was placed on alert to respond to the Bahamas for Hurricane Dorian, but the mission was canceled at the request of the Bahamian government.

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SPECIAL OPS – SWAT/ TACTICAL PARAMEDICS The Coral Springs Tac-Medic Team was the first in Broward County to provide medical assistance in conjunction with SWAT (Special Weapons and Tactics) as a fully operational team during a high-risk operation. The SWAT Team and TacMedics will respond to any incident deemed as a potential hazard for responding medical personnel, as well as police personnel. These incidents include, but SWAT Medics Jan Tripician, Hayden Buckner, Joseph Schiavo, Ivo are not limited to responding Ceciliano and Chris Hunter to violent citizens, barricaded subjects, hostage situations, search warrant service, dignitary protection service, and drug-related incidents. The team was also part of the response to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Feburary 14th, 2018. The SWAT medics have participated in numerous competitions including the International Tactical Emergency Medical Support (ITEMS), which brings TEMS providers from around the world to compete in a simulated “real time” style competition involving tactical emergencies and working with other SWAT teams. The Coral Springs SWAT Medics have placed numerous times including 2nd and 3rd with members on two different teams in 2002 (Toronto, Ca), 2nd in 2003 (Dallas, TX) and eventually taking 1st place in 2004 in Virginia Beach, VA. Members of the team are often used to provide tactical medical training to the Police Department, and surrounding Departments, as many of the team members are instructors for Tactical Combat Casual Care (TCCC). The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department established the SWAT medic program in conjunction with the Police Department’s Special Response Team in 1999. The team was formed to provide close medical support to SWAT Officers during training, search and/or arrest warrants, and any operation outside the scope of normal police operations. The members of the team are chosen based on a selection process involving a physical ability tryout, oral interview, and experience. The team members are required to attend Tactical Emergency Medical Support (TEMS) while maintaining a demanding training schedule in order to be active on the team. During this past year, they responded to approximately 20 callout/warrant incidences.

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Zach Bogenschutz, Justin Parrinello, Yair Soto, and Hayden Buckner ready to respond during Hurricane Dorian

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HONOR GUARD The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department Honor Guard was started in September 2003. The Honor Guard consists of several members of the department who volunteer their time to represent the department with the utmost professionalism.

Examples of the events we participate in are:

• • • • • • •

Award Ceremonies and New Hire Graduations Fire station openings Annual holiday parade Opening of miscellaneous city functions Firefighter/Police Officer funerals 9-11 memorial ceremonies throughout the South Florida area Dignitary welcoming ceremonies Together with several members of the department, the Honor Guard team flew to Colorado in September to attend and participate in the International Association of Firefighters Annual Fallen Firefighters Memorial Service. At this moving ceremony, Driver Engineer Michael Matonak, who passed away in 2018, was one of 250 firefighters whose names were added to the Memorial Wall of Honor. We are grateful to the Coral Springs Professional Firefighters Benevolent Association for their contributions to cover the cost of this trip.

Honor Guard member Captain Sophia Moser with a special flag from the IAFF in honor of Driver Engineer Matonak

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PIPES AND DRUMS Since the inception of the Coral Springs Professional Firefighters Pipes and Drums in 2008, the band has played at many functions throughout the tri-county area. Members of the band are active members of the fire department and they represent the spirit of the history of the pipes and drums across the country. The Pipes and Drums continue to provide their service for the following types of events and fundraisers: • • • • •

Fire Department Retirements & Funeral Services Award Ceremonies and New Hire Graduations Memorial Parades & events Fire Academy Graduations & Parties Community & Promotional Events Military Events

Bagpipers Travis Kane and German Aristegui, above Joseph Russoniello with German Aristegui, right

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CORAL SPRINGS FIREFIGHTERS BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION The Coral Springs Professional Firefighters Benevolent Association is made up of the members of the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department. Our organization includes members from Suppression (Firefighter Paramedics), Community Risk Reduction (Inspectors) and Administration (Chiefs & Assistants). We have been an established non-profit organization since 2000 providing support and services internally to our members and the community through our own contributions. The goal and mission of our organization is to create a partnership with the residents and businesses in the community to assist us in raising funds; gathering donations while providing awareness for local charitable events that offer a direct benefit to the people, person or organization in need. We participate in many community events throughout each year and the events can be found on our website at www.coralspringsfirefighters.org

Firefighter Paramedic Talia Hunter

Lieutenant Michael Farmer

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METRO-BROWARD PROFESSIONAL FIREFIGHTERS IAFF LOCAL 3080 Sworn personnel are also members of the Metro-Broward Professional Firefighters IAFF Local 3080. Metro-Broward Professional Firefighters Local 3080 is a proud member of the International Association of Firefighters (IAFF). The IAFF has a fascinating history, noble cause and provides unwavering service and support for Professional Firefighters throughout the country. Metro-Broward Professional Firefighters Local 3080 was originally formed on January 16th, 1989 when several cities got together and united to form one large Local. Today, our Local currently represent over 750 Firefighters and Paramedics that protect and serve the residents and visitors of 11 Cities in Broward County. Those cities include Coral Springs - serving the City of Parkland, Hallandale Beach, Lauderhill, Lighthouse Point, Margate serving the City of Coconut Creek, North Lauderdale, Oakland Park, Sunrise, and Tamarac. Captain Steve Cross

Metro-Broward Local 3080 is operated by an Executive Board and Board of Trustees who report to the General Membership. The Executive Board consists of three Principal Officers - President, Executive Vice President, Secretary/Treasurer - and nine District Vice Presidents, one representing each of our 9 Districts. The Board of Trustees consists of three members that are elected from the General Membership to oversee the financial operations of the Local and its affiliated internal operations. Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department Captain Steve Cross serves as District President for District 11, Coral Springs.

Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department administration is proud to work hand in hand with the Benevolent Association and Union representatives to better serve our membership and our communities.

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FIRE EXPLORER PROGRAM The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Explorer Program is a hands-on career development program designed for high school aged students, 14-20 years old, who are interested in the Fire Service profession. The Explorers train alongside Firefighters and Paramedics where they learn firefighting and emergency medical care and develop leadership experience. Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Explorers with Program Advisors Zachary Roseboom and Daniel Chavez, Firefighters Dakota Koch and Hayden Buckner, and Fire Chief Frank Babinec

After successful completion of their probation period, they are permitted to ride along on the fire apparatus and respond to emergency calls. They also complete hundreds of hours of community service each month. The Explorer program totaled 3675 community service hours for 2018. The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Explorers hosted and competed in the annual Regional Fire Explorer competition. This is a competition of 12 teams from different programs in region show casing the skills they learned through training. With the hard work and dedication of our Explorers and Advisor they were able to secure a first-place victory. Each year, promising senior Explorers are selected to receive a scholarship to the Coral Springs Regional Institute of Public Safety so they can begin their formal training upon their graduation from High School. Recipients chosen in March 2019 include Gabriel Martelli, Ryan MacDonald, and Juliano Laster.

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The Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Explorer Program has graduated hundreds of young men and women over the years, many of them becoming full-time firefighters, EMTs, and Paramedics. Some of our past Explorers have become high-ranking officials in Fire Departments across the country.

Explorers volunteer at various events throughout the year, such as the city’s Thanksgiving Basket Drive

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AWARDS and ACHIEVEMENTS We are proud of the accolades that our department and our members achieved this past fiscal year, for the outstanding work that they do. In March 2019, we bestowed the following awards for 2018: • • • • • • • • •

1 Community Involvement Commendation 5 Team Citations, presented to 61 members 5 Letters of Commendation 82 Lifesaving Commendations 1 Community Service Commendation 3 Administrative Service Commendations 5 Unit Citations presented to 134 members 57 Meritorious Duty Commendations 1 Distinguished Service Commendation

We also honored the following personnel: Firefighter of the Year: Firefighter Paramedic Caroline Quevillon Supervisor of the Year: Captain Kevin Sullivan Civlian Employee of the Year: Theresa Castro Instructor of the Year: Greg Mulford Fire Explorer of the Year: Gabriel Martelli

Caroline Quevillon

Kevin Sullivan

Theresa Castro

Greg Mulford

Gabriel Martelli

During this year, several members of our department were also recognized in the community and we are proud of the hard work and commitment to their profession.

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Chief Bator recognized for his prestigious award by Mayor Scott Brook, Fire Chief Frank Babinec and other members of the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department

Captain Chris Bator, recently promoted to Battalion Chief of Safety and Health, was recognized in April 2019 as a co-recipent, along with the Denver Fire Depaprtment, of the Senator Paul S Sarbanes Fire Service Safety Leadership Award. This national honor went to Chris along with the other co-founders of the Florida Firefighters Safety and Health Collaborative which Chris helped to create in 2016. The recognition, cosponsored by the Congressional Fire Services Institute and the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation was presented during the Annual National Fire and Emergency Services Conference. The collaborative, through their efforts, have helped make changes in state law that require mental health training, cancer awareness training and decontamination protocol. They have changed the way therapists throughout the state are trained to deal with the unique circumstances that first responders face while on the job

Lieutenant Lazaro Ojeda was honored as the 2019 Dave Foster Paramedic of the Year by the Fire Chiefs Association of Broward County for his leadership, teamwork, and exceptional dedication to quality improvement. Lt. Ojeda received his award at the annual First There, First Care EMS Conference in June 2019

Lieutenant Lazaro Ojeda with Fire Chief Frank Babinec, and Davie Fire Chief Julie Downey

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In April, Chief Babinec, along with our Police Chief Clyde Parry, and members of our SWAT team which include both police officers and paramedics, were humbled to receive the Dave Sanders Rescue Task Force Award for their efforts at the February 14, 2018 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. The awards were given to them at the 4th Annual North American Active Assailant Conference where the team had gone to present on the departments’ response to SWAT Medics Jan Tripician, Yair Soto, Ivo Ceciliano with Fire Chief Frank Babinec this tragic incident.

Throughout this past year, several members of our department have shared the lessons learned that day with other fire departments, police departments, schools, and other agencies in the hope that it will help them prepare to best serve their community on that day when unthinkable tragedy strikes. The award is named for Coach Dave Sanders who lost his life at Columbine High School. Our personnel dedicate each presentation to the victims of the MSD tragedy, their families, friends, school faculty, medical professionals, and first responders. They also recognize the 17 lives that were saved that day. The MSD tragedy has deeply impacted our community and those who provided emergency response, yet we will continue to share our experience to prepare other agencies. While the award was presented for “training and preparedness”, Chief Babinec acknowledges that is an award for which he wishes they would never have been considered. We are proud of the work our members have done locally, statewide, and nationally, and know that the awards are just a representation of the advances made in Safety and Health throughout the fire service. The true benefit is the longer and healthier lives first responders will lead as a result of the changes and innovations made in each department. In August 2019, Assistant Fire Chief John Whalen was recognized at Fire Rescue International with the Chief Sandy Davis Safety Officer of the Year Award for the tremendous work he has done as our department’s Safety Officer. Chief Whalen increased the level of health screenings offered to the membership, was a driving force behind the Clean Cab initiative, hood

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and glove swap program, Gross decon on scene SOPs, and more. He helped to coordinate a presentation on Roadway Safety at the state conference on Safety and Health, and has been very involved with the Peer Support Team on an ongoing basis. His contributiosn to the area of mental wellness have been enormous. John often speaks at conferences on cancer prevention and mental wellness initiatives and was highly deserving of this prestigious award.

Our department was honored to also be a recipient of the Billy Goldfeder Fire Service Organizational Safety Award at Fire Rescue International, which was accepted by Fire Chief Frank Babinec. Chief Babinec has made Health and Safety a priority in our department, and it was under his leadership that the initiatives were developed and came to fruition. In addition to the health screenings, and Peer Support, Chief Babinec was an integral part of the Clean Cab Concept which is designed to keep carcinogens out of the apparatus. Our newest stations have also been designed to keep toxins outside, and Fire Chief Frank Babinec and Assistant Fire Chief John Whalen recognized at the annual Fire separate from living areas. As the Chair of the state committee on Safety and Health, Chief Babinec Rescue International Conference in Atlanta in August 2019 continues to seek best practices from around the world, and to provide them to others as well.

In September 2019, at the annual conference of the Florida CERT Association, our Community Emergency Response Team commander, Michael DiTocco was honored with a Distinguished Service Award for his 16 years of dedicated service to CERT.

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In addition to these individual achievements, the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department was honored to receive the American Heart Association Mission Lifeline Gold PlusAward in July 2019.

In May 2019, we were also humbled to be recognized as a Gold Winner of the Telly Awards in the Social Video for Health & Wellness category. The video, “Our Story,” is a comprehensive look inside the Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department’s efforts to prevent cancer and educate other first responders and the public about the increased risk of the disease in the fire service. The Telly Awards are an industry voice that champions the work of creative and innovative videos, broadcast and shows nationally. Written by Fire Captain Chris Bator, produced and edited by City of Coral Springs Senior Video Producer Ryan Himmel, the video is an emotional journey about the cancer epidemic and how it affected us locally, with the passing of Paul Pietrafesa and diagnosis of other firefighters within the organization. Paul, a Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department Driver-Engineer, led a valiant battle with cancer, but succumbed to the disease in November 2016. The video also highlights the studies, partnerships and the work that has been done to raise awareness nationally, changing fire industry standards. Of the recognition, Fire Chief Frank Babinec, says, “Ryan is truly dedicated to the community and our organization. He puts forth a tremendous amount of effort in everything he produces. That, coupled with Captain Chris Bator’s passion to implement change and save lives, resulted in a powerful video that will

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make a difference in the lives of so many first responders.” We are also grateful to the members of our department who have survived a cancer diagnosis and were willing to be a part of the video to share their story, as well as to Paul’s widow, Karen, who helped us reach others through this powerful film. Although we are honord by the award, what means the most to us is the ability to help others effect change in their own departments by sharing our story. We hope you will take a few minutes to watch it at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zFuY8z2LuSI Coral Springs-Parkland Fire Department – Our Story.

Battalion Chief Chris Bator, Fire Chief Frank Babinec, and Videographer Ryan Himmel

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CORAL SPRINGS-PARKLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT

OUR DEPARTMENT GROWS As the City of Parkland experiences new home sales, and the addition of retirement communities and other development, our department expanded to meet the needs of an increased population. Parkland officials approved the purchase of an additional rescue truck to be housed at Station 42, to serve the east end of the city. Renovations were completed at the station to accommodate the additional personnel needed to staff the Rescue. Throughout 2019, we added several new firefighter paramedics to our roster, so we will be ready when the new Rescue is placed in service. Additional firefighter paramedics were hired due to retirements and promotions within the organization.

23 firefighter paramedics joined us during this last year. Each new hire class participates in an 8-week training and orientation before being assigned to a station.

Shortly after the fiscal year ended, one of our new members tragically lost his life unexpectedly. We dedicate this year’s Annual Report to Firefighter Paramedic Chris Randazzo, below left, and in the group photo, below right. He will be greatly missed.

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2801 CORAL SPRINGS DRIVE CORAL SPRINGS, FLORIDA 33065 CORALSPRINGS.ORG/FIRE 954-344-5934

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Profile for City of Coral Springs

Annual Report Fiscal Year 2019  

Coral Springs / Parkland Fire Department Annual Report Fiscal Year 2019

Annual Report Fiscal Year 2019  

Coral Springs / Parkland Fire Department Annual Report Fiscal Year 2019