Page 1

APRIL 2017

I

z"ga, ixhb

C O R - K A S H R U T H C O U N C I L O F C A N A D A

“All who are hungry, come and eat. All who are needy, come join the Passover celebration.”

PASSOVER 2017

z"ga, jxp


K ASHRUTH COUNCIL BOARD OF D I R E CTO R S C H A I R M A N: DR. IRA MARDER PA S T C H A I R M A N: MR. MEYER FELDMAN PA S T C H A I R M A N: MR. MARVIN SIGLER

R A B B I N I C A L VA A D H A K A S H R UTH C HAI R MAN: RABBI YACOV FELDER C H A I R M A N E M E R I T U S: RABBI YITZCHOK KERZNER RABBI AMRAM ASSAYAG RABBI AVRAHAM BARTFELD RABBI CHANOCH EHRENTREU RABBI SHLOMO GEMARA RABBI OVADIA HABOUCHA

V I C E C H A I R M A N: MR. JACK FEINTUCH

K A S H R U T H C O U N C I L S TA F F C H A I R M A N , R A B B I N I C A L V A A D H A K A S H R U T H: RABBI YACOV FELDER D I R E CTO R O F I N D U STR IAL KO S H E R, K A S H R U S A D M I N I S T R AT O R : RABBI SHOLOM H. ADLER D I R E CTO R O F C O M M U N ITY KO S H E R: RABBI TSVI HEBER R A B B I N I C L I A I S O N: RABBI YOSEF OZIEL M A N A G I N G D I R E C T O R : MR. RICHARD RABKIN D I R E C T O R O F O P E R AT I O N S : MR. JAY SPITZER

V I C E C H A I R M A N: MR. SHIMSHON GROSS

R A B B I N I C C O O R D I N AT O R S : RABBI AVROHOM LOWINGER

V I C E C H A I R M A N: MR. MOSHE SIGLER

RABBI JOSHUA NORMAN

S E C R E TA R Y : MR. ARI MESSINGER

RABBI YECHIEL TEICHMAN

A S S I STA N T S E C R E TA R Y: MR. MICHOEL KLUGMANN TR EAS U R E R: MR. MOSHE KESTEN E X E C U T I V E:

RABBI YOSSEL KANOFSKY

MR. DANIEL BITTON

RABBI MENDEL KAPLAN

MR. NATHAN BLEEMAN

RABBI URI KAUFMAN

MR. PINNY KAUFMAN

RABBI YAAKOV KAUFMAN

MR. DAVID KLEINER

RABBI DANIEL KOROBKIN

MR. NAFTALI WINTER

RABBI CHAIM DOVID KULIK

MR. ROBERT BENMERGUI

RABBI YISROEL LANDA

CYRIL BRAUDE

RABBI RAFI LIPNER

RABBI NEIL COHEN

RABBI MOSHE LOWY

MR. YEHOSHUA CZERMAK

RABBI YIRMIYA MILEVSKY

MR. SHLOME GOLDREICH

RABBI YOSEF OZIEL

MR. ALLAN GUTENBERG

RABBI DOVID PAM

MR. MARK HALPERN

RABBI MEIR ROSENBERG

MR. PAUL JACOBS

RABBI MORDECHAIR SCHEINER

MR. IRVING KAROLY

RABBI DOVID SCHOCHET

MR. SHIMSON KATZ

RABBI RAPHAEL SHMULEWITZ

MR. JERROLD LANDAU

RABBI CHAIM STRAUCHLER

MR. BRIAN LASS

RABBI YEHOSHUA WEBER

MR. ELIE MAMANN

RABBI DOVID ROSEN

SENIOR RABBINIC F I E L D R E P R E S E N TAT I V E S : RABBI DOVID LAUFER RABBI NACHMAN RIBIAT H E A D M A S H G I A C H: RABBI MENDEL BROGNA S E N I O R MAS H G I C H I M: RABBI MENDEL GANSBURG MR. MOSHE MAYER MRVIC J U N I O R D E V E LO PE R & F I E L D R E P R E S E N TAT I V E: MR. CHAIM RIBIAT A D M I N I S T R AT I V E A S S I S TA N T & C U S T O M E R S E R V I C E R E P R E S E N TAT I V E: MRS. ALBINA AMINOB O FFI C E S U PPO RT: MRS. BARBARA BAR-DAYAN E X E C U T I V E A S S I S TA N T & N E W C L I E N T R E P R E S E N TAT I V E: MRS. JUDY PISTER AC C O U NT S PE C IALI ST: MRS. MIRIAM KLEIMAN A D M I N I S T R AT I V E A S S I S TA N T & C U S T O M E R S E R V I C E R E P R E S E N TAT I V E : MRS. ESTHER SCHEER A C C O U N TA N T : MRS. OLGA SEKIRITSKY

MR. ISAAC E OZIEL

KOSHER CORNER E D ITO R I A L STA F F

MR. RONALD RUTMAN

E D I T O R - I N - C H I E F : RICHARD RABKIN

RABBI ELI MANDEL

MR. SIMON SCHONBLUM MR. BEN SHILLOW

S E N I O R HALAC H I C C O NTR I B UTO R: RABBI DOVID ROSEN

MR. AVRUM WAISBROD

C O N T R I B U T I N G E D I T O R : MIRIAM KLEIMAN

MR. DAVID WOOLF MR. MEYER ZEIFMAN

S E N I O R S TA F F W R I T E R : MORDECHAI SCHMUTTER

MR. SHMUEL ZIMMERMAN

D E S I G N & L AY O U T : RB CREATIVE

DR. LEIBEL ZOBERMAN


COR- KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA

L I VE I N OT TAWA For Answers & Appetizers A Pre-Passover Community Event

Monday, March 20th A P P ETI Z E R S at 7:30 pm A N S W E R S at 8:00 pm S O LO W AY J E W I S H C O M M U N I T Y C E N TR E 21 Nadolny Sachs Private, Ottawa COR rabbis will outline the most frequent Pesach questions and answers & perform a live insect checking demonstration. Learn the techniques that COR’s professional mashgichim use every day! C O M PLI M E NTARY APPETIZE R S AN D D E SS E RTS WI LL B E S E RVE D

www.cor.ca • 416.635.9550 • questions@cor.ca


COR- KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA

PESACH, MATZAH & MARROR A Pre-Passover Community Event

Tuesday, March 28th 2017 A P P E T I Z E R S & D E S S E RTS at 7:30 pm L E CT U R E at 8:00 pm S H A A R E I S H O M AYI M • 470 Glencairn Ave. Toronto

PESACH

M AT Z A H

MARROR

Rabbi Sholom H. Adler

Rabbi Dovid Rosen

Rabbi Tsvi Heber

TOPICS IN TODAY’S SHECHITA INDUSTRY

PRACTICAL PESACH RELATED QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

LIVE DEMONSTRATION HOW TO ENSURE YOUR MARROR IS INSECT FREE

With introductory remarks by Rabbi Chaim Strauchler C O M PLI M E NTARY S U S H I, APPETIZE R S AN D D E SS E RTS WI LL B E S E RVE D

www.cor.ca • 416.635.9550 • questions@cor.ca


“All who are hungry, come and eat. All who are needy, come join the Passover celebration.”

WELCOME CORNER

Pet Food on Passover...............................................................38

Message from Rabbi Felder...................................................... 6

Pesach Traveler Checklist......................................................40

Message from Dr. Marder............................................................7

Top 15 Questions from the COR Pesach Hotline...............................................................................41

Nissan Calendar............................................................................... 8 Important Pesach Dates & Times........................................ 9 HALACHIC CORNER

Establishments & Services.....................................................11 Product Guide.................................................................................13 Kitniyot Guide.................................................................................20 Guidelines for use of Medications & Personal Care Products........................................................... 23 Chametz Free Medications....................................................26

RABBINIC CORNER

Bittersweet: What can be used for Marror.................. 45 Checking Marror.............................................................................. 8 Times for Mitzvot of the Seder Night..............................50 Ma Nishtana - Kitniyot Shenishtana............................... 53 A Light from the North..............................................................56 How to Make Used Cast Iron Cookware Kosher.......57 HIT Questions from the Halacha Line.............................59

Kashering for Pesach................................................................29 Tevilat Kelim.....................................................................................34

CHESSED CORNER

Shaimos Guidelines.....................................................................37

Chicken Soup for the Shabbos Soul................................62


/kfhhu h,hh ihpfs kf /jxphu h,hh lhrms kf

Edmonton Kosher Food Bank..............................................64

Rabbi Catriel Blum Named Mashgiach of the Year......84

D.A.N.I...................................................................................................66 Ten Yad................................................................................................68

Kashruth Council and Niagara College Unveil New Project......................................................................84

Montreal Center for Health and Care.............................. 70

New COR Kosher Event Signs.............................................85

C O R P O R AT E C O R N E R

NUTRITION CORNER

Terra Cotta Cookies ....................................................................72

Recipe CORner.............................................................................. 87

Nestle Canada ...............................................................................75

How to Save Money and Stay Healthy on Passover.....................................................................................94

PepsiCo Canada............................................................................ 76 Duchesnay........................................................................................77 Summer Fresh Salads............................................................... 78 COR CORNER

Working out the Bugs............................................................... 79 COR Comes to Edmonton .....................................................83

KIDS CORNER

Sounding the Alarm ................................................................... 97 Comic CORner..............................................................................103 Tips for a Fun Family-Friendly Seder............................ 106 Don’t Ask.........................................................................................107 Activity CORner........................................................................... 111


WELCOME CORNER

A MESSAGE FROM RABBI FELDER As you read through this year’s Pesach Guide, you will see that we have highlighted a number of remarkable Canadian sxj organizations and you may wonder what the connection is between jxp and sxj. The opening statement of the vsdv seems out of place. We invite the guests to our rsx declaring, kufhhu h,hh ihpfs kf, whoever is hungry let them come and eat. But would it not be more appropriate to make this declaration at an earlier point and in a more public venue such as in shul, rather than in our homes as we are already sitting down to our rsx? Furthermore, what is the connection between the three statements that we say in this opening paragraph of the vsdv w'ufu hscg t,av w'ufu tfv t,av, :'ufu tnjk tv w'ufu ihpfs kf The t"shj in his vsdv called kdrv ,jna quotes the words of hhjc ubhcr: The enslavement in ohrmn was due to the fact that we did not support the poor and that we turned away from giving vesm as we were ihg hrm,

stingy and mean. The thrynhd, the numerical value of ihg hrm, he continues, is 430 which is the same as the number of years of ,ukd until ohrmn ,thmh. We recite ukft hs thbg tnjk tv ohrmns tgrtc tb,vct, this is the poor bread that we ate in ohrmn because we neglected to give bread to the poor, vsn sdbf vsn. Then we continue and declare kufhhu h,hh ihpfs kf, as we now appreciate our failing in ohrmn, as a rectification we wish to invite the poor to join and eat with us. In addition, kthknd cr t"yhka .hcubhcr writes, we wish to comfort the poor at our table who may be distressed and embarrassed about joining us. Therefore, we continue to say, w'ufu hscg t,av w'ufu tfv t,av at present we are all in ,ukd where there are ohhbg and ohrhag, wealthy and poor, however, ihruj hbc vtcv vbak next year at the time of the vkutd each person will dwell in comfort, as the euxp says, u,bt, ,j, ahtu ubpd ,j, aht. We are not only concerned with the physical needs of the poor, we try to address their emotional needs and make them feel at home around our table. Because the relationship between sxju vesm and the redemption of our people is so

profound, the theme chosen for this Pesach Guide is ihpfs kf. In this Guide, you will read about a number of distinguished sxj organizations across Canada. It is remarkable to see how they focus on just about every spiritual, physical and emotional need, and it is all done with selfless kindness and compassion. Our Sages teach in c"c ,fxn,

vkutdv ,t ,crena vesm vkusd charity is so great that it hastens the redemption. In our sxj endeavours, the sxj hkgc who donate their time, effort and resources, as well as the beneficiaries that find themselves in need of their assistance, can feel strengthened and comforted in knowing that they are both contributing to bringing the vsh,gv vkutd, the ultimate redemption. I would like to express sincere appreciation to our devoted staff, to the Rabbinical Vaad Hakashruth, to the Executive and Board members, for all of their tireless efforts on behalf of COR, and to all of you – the kosher consumers, for your continued encouragement and trust in us to fulfill our mandate of providing quality kashrus to our wonderful community.

jnau raf dj rgskgp ouka cegh

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Sign up for our kosher alerts, community news and other important information at www.cor.ca or send your email address to info@cor.ca


WELCOME CORNER

A MESSAGE FROM DR. MARDER Dear Kosher CORner readers, My personal greetings to all of our Kosher consumers and friends from the Kashruth Council of Canada. It is my ongoing honour to represent COR as the Chair of our country’s largest and most-respected kosher certifier. A lot has and is happening at COR and it is my pleasure to report on some of them to you. Besides our CORe supervisory role and mandate as a Kosher certifier, we offer many services to the community and public, very much in line with the theme of this issue. If the need is there, we try and respond. Some examples include: • COR offers Kashering of kitchens for private homes; • We provide lectures and hands-on sessions to schools, Shuls and other organizations; • And we provide kashrus information and guidance – (by phone, text, and email) answering many thousands of questions a year, particularly around Pesach time. All of this is done at no cost, as part of our mandate to serve the community. Of course we also welcome any suggestions for other services that the community may find of value. Our Mashgiach training courses continue and we are now on our fourth cohort of Mashgichim being formally trained in a college affiliated course where they learn Hashgocha, Halacha, kitchen

and food safety and handling skills, organizational methods, practical on-site applications, etc. This has proven to be a valuable and welcome program for our existing Mashgichim as well as for others interested in entering the field. The COR Board held our bi-annual election in May 2016 and it is a tribute to our community to have so many dedicated people working hard to further the work and mission of Kashrus. I thank all our returning Board and Executive members and pay special note to our new members Cyril Braude, Pinny Kaufman, Shimshon Katz, Rabbi Eli Mandel and Ben Shillow. It is great for our organization to have fresh blood and new ideas among our Askonim. Our hard working staff are not just improving our Kashrus standards but also increasing the number of clients and products available for the Kosher consumer. We have added many local establishments and foods as well as a number of international plants in places such as the United States, Israel, Columbia and Thailand. Very exciting indeed. B”H with the joint input of the Senior Staff and the Executive, we are having a lot of

Hatzlocha in our efforts and are seeing the successful results of previously reported initiatives. To build on this, we have participated in a strategic planning exercise with an experienced external facilitator and the involvement of both our lay and professional leadership. Our hope is to develop a more focused approach to our mission, objectives and vision which will help guide us in our future planning, budgeting and operations. For those of you who have undergone similar programs, you know that this is an arduous but worthwhile endeavor. As always, I thank my co-volunteers on the Executive and Board, the hard working Management and Staff at our COR office, the many Mashgichim and COR clients, our Rabbinical Vaad HaKashruth and the individuals responsible for this excellent publication. On behalf of my family and myself, please accept my personal wishes for a Chag Pesach Kasher VeSameach. Sincerely, Dr. Ira Marder Chairman, Kashruth Council of Canada

COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 9


WELCOME CORNER

z"ga, jxp MARCH/APRIL 2017 SUN

MON

19 MARCH

TUES

20 MARCH

WED

21 MARCH

THURS

22 MARCH

23 MARCH

27 MARCH

SHABBAT

24 MARCH

25 MARCH

COR Community Kashering at The Bayt

COR Pre Pesach Community Lecture in Ottawa

26 MARCH

FRI

28 MARCH

t

29 MARCH

c

30 MARCH

d

31 MARCH

s

01 APRIL

v

05 APRIL

y

06 APRIL

h

07 APRIL

th

08 APRIL

ch

COR Pre Pesach Lecture at Shaarei Shomayim

02 APRIL

u

03 APRIL

z

04 APRIL

j

Shabbat Hagadol

09 APRIL

dh

Bedikat Chametz

16 APRIL

f

Chol Hamoed

Sefira 5

23 APRIL

Sefira 12

10 APRIL

sh

Erev Pesach Taanit Bechorot First Night Seder

17 APRIL

tf

7th Day

24 APRIL

Sefira 13

uy

Pesach 1st Day Second Night Seder

18 APRIL

cf

12 APRIL

zy

Pesach 2nd Day

zh

Chol Hamoed

Sefira 1

19 APRIL

13 APRIL

Sefira 2

df

20 APRIL

14 APRIL

jh

Chol Hamoed

21 APRIL

Sefira 8

Sefira 7

jf

25 APRIL

Sefira 14

yf

26 APRIL

Sefira 15

Sefira 9

Sefira 10

Shabbat Chol Hamoed

vf

22 APRIL

Sefira 11

k

Text-A-Question For one word answers

(i.e. “Does this require kosher for Passover certification”)

text 647.402.1910

10 KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA | 416-635-9550 | WWW.COR.CA

yh

Sefira 4

Sefira 3

sf

15 APRIL

8th Day Yizkor

Sefira 6

zf

11 APRIL

uf


WELCOME CORNER

IMPORTANT PESACH DATES & TIMES TORONTO

SUNDAY EVENING APRIL 9

MONDAY, APRIL 10 EREV PESACH/ FIRST NIGHT OF PESACH

CALGARY EDMONTON

HALIFAX

MONTREAL

OTTAWA VANCOUVER WINNIPEG

Bedikat Chametz Latest time to eat chametz 10:37 AM 10:46 AM 10:40 AM 10:33 AM 10:12 AM 10:20 AM 10:25 AM 10:40AM Latest time to burn chametz 11:58 AM 12:12 PM 12:08 PM 11:54 AM 11:34 AM 11:42 AM 11:50 AM 12:05 PM Candlelighting 7:37 PM 8:06 PM 8:08 PM 7:35 PM 7:16 PM 7:24 PM 7:40 PM 7:57 PM Shkia 7:55 PM 8:24 PM 8:26 PM 7:53 PM 7:34 PM 7:42 PM 7:58 PM 8:15 PM Chatzot 1:19 AM 1:38 AM 1:35 AM 1:16 AM 12:55 AM 1:04 AM 1:14 AM 1:30 AM

TUESDAY, APRIL 11 FIRST DAY OF PESACH/ SECOND NIGHT OF PESACH

Shkia Candlelighting After Chatzot

7:57 PM 8:42 PM 1:18 AM

8:27 PM 9:12 PM 1:37 AM

8:28 PM 9:13 PM 1:35 AM

7:36 PM 8:18 PM 12:55 AM

7:45 PM 8:30 PM 1:04 AM

8:00 PM 8:45 PM 1:04 AM

8:00 PM 8:17 PM 8:45 PM 9:02 PM 1:13 AM 1:30 AM

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 12 SECOND DAY OF PESACH

Shkia Yom Tov Ends

7:58 PM 8:43 PM

8:28 PM 9:13 PM

8:31 PM 9:16 PM

7:56 PM 8:41 PM

7:37 PM 8:22 PM

7:46 PM 8:31 PM

8:02 PM 8:47 PM

8:19 PM 9:04 PM

FRIDAY, APRIL 14 EREV SHABBAT CHOL HAMOED

Candlelighting Shkia

7:42 PM 8:00 PM

8:13 PM 8:31 PM

8:15 PM 8:33 PM

7:40 PM 7:58 PM

7:21 PM 7:39 PM

7:29 PM 7:47 PM

7:46 PM 8:04 PM

8:03 PM 8:21 PM

SHABBAT, APRIL 15 SHABBAT CHOL HAMOED

Shkia Shabbat Ends

8:02 PM 8:47 PM

8:33 PM 9:19 PM

8:36 PM 9:18 PM

8:00 PM 8:45 PM

7:41 PM 7:26 PM

7:50 PM 8:35 PM

8:06 PM 8:51 PM

8:23 PM 9:08 PM

SUNDAY, APRIL 16 EREV YOM TOV/ SEVENTH NIGHT OF PESACH

Candlelighting Shkia

7:44 PM 8:02 PM

8:16 PM 8:34 PM

8:19 PM 9:37 PM

7:42 PM 8:00 PM

7:24 PM 7:42 PM

7:32 PM 8:50 PM

7:49 PM 8:07 PM

8:06 PM 8:24 PM

MONDAY, APRIL 17 SEVENTH DAY PESACH/ EIGHTH NIGHT OF PESACH

Shkia Candlelighting after

8:04 PM 8:49 PM

8:37 PM 9:22 PM

8:40 PM 9:25 PM

8:02 PM 8:47 PM

7:44 PM 8:29 PM

7:52 PM 8:37 PM

8:09 PM 8:54 PM

8:26 PM 9:11 PM

TUESDAY, APRIL 18 EIGHTH DAY OF PESACH

Shkia Yom Tov Ends

8:05 PM 8:50 PM

8:38 PM 9:23 PM

8:42 PM 9:27 PM

8:04 PM 8:49 PM

7:45 PM 8:30 PM

7:54 PM 8:39 PM

8:11 PM 8:56 PM

8:28 PM 9:13 PM

COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 11


Exceptional Kosher Wines from Around the World for Your Pesach Seder California

TRIBE Propriety Red Napa TRIBE Chardonnay HERZOG VARIATIONS Three / Four / Five Cabernet Sauvignon HERZOG VARIATIONS American Oak Cabernet HERZOG Camouflage JEUNESSE Pink Moscato

Israel

BEN AMI Cabernet Sauvignon BARKAN Winemaker’s Choice Special Reserve Merlot CASTEL Petit Castel GAMLA Reserve Merlot & Cabernet Sauvignon MONTEFIORE Kerem Moshe SOREKA Special Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon ALEXANDER Sandro Red Blend Dry TULIP Espero Special Reserve Red Blend OR HAGANUZ Amuka shiraz

France

BARONS EDMOND BENJAMIN ROTHSCHILD Haut Medoc CHATEAU DE PARSAC CHATEAU LES RIGANES LOUIS ROYER V S Cognac

Spain

CAPCANES Peraj Petita Red Blend

South Africa

VILLA CAPE Reserve Pinotage & Chardonnay YOU CAN FIND THESE AND OTHER FINE KOSHER WINES IN YOUR LOCAL WINE AND LIQUOR STORE


HALACHIC CORNER

HALACHIC CORNER

Establishments and Services For Passover AIRLINE MEALS

You must request Kosher for Passover meals in advance from your travel agent or the airline. Meals prepared for Passover are specially sealed and stamped “Kosher l’Pesach”. BAKERIES

Easy Sweets Bake Shoppe ................................................................................................................................ 416.783.7200 Ellen Jane Desserts (pastry caterer)............................................................................................................. 416.487.7286 Hermes Bakery............................................................................................................................................................416.787.1234 Kosher City Plus Bakery……………….................................................................................................................... 416.782.6788 My Zaidy’s Gluten Free Bakery........................................................................................................................905.763.6463 BUTCHER SHOPS

Glatt Kosher Centre.................................................................................................................................................905.597.7571 Magen Meats..............................................................................................................................................................905.731.6328 Real Canadian Superstore.................................................................................................................................. 416.665.3209 Savours Gourmet..................................................................................................................................................... 416.663.7779 Sobeys (Clark)............................................................................................................................................................905.764.3770 Toronto Kosher......................................................................................................................................................... 416.633.9642

COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 13


HALACHIC CORNER

CATERERS & TAKE-OUT FOODS

Applause Catering...................................................................................................................................................416.628.9198 Ely’s Fine Foods.........................................................................................................................................................416.782.3231 Glatt Kosher Centre.................................................................................................................................................905.597.7571 In The Manor…………………………............................................................................................................................ …416-824-3317 Koshertrends by mona pasternak.................................................................................................................. 416.665.6662 Lechaim Caterers.................................................................................................................................................... 416.650.5440 Magen Meats..............................................................................................................................................................905.731.6328 Mitzuyan Kosher Catering................................................................................................................................... 416.419.5260 MoKo Inc......................................................................................................................................................................416.999.4849 My Zaidy’s Pizza.......................................................................................................................................................905.763.6463 PR Creative Caterers.............................................................................................................................................. 416.787.9889 Real Canadian Superstore.................................................................................................................................. 416.665.3209 Savours Gourmet..................................................................................................................................................... 416.663.7779 Sobeys (Clark)............................................................................................................................................................905.764.3770 The Kosher Dudes................................................................................................................................................... 416.663.2665 The Kosher Gourmet............................................................................................................................................... 416.781.9900 Toronto Kosher......................................................................................................................................................... 416.633.9642 Uptown Gourmet Catering.................................................................................................................................416.636.9000 Zuchter Berk Meat & Dairy Caterers..............................................................................................................416.386.1086 FISH MARKETS

Friedmans Fresh Fish.............................................................................................................................................416.782.6056 Nu Age Fish.................................................................................................................................................................416.663.3474 Sobeys (Clark)............................................................................................................................................................905.764.3770 KOSHER FOOD & NOVELTY STORES

Baskets n Stuf............................................................................................................................................................416.250.9116 Bella Sabatina Tea Shoppe................................................................................................................................. 416.855.2020 Chocolate Charm...................................................................................................................................................... 416.787.4256 Kosher N Natural The Candy Man.................................................................................................................... 416.789.7173 Kosher City Plus....................................................................................................................................................... 416.782.6788 Kosher Food Warehouse....................................................................................................................................... 905.764.7575 Savours Fresh Market............................................................................................................................................ 647.827.6275 The Chocolate Moose............................................................................................................................................416.784.9092 Zack’s Chocolates....................................................................................................................................................905.597.7022 PUBLIC/PRIVATE INSTITUTIONS

Kitchens of the institutions listed below have been prepared for Passover by mashgichim under the direction and instruction of the Rabbinical Vaad Hakashruth in accordance with the requirements for Passover: Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care • Baycrest Terrace • Bernard Betel Centre: Assoc. of Jewish Seniors is providing a first Seder on Monday, April 10, 2017. • Cedarvale Terrace • Kensington Place Retirement Residence • One Kenton • Terrace Gardens WINES

Wines, brandies, liqueurs and other such beverages certified by recognized rabbinic authorities are permissible. The label must indicate that the bottle has been prepared “Kosher l’Pesach”. Grafstein Wines........................................................................................................................................................ 416.256.0440 Simcha Wine Corp....................................................................................................................................................905.761.9022

Questions?

Call the Kosher Hotline at 416.635.9550 x100 or email us at questions@cor.ca

14 KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA | 416-635-9550 | WWW.COR.CA

We have answers.


HALACHIC CORNER

Passover Product Guide Requires Passover Certification

No Passover Certification Required

Kitniyot

Take Note!

ALMOND MILK

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

APPLE JUICE

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

APPLE SAUCE

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

BABY CARROTS, RAW

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED (YEAR-ROUND INCLUDING PASSOVER)

BABY FOOD

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

BABY FORMULA

THE FOLLOWING BABY FORMULAS ARE PRODUCED IN CHAMETZ-FREE FACILITIES AND ARE ACCEPTABLE WHEN BEARING THE OU. THEY ARE KITNIYOT AND SHOULD BE PREPARED WITH DESIGNATED UTENSILS. 1. ENFAMIL 2. ENFAPRO 3. ISOMIL 4. KIRKLAND SIGNATURE 5. LIFE BRAND 6. NESTLE GOOD START 7. NEXT STEP 8. PARENT’S CHOICE 9. PRESIDENT’S CHOICE 10. SIMILAC

BAKING POWDER

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

BAKING SODA

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED (YEAR-ROUND INCLUDING PASSOVER)

BROWN SUGAR REDPATH DARK AND LIGHT BROWN SUGAR, GOLDEN AND LIGHT YELLOW SUGAR (REDPATH DEMERARA IS NOT KOSHER FOR PASSOVER)

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION NO PASSOVER CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

BUCKWHEAT KITNIYOT BUTTER

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 15


HALACHIC CORNER

CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

CANOLA OIL

KITNIYOT

CARROTS, FROZEN/CANNED

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

CHEESE (HARD & SOFT)

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

CHICKEN

SEE POULTRY

CHICKPEAS KITNIYOT CLUB SODA

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

COCONUT (SHREDDED) - SWEETENED AND/OR TOASTED - UNSWEETENED

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED (YEAR-ROUND INCLUDING PASSOVER)

COCONUT OIL

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

COFFEE 1. ALL FLAVOURED - BEANS, INSTANT, DECAF 2. ALL DECAF - BEANS OR INSTANT 3. REGULAR BEANS - WHOLE OR GROUND 4. REGULAR INSTANT (FOLGER’S INSTANT AND TASTER’S CHOICE INSTANT REGULAR, NOT DECAF OR FLAVOURED)

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED (YEAR-ROUND INCLUDING PASSOVER) REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED (YEAR-ROUND INCLUDING PASSOVER)

COFFEE WHITENER/NON-DAIRY CREAMER

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

CONFECTIONARY SUGAR

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

COOKING OIL SPRAY

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

CORN AND CORN PRODUCTS

KITNIYOT

DATES

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

DESSERT GELS AND PUDDINGS

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

DRIED FRUIT

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

EDAMAME KITNIYOT EGGS LIQUID EGGS NOTE: NUTRI LIQUID EGGS FROM SUPREME EGG PRODUCTS CARRY COR-P FOR PASSOVER AND YEAR ROUND USE

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED (YEAR-ROUND INCLUDING PASSOVER) REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

FISH: FRESH: W/ NO ADDED INGREDIENTS BESIDES SALT ALL OTHER VARIETIES

NO PASSOVER CERTIFICATION REQUIRED REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

FOOD COLORING

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

FRUIT JUICE

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

FRUIT, FROZEN: UNSWEETENED, WITHOUT ADDITIVES (I.E. SYRUP, CITRIC ACID, ASCORBIC ACID, VITIMIN C)

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED (YEAR-ROUND INCLUDING PASSOVER)

16 KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA | 416-635-9550 | WWW.COR.CA


HALACHIC CORNER

GARLIC: FRESH PEELED

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED (YEAR-ROUND INCLUDING PASSOVER) REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

GRAPE JUICE

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

GRAPESEED OIL

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

GREEN BEANS

KITNIYOT

GUM

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

HERBAL TEA

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

HONEY

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

HORSERADISH: RAW PREPARED

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED (YEAR-ROUND INCLUDING PASSOVER) REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

ICE (BAGGED)

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED (YEAR-ROUND INCLUDING PASSOVER)

ICE CREAM, SHERBERT, ETC.

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

JAM, JELLY, PRESERVES

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

KASHA KITNIYOT KETCHUP

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

LACTAID CAPLETS,DROPS,TABLETS

MAY CONTAIN CHAMETZ

LACTAID MILK

IF NEEDED, PURCHASE BEFORE PASSOVER

LEMON JUICE REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION NOTE: REALEMON LEMON JUICE (AS WELL AS REALIME LIME JUICE) CERTIFIED BY THE OU IS ACCEPTABLE WITHOUT PASSOVER CERTIFICATION LENTILS KITNIYOT MARGARINE

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

MATZAH

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

MAYONNAISE

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

MILK

PREFERABLE WITH PASSOVER CERTIFICATION IF CERTIFIED MILK IS UNAVAILABLE, PURCHASE REGULAR MILK BEFORE PASSOVER

MUSHROOMS: CANNED FRESH, DRIED, PRE-SLICED

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED (YEAR-ROUND INCLUDING PASSOVER)

MUSTARD KITNIYOT

COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 17


HALACHIC CORNER

NUTS: IN SHELL SHELLED: WITHOUT BHT AND BHA, AND NOT BLANCHED OR ROASTED PECAN PIECES IF THE PACKAGE STATES THAT THE PRODUCT MAY CONTAIN AN ALLERGEN THAT IS CHAMETZ AND/OR KITNIYOT

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED (YEAR-ROUND INCLUDING PASSOVER) NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED (YEAR-ROUND INCLUDING PASSOVER) REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

OLIVE OIL: ALL OLIVE OIL VARIETIES INCLUDING: PURE OLIVE OIL, EXTRA LIGHT AND EXTRA VIRGIN

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

ORANGE JUICE: FRESH FROZEN CONCENTRATE, GRADE A 100% PURE WITHOUT ADDITIVES OR ENRICHMENTS (E.G. CALCIUM)

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED (YEAR-ROUND INCLUDING PASSOVER)

PEANUTS KITNIYOT PEAS KITNIYOT PICKLES

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

PINEAPPLE (CANNED)

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

POPCORN KITNIYOT POPPY SEEDS

KITNIYOT

POTATO CHIPS

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

POULTRY

ALL RAW UNPROCESSED POULTRY FROM MARVID IS KOSHER FOR PASSOVER ALL YEAR ROUND

PRUNES

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

QUINOA

THERE ARE DIFFERING OPINIONS AS TO THE KITNIYOT STATUS OF QUINOA. ASK YOUR RABBI FOR DIRECTION.

RAISINS

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

RICE KITNIYOT RICE MILK

KITNIYOT AND MAY CONTAIN CHAMETZ

SAFFLOWER OIL

THERE ARE DIFFERING OPINIONS AS TO THE KITNIYOT STATUS OF SAFFLOWER OIL. ASK YOUR RABBI FOR DIRECTION.

SALADS, BAGGED

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

SALT: IODIZED NON-IODIZED / SEA SALT

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED (YEAR-ROUND INCLUDING PASSOVER)

SELTZER

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

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HALACHIC CORNER

SESAME SEEDS

KITNIYOT

SNOW PEAS

KITNIYOT

SODA

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

SOUP MIX

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

SOYBEANS KITNIYOT SOY MILK

KITNIYOT AND MAY CONTAIN CHAMETZ

SOY PRODUCTS

KITNIYOT

SPICES

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

SUGAR SUBSTITUE, ARTIFICIAL SWEETNERS

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

SUNFLOWER SEEDS

KITNIYOT

TEA: 1. INSTANT, DECAFFEINATED, FLAVOURED, AND HERBAL 2. PURE BLACK, GREEN, AND WHITE (LEAVES OR BAGS) 3. LIPTON DECAF TEA BAGS 4. NESTEA UNFLAVOURED INSTANT REGULAR AND DECAF

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED (YEAR-ROUND INCLUDING PASSOVER) NO PASSOVER CERTIFICATION REQUIRED NO PASSOVER CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

TOFU KITNIYOT TOMATO PRODUCTS (CANNED, JUICE, PASTE, SAUCE ETC.)

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

TUNA FISH, CANNED

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

VEGETABLE OIL

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

VEGETABLES, FROZEN

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

VINEGAR

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

VITAMINS

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

WATER, UNFLAVOURED

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED (YEAR-ROUND INCLUDING PASSOVER)

WILD RICE

KITNIYOT

WINE

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

YOGURT

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

Out shopping but not sure which products are kosher for Passover? Email passoverproducts@cor.ca from your smartphone to automatically receive a list of Passover-approved products.

COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 19


HALACHIC CORNER

Non-Edible Products Requires Passover Certification

No Certification Required Take Note!

ALCOHOL (ISOPROPYL)

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

ALUMINUM PANS AND FOIL

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

BABY OIL

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

BABY OINTMENT

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

BABY POWDER

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

BABY WIPES

W/O ALCOHOL NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

BAGS, PLASTIC

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

BALLOONS

W/O POWDER NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

BAND-AIDS

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

BLEACH

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

BLUSH

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

CANDLES

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

CHARCOAL

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

CLEANSERS AND POLISHES: AMMONIA BOWL AND TUB CLEANER CARPET CLEANER DRAIN/PIPE OPENER GLASS CLEANER JAVAX, CLOROX MR. CLEAN MURPHY OIL OVEN CLEANER SANITIZERS

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

COFFEE FILTERS

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

CONTACT LENS SOLUTION

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

CONTACT PAPER

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

CRÈME, TOPICAL

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

CROCKPOT LINER

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

DENTAL FLOSS

UNFAVOURED NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

DEODERANT, STICK

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

DETERGENT: DISH, LIQUID DISH, POWDER LAUNDRY

20 KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA | 416-635-9550 | WWW.COR.CA

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED


HALACHIC CORNER

Text-A-Question For one word answers

(i.e. “Does this require kosher for Passover certification”)

text 647.402.1910

DISPOSABLES: PAPER, PLASTIC, STYROFOAM: PLATES, CUTLERY, CUPS

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

NAPKINS, PAPERTOWELS NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED NOTE: MANY PAPER PLATES, NAPKINS AND PAPERTOWELS CONTAIN CORN STARCH, THEREFORE IT IS RECOMMENDED NOT TO USE THESE PRODUCTS FOR HOT OR MOIST FOODS UNLESS THEY HAVE PASSOVER CERTIFICATION PAPERTOWELS: SOME COMPANIES USE A CORN BASED GLUE TO PRODUCE THE ROLLS, THEREFORE THE FIRST THREE SHEETS AND THE LAST SHEET SHOULD NOT BE USED. SPONGE TOWELS ULTRA WITH COR DOES NOT HAVE THIS CONCERN. PAPER CUPS: RECOMMENDED FOR COLD DRINKS ONLY

EYE SHADOW

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

EYELINER

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

FABRIC PROTECTOR

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

FABRIC SOFTENER

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

GLOVES (DISPOSABLE)

W/O POWDER NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

INSECTICIDE: SPRAYS TRAPS

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED SOME BAITS CONTAIN CHAMETZ

LOTION

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

MASCARA

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

MINERAL OIL

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

NAIL POLISH

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

NAIL POLISH REMOVER

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

OINTMENT

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

PAPER PRODUCTS

SEE DISPOSABLES

PARCHMENT PAPER

REQUIRES PASSOVER CERTIFICATION

PLASTIC WRAP

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

PLAY DOUGH

CHAMETZ

POLISHES: FURNITURE POLISH JEWELRY POLISH SILVER, METAL POLISH SHOE POLISH

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

TOOTHPICKS

W/O COLOR NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

VASALINE, PETROLEUM JELLY

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

WAX PAPER

NO CERTIFICATION REQUIRED

COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 21


HALACHIC CORNER

Kitniyot In addition to the Torah’s prohibition of chametz on Pesach, many people have the custom to refrain from consuming kitniyot as well. ORIGINS

REASONS

The earliest literature regarding kitniyot dates back over 700 years. The Smak (Rabbi Yitzchak of Korbol), who lived in the 13th century, writes about the custom of kitniyot that had already been practiced for many generations.

The classic kitniyot products are rice, buckwheat, millet, beans, lentils, chickpeas, and mustard seed. Even though kitniyot products are not chametz, Chazal were worried that if we allow their consumption, actual chametz might be consumed as well. One concern is the realistic possibility that wheat or barley kernels, which are similar to kitniyot kernels, might be inadvertently mixed into the kitniyot. Thereby cooking chametz with the kitniyot. Another concern was that since one can grind kitniyot into flour and bake or cook them into items that resemble actual chametz, the uninitiated observer might assume that chametz products are permissible. Also, the harvesting and processing of kitniyot is done in a similar way to chametz grains, and again, that might lead to confusion. In order to prevent the grave sin of eating chametz, the custom of kitniyot was enacted.

PERSPECTIVE

In order to appreciate the custom of kitniyot, let us first make an observation about the nature of the prohibition of chametz on Pesach. Among the foods that the Torah has forbidden, there is a wide range of rules and regulations. Some foods are only forbidden to be eaten (i.e. typical non-kosher); monetary and physical benefit is additionally restricted from others (i.e. milk and meat mixtures, and orlah - fruits from a tree that is not yet three years old). The penalty for violation and the rules of nullification vary from item to item. The prohibition of chametz is unique in its broad applications and its severity of violation. Chametz has the strictest restrictions of all forbidden foods in the Torah. Besides the prohibition of eating chametz, one is forbidden from even owning or benefiting from it as well. Many times, even a small drop of chametz that gets mixed into an otherwise non-chametz food would forbid the entire mixture. The punishment of karet (spiritual excision) for consuming chametz is the most severe penalty that the Torah gives for forbidden food. With this in mind, we can appreciate that halachah has a heightened cautiousness towards chametz and why extra safeguards have been set in place to avoid chametz. (In addition, since chametz is permitted throughout the year, mistakes are more likely.) The custom of kitniyot is a well-known example of an instituted safeguard.

22 KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA | 416-635-9550 | WWW.COR.CA

TO WHOM DOES THE CUSTOM APPLY?

As the halachic nature of customs dictates, only those communities which have adopted the custom of kitniyot are bound by it. The Ashkenazi communities of that time certainly accepted this custom, while generally the Sephardic communities did not. It is interesting that even within the Sephardic communities; there are those who have this custom to avoid kitniyot to some extent. Many members of the Moroccan communities avoid kitniyot, and some Iraqis don’t eat rice. (There is a Persian custom not to eat chickpeas. The reason is not based on what is mentioned above, but for a different reason entirely. Chummus is a chickpea product, and since “chummus” sounds like “chametz”, that community had a tradition to avoid chickpeas on Pesach!)


HALACHIC CORNER

Kitniyot Although kitniyot has the halachic status of a custom, its observance is in no way optional. There are two types of customs: instituted customs and developed customs. Examples of developed customs include eating fried foods on Chanukah and hamantashen on Purim. These customs developed as their practices relate to the holidays. We cherish these customs, but there is no requirement to practice them. An instituted custom, on the other hand, once it has been accepted and practiced, has a similar status to a binding law. If one is of Ashkenazi descent, they are bound to adhere to the custom of refraining from eating kitniyot. TYPES OF ITEMS INCLUDED

The original kitniyot products are rice, buckwheat, millet, beans, lentils, chickpeas, and mustard seed. As new products were introduced and discovered, their kitniyot status needed to be discussed. We find literature in regard to the kitniyot status of potatoes, corn, peanuts, quinoa, and others as well. Since there are many factors to consider, it is apparent that only a Rabbinic authority can decide what is and what is not included in the custom. LENIENCIES

Although kitniyot was prohibited out of a concern that it would be confused with chametz, kitniyot does not share the same strict applications of actual chametz. The custom was only enacted to forbid eating kitniyot. One is permitted to own, use, and benefit from kitniyot. Therefore, kitniyot products do not have to be sold with the chametz, and pet food containing kitniyot may be used. The laws of nullification are relaxed as well. In addition, when necessary, sick and elderly people may consume kitniyot products; someone suffering discomfort may take medication that has kitniyot ingredients; and a baby may be fed formula that has kitniyot ingredients. Pesach is a holiday in which we cherish our heritage and our link back to the earlier generations. Adhering to one’s traditions in regard to kitniyot is a great demonstration of this appreciation.

COMMON KITNIYOT ITEMS Beans Buckwheat Canola Oil (Rapeseed) Chickpeas Corn Edamame Green Beans Lentils Millet Mustard Peanuts Peas Poppy Seeds Rice Sesame Seeds Snow peas Soy Beans String Beans Sunflower Seeds

COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 23


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HALACHIC CORNER

Medicine First and foremost, it should be stated clearly: no one should discontinue or avoid taking medications that have been prescribed to them without consulting their doctor and Rabbi.

Pleasant Tasting Medicine

Liquid medicines and chewable pills, which are flavoured to give a pleasant taste, have the same halachic status as regular food, even though they are only being taken for their medicinal benefits. If these medications contain chametz, they are forbidden to be ingested on Pesach. In a situation where the patient is seriously ill (choleh sheyaish bo sakana), a Rabbi should be consulted.

Bitter Tasting Medicine

Pills which are bitter are permitted for someone who is ill, even if the pills contain chametz. (If a pill has a thin sweet flavoured coating, but the actual pill is bitter, the pill may be permitted as long as the coating is chametz-free.) This leniency is based on the principle that the pill is being eaten in an abnormal way, shlo k’derech achila, and is limited to one who is ill. Someone who is suffering only slight discomfort should not take pills that contain chametz. In addition, even if someone is ill, the halacha clearly states (Rama Y�D 155:3) that one may not take a pill that contains chametz if there is a chametz-free alternative.

Vitamins and Supplements

Since the allowance for taking medicines that contain chametz is limited to someone who is ill, it is forbidden to electively take vitamins or food supplements unless it is determined that they do not contain chametz.

Kitniyot

Medicine containing kitniyot is permitted for someone who feels ill.

Email passovermeds@cor.ca from your smartphone to automatically receive a list of chametz-free medications.

COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 25


HALACHIC CORNER

Cosmetics and Personal Care Products

Cosmetics and personal care products are generally considered “totally inedible” (aino raooi leachilas kelev), and, therefore, according to the letter of the law, personal care products are permitted for use even if they contain chametz. However, in the categories discussed below, it is commendable to use only those cosmetics that are chametz-free. Sicha Keshtia There is a halachic opinion from the Rishonim that applying products topically is considered ingesting, (sicha keshtia). Typically, we are not stringent in this matter and therefore, one may apply non-kosher products on the skin. However, due to the stringent approach toward chametz on Pesach (meshum chumra dePischa) some avoid using chametz in this fashion and are therefore meticulous in using only chametz-free cosmetics. Lipstick and Toothpaste In addition, due to the stringent approach toward chametz on Pesach (meshum chumra dePischa) it is advised to be stringent with regard to cosmetics and personal care products that are applied to the lips or that are used orally. Therefore, it is recommended to avoid using lipsticks and toothpastes that contain chametz. Denatured Alcohol Denatured alcohol is inedible alcohol that can be derived from either chametz or non-chametz sources. It is commonly found in deodorants, perfumes, and mouthwashes. Although denatured alcohol is inedible, it could conceivably be distilled back to an edible state, and for this reason, many Poskim (Rabbinic authorities) are of the opinion that denatured alcohol is considered edible. In order to avoid this issue, ensure that the product in question is on a reliable “Chametz-Free” list or contact the COR.

Chametz Free Medications Important: No one should discontinue or avoid taking medications that have been prescribed to them without consulting their doctor and Rabbi. Medication which tastes bitter (when chewed) is permitted. However, one should not take a pill that contains chametz if there is a chametz-free alternative. Liquid and chewable medications, as well as coatings of medications that contain chametz, should not be used. Vitamins and food supplements that contain chametz should not be used. Medicine containing kitniyot is permitted for someone who feels ill. Products that are only permitted for medical reasons should be used in separate utensils. The above guidelines do not address the question of consuming medicines on Shabbat or Yom Tov. The following is a list of basic over the counter products that are chametz-free but may contain kitniyot. Furthermore, the list does not verify the general kashrut of the medications.

Items must be in exact format as shown and exactly as named.

26 KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA | 416-635-9550 | WWW.COR.CA


HALACHIC CORNER

Chametz Free Medications ALLERGY AND COUGH + COLD RELIEF • Advil Cold & Flu • Advil Cold & Sinus Plus • Advil Cold & Sinus Nighttime • Aerius • Allegra 12 Hour 60 mg tablet • Allegra 24 Hour 120 mg tablet • Allegra-D • Benadryl Exilir • Benadryl Preparations Caplets • Benadryl Extra Strength Nightime Caplets • Benylin Cold and Sinus • Benylin Cold and Sinus Plus/Benylin Cold and Sinus Night • Claritin Allergy+Sinus Tablet • Claritin Allergy+Sinus Extra Strength • Claritin Kids Syrup • Coricidin HBP Antihistamine Cough & Cold • Dristan tablet and Dristan Extra Strength caplet • Eltor 120 • Reactine Tablets • Reactine Allergy & Sinus • Sinutab Nightime Extra Strength • Sudafed Decongestant 12 Hour • Sudafed Head Cold and Sinus Extra Strength

ANALGESICS/PAIN • Advil Tablets/Caplets • Advil Extra Strength Caplets • Advil Muscle & Joint • Advil- Children Suspension [All Flavors], Infants’ Drops • Advil- Junior Strength Swallow Tablets (NOT Chewables) • Aleve Caplets • Aleve Tablets • Anacin • Aspirin Regular Strength Caplets • Aspirin Regular Strength Tablets • Aspirin Extra-Strength Tablets

• Aspirin Stomach Guard Extra Strength • Aspirin Stomach Guard Regular Strength • Midol PMS Complete • Midol Menstrual Complete • Midol Teen Complete • Motrin IB • Motrin IB Extra Strength • Motrin IB Super Strength • Motrin Suspensions and concentrated drops • Tempra Syrup • Tylenol Regular Strength Caplets & Tablet • Tylenol Extra Strength Caplets

ANTACIDS • Alka-Seltzer • Pepcid AC • Pepcid AC, Maximum Strength • Pepcid Tablets • Zantac

ANTI-DIARRHEA • Imodium Caplets • Pepto-Bismol Liquid • Pepto-Bismol Liquid Extra Strength

ANTI-NAUSEA • Diclectin • Gravol Filmkote Tablets

LAXATIVES • Metamucil Original Texture, Unflavoured Powder (non-kitniyot) • RestoraLAX • Phillips’ Milk of Magnesia Original • Senokot Tablets • Senokot•S

PRENATAL VITAMINS • PregVit • PregVit Folic 5

COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 27


HALACHIC CORNER

Email passovercare@cor.ca from your smartphone to automatically receive a list of personal care products that are chametz-free..

Cosmetics and Personal Care Products Deodorants, hairsprays, perfumes, and mouthwashes that contain denatured alcohol should not be used (or kept in possession) on Passover unless they are chametz free. Lipsticks, toothpastes, and mouthwashes which contain chametz should not be used as they may be ingested. All other personal care products, since they are not fit for consumption, are permitted on Passover. However, some have the practice of being stringent not to use products that contain chametz which are applied to one’s body.

The products listed here are chametz-free.

For any questions about products not listed you can contact the COR in one of 3 ways: 1. Call the COR’s Passover Hotline at 416-635-9550 ext. 100 2. Email the Ask The Rabbi - questions@cor.ca 3. Text the Text-A-Question – 647-402-1910 When emailing or texting, it would be very helpful to send a picture of the product and the list of ingredients (or a picture of the ingredient panel – if it is legible.)

28 KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA | 416-635-9550 | WWW.COR.CA


HALACHIC CORNER

Personal Care Products DENTURE CARE • Fixodent Complete Denture Adhesive Cream • Polident Partials, Antibacterial Denture Cleanser • Polident 3 Minute, Antibacterial Denture Cleanser, Triple Mint Freshness • Polident Overnight Whitening Antibacterial Denture Cleanser DEODORANT - SPRAY • Arrid Extra Dry Aerosol Antiperspirant & Deodorant, Regular • Arrid XX Dry Antiperspirant & Deodorant Spray, Regular • Degree Men Antiperspirant & Deodorant, Sport Aerosol • Dove Dry Spray Antiperspirant • Dove Men+Care Dry Spray Antiperspirant • Right Guard Xtreme Cooling Aerosol Spray, Antiperspirant & Deodorant • Right Guard Sport 3-D Odor Defense, Antiperspirant & Deodorant Aerosol Spray • Right Guard Sport Antiperspirant Deodorant Aerosol Spray • Secret Aerosol Antiperspirant & Deodorant DEODORANT - STICK • Arrid XX Antiperspirant & Deodorant Solid • AXE Antiperspirant &/or Deodorant Solid • Dove Antiperspirant &/or Deodorant Solid • Old Spice Antiperspirant &/or Deodorant Solid

• Secret Antiperspirant &/or Deodorant Solid LIP CARE • Blistex - All with exception of the following: •B  listex Five Star Lip Protection - CHAMETZ •B  listex Medicated Lip Ointment - CHAMETZ •B  listex Ultra-Rich Hydration Dual Layer Lip Protectant CHAMETZ • ChapStick Classic, Original MOUTHWASH • Crest - all Alcohol Free varieties • LISTERINE Zero - All varieties MOISTURIZERS • Neutrogena Deep Moisture Night Cream • Neutrogena Healthy Defense Daily Moisturizer • Neutrogena Liquid Neutrogena Facial Cleansing Formula • Neutrogena Norwegian Formula Body Emulsion • Neutrogena Norwegian Formula Hand Cream • Neutrogena Oil-Free Moisture Facial Moisturizer • St. Ives Daily Hydrating Body Lotion • Vaseline Intensive Rescue Intensive Care Advanced Repair • Vaseline Men Body Lotion SHAMPOO & CONDITIONERS • Axe Shampoo & Conditioners • Dove Damage Therapy Shampoo & Conditioners

• Dove Nutritive Solutions Cool MoistureShampoo & Conditioners • Head & Shoulders Shampoo & Conditioners • Herbal Essences Hello Hydration Shampoo & Conditioners • Herbal Essences Hydralicious Shampoo & Conditioners • Pantene Pro-V Classic Care Shampoo & Conditioners • Pantene Pro-V Normal - Thick Hair Solutions Shampoo & Conditioners • Pantene Pro-V Repair & Protect Shampoo & Conditioners SOAPS & BOBY WASHES • AXE Shower Gels • Dial Antibacterial Hand Soap • Dial Bar Soap • Dial for Men Hair & Body Wash • Dial Kids Hair & Body Wash • Dial Spring Water Body Wash • Dove Bar Soap • Dove Body Wash • Irish Spring Bar Soap • Irish Spring Body Wash • Old Spice Bar Soap • Old Spice Body Wash • Softsoap Bar Soap • Softsoap Body Wash • Softsoap Liquid Soap SUNSCREEN • Coppertone Kids Sunscreen Lotions • Coppertone Sport High Performance Sunscreen Lotions

TOOTHPASTE • Arm & Hammer Complete Care Toothpaste • Colgate Toothpastes • Crest Cavity Protection Toothpaste - Regular • Crest Cavity Protection Toothpaste Gel • Crest Kid’s Cavity Protection Toothpaste • Sensodyne Toothpastes • CoverGirl Colorlicious Rich Color Lipstick • CoverGirl Continuous Color Lipstick • CoverGirl Outlast Lipcolor • L’Oreal Colour Riche Lipcolour • L’Oreal Infallible Le Rouge • Maybelline Color Sensational Creamy Matte Lip Color • Maybelline Color Sensational Creamy Matte Lipstick • Maybelline Color Sensational Lipstick • Maybelline SuperStay 14Hr Lipstick • Revlon ColorBurst Matte Lip Balm • Revlon Colorstay Overtime Sheer Lipcolor • Revlon Colorstay Sheer Lip Color • Revlon Colorstay Ultimate Liquid Lipstick • Revlon Super Lustrous Lipstick • Revlon Super Lustrous Pearl Lipstick • Revlon Ultra HD Lipstick • Revlon Ultra HD Matte Lipcolor

Cosmetics FACE

• BB Cream • CoverGirl Smoothers BB Cream • L’Oreal Magic Skin Beautifier BB Cream BLUSH • CoverGirl Classic Color Blush • L’Oreal True Match Lumi Powder Glow Illuminator • L’Oreal True Match Naturale Mineral Blush • L’Oreal True Match Super Blendable Blush

• L’Oreal Visible Lift Blur Blush • Maybelline Dream Bouncy Blush • Maybelline Fit Me Blush • Revlon Blush Highlighting Palette • Revlon Powder Blush CONCEALER • CoverGirl + Olay Eye Rehab Concealer • CoverGirl Invisible Concealer • CoverGirl Queen Natural Hue Concealer

• CoverGirl Smoothers Concealer • CoverGirl TruBlend FixStick Concealer • L’Oreal True Match Crayon Concealer • Maybelline Cover Stick Concealer • Maybelline Dream Lumi Touch Highlighting Concealer • Maybelline Face Studio Master Conceal • Maybelline Instant Age Rewind Eraser Dark Circles Treatment Concealer

FOUNDATION • CoverGirl + Olay Simply Ageless 3-in-1 Foundation • CoverGirl Advanced Radiance Age-defying Pressed Powder • CoverGirl Advanced Radiance Liquid Makeup • CoverGirl Advanced Radiance Pressed Powder • CoverGirl Clean Liquid Makeup • CoverGirl Clean Matte Liquid Foundation • CoverGirl Clean Oil Control Liquid Makeup

COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 29


HALACHIC CORNER

• CoverGirl Outlast Stay Luminous Foundation • CoverGirl Queen Collection Natural Hue Liquid Makeup Foundation • CoverGirl Smoothers Liquid Makeup • L’Oreal Infallible Pro-Matte Foundation • L’Oreal True Match Lumi Cushion Foundation • L’Oreal True Match Mineral Foundation • L’Oreal True Match Naturale Mineral Foundation • L’Oreal True Match Super Blendable Powder • L’Oreal True Match Super Blendable Compact Makeup • L’Oreal True Match Super Blendable Makeup • L’Oreal Visible Lift Serum Absolute Advanced Age Reversing Makeup • Maybelline Dream Liquid Mousse Foundation • Maybelline Dream Matte Mousse Foundation • Maybelline Dream Velvet Soft-Matte Hydrating Foundation • Maybelline Fit Me! Dewy + Smooth Foundation • Maybelline Fit Me! Gel Stick Foundation • Maybelline Mineral Power Powder Foundation • Maybelline Superstay Better Skin Foundation • Revlon Age Defying Mu Dna Advantage • Revlon Photoready Airbrush Effect Makeup • Rimmel Lasting Finish Foundation POWDER • Almay Clear Complexion Pressed Powder • Almay Smart Shade Loose Finishing Powder • Almay Smart Shade Smart Balance Pressed Powder • CoverGirl Advanced Radiance Age-defying Pressed Powder • CoverGirl Advanced Radiance Pressed Powder • CoverGirl Lasting Matte Pressed Powder

• CoverGirl TruBlend Pressed Powder • L’Oreal Hydra Perfecte Loose Powder • L’Oreal Infallible Pro-Matte Powder • L’Oreal True Match Super Blendable Powder • Maybelline Dream Wonder Powder • Maybelline Face Studio Master Fix Setting + Perfecting Powder • Maybelline Fit Me! Matte + Poreless Powder • Maybelline Fit Me! Set + Smooth Powder • Maybelline Shine Free Oil Control Loose Powder • Maybelline Super Stay Better Skin Powder • Revlon ColorStay Pressed Powder • Revlon Photoready Powder • Rimmel Stay Matte Pressed Powder PRIMER • Almay Smart Shade Luminous CC Primer • Almay Smart Shade Perfect And Correct Primer • CoverGirl + Olay Simply Ageless Makeup Primer • CoverGirl TruBlend Primer • L’Oreal Magic Perfecting Base Face Primer • Maybelline Baby Skin Instant Pore Eraser Primer • Maybelline Face Studio Master Prime • Revlon Photoready Primer

EYES

EYELINER • Almay Eyeliner • Almay Intense I-Color Eyeliner • Almay Intense I-Color Liquid Eyeliner • Almay Liquid Liner • CoverGirl Bombshell Intensity Eyeliner • CoverGirl Bombshell Pow-Der Brow & Liner • CoverGirl Ink It! Eyeliner • CoverGirl Ink It! Waterproof Eyeliner • CoverGirl LineExact Liquid Eyeliner

• CoverGirl LiquilineBlast Eyeliner Pencil • CoverGirl Perfect Blend Eye Pencil • CoverGirl Perfect Point Plus Self-Sharpening Eye Pencil • CoverGirl Vivid Impact Eyeliner • L’Oreal Infallible Mechanical Eyeliner • Maybelline Expert Wear Twin Brow & Eye Pencils • Maybelline Eyestudio Lasting Drama Gel Liner • Maybelline Master Precise Skinny Gel Pencil • Maybelline Unstoppable Eyeliner • Revlon Colorstay Eyeliner • Revlon Colorstay Skinny Liquid Liner EYESHADOW • Almay Intense I-Color All Day Wear Powder Eye Shadow • Almay Intense I-Color Eyeshadow • Almay Shadow Softies Eye Shadow • CoverGirl & Olay Eye Shadow • CoverGirl Eye Enhancers Eye Shadow • CoverGirl Queen Collection Eye Shadow • L’Oreal Colour Riche La Palette • L’Oreal Colour Riche Monos • L’Oreal Colour Riche Pocket Palette Eye Shadow • L’Oreal Infallible 24HR Shadow • Maybelline Expert Wear Eyeshadow Quads • Maybelline Eye Shadow Palette • Maybelline Eye Studio Color Tattoo Concentrated Crayon • Maybelline Eyestudio ColorTattoo Eye Shadow • Revlon Photoready Eye Art Lid Line Lash MASCARA • Almay One Coat Nourishing Waterproof Thickening Mascara • CoverGirl Exact Eyelights Waterproof Mascara • CoverGirl Lash Blast Mega Volume Mascara • CoverGirl Lash Blast Waterproof Mascara

• CoverGirl Lash Fanatic Waterproof Mascara • L’Oreal Telescopic Original Mascara • L’Oreal Voluminous Miss Manga Washable Mascara • Maybelline Volum’ Express The Colossal Washable Mascara • Revlon Ultimate All-in-one Waterproof Mascara

LIPS

LIP GLOSS • L’Oreal Colour Riche Le Gloss • L’Oreal Infallible Matte Gloss • Revlon ColorStay Mineral Lipglaze LIP LINER • L’Oreal Infallible Never Fail Lipliner • Revlon ColorStay Lipliner LIPSTICK • CoverGirl Colorlicious Rich Color Lipstick • CoverGirl Continuous Color Lipstick • CoverGirl Outlast Lipcolor • L’Oreal Colour Riche Lipcolour • L’Oreal Infallible Le Rouge • Maybelline Color Sensational Creamy Matte Lip Color • Maybelline Color Sensational Creamy Matte Lipstick • Maybelline Color Sensational Lipstick • Maybelline SuperStay 14Hr Lipstick • Revlon ColorBurst Matte Lip Balm • Revlon Colorstay Overtime Sheer Lipcolor • Revlon Colorstay Sheer Lip Color • Revlon Colorstay Ultimate Liquid Lipstick • Revlon Super Lustrous Lipstick • Revlon Super Lustrous Pearl Lipstick • Revlon Ultra HD Lipstick • Revlon Ultra HD Matte Lipcolor

Questions?

Call the Kosher Hotline at 416.635.9550 x100 or email us at questions@cor.ca

We have answers.

30 KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA | 416-635-9550 | WWW.COR.CA


HALACHIC CORNER

Kashering for Passover Any kitchen items, utensils, and appliances that were used for chametz during the year must be cleaned well in order to make them suitable for Passover use. Since we are taught that chametz is absorbed into the utensils used during certain cooking processes, many times a thorough surface cleaning is insufficient. In order to remove this absorbed chametz, the utensil must go through a cleansing process known as “kashering”. Not all items can be kashered. An item must be made from a material that will extract absorbed chametz when it is kashered. Below is a list of materials that can and cannot be kashered.

Items made of the following materials can be kashered: • Granite • Marble • Metal • Stone • Wood

Items made of the following materials cannot be kashered: • China • Corelle • Corian • Cork • Corningware • Duralex • Earthenware • Enamel Coating • Formica • Melmac • Nylon • Plastic • Porcelain • Pyrex • Synthetic Rubber • Teflon coating In addition, items cannot be kashered where there is concern that they might break or get ruined due to the kashering process. The rationale is that a person may not kasher an item properly if he fears that he may break or damage it.

The following are five methods of kashering: 1. LIBUN GAMUR 2. LIBUN KAL 3. HAGOLA 4. IRUI ROSCHIM 5. MILUI V’IRUI Each method has a different level of capability in removing absorbed chametz. (Libun gamur has the greatest capability; Milui v’irui has the lowest.) The specific kashering method necessary for each item will depend on how the chametz was originally absorbed. If an item was used in a cooking process that absorbs chametz more intensely, a more intense kashering method is necessary, while an item that was used for a less intense cooking process, a less intense kashering method is required. With this being the case, if a specific item requires a certain kashering method, one may use a more intense process.

COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 31


HALACHIC CORNER

Kashering Overview LIBUN GAMUR

COMPLETE GLOWING

APPLICATION: Items used directly on a stove top or grill or in the oven with food that does not contain liquid. EXAMPLES: Baking pan, roasting pan, grill. METHOD: The item must be heated e.g. by a blowtorch until every part of it becomes red hot. Note: It is highly recommended that only one with experience should use a blowtorch for these purposes.

LIBUN KAL

MODIFIED GLOWING

APPLICATION: This method can be used in place of hagola and as well, can suffice in certain circumstances when libun is required. EXAMPLES: Some types of ovens [see next page]. METHOD: The item must be heated until a piece of paper or straw, touching the other side of it, will burn. Note: One can test to see if the item reached the necessary heat for libun kal by sprinkling water onto the item; if the water sizzles, the item has been kashered with libun kal.

HAGOLA

BOILING

APPLICATION: Items used directly on a stove top or grill or in the oven with food that does contain liquid. EXAMPLES: Pots, stirring utensils, flatware when used on the fire with liquid foods. (Regular flatware also generally requires hagola.) METHOD: 1 Clean the item thoroughly to remove all dirt, labels, glue and tangible rust. Any part of the item that can’t be accessed to clean properly e.g. crevices, needs libun kal. 2 The item should not be used for hot for 24 hours [if this wasn’t done, ask your Rabbi]. 3 If the pot used for kashering is not a Pesach pot, the minhag is that the pot itself should first be kashered. This is done as follows: A. Make sure that the pot is clean and do not use it for 24 hours B. Fill the pot to the brim with water and heat it up to a rolling boil;

IRUI ROSCHIM

4 Immerse each item, one at a time, in boiling water. If you are kashering several items, make certain that the water is still boiling before inserting each one. 5 When the water becomes murky, it must be changed. 6 If the entire item can’t fit into the kashering pot at one time, it may be kashered in sections. 7 After kashering the item, it should be rinsed off in cold water. 8 Once everything has been kashered, the kashering pot itself should be kashered if it will be used for Pesach. (This can be done right away; no need to wait another 24 hours.)

POURING HOT WATER

APPLICATION: Items upon which hot chametz was poured. EXAMPLES: Sinks, counters. METHOD: 1 Clean the item thoroughly [see Hagola, above]. 2 The item should not be used for 24 hours [if this wasn’t done, ask your Rabbi]. 3 Pour boiling water onto every part of the item by using a kettle or a pot of water taken directly from the stove (see Hagola above concerning the type of pot).

MILUI V’IRUI

SOAKING

APPLICATION: Items used only with cold chametz. EXAMPLES: Drinking glasses. Note: If one is able to buy separate glasses for Pesach, this type of kashering should be avoided. METHOD: 1 Clean the item thoroughly. 2 Immerse the item in water e.g. in a tub or basin or fill the item with water. 3 Change the water every 24 hours, for a total of 72 hours.

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HALACHIC CORNER

Kashering & Cleaning Guide OVENS A. Self-Cleaning Ovens • Clean any parts of the oven where the heat of the self-cleaning cycle doesn’t reach -- mainly edges and sides of the doors and the gasket. • Run the self-cleaning cycle for at least two hours. • Don’t put any food during Pesach on the door unless the door is covered. B. Conventional Ovens • Use an oven cleaner to thoroughly clean the entire oven, including the racks and doors. • Turn the oven on to its highest setting for one and a half hours (libun kal). • Turn the oven on to broil for one half hour. • It is preferable to cover the racks with aluminum foil so that no pots or pans touch them directly. C. Continuous Cleaning Ovens • Despite its name, don’t assume that this type of oven is always clean. • Clean the oven thoroughly. (Caution - check the manual for what type of cleansers you should use). • Kasher in the same way as a conventional oven. D. Microwave Ovens • It is best not to kasher a microwave oven. If it must be used, it should be kashered as follows: • Clean the oven thoroughly to remove all dirt, and food residue. If any part of the interior can’t be accessed to clean properly (e.g. crevices), then the microwave cannot be kashered. • The oven should not be used for 24 hours. • Place a container(s) of water in the oven and boil it until the oven fills with thick steam. • The glass tray should either be changed or be completely covered with a material that is microwave-safe. • Some people also either cover the 6 walls of the microwave (Caution – do not block any vents) or completely double wrap any food before heating it.

STOVE TOPS A. Electric and Gas • Clean the entire surface of the stove top and all its parts -mainly grates, burners, chrome rings, drip trays and knobs. • Electric burners – Turn them on to the maximum setting (until they are glowing red hot) for approximately 10 minutes. • Chrome rings should be immersed in a pot of boiling water. Alternatively, one can place a wide pot (with water so as not to burn the pot) on the element while the burners are turned to maximum heat in order to spread the heat to the chrome rings. • Gas grates – Kasher them with libun kal by one of the following methods: 1 Placing them in the oven while it is being kashered. (Caution - if the oven is being kashered by using the selfcleaning cycle, verify that the grates can withstand the heat). 2 Moving them around the flame until every part of them has been heated to libun kal (Caution - use tongs and protective gloves). Alternatively, one can place a wide pot (with water so as not to burn the pot) on the grate while the burners are turned to maximum heat in order to spread the heat to the grates. • Drip trays – Put them in the oven while it’s being kashered. • Knobs – Kasher them with hagola or cover them (if they could come into contact with food or steam from pots). • Surface – Cover the entire surface with heavy aluminum foil or a Pesach blech so that only the burners are exposed. • Backsplash – Cover with heavy aluminum foil. (Caution be careful not to block any vents). • Oven hood – Clean thoroughly. The oven hood does not have to be covered unless it is very low (to the point that the steam from the pot below yad soledet. 113˚ F) B. Glass-topped Range (including Corning, Halogen, Ceran) • Burners: Turn them onto their maximum setting (until they are glowing red hot) for approximately 10 minutes. • Cover the rest of the surface around and between the burners with material that will not easily tear (Caution: do not cover the stove with a Pesach blech as it can cause the glass to crack). COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 33


HALACHIC CORNER

DISHWASHERS A. Enamel interior These types of dishwashers may not be kashered. B. Metal interior It may be possible to kasher a dishwasher with stainless steel walls, however, because of the various issues that are involved, this should only be done after consulting with, and under the direction of, your Rabbi.

SINKS A. Stainless Steel Sinks • Clean every part thoroughly -- mainly basin, knobs, faucet, drain area. Be sure to clean the spout on the faucet. - Pour a strong chemical cleaner down the drain and into any crevices that cannot be properly cleaned. • Do not use the sink with hot chometz for 24 hours. • Dry the sink prior to kashering. • Kasher with Irui Roschim by pouring boiling hot water on every part of the sink, including the knobs and faucet. If the pot used for kashering is not a Pesach pot, the minhag is that the pot itself should first be kashered. (See above Hagola method, third step.) • Some people move a preheated stone or piece of metal around the sink as the water is being poured. • It may take a few refills of the kettle or pot to kasher the entire sink. • Extendable faucets - An alternative way of kashering this part of the sink is to quickly dip it into the kashering pot (Caution – plastic parts could warp if kept in too long). • Stoppers, strainers – replace for Pesach. (If necessary, they may be cleaned well and kashered with boiling water) • Instant Hot Water Device - Pour boiling hot water over it while letting hot water run from it. • Soap Dispenser – Empty it of all the soap, flush out any remaining soap with water and pour boiling water over the entire dispenser. • Some people cover the entire area of the sink after kashering it or place an insert in the sink. B. E  namel, Porcelain, Corian Sinks • Sinks made of these materials cannot be kashered. • Clean them thoroughly and use a strong chemical cleaner (see stainless steel sinks, above) • Place an insert in the sink; or • Line the walls and bottom of the sink with contact paper or heavy aluminum foil. Then, place a rack on the bottom and wash dishes in a dishpan placed on top of the rack.

34 KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA | 416-635-9550 | WWW.COR.CA

COUNTERTOPS A. Materials that CAN be kashered: Granite / Marble / Metal / Stainless Steel / Wood To kasher these counters: • Clean them thoroughly. • Do not put anything hot on them for 24 hours. • Kasher with Irui Roschim by carefully pouring boiling water on entire area from a kettle or from a pot taken directly from the stove. If the pot used for kashering is not a Pesach pot, the minhag is that the pot itself should first be kashered (see above Hagola method, third step). • Some people cover these types of counters even after kashering them. Alternately, they move around a preheated stone or hot iron as they pour the hot water. B. Materials that CANNOT be kashered: Corian / Enamel / Formica / Plastic / Porcelain / Surrel Before using these counters: • Clean them thoroughly. • Cover them with a thick waterproof material that won’t rip easily while you are working on them. • Some people kasher these counters as outlined above before covering them.

R  EFRIGERATORS & FREEZERS

• Clean every surface and all parts thoroughly using a cleanser that will render inedible any tiny crumbs that may have been missed. • Some have a custom to cover surfaces that will directly touch food.

 UPBOARDS, C DRAWERS & SHELVES

• Clean thoroughly with a cleanser that will render inedible any tiny crumbs that may have been missed. • Some have a custom to cover surfaces that will directly touch food.

FLATWARE • Requires Hagola (see method on page 30).

TABLES & CHAIRS

Clean thoroughly. Cover tables with a thick material that won’t tear easily and through which spills won’t easily penetrate. Covers should be fastened securely.

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HALACHIC CORNER

M  ISCELLANEOUS ITEMS A. T  ablecloths and Dish Towels • Launder with soap and hot water. (Plastic tablecloths cannot be kashered.) B. Highchairs • Clean thoroughly and cover tray. • Some pour hot water on the tray before covering it. C. Rings • Clean thoroughly and pour boiling water on them (Irui Roschim). D. Candlesticks and Tray Clean thoroughly and don’t wash in a Kosher for Pesach sink (the same applies for flower vases that were on the table during the year).

ITEMS THAT CANNOT BE KASHERED • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Blech Bottles with narrow necks Ceramic China Colander/Strainer/Sieve Crockpot Food Processor George Foreman Grill Grater Hot Plate Mixer Plastic Tablecloths Sifter Toaster / Toaster Oven Warming Drawer Wooden Cutting Board

Kashering Notes Kashering (with the exception of libun gamur) should be done before the latest time to eat chametz. If this was not done, ask your Rabbi. Typically, it is not permitted to kasher a meat item in order to use it for dairy or vice versa. However, once an item has been kashered for Pesach, it may be designated for either one. Since kashering can involve boiling hot water, red-hot burners or even a blow torch, safety is an important concern. It’s best to use protective gloves and tongs while kashering. Children should be kept away from the area in which you are working. When in doubt, ask your Rabbi. Although this is an important rule all year round, it’s crucial when it comes to Pesach when the laws are more complex and more stringent. These guidelines are for kashering chametz items for Pesach use only. To kasher items all year round that may have become non-kosher (i.e. meat utensil that absorbed milk), consult your Rabbi as there may be more leniencies. Due to the complexities of the kashering process, to the extent that it’s feasible, it’s best to have separate items for Pesach. COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 35


HALACHIC CORNER

Tevilat Keilim: IMMERSING DISHES AND UTENSILS IN A MIKVAH In a kosher kitchen, many types of dishes and utensils must be immersed in a mikvah before they may be used. Tevilat keilim is independent from kashering. The basic difference between the two is that kashering refers to various methods of extracting or burning absorbed substances, while tevilat keilim is a ritual of sanctifying the utensil. Based on this discrepancy, tevilat keilim has different applications, requirements, and guidelines than kashering. OWNERSHIP REQUIREMENTS:

The function of tevilat keilim is to sanctify a vessel that is now owned by a Jew. Consequently, if an item was originally made by a Jew, and has always been owned by a Jew, the item would not require tevilah (immersion in the mikvah). Conversely, if an item is owned jointly or in a partnership with a non-Jew, it would also not need tevilah. If later the Jew becomes the exclusive owner, the item would then need tevilah. Tevilat keilim is required only on utensils that are considered klai achila, utensils used for food preparation or mealtime. Based on this classification, a storeowner who sells these utensils should not tovel them. This is because the storeowner relates to them as klai schorah, store inventory, and not as klai achila. Once the customer buys the utensil, the utensil is now considered klai achila, and the utensil could now be toveled. Questions arise when sending a gift if the sender could do the tevilah. As the scenarios can be quite complex, one should consult their Rabbi or contact the COR, with the specific question. UTENSIL REQUIREMENTS:

We are required to tovel (immerse in a mikvah) items that come into direct contact with food during preparation or mealtime. Oven racks generally do not come into direct contact with food, and would, therefore, not require tevilah, but the racks from a toaster oven which do directly touch food would require tevilah. To require tevilah, items must be made of metal (aluminum, brass, copper, gold, iron, lead, silver, steel, and tin) or glass (including Pyrex, Duralex, and Corelle). Wood, plastic, rubber, and unglazed earthenware do not require tevilah. PREPARING THE UTENSIL:

In order for the tevilah to be valid, the item must be immersed in the mikvah waters without

36 KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA | 416-635-9550 | WWW.COR.CA

any interference. The item must, therefore, be prepared accordingly. All labels and stickers that one plans to remove when using the item must be removed before tevilah. After the sticker is removed, any residual adhesive that is left on the item must be removed as well. On a practical note, WD-40 and nail polish remover are known to be effective in adhesive removal. Also, if there are many items to tovel, it is recommended to prepare the items before going to the mikvah. BRACHAH:

Generally, one must make a brachah (blessing) before performing the mitzvah of tevilat keilim. One should hold the item, or one of the items that is to be toveled while making the brachah. If one item is being toveled the brachah is “Baruch… asher kedishanu bemitzvotav vetzivanu al tevilat keli.” If many items are to be toveled the brachah changes to “Baruch… asher kedishanu bemitzvotav vetzivanu al tevilat keilim.” There are a number of items that require tevilah, however, a brachah is not said. This could be for a number of reasons. For example, if there is an uncertainty in halacha if an item requires tevilah, then tevilah would be done without a brachah. Many of these items are listed in the chart on the next page. TEVILAH PROCEDURE:

It is preferable to wet one’s hand before tovelling the item, and if possible to do this before making the brachah. The item being tovelled must be totally immersed with the mikvah waters touching the entire item both outside and inside. The entire item must be under water at one time and may not be immersed in stages. One must be aware when tovelling many items simultaneously that the pile is not weighed down in a way that water cannot reach all the items. As with any matter in halacha, if a question arises or if you need further guidance, consult your Rabbi or contact COR.


HALACHIC CORNER

ITEM

TEVILAH BRACHAH REQUIREMENT REQUIREMENT

Aluminum pans - to be used once - to be used more than once

No Tevilah Required Preferable to Tovel

NO

Blech

No Tevilah Required

-

Blender

Tevilah Required

YES

Can Opener

No Tevilah Required

-

Ceramic Dishes (i.e.: coffee mug)

Preferable to Tovel

NO

China

Preferable to Tovel

NO

Cookie Cutters

Tevilah Required

NO

Cooling Racks

Tevilah Required

NO

Cork Screw

No Tevilah Required

-

Corningware

Tevilah Required

NO

Crockpot: Ceramic Insert Metal Insert Glass Lid

Preferable to Tovel Tevilah Required Tevilah Required

NO YES YES

Dish Rack

No Tevilah Required

-

Earthenware, non-glazed

No Tevilah Required

-

George Forman Grill

Tevilah Required

YES

Glass

Tevilah Required

YES

Hot Water Urn

Tevilah Required

YES

Meat Tenderizer Hammer

Tevilah Required

NO

Meat Thermometer

No Tevilah Required

-

Microwave - Turntable Only

Tevilah Required

YES

Mixer Beaters - if to be used exclusively with not yet edible food (i.e. dough) - if to be used at times with already edible food (i.e. ice cream)

Tevilah Required

NO

Tevilah Required

YES

Oven Racks

No Tevilah Required

-

Peeler

Tevilah Required

YES

Plastic

No Tevilah Required

-

Popcorn Popper

Tevilah Required

YES

Porcelain Enamel

Preferable to Tovel

NO

Sandwich Maker

Tevilah Required

YES

Spatula, metal

Tevilah Required

YES

Stoneware, glazed

Preferable to Tovel

NO

Styrofoam

No Tevilah Required

-

Tea Kettle

Tevilah Required

YES

Teflon Coated Pots

Tevilah Required

YES

Toaster Oven - Racks & Tray Only

Tevilah Required

YES

Some of the most common questions that arise pertaining to tevilat keilim concern tovelling small electrical appliances. Typical sandwich makers, hot water kettles, and urns require tevilah. Discuss with your Rabbi or COR how to practically tovel these appliances. For example, how much of the appliance must be immersed? Does the cord have to be immersed as well? When it comes to appliances with a digital panel, i.e. a Keurig coffee brewer, there is a greater concern that these items would be ruined with tevilah. Taking this into account, there is a valid halachic claim that tevilah is not required. The best option in these situations is to free yourself of any question with regard to tovelling the appliance. As mentioned in the article, if an item is partially owned by a non-Jew, it does not require tevilah. Therefore, under the circumstances, it would be advisable to sell a percentage of the appliance to a non-Jew. To receive instructions how to properly administer such a transaction, talk to your Rabbi or call COR to obtain a contract which has been designed specifically for this purpose.

COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 37


HALACHIC CORNER

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38 KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA | 416-635-9550 | WWW.COR.CA

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HALACHIC CORNER

Shaimos Guidelines:

Discarding Holy Objects As we clean for Passover, we tend to use the opportunity to de-clutter our homes as well. We find that over the course of the year we manage to collect a sizeable collection of Torah and mitzvah related material. Since the Torah requires us to treat holy writings and objects with dignity even when they won’t be used anymore, many of these items cannot be thrown out in the regular garbage. These items, known colloquially as shaimos, must be discarded in the respectful manner that is outlined in halachah. Many cities have an organization that deals with shaimos burial. People collect their personal shaimos materials and place them either in a designated bin, or, as is the practice in Toronto, wait for a city wide shaimos collection. Just as it is important to clarify which items belong in shaimos, it is also important to know what is not considered shaimos, since there are times that it is considered disrespectful to bury non-shaimos with regular shaimos.



THE FOLLOWING ARE SPECIAL STATUS SHAIMOS AND SHOULD BE WRAPPED IN PLASTIC BEFORE BEING PLACED IN SHAIMOS: • Tefillin, mezuzot, and megilot



THE FOLLOWING ARE CONSIDERED SHAIMOS AND SHOULD NOT BE DISCARDED INTO THE REGULAR GARBAGE OR THE RECYCLING BIN: • Chumashim, siddurim, benchers, mishnayot, gemara, Torah commentaries, Shulchan Aruch and Halacha seforim, etc. • Covers of the seforim mentioned above • Mezuza covers, tefillin straps, boxes and bags • Paper that contains Hashem’s name

THE FOLLOWING SHOULD BE PLACED IN SHAIMOS OR WHEN DIFFICULT IT SHOULD BE DISCARDED RESPECTFULLY BY WRAPPING THEM BEFORE PLACING THEM IN THE RECYCLING BIN:

• Printed material which by their nature are not intended to be saved, i.e. weekly Divrei Torah flyers, Torah articles printed in newspapers and magazines. (The rest of the newspaper or magazine is not shaimos, and should not be placed in shaimos.) • Children’s Lemudai kodesh homework and parsha sheets • Invitations that contain additional pesukim (verses) besides the standard Od Yeshama

THE FOLLOWING SHOULD BE DISCARDED

RESPECTFULLY BY WRAPPING THEM BEFORE PLACING THEM IN THE RECYCLING BIN (IF NOT ACCEPTED IN THE RECYCLING BIN THEN PLACE THEM WRAPPED INTO THE REGULAR GARBAGE):

• Tzitzis, tzitzis strings, and talleisim • Kippot • Lulav, esrog, schach • Tallis bags, tallis and tefillin plastics

THE FOLLOWING ARE NOT SHAIMOS AND SHOULD PREFERABLY BE DISCARDED IN THE RECYCLING BIN (IF NOT ACCEPTED IN THE RECYCLING BIN THEN PLACE THEM INTO THE REGULAR GARBAGE):



• CDs, DVDs, tapes, computer disks that contain Torah shiurim • Torah-themed projects and pictures – provided that no pesukim (verses) are displayed • Invitations that contain only the standard Od Yeshama and no additional pesukim (verses) COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 39


HALACHIC CORNER

Pet Food on Passover (AND THROUGHOUT THE YEAR)

A

lthough one is allowed to feed pets non-kosher foods, there are still kashrut issues that one has to be aware of. Throughout the year, not only are we commanded not to eat foods that contain a meat and milk mixture, one is also not allowed to derive benefit from them. Feeding pets these foods is considered a derived benefit and, therefore, it is forbidden. On Passover, we are commanded not to eat chametz, nor may we derive benefit from or own it. Having pet food, which contains chametz in one’s possession during Passover, transgresses this prohibition. On the other hand, it is permitted to derive benefit from non-kosher and, therefore, one is allowed to feed pets non-kosher food. Ashkenazi Jews who do not eat kitniyot are allowed to feed kitniyot to their pets on Passover. The Torah’s prohibition of eating, owning, and deriving benefit from chametz is limited to the five grains – wheat, barley, oats, rye, and spelt. As an extra safeguard, Ashkenazi Jews have been instructed to avoid kitniyot as well. (See our article on kitniyot in this guide.) This safeguard prohibits eating kitniyot, but does not forbid owning and deriving benefit from kitniyot. Therefore, one may feed kitniyot to pets on Passover. What should one be aware of when buying pet food? DOGS AND CATS

Throughout the year, one has to make sure that pet food with meat does not contain dairy. When it comes to regular food, we are forbidden to have dairy mixed with any sort of meat or poultry, however, with pet food it is only forbidden to have dairy mixed with beef. It is not a problem if dairy is mixed with poultry, fowl, or meat from a non-kosher species (i.e. pork). Therefore, if the label states “beef”, “lamb”, “meat”, or similar declaration it must not have dairy ingredients. “Animal fat” should be considered an ingredient that cannot be mixed with dairy. Whey and casein are some of the notso-obvious dairy ingredients that could be found in pet food. For Passover, pet food cannot have chametz ingredients. Ingredients made of wheat, barley, oats, rye, spelt, pasta, and brewer’s yeast are chametz. Also, note that “starch” could be wheat starch and should be avoided. Kitniyot ingredients are permitted. Common kitniyot ingredients are: beans, buckwheat, corn, millet, peanuts, peas, rice, sorghum and soybeans. Be careful with pet foods that are “gluten free” as they still might have chametz ingredients. “Grain free” pet foods seem not to be a problem, but make sure to check the ingredient label. 40 KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA | 416-635-9550 | WWW.COR.CA

FISH, BIRDS, AND SMALL ANIMALS

Feed for fish, birds, and small animals has its own unique challenge as many feeds are grain based. Reading the ingredient panel is imperative. Since some people have difficulty finding suitable pet food, there are those who make their own homemade “Kosher for Passover” pet food. It is recommended to speak with a pet food specialist for advice as to what to feed your pets. It is also a good idea to start acclimating your pet to its new Passover diet for a little while before Passover. Also, beware that although some reptile foods are not a problem, the feed might be packaged with oatmeal or wheat flakes, which is chametz. Below are a few chametz-free options:

Spray Millet for birds

Alfalfa Hay and Cubes

For Fish. (Please read ingredients to verify that the pet food is chametz-free. Similar looking items might contain chametz.)

While it seems like a good solution, it is not simple to halachically avoid the issue by giving your pet to a non-Jew for Passover. If you wish to do so, you must discuss this issue with your Rabbi. As always, if you have any questions about specific ingredients please call the COR and we will be pleased to assist.


HALACHIC CORNER

THE KOSHER PET FOOD 10 COMMANDMENTS 1 Pet food may contain non-kosher ingredients.

 uring Passover, pet food that is chametz 6 D should be sold with the rest of your chametz.

2 Pet food may not contain a mixture of meat (beef) and milk. This applies yearround.

Passover, avoid the following 7 During  ingredients: wheat, barley, oats, rye, spelt, brewer’s yeast, and starch.

3 Pet food may contain a mixture of pork and milk.

Passover, pet food may contain kitniyot. 8 During 

4 Pet food may contain a mixture of poultry and milk. 5 During Passover, pet food may not contain any chametz.

Passover, be careful with foods for fish, 9 During  birds and small animals. Passover, double-check the ingredient 10 During  panels even if the food is grain/gluten free.

COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 41


HALACHIC CORNER

PESACH TRAVELER CHECKLIST BELOW IS A LIST THAT ADDRESSES COMMON SCENARIOS FOR THOSE PEOPLE WHO ARE NOT STAYING HOME FOR PESACH

PRIMARY RESIDENCE If leaving more than 30 days before Pesach (and not returning until after Pesach): • No bedika required • Must sell chametz and must declare Kol Chamira before the latest time for owning chametz on Erev Pesach If leaving less than 30 days before Pesach: • Bedika required -M  ust be performed at night by candlelight during the night before you leave this location

-N  o bracha is said

- Kol Chamira is said, however, substitute bershusi (in my possession) with bebaisa hadain (in this house).

-O  ne could also appoint a shaliach (agent) to perform the bedika on their behalf on Erev Pesach

- It is more appropriate to perform a bedika rather than to absolve oneself of the requirement to have a bedika performed by selling the entire house on the 13th of Nissan. In case of need, speak to your Rabbi.

• Must sell chametz and must declare the regular Kol Chamira before the latest time for owning chametz on Erev Pesach

DESTINATION (HOTEL) If you brought in chametz: Bedika with bracha required If chametz was not brought in: Bedika without bracha required Make sure that when selling chametz it will be sold before the latest time for owning chametz in the place that you are staying and that it will be bought back only after Pesach is over for you at the place where you are staying.

WHEN FLYING: Make sure that the kosher meal is certified Kosher for Passover, and that the double wrap of the hot airline meal is not pierced (this applies all year, not only for Pesach). One should not have any of the hot drinks, and you should assume that the cold drinks are not Passover certified, unless clearly stated that they are.

IN A HOTEL: One should not use the coffee urn in the room (or anywhere in the hotel) unless it is clearly stated that it is certified Kosher for Passover.

42 KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA | 416-635-9550 | WWW.COR.CA


HALACHIC CORNER

TOP 15 questions from the

cor passover hotline COR is pleased to answer questions from kosher consumers throughout the year. This service is especially popular during the weeks leading up to Passover, as is evidenced by the over 5000 questions answered last year prior to Passover. This COR Passover magazine can be used as a reference guide for much of the information that is needed during Passover. However, many questions do come up and we are here to answer them. To contact us, call the COR Passover Hotline at 416-635-9550 ext. 100 or email us at questions@cor.ca. You can also use our Text-A-Question service by texting your question to 647-402-1910 for yes/no questions.

1

Here is a list of the more frequently asked questions from Passover 2016:

Do liquid eggs require Kosher for Passover (KFP) certification? YES. Nutri Liquid Eggs from Supreme Egg Products carry a COR-P for Passover and year round use.

COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 43


HALACHIC CORNER

2

3

May extra virgin olive oil be purchased without certification? NO. We recently became aware of reports claiming that much of what is being sold as extra virgin olive oil is actually diluted with lower grade olive oil, sunflower or canola oil. Indeed, an industry expert stated that “75-80 percent of the oil sold in the U.S. does not meet the legal grades for extra-virgin oil.� We are currently conducting a comprehensive study of the matter together with the Canadian Food and Wine Institute at Niagara College. We will share the results as soon as we have conclusive evidence. In the meantime, we can only recommend extra virgin olive oil that carries Passover certification.

Do lemon or lime juice products require KFP certification? YES. But ReaLemon Lemon juice, and ReaLime Lime juice certified by the OU are acceptable for use on Passover even without KFP certification.

5 Do sliced raw mushrooms need KFP certification? No

4 Does toothpaste need to be chametz free? Since toothpaste is used orally, it should be chametz free. All Colgate and Sensodyne toothpastes are chametz free.

6 Do spray & liquid deodorant, hairspray and perfume need to be chametz free? Since it is theoretically possible to distil alcohol found in these products and restore the alcohol to an edible state, they should be chametz free. The same applies to dry shampoo. All stick deodorants however are acceptable.

7

8

Which alcohols that are found in personal care products are problematic on Pesach and which are not? Alcohol that contains chametz could be referred to in any of the following ways: 1. Ethyl Alcohol, 2. Ethanol, 3. Denatured Alcohol, 4. Alcohol Denat., 5. SD Alcohol, 6. SDA or SDA Alcohol, 7. Alcohol The following are not sourced from chametz: 1. Benzyl Alcohol, 2. Cetyl Alcohol, 3. Isopropyl Alcohol, 4. Methanol, 5. Stearyl Alcohol.

Does frozen fruit need KFP certification? Any frozen fruit, whole or sliced, that is unsweetened and without additives (i.e. syrup, citric acid, ascorbic acid, vitamin C) is acceptable without KFP certification.

44 KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA | 416-635-9550 | WWW.COR.CA


HALACHIC CORNER

9 Which coffees do and don’t require KFP certification? A. All regular ground coffees are acceptable for Passover use. B. Decaffeinated coffee: Coffee is often decaffeinated by means of ethyl acetate, KOSHER FOR PASSOVER which is derived from either kitniyot or chametz. Therefore, decaffeinated coffees are not acceptable without Passover certification. C. All flavoured coffee requires Passover certification. D. Instant coffees often contain maltodextrin, which is derived from either kitniyot or chametz. Therefore, all instant coffees require Passover certification. Nescafe Taster’s Choice and Folgers Instant Coffee are acceptable even without Passover certification. Please note: Nescafe Rich Instant Coffee is not acceptable for use on Passover the two products do look similar (see images).

10 Can I purchase a cup of black coffee at a non-kosher establishment such as Starbucks or Tim Horton’s on Passover? Definitely not. These establishments bake items such as muffins and donuts which are chametz and as such all of the utensils used are chametz.

12 Does frozen salmon require Passover certification? Frozen salmon requires Passover certification. This is a list frozen salmon that is acceptable even without Passover certification: 1. Kirkland Atlantic (Farm Raised) Salmon when it bears the OU symbol; 2. Kirkland Wild Frozen Salmon only after rinsing it off (OU); 3. Olivia Atlantic Frozen Salmon with the KF certification

NOT KOSHER FOR PASSOVER

11

What medications are recommended for children during Passover? (The following are both acceptable on Passover and do not contain non-kosher ingredients) 1. Liquid Tempra is for children and is acceptable. 2. Advil- Children Suspension [All Flavors], Infants’ Drops 3. Advil- Junior Strength Swallow Tablets (NOT Chewables) 4. Motrin Suspensions and concentrated drops 5. Claritin Kids Syrup 6. (Although not a children’s medication - Benadryl Exilir is chametz free as well.)

14

13 Is Metamucil suitable for use on Passover? Only the Original Coarse Metamucil is acceptable. It is also kitniyot free.

How about Benefibre? Benefibre is acceptable for use on Passover in Canada. Please note Benefiber from the United States has a different formula and is not kosher for Passover.

15

FROM UNITED STATES NOT KOSHER FOR PASSOVER

FROM CANADA KOSHER FOR PASSOVER

And Restoralax? Restoralax is acceptable for use on Passover. COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 45


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RABBINIC CORNER

RABBINIC CORNER

Bittersweet:

What can be used for Marror? THERE ARE FIVE VEGETABLES IDENTIFIED BY THE MISHNA THAT CAN BE USED FOR THE MITZVAH OF MARROR.

By: Rabbi Tsvi Heber This article was inspired by two of my daughters1 who simply find it difficult to eat marror. Our family’s tradition is to eat grated horseradish wrapped inside romaine leaves and then, of course, dipped into charoses.2 But eating even a small k’zayis of this mixed breed of marror seems too bitter to bear. My suggestion of simply eating romaine lettuce without any horseradish was also met with raised eye brows. “Girls who don’t like salad?” I wondered. After pondering that for a moment, I quickly set out on a quest to determine if there were any other options when it comes to fulfilling the mitzvah of marror.3

T

here are actually five vegetables identified by the Mishna4 that can be used for the mitzvah but their names give little clue as to their true identity. They are chazeres, ulshin, tamcha, charchavina and marror. We are taught that the Mishna lists these vegetables in order of preference; chazeres being most preferable followed by the others in sequential order.5 So what exactly

are they? Chazeres is most commonly referred to as chasa6 or salatin7 and is even called by a familiar Hebrew word salat.8 While a quick entry of chasa into Google Translate turns up the word “lettuce”, most people seem to identify it as romaine lettuce.9 That said, one who has no specific tradition may use other lettuces such as iceberg lettuce or other open-leaf lettuces.10 Interestingly enough, the reason that chasa was chosen as the

vegetable best suited for this mitzvah is due to the meaning of its name. Chasa means mercy and using chasa for the mitzvah enforces the message that Hashem had mercy on us and took us out of Egypt. Additionally, chasa has a characteristic that is similar to the way that the Ancient Egyptians acted toward us. Just like the Egyptians first acted sweetly toward us and then turned bitter so too chasa’s initial taste is sweet and

COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 47


RABBINIC CORNER

Horseradish Root

then turns bitter.11 But to my girls, romaine seemed to be bitter through and through. “Would iceberg lettuce do the trick?” I wondered if there were other options. The second vegetable identified in the Mishna is ulshin which is referred to as hindibi and translated to Ancient French as Crespele.12 Some authorities use the words indibin or indaibi13 and most recently, it has been called indvies.14 Ulshin has ultimately been identified as chicory or curly endive (olesh in Hebrew) which is also used to make a type of coffee.15 This should not be confused with the Belgian endive which apparently should not be used for marror.16 I didn’t think they were going to go for this option. The third vegetable identified in the Mishna is tamcha. This is commonly known as krayn17 or chrayn18 which is the Yiddish name for the root vegetable horseradish. It must be clarified that one cannot use

a classic retail brand of horseradish that is used on Friday night gefilte fish since it is generally mixed with beets, vinegar, sugar and other ingredients.19 Rather, one must use either the green leaves of the horseradish20 or the root itself which should be grated before consumption.21 It is best to grate the horseradish as close to the meal as possible so that it remains bitter or, at the very least, to seal the grated horseradish tightly in a container.22 This was the one that they were trying to avoid. The fourth vegetable identified in the Mishna is called charchavina. Rashi identified this as the bindweed that grows around a palm tree.23 While I have seen some who try to identify this weed as calystegia sepium or in Hebrew as chabalbalan hamishuchos,24 ultimately, there doesn’t seem to be much confidence in our tradition of the identity of charchavina and, accordingly, contemporary authorities

Charchavina according to Rashi

48 KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA | 416-635-9550 | WWW.COR.CA

Chazeres - chasa.

strongly advise against using it.25 The fifth and final vegetable listed in the Mishna is actually called marror which the Gemara calls Marrorisa. Some say that like the others, marror is a specific vegetable; amerfoil26; or kusbarta27 which sounds similar to the Hebrew word for coriander which is kusbar; or la’ana28 in Hebrew and wermut in German29 which refers to a plant called wormwood. Others30 claim that marror is a broad term which refers to any bitter herb, similar to the way it is used in common language.31 There is an opinion which establishes marror as any vegetable whose characteristics match the following criteria: 1) it must contain a milky sap which leaks out when it is sliced; 2) its colour mustn’t be profoundly green but rather a pale whitish-green; and 3) it must be edible.32 One may rely on this opinion only in exceptional circumstances and, in such cases, a bracha would not be recited.33

Ulshin


RABBINIC CORNER

Romaine Lettuce

Belgian Endive

An interesting question arises as to whether one can use marror that is not grown directly in the ground, such as greenhouse grown leaves (grown in nonperforated flower pots34) or hydroponically grown vegetables, for the mitzvah.35 The Chazon Ish36 cites the Gemara37 which clearly indicates that one is able to fulfill the mitzvah of matza using grains that grow inside non- perforated flower pots. This application is equally relevant to marror38 thereby allowing us to use greenhouse grown marror for the mitzvah. Hydroponics are different since the leaves are not growing in earth but rather in water. The Gemara39 requires that marror be gidulay karka or grown in the earth which presumably excludes hydroponics. That said, it must be noted that this criterion is mandated so that marror be similar to matza. It would appear that matza which is hydroponically grown would qualify for the mitzvah since the only qualification required to establish the identity of kosher matza is that it must be made from ingredients that can become chametz.40 Therefore, since the combination of hydroponically grown wheat flour and water would indeed create chametz, the same combination should similarly qualify as matza and hydroponically grown leaves as marror.41 One who is fastidious or particularly sensitive, like my daughters, would have a choice as to the type of marror which is most appealing to them as long as it is one that a bracha can be recited on.42 But after reading this article they politely informed me that they would like to stick to romaine lettuce after all. Apparently, for them, the taste of romaine lettuce started off bitter but then turned sweet. I guess salad, like all good things, is an acquired taste. RABBI TSVI HEBER IS COR’S DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY KOSHER

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RABBINIC CORNER

Checking Marror 1 P  RELIMINARY CHECK: Check the produce for the presence of insects; focusing on heavy infestation or infestation of aphids and leaf miners. • If three or more aphids are found then the produce is not recommended for use. • If ten or more thrips are found then the produce is not recommended. 2 P  REPARE LEAVES: Leaves should be separated from the head.

ABOVE: THRIPS

3 P  REPARE SOAP AND WATER: Add cold water and sufficient amount of food-grade dish soap or vegetable wash that contains a surfactant in the ingredients to a clean sink or container. The appropriate water to produce ratio is 3:1 (3 parts water to 1 part produce). The proper amount of vegetable wash/soap is when the soap suds are visible in the water. 4 S  OAKING AND AGITATING: Place leaves in water ensuring that the produce is completely submerged in the water. Leaves are thoroughly but gently agitated. Leaves should be agitated in the water for a minimum of one minute. 5 R  INSING: Leaves should be removed from water and rinsed individually under a strong stream of water; rub the leaves gently while they are rinsed. Care should be taken to ensure that all crevices and folds are opened while rinsing. Rinse both sides of the leaves. NOTE: Steps 1-5 can be performed by kitchen help that is not Jewish or a Jewish minor. The following steps should be performed by a Jewish person of the age of mitzvos who is confident in their ability to identify small insects.

ABOVE: APHIDS

CHECKING METHOD FOR SMALL QUANTITIES: INSPECTION:

Check both sides of each and every leaf on a light box for insects. Care must be taken to unfold and open all cracks and crevices. Special focus should be applied to determine the presence of leaf miners.

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RABBINIC CORNER

Checkin Marror CHECKING METHOD FOR LARGE QUANTITIES: (I.E. KOSHER SCREEN METHOD) 6 W  ASH Fill up a container with fresh water. Place produce inside the container. The appropriate water to produce ratio is 3:1 (3 parts water to 1 part produce). Agitate well and slowly. Remove produce from the container, while shaking out the water from the produce; then place produce in a clean container. 7 P  OUR WATER THROUGH KOSHER SCREEN: Place a clean Kosher Screen in between two colanders and empty the water through the colanders while ensuring that all the water goes into the Kosher Screen. Rinse the container with fresh water and empty the fresh water through the colanders. Let the water flow out completely through the Kosher Screen and into the drain. Shake the top strainer into the Kosher Screen to ensure that any caught insects are now on the Kosher Screen. 8 CHECK KOSHER SCREEN: Place the Kosher Screen on a light box. Use a spray bottle to gently spray water on the Kosher Screen. This allows any dirt to spread while allowing clearer visibility of the screen. Examine the Kosher Screen on the light box for the presence of insects. If the screen is free from insects, move on to point 9. • If one or two insects are found then repeat steps 6-8. • If three or more thrips or mites are found then this demonstrates that washing was not effective and steps 1-8 should be repeated. • If three or more aphids, specifically, are found after performing the Kosher Screen Method two times then the Kosher Screen Method should not be repeated and the produce is not recommended for use. 9 SAMPLE CHECKING: Twenty-five leaves should be checked on a light box for insects and possible leaf miners. If any insects are found then the rest of the leaves must be checked individually, one by one, both sides of each leaf, on a light box. NOTE: Those who wish to be extra careful, can rip the leafy part of the leaf off of the stalk and use only the stalk for the mitzvah. Each stalk should be washed under a strong stream of water using a vegetable brush to scrub both sides of the stalk.

Text-A-Question For one word answers

(i.e. “Does this require kosher for Passover certification”)

text 647.402.1910

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RABBINIC CORNER

Times for Mitzvot of the Seder Night By: Rav Yaakov Hassan

Korban Pesach

The Gemara in Pesachim (:f"e) discusses the start and end times of the mitzvah of Korban Pesach on the night of Pesach. Everyone agrees that the mitzvah cannot be fulfilled earlier than Tzet HaKochavim. The latest one can fulfil this mitzvah, however, is a matter of dispute: R. Elazar ben Azarya maintains that the latest is Chatzot (halachic midnight), while R. Akiva holds that the mitzvah can be fulfilled until Ammud HaShachar (dawn). Matzah

The Gemara there further states that according to R. Elazar ben Azarya one cannot fulfil the mitzvah of Matzah if he ate the Kezayit only after Chatzot (this is due to the Hekesh (link) in the Pasuk between the Mitzvah of Korban Pesach and Matzah). Maror

Accordingly, one cannot fulfil the Mitzvah of Maror after Chatzot either, since the above-mentioned Hekesh links Maror with the Mitzvot of Korban Pesach and Matzah as well. Indeed, this is the position of the Mishnah Berurah ('u e"x z"g, 'hx). Afikoman

Regarding the Mitzvah of Afikoman; whether we consider the opinion of Ro”sh (which is adopted in the Shulchan Aruch (beginning of z”g,)) that the reason for Afikoman nowadays is Zecher LaKorban Pesach (as a remembrance for the Korban Pesach), or we consider the opinions of Rashba”m and Rash”i (:y"he ihrhypn iht v"s) that Afikoman is actually the principal fulfillment of the Mitzvah of Matzah, It follows that Afikoman

cannot be fulfilled (according to R. Elazar ben Azarya) beyond Chatzot (since both Mitzvot cannot be done past Chatzot, as established above). Sippur Yetziat Mitzrayim

Regarding the Mitzvah of Sippur Yetziat Mitzrayim (recounting the story of Yetziat Mitzrayim); the Terumat HaDeshen (z"ke 'hx– also quoted in the Bet Yosef 't c"g, 'hx) states that reciting the Haggadah must be done at “night” because this Mitzvah follows the other Mitzvot of Pesach night, which must be done at night, i.e., after Tzet HaKochavim (see Tosafot and Ro”sh, beginning of ohjxp hcrg 'p, who argue that this is the case because of the Hekesh that links Matzah and Maror to Korban Pesach). The Terumat HaDeshen takes this a step further and applies the same Halachah to the Mitzvah of Haggadah because the Pasuk clearly states vz rucgc ///lbck ,sdvu, and, as we know, we expound this to mean

lhbpk ohjbun rurnu vmna tkt h,rnt tk, the Mitzvah of Haggadah (,sdvu)

only applies when Matzah and Maror “are placed before you,” i.e., after Tzet Hakochavim. According to this reasoning, it would follow that the latest time one can fulfil the Mitzvah of Haggadah is also like the other Mitzvot (according to R. Elazar ben Azarya), i.e., Chatzot. For if we compare these Mitzvot regarding the earliest time, we should do the same regarding the latest time. Indeed, so says the Minchat Chinuch (end of Parashat Bo). I was later shown that this is also evident in the words of the Mechilta (end of Parashat Bo, Parashah 18) - as explained by the Chazon Yechezkel

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- that all Mitzvot of Pesach night, including Haggadah, apply only until Chatzot. (The Netzi”v states that the abovementioned Mechilta is consistent with the opinion of R. Elazar ben Azarya. The Tosefta (10:8), on the other hand, adopts the view of R. Akiva, that the Mitzvot expire at Ammud HaShachar. The fact that R. Elazar ben Azarya stayed up all night recounting the Nissim of Yetziat Mitzrayim with the other Chachamim, as stated in the Haggadah, was not because of the Mitzvah of Haggadah, but rather because of the Mitzvah of Talmud Torah. See z"ke 'hx j"ut, h"bfan ,"ua where he summarizes everything the Netzi”v says. See also Ritv”a’s commentary on the Haggadah about the story of the five Chachamim etc, where he states clearly that according to R. Elazar ben Azarya, all Mitzvot must be performed by Chatzot.) It emerges that if we are to consider the opinion of R. Elazar ben Azarya, then if one only concluded the Haggadah after Chatzot, he would not be allowed to recite the Berachah of “Asher G’alanu…” with Shem Umalchut (the Name of Hashem) because this Berachah seems to have been instituted as a conclusion to the Haggadah. Indeed, the Kaf HaChayim quotes the opinion of Pitchei Teshuvah, which states that the Berachah may not be recited (with n”ua) after Chatzot. However, Chacham Ovadya ztz”l (cited in d"f 'hx t"j vhscug iuzj ,"ua ) was of the opinion that the Berachah may in fact be recited because there are Poskim who hold that the Berachah is actually a form of ohxhb


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vaga and not a concluding Berachah for the Haggadah (see s"p, 'hx van hfrs). And if in addition to this we

factor in the opinions of the Rishonim who adopt R. Akiva’s view, one would be allowed to recite the Berachah normally. As far as the practical custom, g”m Four Cups

The Shulchan Aruch ('t c"g,) writes that one should not make Kiddush until nighttime. The Magen Avraham explains in the name of the Terumat HaDeshen that this Mitzvah – as well as the vegetables we eat – follows the other Mitzvot of Pesach night and therefore must be performed as of the time that one can fulfil the Mitzvot of Matzah and Maror. The wine drunk for Kiddush is also the first of the Four Cups, therefore, it cannot be done before nighttime. According to this, it would follow that the fourth cup should be drunk before Chatzot (according to R. Elazar ben Azarya). Indeed, so says the Gr”a on the Rem”a in 't z"g,, who writes that the Hallel too should not be recited past Chatzot; “because Hallel is recited on the fourth cup, and the fourth cup must be drunk before Chatzot”; and then the Gr”a references the Shulchan Aruch in c"g,. He is no doubt referring to the Shulchan Aruch’s Halachah above about reciting Kiddush after nightfall. The Gr”a is thus applying the comparison of the Four Cups and the other Mitzvot as far as the earliest time, to the latest time as well! See also Mahari”l in Sefer HaMinhagim, Seder Haggadah z"n. See also Peri Megadim t"t ('t d"g,) who writes that the Berachah of Borei Peri HaGefen on the 2nd and 4th cups (according to

the Minhag of Ashkenazim) must be recited before Chatzot. This will also apply to the Berachah of lukkvh after Hallel – according to the opinion that this Berachah is connected to the 4th cup, it cannot be recited with d"p, after Chatzot (the Bet Yosef d"p, writes in the name of the Orchot Chayim that one who doesn’t have wine should not recite this Berachah, and this applies as well to the Berachah of ubktd rat). Hallel

As stated above, the Rem”a ('t z"g,) writes that Hallel should not be recited after Chatzot. Rem”a seems to be saying that this is a Halachah in the Hallel itself, and not due to the Four Cups as put forth by the Gr”a. The reason for this Halachah can be as the Kaf HaChayim there writes in the name of the Ra”n, that the Gemara in Pesachim (v"m) says that Hallel must be recited during the feast of the Korban Pesach. Therefore, it follows that the Hallel nowadays should be recited only during the time that the Korban Pesach would be consumed, i.e., until Chatzot according to R. Elazar ben Azarya. Thus, one who concludes Hallel after Chatzot should not recite the Berachah of lukkvh, which is the usual after-Berachah for Hallel. Another possible reason for the Rem”a’s Halachah could be the Minchat Chinnuch ('c ,ut t"f vuum), who writes that Hallel is part of the Mitzvah of Sippur Yetziat Mitzrayim, which, as we’ve established above, expires at Chatzot. Halachah

Now that we have established that all seven Mitzvot expire at Chatzot according to R. Elazar ben Azarya, all

that remains is to clarify the position of the Shulchan Aruch in these matters. The Shulchan Aruch (z"g,) writes that one should be careful vkhj,fk to eat the Afikoman before Chatzot. The Rem”a adds that one should do the same for Hallel. The Mishnah Berurah (‘u e"x) and Biur Halachah write that the lashon rhvz tvhu used by the Shulchan Aruch in this Halachah indicates that the question of whether the Halachah follows R. Akiva or R. Elazar ben Azarya remains a safek. Thus, it is a matter of chumra and not a definitive ruling in favour of R. Elazar ben Azarya. Therefore, writes the Mishnah Berurah, if one did not eat Matzah and Maror before Chatzot, he should definitely do so after Chatzot because of R. Akiva’s opinion, but he may not recite a Berachah because of the principle of Safek Berachot L’hakel. The Mishnah Berurah (‘z e"x) further writes (in the name of the (z"rd) regarding Hallel, that if one did not recite it before Chatzot, one does so after Chatzot as well…with a Berachah (see (‘u ,ut m"vga). (The difference between Hallel and Matzah is that Matzah is a Mitzvah Mid’orayta, therefore Safek d’orayta l’chumra and the halachah follows R. Elazar ben Azarya; whereas Hallel is a Derabbanan, therefore Safek d’rabbanan l’kulla and we follow the opinion of R. Akiva. The problem with this is Maror. Maror nowadays is d’rabbanan. If so, why does the Mishnah Berurah say that we may eat it after Chatzot but we do not recite a Berachah? Why is it different from the Mitzvot of Hallel and Four Cups whose Brachot we do recite B’dieved after Chatzot? Perhaps we may answer that Maror COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 53


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is different because its Ikar Mitzvah is d’orayta. Therefore, we are machmir like with Matzah. And according to this approach, we may explain why Mara”n only lists Afikoman as a Mitzvah that one should be careful to fulfil before Chatzot, but he leaves out the Mitzvot that come afterwards, like Hallel and the remaining 2 cups. Rem”a disagrees; but it seems from Mara”n’s omission that one need not be careful with the Mitzvot after Afikoman to fulfil them before Chatzot. Perhaps the reason here too is that the Ikar Mitzvah of Afikoman, like Maror, is d’orayta, unlike the Four Cups and Hallel, which are not.) The Mishnah Berurah (‘u e"x) quotes the Dagul M’revavah, who says that in case of extreme delay, where one is up against Chatzot, one should recite Kiddush and eat Matzah and Maror before Chatzot, and then recite the Haggadah after Chatzot. This is very difficult to understand; the Mitzvah of Haggadah is d’orayta! According to R. Elazar ben Azarya, whose opinion is adopted as Halachah in the Mechilta and by many Rishonim, this must be done before Chatzot! The Dagul M’revavah should have at least recommended that one recite part of the Haggadah before Chatzot! This question is also posed by the Netzi”v (rsxv khk hbhbg vfrc eng). (Perhaps we can answer this question according to the Pri Chadash (‘u ,ut d"g,) who writes that Mid’orayta one fulfils the Mitzvah of Sippur Yeztiat Mitzrayim in the Kiddush because there is mention in it of Yetziat Mitzrayim (he uses this argument to explain why one doesn’t say a Berachah for the Mitzvah of Haggadah – this Berachah is covered in the Kiddush). Similarly, the Pri Megadim (gna ,thre ‘kvk ,kkuf vjh,p) writes that without a doubt, one fulfils the Mitzvah of Sippur Yetziat Mitzrayim by saying “HaKadosh Baruch Hu has taken us out Mitzrayim.” The idea of elaborating on this is a Derabbanan. Therefore, according to the Pri Chadash and Pri Megadim, in the Dagul M’revavah’s case, one would have fulfilled the d’orayta portion of the Mitzvah of Sippur Yetziat Mitzrayim in the Kiddush alone.) Furthermore, the Mishnah Berurah seems to be in agreement with the

ruling of the Dagul M’revavah because he doesn’t comment on it. If so, it would seem that the Mishnah Berurah would be of the opinion that in such a case, the Berachah of ubktd rat is recited together with the Haggadah after Chatzot! How can this be? This Berachah is for the Mitzvah of Haggadah, which can only be fulfilled until Chatzot according to R. Elazar ben Azarya! So why is this Berachah different from the Berachot of Matzah and Maror, which, the Mishnah Berurah says (z"g,), cannot be recited after Chatzot? After all, this Mitzvah, like Matzah and Maror (the Ikar Mitzvah of Maror, that is) is d’orayta (its minimum form anyway)! It should be noted that the Kaf HaChayim writes that this Berachah should not be recited after Chatzot – probably because of our difficulty. Perhaps we can answer this difficulty with the words of Chazon Ovadya cited above, that some hold that the Berachah in question is a form of ohxhb vaga. That together with the many Rishonim who adopt the view of R. Akiva would allow us to recite the Berachah after Chatzot in cases such as the Dagul M’revavah. It must be stated that even though the Mishnah Berurah (‘z x"e)writes that the Rem”a ruling that one should be careful (per Mara”n’s wording) not to say Hallel past Chatzot is only vkhj,fk, but scghsc one can do so after Chatzot with a Berachah; in the Chafetz Chayim’s Sefer Machaneh Yisrael ('d 'kv c"hp) he writes otherwise – that one should not say the Berachah of lukkvh after Chatzot. The Pri Megadim (,"gd ‘t ,ut t"tc) writes the same regarding the Berachah for the 4th cup (according to the Minhag of Ashkenazim) – one should not recite this Berachah after Chatzot. Chacham Ben-tziyon Abba-shaul ztz”l writes the same (see c"f ,ut u"yp d"j iumk rut ,"ua). I later saw written in the older version of the Chazon Ovadya’s Haggadah Shel Pesach that one should be machmir and not say the Berachah of n"uac lukkvh; but in the newer edition Chacham Ovadya seems to have retracted this ruling and writes that one can say the Berachah, as mentioned in the vhscg iuzj ,"ua cited above (in the vrgv to s"b he adds that the Berachah of lukkvh is not necessarily

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connected to the Hallel, but rather it is a jcau ,frc - see there). But since the Mishnah Berurah retracted from what he wrote in Sefer Machaneh Yisrael, one can be lenient and recite the Berachah, udvb ifu. One final point: our entire discussion hinges on the position that the Halachah follows the opinion of R. Elazar ben Azarya. However, it seems very likely that Mara”n actually rules in favour of R. Akiva, that these Mitzvot can be performed all night long. It is well known that Maran almost always rules like the Ramba”m and the Ri”f, both of whom rule like R. Akiva. Furthermore, in c"x t"p,, Maran quotes the Tosefta (which, as stated above rules like R. Akiva): “One must engage in the…Sippur Yetziat Mitzrayim and must recount the miracles…until he is overcome by sleep.” This, once again, is the opinion of R. Akiva, as explained by the Netzi”v and other Acharonim cited above. The fact that Mara”n writes regarding the Afikoman that one “should be careful” -rhvz tvhu- to eat it before Chatzot is only just that – a ,urhvz, not the Halachah. And the reason for this is, as the Gr”a writes, “to distance a person from Aveirah,” notwithstanding the fact that the Halachah follows R. Akiva (similar to what the Ramba”m writes regarding the Mitzvah of Korban Pesach, see jxp icre 'kvn jp u"yv and t"v n"uj j"vn u"p). In fact, in the Bet Yosef Mara”n only cites the opinion of the Ro”sh in ohjxp hcrg, where the Ro”sh rules like the opinion of R. Akiva. This would explain why Mara”n in the Shulchan Aruch was not stringent regarding the Four Cups or Hallel to have to do them before Chatzot, because the Halacha is like R. Akiva, and unlike the Afikoman (which is either de’orayta or its Ikar is de’orayta) these are Derabbanans, and there is no Inyan to “distance one from Aveirah.” I later found that the Pri Chadash writes clearly ("zg,) that Mara”n in the Shulchan Aruch rules according to the Ri”f and Ramba”m, that the Halachah is like R. Akiva. RAV YAAKOV HASSAN IS THE ROSH KOLLEL OF KOLLEL YISMACH MOSHE IN TORONTO


RABBINIC CORNER

Ma Nishtana? COR’S POSITION ON DIET COKE AND OTHER “KITNIYOT SHENISHTANA”1 By: Rabbi Tsvi Heber

Pesach is a family time when many of us travel across the Canadian/American border to spend Yom Tov with our families. While there are certainly different products available with different hashgachot on both sides of the border, one particular product seems to stand out. In Canada, COR supervised Diet Coke is kosher for Passover for Sephardim only and is designated as Kitniyot; while in the United States, OU supervised Diet Coke is simply kosher for Passover and does not bear any kitniyot label. Contrary to popular belief, there is no difference between the ingredients that make up the Canadian and American versions of this soft drink so if one does not drink kosher for Passover Diet Coke at home in Canada then the same would apply for the American version. Rather, the difference between the two lies in the understanding of a relatively specific halachic nuance which has been highlighted through the production of the world’s most popular diet beverage and other products made from so-called “Kitniyot Shenishtana” or transformed kitniyot.

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here are two major food additives which can be categorized as Kitniyot Shenishtana, namely, citric acid (or ascorbic acid) and aspartame. Both are originally derived from corn2 and are wholly transformed through chemical changes into entirely different substances that have no resemblance whatsoever to corn. Citric acid has many applications. It is used as an acidulent, flavouring component and a preservative and is found in many canned products. Aspartame is a well-known artificial sweetener used in diet beverages and many foods. Even though in the United States citric acid is manufactured from corn, it should be noted that European citric acid is actually made from wheat sources and is chametz. Also important is to highlight that a prominent hashgacha in South America supervises the

production of a citric acid derived from beets which is unquestionably kosher for Passover. The Rabbanim of the Kashruth Council of Canada (COR) have always been stringent in their approach to the question of Kitniyot Shenishtana by unequivocally categorizing them as kitniyot and kosher for Passover for Sephardim only. This is based on a psak issued by many poskim including the Rosh Hakollel, HaRav Shlomo Miller Shlit”a, Rosh HaKollel and Av Bais Din, Kollel Avreichim Institute for Advanced Judaic Studies in Toronto. It is important to mention that this is also the position of many other major kosher certifiers; including those whose symbols are most predominantly found on kosher for Passover products. Rabbi Miller’s position has been questioned by those who have difficulty comprehending why these ingredients should retain the status of kitniyot

notwithstanding the fact that they have undergone a significant transformation and are nishtana. It is therefore my goal, in this article, to summarize Rabbi Miller’s position and to explain COR’s historic stance to the best of my ability. Musk Oil: Fragrance or Flavour

When discussing the brachos of fragrances, the Tur3 brings an example of a smelling spice called mor whose bracha is borei minei besomim. Interestingly, the discussion diverts into a debate of the origin of mor and its kashrut status. Some claim that mor is derived from the sweat of a chaya while others, more accurately, claim that it comes from dried blood in the neck of a known chaya.4 Herein, we choose to refer to mor as musk oil which is a fragrance made of secretion from the gland of the musk deer.5 The Ram’ah holds that the COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 55


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THE RABBANIM OF THE KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA (COR) HAVE ALWAYS BEEN STRINGENT IN THEIR APPROACH TO THE QUESTION OF KITNIYOT SHENISHTANA BY UNEQUIVOCALLY CATEGORIZING THEM AS KITNIYOT AND KOSHER FOR PASSOVER FOR SEPHARDIM ONLY.

consumption of musk oil is prohibited because it is one and the same as consuming blood. Rabbeinu Yonah disagrees and allows consumption of musk oil based on two distinct arguments; 1) it is pure decay (tuv tnkgc tarhp) and 2) even though it is derived from blood which is certainly prohibited, it has been completely transformed – nishtana – and its current state does not resemble blood in the slightest. Rabbeinu Yonah proves his lenient position based on a premise that non-kosher meat which falls into honey is permitted at such time that all the meat completely disintegrates and takes on the properties of its host. Similarly, in the case of musk oil, we determine its kashrus status by its current transformed state and not by the substance from which it was derived. The Rosh defends the position of the Ram’ah by challenging Rabbeinu Yonah’s premise that non-kosher meat which disintegrates into honey could be considered kosher. In his opinion, there is absolutely no source to substantiate such a chiddush and the kashrut status of a transformed substance should always be determined by its source. Smells of Decay

Magen Avrohom6 further challenges Rabbeinu Yonah’s premise from the Gemara in Bechorot7 which proclaims that the Torah’s allowance for the consumption of milk is a chiddush since the origin of milk is animal blood whose consumption is otherwise prohibited. The Gemara’s procla-

mation teaches us that the kashrut status of a transformed substance is dictated by its origin and that only milk, which is specifically exempted by the Torah, is permitted.8 The Magen Avrohom presents a possible way of defending Rabbeinu Yonah’s position by suggesting that musk oil may decay in mid-process. While he questions the factual basis of his suggestion, he posits that, if it were to be accurate, the musk oil is kosher because there is no longer a connection to its non-kosher origin. Are You my Mother?

Magen Avrohom cites the Gemara Temura9 as proof of his defence of Rabbeinu Yonah’s position. The Gemara states that a chick that hatches from the egg of a chicken that is a nevayla or a trayfa is, nevertheless, kosher. While the general rule states that if the mother is kosher then the offspring is kosher and if the mother is not kosher then the offspring is also not kosher;10 our case is the exception. This is because the chick hatches only after there is complete decay inside the egg. The decayed egg is like dust and produces a chick that has no connection to its mother.11 Similarly, it would be argued that when a substance decays in mid-process before it is transformed, the kashrut of the transformed substance is not dictated by the status of its origin since it no longer has any connection to its origin. Sweet as Honey

The Vilna Gaon points to a Gemara

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Avoda Zora12 as the source for Rabbeinu Yonah’s position. This Gemara permits purchasing honey from a gentile because there is no kashrut concern. The second interpretation cited in the Ran explains that the Gemara is not even concerned for the possibility that the gentile might add non-kosher meat to the honey because doing so does not affect the kashrut of the honey. This is because the non-kosher meat decays into the honey and consumption is permitted. It is abundantly clear from this Gemara that Rabbeinu Yonah’s approach to nishtana, in general, and musk oil, in particular, is based on the idea that the kashrut status of a substance that decays in mid-process is no longer connected to its origin. This must be what Rabbeinu Yonah means when he cites the term tuv tnkgc tarhp. If so, what is the purpose of adding the second argument to claim that the substance is transformed – nishtana – because it does not resemble its original source? Even if the musk oil were to have the same physical properties as the musk’s blood would it not anyway be permitted because it decays in midprocess? Kosher Nevayla?

Chavas Daas13 cites the rule that nevayla meat is non-kosher only so long as it is edible, but if it decays to the extent that is no longer edible, it would no longer be prohibited.14 He posits that once the nevayla loses its non-kosher status, it can never again re-establish that status, even if the


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A Final Note – Is Aspartame batul?

nevayla were to somehow be reconstituted to the extent that it was effectively edible again. Rabbi Miller shlit”a explains that Rabbeinu Yonah does not agree with the position of the Chavas Daas. Rather he holds that should a decayed substance be reconstituted to the point of edibility, it would indeed be a prohibited nevayla. But re-establishing its original prohibition is conditional upon whether the reconstituted meat bears the same characteristics as the original prohibited meat. If the new substance is nishtana and does not bear the same characteristics as its prohibited source then it does not re-establish its prohibition. According to this logic, Rabbeinu Yonah permits the transformed musk oil only because 1) it decays in mid-process; and 2) it is nishtana in such a way that its current state does not resemble its source in the slightest.

Throughout our discussion, we assumed that Diet Coke takes on the status of kitniyot shenishtana since it contains aspartame. But the fact is that aspartame is just one of its many ingredients. Is the amount of kitniyot contained inside Diet Coke perhaps batul? While most issurim are batul b’shishim, kitniyot are batul b’rove.17 Does that mean that Kosher for Passover Diet Coke with aspartame could be permitted even though it contains kitniyot? Rama18 states that it is forbidden to eat mustard seed on Pesach even if the mustard seed is used only as an ingredient in a wine product and was mixed in to the wine prior to the onset of Pesach. Mishna Berura19 points out that the only time that we allow for bitul is if the mustard fell into a mixture by accident and not if it is an ingredient in the product which is placed there intentionally.20 In the case of Diet Coke, aspartame is certainly placed there intentionally as an ingredient and therefore according to the COR position, it can be certified as kosher for Passover for Sephardim only due to the presence of kitniyot. RABBI TSVI HEBER IS COR’S DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY KOSHER

Gahr Nisht Nishtana

The lenient position of the OU on products such as Diet Coke is laid out in an article written by Rabbis Yaakov Luban and Eli Gersten.15 The noted Rabbonim explain their position as follows: “If a non-kosher item is transformed into a completely different entity, it can lose its non-kosher status and become kosher. In halachic terms this is called nishtana…The general consensus of the Poskim is that we only rely on the leniency of nishtana when dealing with a rabbinic prohibition, albeit not a Torah prohibition.16 Since the prohibition of not eating kitniyot is a minhag, and the OU position is that a minhag is treated as a rabbinic injunction, we can apply the leniency of Rabbeinu Yonah and permit the consumption of kitniyot shenishtana.” Our own analysis of the subject helps us understand that there is another point of view; nishtana cannot be achieved unless the food decays in mid-process. Rabbi Miller shlit”a therefore concludes that citric acid and aspartame, which do not decay in midprocess, are not permitted under the guise of nishtana. COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 57


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“A Light from the North” BY CELEBRATING PESACH IN PLACES LIKE EDMONTON WE ARE ABLE TO EXTRACT THE G-DLY SPARKS AROUND US. By Rabbi Ari Drelich

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aving been born and raised in Brooklyn and having studied in Montreal for a number of years as well as spending time in Toronto, I am very familiar with the notion that many have, that Yiddishkeit (and for that matter, civilization) is almost nonexistent beyond the borders of the big cities. I too have been guilty of this -- despite having graduated High School in Montreal, I don’t know if I had ever heard of Edmonton Alberta prior to arriving here some 25 years ago. But now for the truth. Edmonton Alberta has been home to an active Jewish community for over 100 years. Although there have been highs and lows, the community has Boruch Hashem witnessed tremendous growth in the area of Torah and Mitzvah observance. So much so, that Edmonton has become a “victim of its own success” which is evidenced by the many individuals and families who, having begun their journey in Torah observance in Edmonton, now call Toronto or other larger cities their home. Edmonton is blessed, firstly, with a very philanthropic family -- the Ghermezians --who have dedicated themselves to creating a Shomer Torah Umitzvas community. It is because of their generosity that our small community of approximately 5000 is blessed with a Torah Umesorah day school, a state of the art Mikvah, a kosher eatery and many other amenities that allow for a meaningful Jewish life. As well, the dedicated work of the Edmonton Kollel (another gift from the Ghermezians) coupled with the talented work of the other Rabbis serving this

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community have enabled Edmonton to host a variety of shiurim and programs that cover the entire gamut, both in age as well as in level of Yiddishkeit. There’s really nothing that you can’t get here as far as Jewish amenities are concerned (albeit with a little less of a selection) So, no, this is not a “sales pitch” to get people to relocate to Edmonton; just an effort to point out that just as Yaakov Ovinu and his family had to find themselves in Mitzrayim for a period of time for the express purpose of extracting the G-dly sparks that were hidden there; after which Yeitzu Birchush Godol (they left with great wealth), so too it is the mission of all those who find themselves in places that may seem less than ideal. Lest anyone think that the responsibility of having an impact on ones surroundings is limited to Rabbis we are reminded on Pesach that all of us can extract the G-dly sparks around us. We do this by heeding the injunction that we recite on seder night of “Kol Dichfin yesei veyichol” -- that all who are hungry should come and eat. May Hashem grant that as we fulfill the mandate of “Kol Dichfin” that He in turn should fulfil this mitzvah by taking us all out of exile so that we can celebrate as one united people with the coming of Moshiach. Wishing everyone a very meaningful Pesach. RABBI ARI DRELICH IS THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF CHABAD OF EDMONTON


RABBINIC CORNER

How to Make Used Cast Iron Cookware Kosher

EVER SINCE MY WIFE INTRODUCED ME TO CAST IRON COOKWARE, I HAVE BEEN ENAMOURED. By Chaim Ribiat

Ever since my wife introduced me to cast iron cookware, I have been enamoured. They impart a fabulous sear, work on all stove top surfaces, can go from stove top to oven, and they keep food warm longer because of their superior heat retention. Researching the history of cast iron cookery, I discovered some interesting facts. The History of Cast Iron

Historians believe cast iron was invented in China in the 5th century BCE. The first widespread use of cast iron cookware was in the 16th century. With the innovation of sand casting in 1707, cast iron became both lighter and cheaper. This very method is still used

today. The cast iron skillet was born towards the end of the 19th century when it became popular to use flat cooking surfaces. Before the advent of aluminium non-stick and even stainless steel pans, cast iron was the benchmark for cookware. During the late 1800’s to the early 1900’s, production and innovation flourished, forming the golden age of cast iron. Skillets from that era are highly prized and most sought after. They are known to be family heirlooms and passed down from generation to generation. For some, finding an old and unique cast iron pan in an antique shop or even a local garage sale can be very exciting! Cast Iron and Kosher

Cast iron differs from all other cookware in that if left untreated

it will rust. Therefore in order to be an effective cooking surface it requires seasoning. Seasoning is a protective layer formed by burning fat or oil on to the surface of the pan. Traditionally bacon was fried and its rendered fat was used for the seasoning. This obviously presents a problem from a kosher perspective. The questions now are: Can this item be kashered? Would the seasoning need to be removed before kashering? What kind of kashering would it need? I posed these questions to my colleague at the COR, Rabbi Yechiel Teichman, who determined that two steps must be taken. First, it would require kashering with extreme high heat, using libun gamur (see our Kashering Overview in this Guide). For cookware that

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you usually use with liquids, like pots, pans, or skillets a self-clean oven cycle is sufficient. For grill-tops, griddles, or griddle pans covering them with coals and allowing them to burn-out is required to achieve libun gamur. Second, it would require immersion in a mikvah if it was previously owned by someone who was not Jewish. In addition to the kashering requirements a full stripping and re-seasoning of the cast iron vessel would be necessary. So my plan had three parts: self-clean the pan in the oven, tovel it in the mikva, and then re-season it to create the perfect working surface.

Before stripping and Kashering.

Afterstripping and Kashering.

Cleaning and Kashering

Most used cast iron skillets contain burnt on grease (this is not the case with new skillets). All cast iron cookware also have seasoning. Seasoning is the process of coating the bare metal with multiple layers of polymerised oil to create a barrier against rust and will provide a non-stick surface. Without seasoning the pan will become rusty and unusable. The high heat required to accomplish libun gamur also burns all surface grime and old seasoning to a powdery ash. This will clean and strip the pan while also kashering it. Toveling

Since the cleaning and stripping process leaves the metal bare, you must be careful to avoid rust. Completely dry the pan after immersion in the mikva.

Grinding the surface.

Resurfacing

Now that you have a clean and kosher pan, you must return it to its seasoned state. This will create the perfect cooking surface. If you have a newer pan with a pebbled surface, before re-seasoning the pan, you can grind the surface for a mirror smooth surface finish. The seasoning layer is accomplished by smearing oil and baking it so that the oil polymer rises and forms a solid layer. The oil should be applied as thinly as possible and heated past the smoking point. It is then cooled and redone multiple times until a strong cooking surface is formed.

The ground surface.

I know this all sounds pretty involved but don’t be intimidated, it’s not as bad as it seems. Adding some cast iron cookware to your kosher home can be really rewarding. So if you come across some cast iron cookware seize the opportunity – don’t cast it aside. Note: This article applies to used cast iron only. As per COR policy, new cast iron does not require kashering. Like all other metal pans it would require immersion in the mikvah. CHAIM RIBIAT IS A COR FIELD REPRESENTATIVE, IT SPECIALIST AND JACK OF ALL TRADES.

Immersing in the Mikvah.

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The pan is complete and ready to use.


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Questions from the Halacha Line

1

I HAVE HEARD THAT THERE MAY BE A PROBLEM WITH PURCHASING MITZVAH

KINDER OR MITZVAH MENCHIES BECAUSE THEY ARE IMAGES OF HUMAN BEINGS. IS THERE ANY BASIS TO THIS IN HALACHA?

One may not create, or even commission a gentile to create, a sculpture or a graven image that depicts a –ost ,rum– the form of a person. This includes dolls and toys that demonstrate the full features of a human being. When idol worship was more common, there was even a prohibition against owning them. This is the reason that some people customarily cut off part of the nose or ear of a doll that is manufactured to resemble a human being. It is also the reason why Jewish manufacturers will take care to ensure that one or multiple limbs do not resemble human limbs. Nowadays, many Poskim permit ownership of dolls and toys that resemble human beings because it is well known that they are not used for idol worship.

2

I HEARD THAT YOU ARE ALLOWED TO TOYVEL KAYLIM IN THE SNOW. IS THIS

TRUE? IT WOULD SAVE ME A TRIP TO THE LOCAL MIKVAH.

Under normal circumstances, one should not toyvel vessels in snow. In case of great need, such as where no kosher mikvah is available, it is permitted to toyvel in snow a vessel made of glass whose obligation to toyvel is rabbinic, or glazed china whose obligation is at most rabbinic, if there is at least 240 cubic feet of snow joined together in one area. This is the shiur of snow that constitutes

a kosher mikvah. When immersing the vessel, care must be taken to ensure that the snow is deep enough so that the vessel is connected to the required amount of snow. The vessel must also be completely immersed in the snow such that the snow covers the entire vessel, both inside and outside, similar to the way that a vessel is immersed entirely in the water of a mikvah. As the details of this procedure are complex it is recommended to contact your rabbi or H.I.T. for further guidance.

3

have been sealed in a container in the fridge or left out on the counter. If, on the other hand, some of the peel remained on the onion or if other ingredients were mixed with the onion or even if it was lightly sprinkled with salt, it is no longer a problem. In your case, you already used the problematic onion in a kugel. Since we are only dealing with this problem after the fact, there is room to be lenient.

5

UNFORTUNATELY, I KNOW OF SEVERAL DIVORCED COUPLES WHO HAVE TAKEN

I RECENTLY BOUGHT A BUSINESS FROM A JEWISH PERSON AND I AM PAYING FOR IT

THEIR CASES TO CIVIL COURT AND NOT TO BAIS DIN. I ALWAYS THOUGHT IT WAS FORBIDDEN TO

IN MONTHLY INSTALLMENTS. AS A SAFEGUARD,

GO TO COURT?

HIS LAWYER ADDED A “LATE PENALTY CLAUSE”

Engaging in arka’os - civil courts - without the express permission of a halachic authority, is strictly forbidden. This applies to both monetary disputes as well as family matters. When it comes to family law, however, Ontario law deems any third party arbitration that is not conducted in accordance with the law of Ontario or another Canadian jurisdiction to be unenforceable. The possibility exists that if a decision is rendered in Bais Din which is not in accordance with the law of Ontario it may be deemed unenforceable, if subsequently challenged by one of the parties. It is, therefore, critical that every situation be first discussed with a Rav or a Bais Din. Voluntary Mediation, offered by HIT, is a method of alternative dispute resolution whereby Rabbonim who are trained and certified as mediators who can help

WHICH STIPULATES THAT IF I DELAY PAYMENT PAST THE DUE DATE, THE OUTSTANDING PAYMENT WOULD INCUR AN ACCUMULATING PENALTY WHICH WOULD GROW EACH DAY THAT IT REMAINS OUTSTANDING. IS THIS A PROBLEM OF RIBBIS (FORBIDDEN INTEREST)?

Late payment penalties are permitted only if they occur once and do not recur as an accumulating penalty. Accumulating late penalties, such as yours, act similar to interest and are prohibited.

4

I LEFT A FULLY PEELED ONION OVERNIGHT IN THE FRIDGE WITHOUT SPRINKLING

SALT ON IT. I THEN USED IT THE NEXT MORNING FOR A KUGEL. SHOULD I NOW DISCARD THE KUGEL?

The Gemara warns against leaving peeled onions, eggs and garlic overnight due to the risk of ruach ra’ah. It makes no difference whether the peeled onions would

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the parties come to an agreement without being subject to the hefty legal fees that are incurred through the civil system. For more information, please contact HIT at 416 535-8008. Jewish Alternative Dispute Resolution (JADR) Centre Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) is a powerful tool that helps parties settle their disputes. In fact, l’havdil, the civil court system requires parties to attend mandatory mediation sessions, often multiple times, before arriving at trial. According to some studies, over 80 percent of parties who attend voluntary mediation resolve their disputes instead of proceeding to trial. As such, H.I.T. offers ADR to anyone wishing to resolve disputes in a halachic framework. Our roster of Rabbonim and business professionals are trained and certified as mediators through the University of Windsor Law School and the Stitt Feld Handy Group. Since launching in Sukkot 5777, JADR has been engaged by members of the community to mediate both choshen mishpat disputes and family disputes. We encourage the community to consider alternative dispute resolution as a bona fide alternative for dispute resolution. Halachic Business Solutions HIT will review your investment structures and loan documents; partnership and purchase agreements to identify questions of Ribbis and offer Halachic Business Solutions. Identifying Ribbis in the contemporary business environment can be elusive and requires careful analysis. HIT’s Rabbonim and professionals are uniquely trained in both business finance and halacha; combining

the skills required to offer practical business solutions in the contemporary business environment. For example, HIT was recently engaged to provide a halachic consultation on a real estate deal that syndicated the investments of several small investors so that a $500,000 down payment could be provided on a $2 million deal*. The difference between the purchase price and the down payment would be financed by the Bank of Montreal. Each party was asked to provide a personal guarantee for the bank mortgage proportionate to their own percentage of the loan. For example, Reuven invested $100,000 which represented 20% of the equity. His percentage of the $1.5 million mortgage worked out to be $300,000 to which he provided a personal guarantee. HIT’s Rabbonim identified the issue, reviewed it and ultimately paskened that providing a personal guarantee in this manner could, in fact, lead to a violation of Ribbis. This is because the provision of a personal guarantee on a bank loan has the status of arev kablan (guarantor) which guarantees the loan for the entire partnership. A Jewish arev kablan who pays interest on behalf of a Jewish borrower; even on a loan that is obtained from a non-Jewish

bank; violates the prohibition of Ribbis. While it is true that each partner’s guarantee strictly covered the dollar amount of the loan proportionate to his own share, nevertheless, since the guarantee was structured as a dollar figure which, after a single payment of principal, exceeded his own share in the mortgage, an interest payment on behalf of the partnership ultimately constitutes Ribbis. In the above case, heter iska was not an option, primarily because two of the partners were not religious and would not agree to sign one. HIT recommended that a request be made from the Bank to restructure the personal guarantees so that each guarantee covers their respective percentage of the outstanding mortgage. For Reuven, the personal guarantee should be converted from $300,000 to 20%. That way, Reuven would never be responsible to pay more than his own share of the mortgage interest. For more information and to obtain a halachic consultation for your business venture, please call HIT at 416 535-8008. *Facts have been modified to protect the privacy of HIT’s clients

You are invited to call the Halacha Line at: TEL

416.535.8008

WEB

www.HalachaInstitute.com

EMAIL

info@HalachaInstitute.com

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CHESSED CORNER “All who are hungry, let them come and eat.” This is the famous directive that our sages taught us, and it is one that Jewish families have taken to heart for millennia, opening our doors to the less fortunate. As communities, we have taken this maxim further by establishing countless charitable organizations not just for those who are hungry, but for those who need any manner of assistance. This is chessed, and it is what the Jewish people are known for. In keeping with the theme of this magazine, we have profiled a number of these chessed organizations that operate across the country. From Chicken Soup for the Shabbos Soul in Vancouver where a local girl’s high school delivers warm meals to the elderly and homebound; to the Edmonton Kosher Food Bank; to DANI in Toronto which is a food service venue and provider staffed by people with developmental disabilities; to Ten Yad in Ottawa which provides support to families in acute situations; to the Montreal Center for Health and Care which provides guidance advocacy and support for patients and their families in their times of need. These organizations serve different cities and different needs but they share one thing in common: they show that at the heart of the Jewish community is chessed.

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Chicken Soup for the

Shabbos Soul

Connecting Young and Old MRS. ABRAMCHICK Dean, Shalhevet Girls High School Vancouver, B.C.

CHICKEN SOUP FOR THE SHABBOS SOUL BIO MOTTO: ““Turning potential into performance.” YEAR ESTABLISHED: 2013. School established 2007 AREA COVERED: Vancouver, BC NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES/VOLUNTEERS: Approx. 35 students and 6-8 adults NUMBER OF PEOPLE SERVED: Approximately 15 HOW YOU CAN HELP: My family has always paid for the ingredients, as I felt this was a worthy cause – to nourish both the body and the soul of those who are alone for Shabbos. But having more funds always means the ability to improve and expand the program. CONTACT INFO: Office@Shalhevet.ca

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WHAT THEY ARE:

Shalhevet Girls High School is a community school that prides itself on maintaining Bais Yaakov standards, and, despite our small size, is able to welcome students from different backgrounds, as long as they’re looking for an environment of Torah growth. Our alumni have all gone on to their choice of seminaries, universities, and post-high-school programs. We have students who’ve moved to larger cities, made Aliyah, or gotten married and settled back home in Vancouver.

WHAT MAKES SHALHEVET UNIQUE:

During the school year, we run a few wonderful chessed programs, including: Bikur Cholim – in which our girls visit the local hospitals, “Gals and Pals”, a partnership between the local seniors’ home and our students, in which the girls schmooze with seniors as well as share what they learned in school, and, before some of the holidays, do art projects together. T-Jex – a “big sister” after-school program in which our girls mentor and become role models for elementary-aged children from around the neighborhood. But the crown jewel of our chessed program is our famous “Chicken Soup for the Shabbos Soul”. This program has always worked in collaboration with two local synagogues. The first – Beth Hamidrash – would arrange to make weekly “Shabbat Shalom” calls to the elderly and homebound. Callers would chat with them, ask them about their week, and wish them a Good Shabbos. But once a month, the callers would notify them about the chicken soup (to make sure someone would be home). On those weeks, the second Synagogue – Schara Tzedeck – would provide drivers to deliver the soup on Friday afternoons. Our part here at Shalhevet is to make the soup and package it, and then send our students along with the drivers to run out and deliver the soup and give the homebound person a personal, face-to-face “Shabbat Shalom” call. The container of soup and the few moments of personal interaction are so special for both the recipients and our girls. And beginning this year, the local NCSY started a program that will provide us with personal homemade cards to go with the soup.


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RECIPIENTS RESPOND:

Seeing our volunteer drivers come in once a month, eager to see the students again, in itself is beautiful, but hearing the girls’ accounts of their interactions with the lonely seniors and seeing the smiles on their faces is incredible:

OVERCOMING CHALLENGES:

Our biggest challenge is manpower. One of the shuls that we work with recently underwent a change in structure and is no longer available to arrange the weekly phone calls, so we have to find people to step in. We’re also constantly on the lookout for drivers.

A BUSY PESACH SEASON:

Over the years, Shalhevet has reached out to members of our community who need extra help before Pesach. Students give up their school time as well as their own free time as part of our “Helping Hands” program, in which they support young families who can use it – by helping them clean or cook, or watching the children so the parents can do so.

INSPIRATION:

It was a joint effort, inspired by the need to create opportunities for our students to go out into the community and make a difference. The idea was to teach them that chessed is not just about giving money or help; sometimes you can do a chessed in small, simple ways, with a phone call, a visit, a smile, and a bowl of soup. Lifting lonely spirits is a chessed that anyone can do, regardless of means.

LESSONS LEARNED OVER THE YEARS:

“We really enjoy going to deliver chicken soup on Fridays with members of the Schara Tzedeck Synagogue. Driving around with older residents of the community whom we would otherwise have nothing to do with gives us a chance to talk about school and share the things going on in our lives and find out how much we really do have in common.”

“The people receiving th e soup var y in the ir response . Some just thank us f or the delicio us soup and go abo ut their day . Bu for example , Mrs. Renia t, Perel, a small, frag ile old lady who is also a Holocaus t sur vivor, invites us in and asks u s about th is program and thanks us each tim e.

It does not make a difference to us, but we definitely enjoy the interaction with those who are interested. Seeing how happy our simple and kind actions make others gives us an appreciation for the value of this mitzvah. :) ” Malka Brody and 10

-Adi Bloom and 1. Working with other organizations takes a lot of Students, Grades 11 coordination, planning, and time, but the results are outstanding! 2. Though going to a stranger’s home was a bit of a new idea for our students, the satisfaction of personal interaction and the joy they brought often surprised them. 3. No matter your beliefs, EVERYONE supports and encourages chessed projects that have different generations interacting in a meaningful way. The lessons learned through these experiences are immeasurable.

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WHAT THE JEWISH FOOD BANK IS:

Jewish Food Bank, Edmonton:

The Mission of Jewish Family Services is to provide strength and support to individuals and families in need, in a manner sensitive to Jewish values. We presently have 5 core programs: 1. Holocaust Survivor Support: We offer light housekeeping, home care, food assistance, and emergency assistance on an income-tested basis specifically for surviving Jewish victims of Nazi aggression. 2. Community Links Program: We offer a way-finding service geared to people who aren’t sure where in the community to find the help they need. This includes both newcomers to Edmonton and established individuals with complex situations. People achieve their greatest self-reliance when they build their personal capacity and engage with a supportive community. This program helps them do both. 3. Seniors Making Age-Related Transitions (SMART): Aging affects each person differently, creating new challenges with regards to mobility, housing, community relationships, and health. Our outreach worker assists Jewish seniors with issues such as a transitioning to a new home, staying active, staying connected with the community (partially through occasional kosher dinners), and understanding and managing health concerns. 4. The Edmonton Healing Centre for Grief and Loss: The primary focus of this program is to enable people to find meaning in their loss, improve their level of personal functioning, and become resilient to future loss. 5. Integrity Counseling: Trained clinical counselors help people to address deep-seated emotional and psychological issues. We provide counseling for as long as the client needs it and is being helped; with a sliding fee scale that makes the service available regardless of means. The Food Bank is a part of our Community Links program.

Assistance with Dignity MEGAN KOMPF Manager of Programs and Services, Jewish Family Services Edmonton, Alberta

JFSE BIO MOTTO: “Help, with Heart, for one and all.” YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1932. Food Bank launched in 2011 AREA COVERED: Edmonton and surrounding area NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES/VOLUNTEERS: 45 employees, 120 volunteers NUMBER OF PEOPLE SERVED: In 2016, 1,051 people were helped within all of our programs, and 163 received grocery cards HOW YOU CAN HELP: 1) Donations to support the program.

INSPIRATION:

I joined this agency in 2015. I’ve devoted my career to working in nonprofit agencies, and Jewish Family Services manifests my values of being part of a strong and intact social net and giving back to my community. Our motto – “Help, with heart, for one and all” – is not just a line; our agency will do whatever it can to assist you or direct you to resources you need, and I am proud of this.

2) Volunteering to help cook and deliver occasional dinners. CONTACT INFO: www.jfse.org

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WHAT MAKES THE JEWISH FOOD BANK UNIQUE:

While we happily accepted donations of kosher items at first, the primary thrust of the Food Bank is to encourage donations of grocery store gift cards, or cash with which we could buy cards. Gift cards enable recipients to shop for what they need, rather than choose from what happens to be on a shelf at the food bank. They can also do so at their convenience, which is important when transportation is an issue. This kind of help is convenient, dignified, and a little more anonymous for the client, who isn’t seen walking out of our office carrying bags of food. It also minimizes our burden of maintaining a large stock of pantry items, which our small office has neither the space nor the personnel to do. Jewish Family Services serves the wider (non-Jewish) community as well, so our doors are open to all who may ask for help. However, Edmonton is well-served by a network of neighbourhood food cupboards, coordinated by The Edmonton Food Bank, so our aim is to ensure that anyone who keeps kosher has the option of choosing our bank when receiving food assistance.

RECIPIENTS RESPOND:

Practically every day, something inspiring happens in our office, be it a positive response from one of our clients or a relative extending their appreciation for services a client has received.

OVERCOMING CHALLENGES:

We are committed to having clients be able to receive services without their inability to pay being a barrier. Our programs are only partially funded, and for the two counselling programs, we rely on a sliding fee scale for clients coupled with donations from the public to make up the shortfall. Having sufficient funding and resources is an ongoing issue. Additionally, the larger community often believes we serve only the Jewish residents, so we have to spend time educating them that, with the exception of our two seniors programs, our services are available to all. By “Jewish Family Services”, we mean “in keeping with Jewish values”.

A BUSY PESACH SEASON:

At Pesach time, with the financial support of the National Council of Jewish Women, our agency is able to sponsor community members with financial difficulties to attend one of the community sedarim at a local Synagogue. Their names just go on the attendance list with everyone else, and no one knows who was paid for by the agency.

“You wiped away my tears. I am speechless -- how did you feel my pain and suffering to try to heal it? But you did it -- like a miracle!” “It always makes a difference for people like us to know that someone out there is always ready to help when needed.”

“T hanks for your supp ort through the Food Bank progra m. You have opened the gate for s, and we are forever grateful for th at. I may not have been able to do it without your help. I just feel ba d that, other than my apprecia tion, I don’t have anything yet to offer in return.”

LESSONS LEARNED OVER THE YEARS:

One of the lessons I’ve learned is to recognize the strength it takes for individuals to ask for help. We strive to connect with clients on their terms and to minimize the steps they need to take to get help – e.g., not having to tell their story over and over again to multiple people – and to be as responsive as we can in giving aid quickly. Another lesson would be how small investments in individuals can draw big dividends. Sometimes, just a small hand up is all the help clients need. We have clients that continue to call in – not for assistance, but to update us on their progress and to express their thanks.

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WHAT D.A.N.I. IS:

D.A.N.I.

Teaching People to Fish A N I TA M I L L E R Business and Catering Manager Toronto, Ontario

D.A.N.I. BIO MOTTO: “A hand up; not a hand out.” YEAR ESTABLISHED: 2006 AREA COVERED: Greater Toronto Area NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES/VOLUNTEERS: - 14 full-time employees - 15 part-time employees - Average of 6 university/ college placement students - About 12 daily/weekly volunteers NUMBER OF PEOPLE SERVED: Approximately 85 HOW YOU CAN HELP: By giving us a hand up (not a hand out). At some point, you will have an event to host in your home or office. Or you might need a hostess gift, a baby gift or a holiday gift. You might need to send a neighbor a shiva meal or mail a friend a greeting card. When you do, please think of using our café, our event centre, or Dani Delights Catering! CONTACT INFO: www.DANI-Toronto.com

DANI provides a day program, vocational training, and employment possibilities for adults with developmental disabilities. Participants are trained according to their goals and abilities, and then given work in an office environment (filing, shredding, etc.), a warehouse (packing, pricing), or even the organization itself (stuffing envelopes, light assembly). DANI also operates a Social Enterprise (COR certified, cholov yisroel), which has 5 arms: Catering • Café • Event Centre • Pop-up Restaurant • Gifts (baby gifts, hostess gifts, corporate baskets) Each arm trains and employs DANI participants, is supported by many volunteers, and is managed by industry professionals.

WHAT MAKES D.A.N.I. DIFFERENT:

DANI never set out to become another kosher caterer. Our goal was to provide a training ground for adults who have a developmental or learning disability, and to somehow generate income to help support our many programs. Fortunately, our two goals feed into each other. In just the last 3 years – since we moved into our Thornhill location – we have reached these goals and more! Our venue has become a popular place to host all life-cycle events, from brissim to bar and bat mitzvahs to sheva brachot to anniversary and birthday parties. We also cater many corporate functions and off-site events – no event is too small, as we custom tailor everything for our patrons. But our most innovative idea is our Kosher Pop-Up Restaurant. We’ve developed relationships with corporate offices and organizations, so that our participants, along with their job coach, arrive on a pre-set date and set up a “kosher food court in your office”. We sell soups, vegetarian chili, assorted wraps, salads, desserts, and more. Employees have no obligation to buy anything, but in our experience, they really appreciate the fresh, healthy food choices, market-value prices, and especially the warm customer service that our participants provide. It’s a win-win situation, and in today’s world, it’s essential to recognize the value this population can offer.

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OVERCOMING CHALLENGES:

DANI doesn’t receive any ongoing government support, nor are we supported by the UJA. We rely on the generosity of our community. And while we truly believe in our motto of “A hand up, not a hand out,” we do need additional financial help to continue our wide range of programs. After all, not every DANI participant is able to work. Their goals might be more focused on basic life skills, and their need for support may be greater. But we can’t leave them behind just because it’s more costly to support them.


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INSPIRATION:

Two words: MY SON. When my son, Danny, who has autism, was about to leave high school, I was looking for a day program where he could continue to be integrated with his peers and the community at large, and would be able to be productive in a Jewish environment. A few of us parents got together and soon realized that there was nothing out there to meet our needs. So we formed a parent group and turned our dream into a reality. Susie Sokol and I lead the group, and the small seven-family group grew to encompass over 100 families. Both Susie’s daughter and my son are part of the program.

RECIPIENTS RESPOND:

In just a few short years, we’ve touched many lives. The following is a testimonial given by one participant who has a mental health illness, yet gets regular paychecks as part of our Employment Program:

“ Professionals have told me that because I have a serious mental health

A BUSY PESACH SEASON:

The various DANI food enterprises don’t take a break in the days leading up to Pesach, and we can’t afford to close our kitchen several days before the holiday to turn everything over. But because our kitchen stays chametz, our Café and takeout catering can serve the community until the last minute before Pesach!

illness, I will never be able to both have paid employment and go to my medical sessions. I have been told that it is either one or the other. It is now more than 2 years later, and all I’d like to say to these professionals is, ‘I did it, I am doing it, and I will continue to do it.’

“DANI is giving me the opportunity

to be a productive member of society. DANI is providing me with an environment where I can be myself – illness, symptoms and all – and throughout it all, I will have support.

LESSONS LEARNED OVER THE YEARS:

Being involved with DANI has shown me that everyone has something positive to contribute to the workplace. Everyone. In fact, as much as we teach them, there is so much to learn from individuals who are labeled “disabled”. It might be a new way of looking at a situation. It might be a different, innovative way to accomplish a task. It might be their ability to do something with ease that is difficult for you and me, such as speaking or performing in public. It might even be something as simple – yet as important – as a smile on a hectic day. I have learned that adults with “special needs” are themselves very special.

DANI is teaching me how to trust people.

“I am learning that I am a

human being with values, skills and importance. DANI is the only employer who took a chance with me.

“At DANI, I have colleagues who

check in on me periodically throughout the day to make sure I’m alright. DANI is the only employer I have ever known that has compassion, understanding, a heart, and a wealth of knowledge.”

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Ten Yad, Ottawa

WHAT TEN YAD IS:

All Hands on Deck ESTI FOGEL Chair Ottawa, Ontario

TEN YAD BIO MOTTO: “Ten Yad Ve’ten Bracha – Helping Hands are a Blessing.” YEAR ESTABLISHED: 2008 AREA COVERED: The Ottawa Jewish community NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES/VOLUNTEERS: With the exception of a part time office manager, Ten Yad is exclusively volunteer run. Our core team leadership is comprised of 30 volunteers. In addition, we draw from a pool of over 200 volunteers for meal preparation, meal delivery, drives to hospitals, Kosher Pantry activity, bikkur cholim, and more. NUMBER OF PEOPLE SERVED: Approximately 1,700 acts of chessed in a given year. HOW YOU CAN HELP: We always welcome volunteers, especially with regard to meal delivery and rides to hospitals. You can also buy our cookbook, which is available on our website. CONTACT INFO: www.TenYad.ca

Ten Yad is dedicated to providing support and relief for families confronted with acute situations. These situations can be triggered by unexpected crises, such as medical emergencies or illness, or conversely, happy occasions such as births and relocations can also generate substantial stress and disrupt the regular family routines. Ten Yad steps in to offer a “helping hand”, allowing families to cope with these challenges over the short term, after which things can return to regular routine, or else longer-term plans with appropriate agencies can be put into place.

WHAT MAKES TEN YAD UNIQUE:

Ten Yad provides a huge range of support services – from providing families with meals and helping with errands to coordinating “Kosher Pantries” in local hospitals to relocation assistance for newcomers to our city. Ten Yad also organizes hospital visits (upon request) and has a dedicated team that recites all of Sefer Tehillim (the Book of Psalms) in the merit of an individual confronted with a life-threatening situation. In addition, we facilitate an Urgent Shabbat/Yom Tov Taxi Service for non-emergency hospital transportation on Shabbat and Jewish Holidays (such as the onset of labor, an ill child, or a slip-and-fall with a possible fracture).

A BUSY PESACH SEASON:

OVERCOMING CHALLENGES:

As we’re entirely a volunteer-run organization, we have to rely on volunteers’ schedules and availability. This is true whether we’re trying to fix meals, deliver the meals, give rides to hospitals, or restock the Kosher Pantries. We also need to customize event plans depending on what the recipients’ needs are with respect to allergies and level of kashrut. Ten Yad’s mandate is to provide urgent, short-term assistance, which often requires a high level of agility and rapid response. Births and relocations can be predicted well in advance, but illness and other crises are sudden and require speedy action.

Pesach is perhaps the most challenging time of the year. Because a substantial portion of Ten Yad activities revolve around food, all of the standard routines must be adjusted. The Kosher Pantries at the hospitals have to be completely restocked with “kosher l’Pesach” products, for example. Food preparation is quite difficult for everyone during Pesach, so we improvise as needed to offer maximum support.

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LESSONS LEARNED OVER THE YEARS:

I’m consistently reminded that chessed is all about the recipient. Any gesture must be given with respect and mindfulness to what level of support – if any – the intended recipient wants to receive. We often think we know what someone needs, but if they’re not open to a particular offer of assistance, we need to step back. And if what they do need differs from what we think they might need, that, too, has to be respected. In addition, I’ve learned how important humility is in the goal of making a difference. Sharing credit, showing respect, and ignoring slights are all things that place the objective front-and-center. I’ve also learned that most people genuinely want to help others, and if an opportunity can be offered, they will jump at the chance to pitch in and make a difference.

INSPIRATION:

For a number of years, several individuals (myself included) were involved in stepping in to help neighbors and friends who had just given birth or were confronted with less-welcome developments in their lives. What we noticed was that as much as people wanted to help, the lack of coordination in providing that help was resulting in efforts that didn’t always match the needs of the families. Ten Yad was our response. In implementing our vision, we had two complementary goals: 1) To do chessed, and 2) To do it in a way that fostered harmony and promoted unity within the community. Today, Ten Yad has coordinators in each neighborhood who work with a recipient’s “Circle of Support”. This Circle could include family, friends, acquaintances, neighbors, and others across the community. Once such a list is established (and we can help develop that list), Ten Yad works with the Circle to provide the services required, as research has shown that social support and connection to community is key in positively affecting those who are going through life-altering circumstances. More than the meals cooked or any other support that Ten Yad provides, I’m always hearing about the warm feeling and sense of community that our recipients receive from their Circle of Support during tough times.

RECIPIENTS RESPOND: We do have a number of testimonials on our website, such as this one from Anna Tal:

“Words cannot describe how much Ten Yad has been there for me personally, for my family, and for my kids!

“While busy caring for my three

energetic munchkins, I never expected to have to battle Thyroid Cancer at the age of 38, and, more recently, recover from Open Heart Surgery at the age of 40. Ten Yad really made this difficult experience that much easier. Every week that we received Ten Yad meals was incredible and helped me remain positive, become stronger, and move forward. There were some days that were so painful that I didn’t want to get out of bed, but Ten Yad’s assistance gave me the added help I needed to become healthier faster, thereby giving me the ability to be a mom again.

“Thank you so very much from

the bottom of my heart (no pun intended). B”H, I feel truly blessed to be part of the world again, knowing this is behind me, and to be surrounded by so much love and kindness! I wouldn’t be the person or mother I am without all of you.” COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 71


CHESSED CORNER

The Montreal Center for Health and Care/Refuah V’Chesed: Bringing Hospitality to Hospitals AV R A H A M H I L LY A P T E R Director of Development

THE MONTREAL CENTER/REFUAH V’CHESED BIO MOTTO: “Your health. Our mission.” YEAR ESTABLISHED: 2007 AREA COVERED: The entire Montreal region NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES/VOLUNTEERS: 9-10 employees 150 volunteers NUMBER OF PEOPLE SERVED: 40,000 calls received 12,000 beneficiaries of hospitality services 3,000 patients who benefit from Chesed on Wheels HOW YOU CAN HELP: We need caring people to help us continue. Aside from manpower for such programs as Chesed on Wheels, we need our phone lines open and answered, our fridges stocked, our ambulette filled with gas, and much, much more. Every dollar makes a difference. CONTACT INFO: www.TheMontrealCenter.org

WHAT WE ARE:

The Montreal Center for Health and Care (formerly “Refuah V’Chesed”) is a volunteerbased organization that provides guidance, advocacy, and support – both emotional and physical – for patients and their families in time of need. When, Heaven forbid, someone in the community gets diagnosed with something they never asked for, we are there 24/7 – Shabbos included – to hold their hand and see to it that they get the best treatment there is, and fast.

WHAT MAKES US UNIQUE:

Our goal is to ease the burden of medical predicaments by providing programs and services in 3 key areas: 1. Medicine: 24-hour on-call Patient Advocacy, Medical Referrals, End-of-Life Ethics, Mental Health Services, Preventative Medical Screening Events, Health Seminars, a Medical Equipment Gemach, and a Health and Wellness Clinic that serves roughly 500 patients each week. 2. Hospitality: Shabbos Rooms with kosher food in 5 local hospitals, Family Apartments near hospitals, Mesamchim Music Project (live music to cheer up patients), and volunteer Shofar, Megillah, and Sukkah Services. 3. Transportation: Ambulette transport for wheelchair-bound patients, Emergency Transfers cross-border, Patient Air Transfers, and Chesed on Wheels, which, according to project manager Shmuel Igel, “provides transportation for doctor and treatment appointments, drives family members to hospitals to visit their loved ones, and takes personal items or home-cooked meals to patients in hospitals upon request.” The area hospitals trust and respect our level of care and confidentiality for all cases. They reach out to us when they have even a potentially Jewish patient (or a deceased) for proper attention, care, and dignity.

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OVERCOMING CHALLENGES:

Our patient liaisons (Aron Friedlander and Aron Schmeltzer, whom the doctors have affectionately nicknamed “The Two Arons”) do not have an easy time advocating for patients to get procedures. Government regulations have become increasingly strict, so this has become a full-time job for them. Money is also an issue, obviously. Most people don’t realize that the organization is supported entirely by the community’s charitable giving. Everything costs money. But, as Aron Schmeltzer says, “Every person who supports The Montreal Center can consider themselves partners of this organization. We live once. We all have to do the most we can with the time we are given, and Hashem wants us to take care of each other.”

A BUSY PESACH SEASON:

For every Jewish holiday, we station a doctor at our centrallylocated medical clinic so that people can be seen and get prescriptions over Yom Tov and not have to spend time in the E.R. We also have to restock all our pantries with kosher-for-Pesach items.


CHESSED CORNER

RECIPIENTS RESPOND:

LESSONS LEARNED OVER THE YEARS:

I learned to see the beauty of people. You can see someone in shul and say, “Hello,” and he grumbles at you, and you think, “What a jerk.” But you never know what’s he’s going through. He could be going through the wringer with an ill family member – you don’t know. Or he could be involved with a chessed organization – running around and helping hundreds of people and not announcing it to the public (as many of our volunteers do) and he’s exhausted. Be kind, don’t judge, and have respect for others. If we can all do this, the world would be a better place.

INSPIRATION:

Aron Friedlander always says, “I don’t have any other reason to do this job, other than a higher calling.” A paramedic for over twenty five years, Aron would follow his patients out of the ambulance and see how the emergency room worked – and how it didn’t, with the many challenges that the social system presents. The wait to be seen at an emergency room was hours. The wait for diagnostic testing could be weeks. But he also saw that the challenges were mostly beatable, if someone would just care. All of us at The Montreal Center – from founders to board members – know too well what it feels like to be at the bedside of a loved one. We know how hard it is to spend hours trying to cope with the unknown, without support or advocacy, and to be stranded without kosher comfort food. “In the beginning, the doctors didn’t understand why we were needed,” Schmeltzer says. “We explained to them that we were assisting with the (French) language barrier. We also introduced the possibility that it was in the hospitals’ interest to work with us, since patients would be happy to use their hospital, knowing there was a liaison.” He adds, “To the patient, I say, ‘I do what you need. I belong to you.’”

“In 2010, when our daughter wasn’t doing well, our doctor advised us to take her to Toronto to receive a double lung transplant. The Two Arons picked her up in an ambulance and drove us all the way to Toronto.” -Pinchus Riven “Living in a hospital room next to my spouse for many weeks was hard enough, but I knew I could have a cup of tea in The Montreal Center’s hospitality kitchen 24 hours a day. There’s so much comfort in being able to disconnect from reality with a hot beverage and a newspaper when going through a medical predicament.” -Name withheld

“T he Yom Kippur nigh t visit by the singing group was a very emotional and spiritual experience. Not often does a patie nt hear Kol Nidrei and Avinu Mal keinu being sung in a hospital at te n o’clock at night. What an exam ple of bikur cholim!” -Judy W.

“The care team focused not only on my cancer, but also on my overall health and well-being. They treat the whole person, not just the cancer. I’ve never felt like a patient with them; I feel like a person. And that’s a big difference.” -Devorah B. COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 73


‫‪SAY‬‬ ‫‪CHEESE‬‬

‫המדקדקים ביותר לחג הפסח‬ ‫ולכל השנה משתמשים רק במאכלי מהדרין‪.‬‬

‫חג כשר ושמח‬


C O R P O R AT E C O R N E R

CORPORATE CORNER

F

or the Jewish community, chessed is part of who we are, but for the corporate community what they call “Corporate Social Responsibility� is part of their businesses. Many companies give back to the community because they are a part of those communities and want to see them thrive.

COR certifies a number of such companies that stand out not only because of the food that they produce, but because of what they do to give back. Whether it is PepsiCo Canada, Terra Cotta Cookies, Nestle Canada, Duchesnay, or Summer Fresh Salads, their stories share one thing: giving makes them better.

Terra Cotta Cookies: Helping Schools Raise Dough Jason Brass, President It all began in 1985, in the small hamlet of Terra Cotta, Ontario, when a mother sent her kids to school with homemade cookies to sell for a fundraiser. Immediately, the cookies were a hit. The school requested more cookies so they could sell them to students full time as snacks during the school day. The school raised a lot of money by doing so, and more schools caught on. A business was born! Since then, Terra Cotta has grown to new heights by adding certifications, moving to a larger facility, and developing many new items. They are now located in Georgetown, Ontario, and are proud to sell cookies to over 2,000 schools and business across the GTA. COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 75


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All of their cookies are 100% Peanut and Nut Free and contain no preservatives or trans-fats. They are also compliant with Ontario’s PPM 150 School Food and Beverage Policy, meaning that their cookies meet all of the fat, saturated fat, and fiber content regulations. And they boast several products that are completely unique to the market, such as their famous Ice Dawgs. Terra Cotta considers having COR certification a no-brainer, noting that the hechsher has been an excellent selling point in marketing the products to schools, retailers, and other organizations. According to company president Jason Brass, “We have certainly noticed that we have gained more customers in the more heavily-populated Jewish communities.” The company strives to be a role model for other companies looking for certification, in having dedicated employees who ensure that all ingredients are approved, and that everything is made in a way that respects the laws of kashrut. “When Rabbi Rosen comes to review our program,” Jason says, “it feels like a family member coming to visit. We enjoy having him educate us on kosher rules, and sharing stories with each other which often turns into new leads. It’s also great to have a personal relationship with an association from which we can get answers to questions that we or our customers may have.”

ON TERRA COTTA’S SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY PROGRAM:

“Our company was built on social responsibility from the very beginning – we help schools raise important funds, as well as offer a snack that keeps students fed and alert. Our wholesale prices enable our customers to earn a large profit from their sales, so ultimately, the money raised benefits the schools and communities. “We also donate any extra product (test items, overstock, items that are imperfect for sale) to local food banks.”

ON WHAT INSPIRES THEM TO GIVE BACK:

“We had the honor of being given the 2015 Large Business of the Year Award for Halton Hills, for which much of the criteria for being nominated involves what the business does for and within the community. We were able to provide examples of ways we helped out, and how -- even within our walls -- every bit of hard work helps someone.”

ON WHY IT’S IMPORTANT FOR THE COMPANY TO GIVE BACK TO THE COMMUNITY:

“Giving back to the community is important to us specifically, because it’s good for business! Corporate Social Responsibility builds reputation and respect in your community, which can then turn into recommendations and leads. “It’s also important to remember that, as a manufacturer, we ultimately take from the environment, so it’s simply our duty to do what we can to give back.”

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Nestlé Canada: Sharing Their Values With the Community Cedric Schneider, Corporate Affairs Manager

The Nestlé Company was founded in Switzerland in 1867 by Henri Nestlé, who developed the first milk-based baby formula in order to save the life of a neighbor’s baby. His Farine Lactée formula went on to nourish many babies who were unable to feed from their mothers. Since the beginning, nutrition has always been the heart of the Nestlé business. anadians first saw the Nestlé name on canned milk products imported from Europe in 1887. Today, Nestlé of Canada employs 3,500 people in approximately 20 manufacturing, sales, and distribution sites across the country, with the home office located in North York, Ontario. 150 years after Henri Nestlé, nutrition is, now more than ever, the key to the company’s future. Nestlé produces and markets a wide range of foods and beverages that satisfy many consumer needs from prenatal to seniors’ nutrition. Nestlé also continues to use extensive scientific research to develop new products that help consumers manage their health, well-being, and body weight, and to improve the nutritional profiles of their existing products to do the same. While many Nestlé products around the world are kosher, the COR certifies most of the products at their ice cream plant, in London, Ontario, where they have a very good working relationship with the COR. The staff finds the certifying Rabbi, Rabbi Rosen, very helpful and willing to answer any questions they might have.

ON NESTLÉ’S SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY PROGRAM:

“At Nestlé, we believe that, to be a successful and sustainable business, we must bring value to both our shareholders and our society at the same time. We call this “Creating Shared Value” (or CSV), and it’s our philosophy in doing business. “We remain committed to having a positive impact through our products. When we change our recipes, it’s to make our products tastier and healthier. When we update our packaging, it’s to reduce their impact on the environment and to add clear portion size information to help consumers make better, more informed choices. In the short run, for example, clear portion size means that our consumers eat less of our product. But in the long run, it means they can keep a balance on their eating habits, live longer, healthier lives, and continue to purchase from us far into the future.”

ON WHAT INSPIRES THEM TO GIVE BACK:

“As a business operating in Canada for over 98 years, we believe our role is to create jobs and support local businesses, thereby investing in our own operations to ensure long-term business growth – again, our “CSV” approach. That is why, in response to the high global youth unemployment rate, we launched our Youth Initiative in September of 2015. “Anyone who has children knows what a significant contribution they can be, from their fresh perspectives to their ability to tap into today’s trends and latest innovations. The Nestlé Youth Initiative offers young Canadians the opportunity to develop their professional skills, increase their employability, and expand their network, all with the goal of helping young adults prepare for the future.”

ON WHY IT’S IMPORTANT FOR THE COMPANY TO GIVE BACK TO THE COMMUNITY: “We don’t see CSV as giving back; it’s a way of doing business that benefits everyone in the long term. It’s about integrating the improvement of the lives of workers, families, and communities into our core business strategy. Our purpose was defined in the very beginning with the creation of the world’s first baby formula, and this philosophy stays true today and guides our approach to business.”

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Pepsi Canada: Performance with Purpose Denis Sacks, Director of Franchise Development

PepsiCo Canada, many of whose products are certified by COR, is home to some of the world’s most recognized and respected brands including Pepsi, Quaker, Tropicana, Gatorade, Lay’s, Doritos and Tostitos. From beverages to foods and snacks, they offer consumers a broad range of product choices from simple treats to healthful offerings. PepsiCo Canada employs nearly 10,000 Canadians and is organized into two business units - PepsiCo Beverages Canada, which includes brands such as Pepsi, Gatorade and Tropicana; and PepsiCo Foods Canada, which includes Frito Lay Canada and Quaker foods & snacks. PepsiCo Canada, in turn, belongs to the global PepsiCo, Inc., family which is comprised of three divisions: PepsiCo Americas Beverages, PepsiCo Americas Foods, and PepsiCo International. PepsiCo Canada believes in the importance of being a responsible corporate citizen. They seek to provide opportunities for growth and enrichment to their employees, business partners and the communities in which they operate.

ON PEPSICO CANADA’S KOSHER PROGRAM

According to Denis Sacks, Senior Director of Franchise Development, “PepsiCo Beverages Canada has had a wonderful, collaborative long-term relationship with COR. We proudly carry the COR logo on our packaging, thereby assuring consumers about the Kosher status of our product.”

ON PEPSICO CANADA’S SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY PROGRAM:

“It is our vision of Performance with Purpose that enables us to achieve financial success while improving all aspects of the communities in which we operate - environmentally, socially and economically - creating a better tomorrow. “Performance With Purpose starts with what we make – a wide range of foods and beverages from the indulgent to the more nutritious; extends to how we make our products – conserving precious natural resources and fostering environmental responsibility in and beyond our operations; and considers those who make them – striving to support communities where we work and the careers of generations of talented PepsiCo employees. We are committed to investing in our people, our company and the communities where we operate to help position the company for long-term, sustainable growth.”

ON HOW PEPSICO CANADA GIVES BACK TO THE COMMUNITY

“PepsiCo Canada is building brighter futures in the communities where we operate, through strategic grants provided by the PepsiCo Canada Foundation, and through employee volunteering and community service. “The mandate of the PepsiCo Canada Foundation is to fundraise and solicit donations for use in conducting, promoting and supporting activities, programs and education that encourage and promote physical activity, healthy lifestyle habits and health and wellness, especially among underprivileged youth. The PepsiCo Canada Foundation supports five major charitable organizations: YMCA, ONEXONE, Kiwanis, Jerry Love (City of Mississauga), and Calgary KidsSport. Above and beyond these five grant recipients, the Foundation occasionally provides smaller grants to other qualified charities, when additional funding is available.”

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Duchesnay Keeping Things Joyous Ron Vaillancourt (Media Inquiries)

ON DUCHESNAY’S SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY PROGRAM:

Duchesnay, whose products have been certified by the COR since 2007, is a unique pharmaceutical company whose mission is “to preserve the health of women and their families at every stage of life.” Although they’re continuously expanding their entire portfolio of products, they place a strong emphasis on researching and developing treatment options that are safe even for women who are expectant or nursing. This includes treatment for “morning sickness”, and of course prenatal vitamins. According to Ron Vaillancourt, a spokesman for Duchesnay, “Duchesnay understands that ‘morning sickness’ is a real medical condition that can have a serious impact on every aspect of an expectant woman’s daily life. We believe that every woman, regardless of her religious beliefs, deserves to have access to a safe and effective treatment option if simple dietary and lifestyle changes fail to adequately control her symptoms. We also believe that every baby deserves to have the best possible chance of being born healthy. That is why it was so important to us that we obtain kosher certification and are Passover compliant for Diclectin® (a drug used for the management of nausea and vomiting during pregnancy) and also for our Pregvit® and Pregvit folic 5® prenatal vitamins.”

“Duchesnay and its employees are deeply committed to giving back to our community. As such, we’re actively involved with several charitable organizations, including La Fondation OLO, Moisson Laurentides, and The Cure Foundation: “La Fondation OLO OLO provides nutritional support to disadvantaged expectant women and young children in Quebec. Through local CLSCs (local community service centers), these beneficiaries receive food vouchers for eggs (Oeuf ), milk (Lait), and oranges (Oranges) to help meet their most basic nutritional needs. And thanks to donations from Duchesnay, they also receive high-quality prenatal vitamins (either Pregvit or Pregvit folic 5) free of charge. “Moisson Laurentides Moisson Laurentides is a local food bank that provides assistance to over 22,000 people in the region – including almost 8,000 children – each month. Thanks to a range of fundraising activities organized by our employees throughout the year, Duchesnay is proud to have contributed $12,000 to their 2016 La Guignolée (food drive) campaign – $2,000 up from the previous year. “Environmental responsibility Duchesnay also makes every effort to minimize its own environmental footprint. For example, we are proud members of the Health Products Stewardship Association (for medications return programs and proper drug disposal).”

ON WHAT INSPIRES THEM TO GIVE BACK:

“Throughout the year, our employees organize a variety of fundraising activities for several charitable organizations. Participation levels are always high, whether it’s our “Jeans Fridays” for The Cure Foundation, our “Bagel Breakfasts” (bake sales and drawings) benefitting the Moisson Laurentides Food Bank, or the “yellow noses” selfies we take to promote the OLO Foundation’s media awareness campaign. (The yellow noses represent egg yolks.) We have a great time helping out these charities, and everyone gets involved.”

ON WHY IT’S IMPORTANT FOR THE COMPANY TO GIVE BACK TO THE COMMUNITY: “We have a long-standing commitment to preserving women’s health. Thanks to Duchesnay, expectant women have been recognized as a vulnerable population, due to their unique healthcare needs and the dangers of their taking certain medications. That is also why we offer patient assistance programs, as well as donate our prenatal vitamins to less fortunate women who might otherwise not receive the nutritional supplements they need during what should be a joyous time in their lives.”

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Summer Fresh Salads Promoting Healthy Lifestyles Susan Niczowski, President

Summer Fresh Salads is one of the largest manufacturers of freshly-prepared food in Canada, specializing in an amazing assortment of dips, hummus, salads, and appetizers.

ON SUMMER FRESH SALAD’S SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY PROGRAM:

“Aside from our involvement with many charitable organizations across North America -- SickKids hospitals, Toronto East General Hospital, the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, Best Buddies International, JEDx, and the Canadian Macedonian Place Foundation, to name a few -- we constantly strive toward creating positive impacts on the consumer and giving back to the community as a whole. We feel that good nutrition and healthy, clean food is a pillar in healthy growth, whether it be for children, adolescents, adults, or the elderly.”

The family-run company specializes in providing unique products that cater to every palate and occasion. Always following seasonal trends in healthy eating, Summer Fresh’s salads are “food for real life”, ready to be served on their own or as part of a meal with minimal preparation. The company also evolves to meet their customers’ needs, offering variety and trending flavors, all designed to bring family and friends closer together. The COR has been part of Summer Fresh from the company’s inception. According to company president and founder Susan Niczowski, “The knowledge and insight imparted by the certifying rabbis over the years has not only helped in strengthening our Kosher program, but our daily operations as well.” She also finds that the kosher guidelines fall in line with all of their other food safety programs – HACCAP, CFIA, and FDA – helping ensure that they supply every consumer with top-quality products.

ON WHAT INSPIRES THEM TO GIVE BACK:

“One of our charitable contributions is that we’re part of the Adopt-aFamily Program. We sponsor children going back to school and buy them backpacks filled with school supplies, and we also offer them Summer Fresh products so they have a great lunch, dinner or healthy snack. We have also gone into their communities and mentored adolescents and young adults. “In addition, we are frequent donors to the Ronald McDonald House. Nothing gives us more joy than to help a family in need, as those families do not always have access to adequate healthy meal options and snacks. And the correspondence we receive from them expressing their joy makes giving back all the more worthwhile.”

ON WHY IT’S IMPORTANT FOR THE COMPANY TO GIVE BACK TO THE COMMUNITY:

“As a company, we would not be where we are today without the support of both our employees and consumers. Giving back not only strengthens our community, but it completes the circle as well.”

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COR CORNER

COR CORNER

Working Out the

BUGS! Checking produce for insects is no small matter. In fact, the

RABBI EPHRAIM HAMBURGER AND RABBI ARIEH KADOCH ARE TWO COR MASHGICHIM WHOSE SOLE JOB IT IS TO CHECK FOR BUGS.

COR has two very busy mashgichim – Rabbi Ephraim Hamburger and Rabbi Arieh Kadoch – whose sole job it is to check for bugs. In this article, we put them under the magnifying glass, for a change.

By Mordechai Schmutter

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COR CORNER

WHAT DOES YOUR DAILY ROUTINE LOOK LIKE? AK: As a Bedikat Yerakot (vegetable checking) mashgiach, I visit a number of establishments every day, including Sunday, while others have to be visited frequently, though not every day. My route includes pizza shops, restaurants, bakeries, and catering venues. EH: Our job is to make sure that all of these establishments have all of their vegetables checked and ready to be served. That said, we need to be available to be called to any establishment at any time of the day to check items. Officially, I have to put in 44 hours a week, but I don’t count the hours. I love my job, and I’m unable to wrap up my day until I know that each establishment has been looked after. WHAT KINDS OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES DO YOU GENERALLY CHECK? AK: We mostly check leafy vegetables, herbs, and strawberries. The COR has specific lists of what is and isn’t allowed in our establishments. COR also recommends that kosher consumers refrain from purchasing fresh produce that is highly infested and difficult to check (unless it bears a reliable kosher certification). (See the Produce Inspection Guide at www. COR.ca.)

Top: Rabbi Ephraim Hamburger Bottom: Rabbi Arieh Kadoch

EH: It was actually fascinating to me, back when I started, what types of foods had to be checked. We might think, “Okay the Mashgiach checks the lettuce for the Caesar salad. What else?” It’s not an exaggeration to say that when a person goes to a wedding, for example, every course has some ingredient that had to be checked, be they ingredients used to make the fish, soup, chicken, or dessert. Every dish is prepared with a variety of fruits, vegetables, and herbs that some of us may not generally use for home cooking, but that chefs who know the intricacies of each ingredient want to use, and they prefer to get them fresh.

WHAT DO YOU DO WITH ALL THE BUGS YOU FIND? EH: I keep them as a souvenir.

Just kidding. I simply remove them from the vegetable. Actually, if I find a really interesting or gross bug, I’ll probably snap a picture of it, just so I can show it to the chef next time he mocks the whole checking procedure. AK: If we find bugs, the affected leaves are rewashed and rechecked. If we find an infestation, (i.e. several bugs in a batch), the supplier is notified and informed to bring a new supply. As for the affected batch, it is labeled as “Do Not Use”, and if a non-Jewish employee wants to take it, he can get the extra protein.

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WHAT ARE THE STEPS THAT A VEGETABLE OR FRUIT GOES THROUGH IN ORDER TO BE CERTIFIED AS “CHECKED”? EH: Each fruit or vegetable is different, meaning different kinds of infestations and different kinds of washing and checking procedures are employed. But if I were to give one general answer for all produce, it would be as follows… AK: Prior to checking, all produce needs to be washed thoroughly with water and vegetable-grade soap. Personally, I cannot stress this point enough: Aside from insects, the amount of sand and sediment attached to fresh produce – particularly herbs – is astounding. My experience has shown that cilantro, leeks, and fresh basil are the dirtiest of produce, sediment-wise.

After the vegetables are washed and rinsed, they are again dipped into a container of water and agitated. The water is then poured through 2 colanders. There is a micro-screen sheet, or a “Kosher Screen” as we call it, that sits between the colanders, catching any thrips, aphids, etc. The sheet is then examined over a light box to determine if the produce is infested. This is known as “The Kosher Screen Method” or, colloquially, as “The Shmatta Method”. EH: If the cloth is bug-free, the mashgiach will take a sample of the produce and check it directly on the light box. If the sample is also bug-free, the mashgiach can certify the product as “Checked and Ready to Use”. AK: This step is very important, especially when it comes to certain varieties of romaine lettuce. I have personally seen instances where a thin membrane covers the spine of the lettuce leaf, thereby trapping a bug inside the leaf, and it could only be detected through examination against a source of light.

I love my job, and I’m unable to wrap up my day until I know that each establishment has been looked after.

HOW DO YOU CHECK THROUGH SUCH MASSIVE AMOUNTS OF PRODUCE? DO YOU CHECK EVERYTHING YOURSELF, OR ARE THERE OTHER PEOPLE? EH: The COR trains every single mashgiach before

putting him in a position to check vegetables. In fact, they will not allow a mashgiach to check vegetables on his own until they’re absolutely confident that he knows exactly what to do. So usually, I check everything myself. The exception is when I know there will be astronomical amounts to check, in which case I’ll contact my supervisor and give him advance notice that a second mashgiach will be necessary. The kitchen staff does often help with the washing process, but the actual checking must be done by the mashgiach ONLY. That said, a mashgiach always needs to be one step ahead, which means that he should know what the produce orders of the week are, what the menu is, and so on. This way, if I know that a caterer has an order for 75 portions of spinach-stuffed chicken, I’ll approach the chef and ask him when the earliest is that I can check the spinach. I can’t wait for the phone call; I need to be proactive. If I have an empty 45 minutes between jobs, I’ll text one of my establishments: “Hi, Joey. Do you need anything checked today? How about tomorrow?” Organization is key for a mashgiach to do his job properly. DOES BUYING SOMETHING “CHECKED” MEAN THAT SOMEONE TOUCHED ALL MY LETTUCE? AK: Yes. EH: The first thing I do when coming into an establishment is I wash my hands. When I check vegetables, I wear a hairnet, a beardnet, and disposable gloves. Additionally, every mashgiach at the COR has a foodhandlers’ certificate, certifying that he has learned how to handle food correctly and is approved by the government of Canada to handle food items.

The chef touches everything too.

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COR CORNER

WHERE AND WHEN DO YOU FIND THE MOST BUGS? EH: It’s difficult to point at a certain vegetable and say,

“This has the most bugs.” It depends on the season, which brand it is, and where in the world it originated from. One day we can have high infestation in romaine lettuce, and next week the romaine clean, but the cabbage is teeming with bugs. AK: I’ve found certain brand names (e.g. Dole) to be more reliable than others, and ‘no-name’ produce (i.e. 3rd-party produce) to be riskier than company brands. In addition, it’s been observed that a sudden change in weather conditions (temperature and humidity) can promote growth of bugs. DO YOU HAVE ANY GROSS-OUT STORIES? EH: No. You’d be hard pressed to gross me out! Actually,

contrary to what you might think, I have never been an entomological type of guy. I could never bring myself to touch a worm when going fishing. But when it comes to bedikas tola’im, I feel privileged to be doing such an important task. My whole outlook toward living creatures has changed. That said, I once found cases upon cases of pasta crawling with bugs.

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HOW DO YOU AVOID MIGRAINES? AK: Davening to Hashem is the key. I also carry a

magnifying glass (jewelers’ loupe, 10x) to minimize straining. EH: I take short breaks when I feel overly strained. It’s very important for me to get a good night’s sleep as well, or I’ll end up with a headache before I can call it a day. Also, it helps to know what you’re doing. I have enough experience at this point that I usually don’t need to check a piece of lettuce for more than a couple of seconds. ANY PERSONAL TIPS FOR CHECKING VEGETABLES OURSELVES? AK: Proper washing techniques with copious amounts of

soap, water and agitation, after davening to Hashem, is the key to insect-free produce. EH: 1. Work in a neat and organized environment. 2. Have all your tools handy. You don’t want to have to start looking for containers in the middle of washing or checking. 3. Obviously you should work near a sink or another source of water. 4. To minimize stress, have a comfortable chair handy.

You can also take advantage of the Produce Inspection Guide on the COR website, complete with pictures. It’s extremely clear and informative, leaving no questions unanswered with regard to bug checking.


COR CORNER

COR-KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA comes to

EDMONTON

for first ever PRE-PESACH COMMUNITY EVENT

C

OR-Kashruth Council of Canada Comes to Edmonton for First Ever Pre-Pesach Community Event Jewish communities in large metropolitan areas sometimes take for granted having access to Jewish communal resources, kosher agencies being at the forefront leading up to Pesach. Unfortunately, smaller Jewish communities at times don’t get the same access. That is why the Kashruth Council of Canada (COR), travelled to Edmonton Alberta for the city’s first ever pre-pesach community event. The COR delegation was composed of Rabbi Sholom H. Adler, COR’s Kashrus Administrator, Rabbi Dovid Rosen COR’s Pesach Specialist and a Rabbinic Coordinator, and Richard Rabkin, COR’s Managing Director. “At COR we partner with Jewish communities across Canada to act as a resource for all things kosher,” said Rabkin. “Whether it’s answering consumer questions, kashering peoples’ homes, or advocating on behalf of kosher consumers with our elected officials. We at COR feel that all Jewish communities across Canada should have equal access to kashrus resources and that is why we decided to come to Edmonton.” The event was held in a conference room at the West Edmonton Mall, the largest shopping mall in North America and was attended by over 125 people from the Edmonton Jewish community. It received the strong support of local Edmonton rabbis including Rabbi Ari Dreilich, Executive Director of Chabad of Edmonton, Rabbi Daniel Friedman, spiritual leader of Beth Israel Congregation and Rabbi David Laufer, then Director of the Edmonton Kollel. Edmontonians were treated to a selection of complimentary appetizers followed by a PowerPoint presentation by Rabbi Dovid Rosen outlining the most frequently asked Pesach related questions. The second half of the evening was a seminar demonstrating how a COR mashgiach cleans and checks produce to ensure that it is insect free and how to apply these techniques in the home. In opening remarks, Rabbi David Laufer of the Edmonton Kollel said, “We in Edmonton are fortunate

to have a resource like the COR. Not only do they make kosher products more accessible as you can go into any supermarket and find almost any type of kosher certified product on the shelves, but they themselves are accessible, answering our questions via phone, email and text message, and of course now in person. Thank you COR.” In closing remarks, Rabbi Daniel Freidman of the Beth Israel congregation commented, “Over my years in the rabbinate I have made an interesting observation: the people who ask me the most kashrus questions are usually the ones with the highest kashrus levels in their kitchens. Kashrus questions come up daily and we should never be afraid to ask. That is why we are so fortunate to have the COR here with us tonight, and to answer our questions throughout the year as well.” The feedback from those in attendance was overwhelmingly positive but the most significant feedback came from Rabbi Friedman two days after the event via a text message. “Since Sunday I have already been approached by two people who want to kasher their kitchens and toivel their dishes. Yashar Koach!”

“At COR we partner with Jewish communities across Canada to act as a resource for all things kosher”

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COR’s Rabbi Catriel Blum Named Mashgiach of the Year COR’s very own Rabbi Catriel Blum has been selected “Mashgiach of the Year.” KASHRUS Magazine, the Brooklyn-based periodical for the kosher consumer and Trade made the announcement and presented him with a check for $1,000. The presentation was made at Kosherfest, on Wednesday, November 16. Kosherfest is the world’s largest trade show for the kosher industry. Rabbi Blum was chosen from among the nominees of the 1,371 kosher agencies worldwide. He has worked for the COR-Kashruth Council of Canada for 15 years as a “route mashgiach,” a kosher supervisor for multiple establishments. Rabbi Blum supervises 12 establishments, including both dairy and meat restaurants and bakeries, visiting each as many as six times a day. “A kosher supervisor is not a policeman,” said Rabbi Yosef Wikler, editor of Kashrus Magazine, “rather, he is the representative of kosher and Judaism to the staff in his facility and to the administration of the company he works for. Rabbi Catriel Blum, through his winning personality and firm resolve, wins daily the hearts and cooperation of proprietors, kitchen staff, and the COR, truly deserving the title ‘Mashgiach of the Year.’” Rabbi Tsvi Heber, COR’s Director of Community Kosher adds, “The Toronto kosher community is known for its high expectations for the kosher standards of the establishments located in their city. Rabbi Blum, through his tireless years of superhuman effort, has won the community’s full confidence.” Rabbi Blum has literally become a legend in the Bathurst & Lawrence section of Toronto as he is seen walking from store to store in a three block area, clocking five miles per day. People there see him as a “community kosher supervisor” and he sees them as “my people.”

Kashruth Council of Canada (COR) and Niagara College Partner on Project to Integrate Kosher, Food Safety Guidelines SEEKING A MORE EFFICIENT WAY to make kosher certification integrate with food safety planning, the Kashruth Council of Canada recently partnered with Niagara College on an ambitious project to do just that. Most of the world’s leading food retailers and manufactures participate in the Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI), which sets standards for food safety, with the British Retail Consortium (BRC) and the Safe Quality Food Program (SQF) as the most predominant GFSI regimes. At the same time, many food manufacturers carry kosher certification as more than 40% of packaged food products sold in the United

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States are kosher certified, according to market research firm Mintel. While there is much overlap between kosher and food safety programs, they have been kept markedly separate. Until now. The Kashruth Council of Canada (COR) and Niagara College Canada’s Canadian Food & Wine Institute (CFWI) Innovation Centre collaborated on a project to integrate kosher certification requirements into both SQF and BRC food safety programs. This work is now being released to the food manufacturing community. “We are thrilled to offer this service to the food manufacturing community,” says Rabbi Sholom H. Adler, COR’s Director of Industrial Kosher. “We are always looking for ways to make kosher certification more efficient and effective for our kosher certified companies, and we are hopeful that this project will do just that.” “Food manufacturers already speak a certain language, and that is the language of SQF and BRC,” says Dr. Amy Proulx, Niagara College professor, program coordinator


COR CORNER

New COR Kosher Event Signs If an event is catered by a kosher caterer, that means that the event is kosher, right? Wrong. COR certified kosher caterers typically cook in their own kitchens where they have an onsite mashgiach who ensures that kosher standards are being complied with. But often times a caterer delivers food to an offsite event, such as a hotel, venue, or even someone’s home. If the event organizer has requested that this be a “kosher event” it means that a COR mashgiach will be present at the event and will for example, be responsible for making sure that the kosher food is not reheated with non-kosher equipment, served on non-kosher dishes, or that no non-kosher beverages or food are brought into the event. At “kosher events” a COR placard will be placed at the entrance of the event so guests will know that the event is under COR supervision. If there is no mashgiach present however, there is no one charged with overseeing the event’s kosher program. That means that non-kosher dishes may have been used, that the food may have been reheated with non-kosher equipment or that non-kosher food or beverages may also be present at the event. This is what we call an “unsupervised event.” COR has just unveiled attractive new “Kosher Event” placards that are being used at COR supervised kosher events. Please make sure to look out for the Kosher Event placards to ensure that the event you are attending is in fact kosher supervised. Alternatively, you can check in advance by contacting the COR office at 416 635-9550 or info@cor.ca. It may be helpful to remember the following adage, “un-supervised could be un-kosher.”

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 84

with the Culinary Innovation and Food Technology program, and faculty lead on the project. “What this project has done is translate kosher certification into that same language spoken by food safety professionals. As a result, I am confident that this initiative will be well received.” The newly released kosher guidelines are not meant to supplant an existing kosher certification program, but rather to supplement one. “Whatever kosher certification partner a manufacturer has, this new framework will simply help organize one’s kosher program,” says Richard Rabkin, COR’s Managing Director. “In short, our hope is that it will make keeping kosher easier.” Indeed, this new initiative has support from across the kosher industry, as it has been endorsed by other leading kosher agencies including the Orthodox Union (OU), Stark-K Kosher Certification (Star-K), Kof-K Kosher Supervision (Kof-K), Chicago Rabbinical Council (cRc) and the Rabbinical Council of New England (KVH). Copies of the newly published guidelines may be obtained through the Kashruth Council of Canada

GUIDELINE FOR INTEGRATIN G KOSHER CERTIFICAT ION REQUIREME N TS GUIDELINE FOR INTO BRC INTEGRATIN FO G OD SAFETY KOSHER ISSUE 7 CERTIFICAT ION REQUIREME NTS INTO SQF CODE 7 .2 DEVE LOPE D BY THE KASH RUTH COUN CIL OF CANA AND THE CANA DA DIAN FOOD & WINE INSTI INNO VATIO N TUTE CENT RE AT NIAG ARA COLL EGE CANA DA

DEVE LOPE D BY THE KASH RUTH COUN CIL OF CANA AND THE CANA DA DIAN FOOD & WINE INSTI INNO VATIO N TUTE CENT RE AT NIAG ARA COLL EGE CANA DA

COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 87


NUTRITION CORNER

NUTRITION CORNER

T

he theme of this COR Passover Magazine is, “All who are hungry let them come and eat,” and as we know, on Passover we Jews are all hungry and we like to eat. Of course the true meaning behind this principal is that we should open our homes to the less fortunate, but even if we are just cooking for friends and

family, we all know that we will be cooking for a lot more people than we are used to. That’s why this year we’ve focused on recipes that you can cook for a crowd. Whether it’s a Coke Brisket, a Tart and Tangy Apple Kugel, or Crispy Cookies, we’ve got recipes that will ensure those who come and eat with you will no longer be hungry. Thanks to our friends at the Kosher Scoop (www.KosherScoop.com) for coming up with these fabulous recipes.

COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 89


NUTRITION CORNER

Three Colour Gefilte Fish YIELD 5 • BY NORENE GILLETZ

FISH MIXTURE: 2 loaves frozen gefilte fish loaf, thawed (22 oz each) 2 large eggs, lightly beaten ½ tsp salt ½ tsp freshly ground black pepper ½ tsp garlic powder FIRST LAYER: ⅓ of fish mixture ½ cup seeded and diced red pepper 1 package (10 oz) frozen spinach, thawed and squeezed dry 2 frozen cubes of basil or parsley SECOND LAYER: ⅓ of fish mixture ½ cup seeded and diced red pepper 2 green onions, diced 3 frozen dill cubes THIRD LAYER ⅓ of fish mixture ½ cup seeded and diced red pepper 1 cup cooked, mashed sweet potatoes, squash, or carrots 2 frozen dill or parsley cubes GARNISH AND ACCOMPANIMENT:

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Spray two 9x5-inch loaf pans with nonstick cooking spray. 2. In a large bowl, combine the gefilte fish mixture, eggs, salt, pepper, and garlic powder. Mix well. Divide the mixture in thirds and place in three separate bowls. 3. For the first layer, combine the fish mixture with red pepper, green onions, and dill; mix well. Divide in half and spread evenly in each prepared pan. 4. For the second layer, combine the fish mixture with spinach and basil; mix well. Divide in half and spread evenly on top of the first layer in each pan. 5. For the third layer, combine the fish mixture with sweet potato and dill; mix well. Divide in half and spread evenly on top of the second layer in each pan. 6. Bake uncovered for 1 hour. When done, the top layer should be firm to the touch and the edges should pull away from the sides of the pan. 7. Remove from oven and cool for 20–30 minutes. 8. Loosen fish from sides of pan with a long, narrow spatula. Cover pan with a serving plate, invert and shake gently to unmold. Repeat with second fish loaf. Chill thoroughly. 9. Shortly before serving, slice and garnish with lettuce, cherry tomatoes, and cucumber. Serve with horseradish. Note: Fish loaves will keep in the refrigerator for 3–4 days

Salad greens, cherry

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NUTRITION CORNER

Tzimmes Y I E L D 1 0 -1 2 • B Y E S T E E K A F R A

Passover Broccoli Noodle Kugel

Tzimmes, is one of the many foods served connoting a positive outcome of the day. 2-lb. bag frozen carrots (crinkle cut or regular)

N O N G E B R O K T S • Y I E L D 8 • B Y S H A R O N M AT T E N

3 small (16 oz.) cans yams or 3 lbs. fresh yams (sweet potatoes), unpeeled and diced

9 ounces Gluten Free Matzo Passover wide noodles

1 (14 oz.) can crushed pineapple with juice

1 tsp kosher salt

1 lb. pitted prunes

1 Tbsp olive oil

1¼ cups brown sugar

1 lb. frozen chopped broccoli*, defrosted

1 stick margarine (½ cup)

3 large eggs

6 Tbsp. orange juice concentrate (optional)

¼ cup mayonnaise 1 Tbsp onion soup mix

1. Preheat oven to 350° F.

Non-stick vegetable spray

2. Mix all ingredients together and place in a sprayed 9-inch x 13-inch pan.

1. Preheat oven to 350° F. Spray a 8”x8” square or 8” round pan with non-stick vegetable spray. Set aside. 2. In a large bowl, combine the broccoli eggs, mayonnaise and onion soup mix. Set aside. 3. Fill a large pot with 8 cups of water. Add the salt and olive oil and bring to a rapid boil over high heat. Add the noodles all at once and gently stir to make sure that the noodles don’t stick together. Reduce heat to medium, and boil for 6 minutes stirring frequently. The noodles should not be completely soft in the center. Immediately remove from heat, drain into a colander and rinse with cold water, gently separating the noodles as you rinse them. Combine the noodles with the broccoli mixture and gently toss until the noodles are evenly incorporated. Transfer the broccoli-noodle mixture to the prepared pan and bake for 45 minutes until browned on top. *Note: If you like a finer chopped broccoli and the packaged broccoli pieces are too large, you can chop them more finely by hand or with a food processor.

3. Cover and bake for 2 hours. Uncover and bake for an additional hour. NOTE: For a really delicious alternative, add 2 strips of flanken (short ribs) or meat bones to the pan before baking.

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COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 91


NUTRITION CORNER

Coke Brisket Y I E L D 1 2 • B Y C H AV I F E L D M A N

3 onions 4 ½ - 5 lbs beef brisket 4 cloves garlic, crushed Salt and pepper, to taste 1 tsp dried basil 1 Tbsp paprika ¼ c. apricot jam

Tender Lemon-Herbed Chicken

2 Tbsp lemon juice

Y I E L D 4 • B Y C H AV I F E L D M A N

1 c. cola (regular) 1. Spray roasting pan, place onions in pan and brisket on top of them. 2. Combine the garlic, seasonings, jam and lemon juice, and rub onto the brisket. Pour Cola over brisket. Marinate for 1 hour at room temperature, or overnight in fridge. 3. Preheat oven to 325°F and cook covered, allowing 45 minutes per pound of meat, basting occasionally. Uncover for last half hour. Cool completely and refrigerate overnight before serving.

This zesty marinade is made with few ingredients 4 chicken pieces MARINADE: 3 Tbsp finely chopped fresh parsley 2 tsp minced garlic ¼ tsp black pepper 1 Tbsp salt 2 Tbsp lemon juice ⅓ cup oil 1 Tbsp paprika

1.Pat chicken dry and place in a ziplock bag. In a medium bowl, combine all marinade ingredients; mix well. Pour marinade over chicken and seal bag; allow to marinate a minimum of 4 hours, or overnight. 2.Remove chicken from bag to a 9x13-inch (23x33 cm) pan. Pour marinade over chicken and bake covered at 350°F (180°C) for 2 hours and uncovered for additional 30 minutes.

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NUTRITION CORNER

Crispy Baked Root Vegetables Y I E L D 8 -1 0 • B Y D I N I N G I N O N P E S A C H

Crisp and colorful goodness in a bowl! You really can try practically any veggies you like with this versatile side dish. 3 potatoes

2 red onions, cut into eighths

1 small turnip

3 Tbsp oil

1 large sweet potato

½ tsp. salt, or to taste

2 small parsnips

1 ½ tsp onion powder

2 large carrots

1 ½ tsp garlic powder

1 small zucchini

½ tsp black pepper

2 medium beets 1. Preheat oven to 375°F. Peel and cube all vegetables. Stir in oil. Season with salt, onion powder, garlic powder, and pepper. Toss until evenly coated. 2. Spoon vegetables into a 9x13-inch baking pan. Bake vegetables, uncovered, for 20 minutes. Mix, return to oven, and continue baking, stirring once, until vegetables are tender, about 40 minutes longer.

Tart and Tangy Apple Kugel Y I E L D 8 -1 0 • B Y C H AV I F E L D M A N

This scrumptious Pesach version of apple kugel is sure to become a family favorite. Packed with sweet and tangy flavor, it 9 Granny Smith apples, peeled 1 12-oz (340g) jar apricot preserves Cinnamon BATTER: ½ cup sugar ½ cup potato starch 3 eggs ¾ cup oil 1 tsp baking powder 2 Tbsp vanilla sugar 1. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C).

Questions?

Call the Kosher Hotline at 416.635.9550 x100 or email us at questions@cor.ca

2. Slice apples very thinly and place in a 9x13-inch pan. Spread apricot preserves over apples. (You may need to first heat preserves to soften.) Sprinkle generously with cinnamon. 3. Mix batter ingredients well by hand to form batter. Spread over preserves. Bake, uncovered, 1 ¼ hours, or until golden brown.

We have answers.

COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 93


NUTRITION CORNER

Chocolate Sponge Cake B Y TA M A R A N S H

8 eggs 1 ¼ cups sugar 5 Tbsp cocoa 2 ½ Tbsp potato starch Preheat the oven to 350°F / 180°C. 1. Prepare a large 10” tube pan. Although most sponge cakes say not to grease the pan, I do grease it very lightly. Then dust it lightly with a bit of cocoa, shaking off the excess. Set aside. 2. Separate the eggs, putting the yolks into one bowl and the whites into another bowl. Beat the whites until they are nearly stiff. Then add in half the sugar while continuing to beat the whites. Turn off the beaters and set the whites aside.

5. Bake for 50–75 minutes, checking to make sure it does not burn. When the cake is done, remove it from the oven and place on a wire rack. Leave it for 15 minutes. I like to let it rest on its side, not upside down, while cooling. Then prepare a large piece of foil, lined with one or two paper towels on it. 6. After the cake has cooled, slide a long, sharp knife around its edges, as well as around the innermost edges. Carefully flip the cake pan over onto the prepared foil. Remove the pan. Leave the cake to sit until it has cooled more, then wrap it up gently and freeze until the day of use.

3. Beat the yolks until they are thick. Add the remaining sugar, and beat them until they are creamy. Add in the cocoa and potato starch and beat just another minute or two until they are incorporated. Turn off the beaters. 4. Fold both mixtures together using a rubber spatula. While folding, if the batter seems too liquidy, you may add in a bit more potato starch. Pour this into the prepared tube pan.

Text-A-Question

We are proud to be measured by the highest standard of Kashruth Chag Kasher v’Sameach

For one word answers

(i.e. “Does this require kosher for Passover certification”)

text 647.402.1910

94 KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA | 416-635-9550 | WWW.COR.CA

Beth Torah Congregation 47 Glenbrook Ave bethtorah.ca (416) 782 4495


NUTRITION CORNER

Crispy Cookies YIELD 20-30 COOKIES (DEPENDING ON SIZE) BY BRYNIE GREISMAN

2 eggs ½ tsp salt 1 tsp vanilla sugar 1 cup sugar 3 cups ground nuts (walnuts, almonds, etc.) Coconut (optional) 1. Beat together the eggs, salt, and vanilla. Add the sugar and then nuts (and coconut). The mixture will be very thick. Drop onto a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper. 2. Bake at 350°F/180°C for 15 minutes or until golden. I know you will want to eat them now, but let them harden a bit before you remove them from the pan, or they’ll fall apart. Store them in the freezer, if they make it there! Note: Make the cookies small, as they tend to spread a bit. You want them smaller and rounder, as opposed to flatter and bigger. If you really want to dress them up, you can drizzle your favorite chocolate glaze on them, but they are scrumptious as is.

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www.chocolatecharm.ca COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 95


NUTRITION CORNER

How to Save Money and Stay Healthy on Passover

PLAN YOUR MENU IN ADVANCE, MAKE A SHOPPING LIST AND STICK TO IT. AVOID IMPULSE BUYS -- DO YOU REALLY NEED THAT $30 JAR OF CASHEW BUTTER? By Miriam Leibowitz, MHSc, RD

Passover can be an expensive and stressful time. From wine and matzah to plastic goods and snacks for the kids, the cost of making Passover can get quite high. Here are some tips that may help save you some money and keep you healthy at the same time.

MAKE A BUDGET: Sit down and make a budget prior to Passover, keeping in mind seder meals and guests you will be hosting. Budgets are a good way to separate needs and wants. For example, do you need that $30 jar of cashew butter? PLAN IN ADVANCE: Write out your Passover meals and menu and stick to your grocery list when you shop. Avoid impulse buying as those items are most likely to be expensive. Many stores offer discount prices if you buy in larger quantities or ahead of time so look out for deals in local magazines and flyers. DON’T SUCCUMB TO PEER PRESSURE: It’s easy to get caught up with all the fancy dishes your friends and neighbors may be making. You know your family and needs so stick with what you know works to minimize additional costs and stress.

96 KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA | 416-635-9550 | WWW.COR.CA

KEEP IT SIMPLE: Try to use basic ingredients like oil, salt, pepper and other spices. As well, many Kosher for Passover spices can be kept from the year before so no need to throw them out. Take stock of your pantry from the year before and see what can be used before you go out and buy new. STAY AWAY FROM MANY PROCESSED FOODS that are Kosher for Passover (KFP) such as cookies, mixes and cakes: These foods tend to be quite expensive and high in fat, sugar and calories. When you can bake from scratch, it won’t break the budget and will be a lot healthier. Many KFP mixes are quite costly so stick to desserts that use ingredients that are not particularly for Passover, such as sorbets and meringues as these tend to be cheaper. Freezing in advance will also give you more time to cook your fresh foods the week before.


NUTRITION CORNER

MAKE YOUR OWN HOME MADE CEREAL by crushing up matzah in milk instead of consuming processed cereals, it will be healthier and cheaper too. You can even add a little sugar to sweeten it if needed. (Gebrokst) INCORPORATE LOTS OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES IN YOUR MEALS: Luckily, the cost of these do not increase at Passover

time and don’t require a Passover certification. Soups are filling, delicious, healthy and can also be made early and frozen. Choose vegetables like cauliflower as alternatives to potato kugels. Invest in a non-stick fry pan and sauté fresh vegetables, purchase a salad spinner or grill vegetables in your oven with a little, salt, pepper and oil to eat light and healthy. BECOME FAMILIAR WITH AND REFER TO THE COR PASSOVER GUIDE for items that do not require any special

kosher certification such as some oils, nuts and, sugars. Frozen fish is a good option and when you can buy it at a place like Costco it keeps costs down. Frozen fish does require a certification but as stated in the COR Pesach magazine the following brands are acceptable without a special Passover certification: A) Kirkland Atlantic (Farm Raised) Salmon when bearing the OU symbol; B) Kirkland Wild Frozen Salmon only after rinsing it off (OU); C) Olivia Atlantic Frozen Salmon with the KF certification; SOME STORES WILL PUT OUT some “special” KFP products for a higher price but these products are actually kosher for Passover all year round. A good example of this is Redpath sugar which has a COR-P which means it is kosher for Passover and it shouldn’t be any more expensive. Orange juice is another item that is usually imported from the US and can be expensive. However, frozen concentrate Grade A 100% pure Orange Juice, which contains lots of Vitamin C and has no additives or enrichments can be a more economical option and it can be purchased without a Passover certification. FINALLY, LEARN FROM WHAT WORKED THE YEAR BEFORE: Keep track of what you made, what people

liked and what didn’t go over well. Did you order too much matzah? Not enough wine? Did you run out of eggs or yogurt? Work off a list and save that for the following year. Wishing you and your families a happy and healthier Passover! MIRIAM LEIBOWITZ IS A REGISTERED DIETITIAN IN TORONTO WHO RUNS A PRIVATE NUTRITION COUNSELING PRACTICE. SHE HAS AN OFFICE IN THE BATHURST &

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KIDS CORNER

KIDS CORNER

Sounding the Alarm “Hi…

By Richard Rabkin

you know those pre sliced mushrooms that they sell at the grocery store – they don’t have any kosher certification at all – can I use them on Pesach?” “You sure can!” “Thank you so much. Who am I speaking to?” “This is Rabbi Rosen. Rabbi Dovid Rosen.” “Thank you so much Rabbi Rosen for answering all of my questions. And on Erev Pesach no less! You should go home to your family. Pesach is coming.”

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She was right. Rabbi Rosen came into the office early just to pick up a few things and the COR Pesach Hotline wouldn’t stop ringing. “Hello, COR Pesach Hotline,” answered Rabbi Rosen. “Hi, I’m at Costco right now, and they have this frozen salmon. It’s certified by the OU but there’s no P on it…” “If it is the Kirkland Wild Frozen Salmon it is acceptable after rinsing it off.” “Oh yes, that’s the one.” Suddenly a loud alarm rang. “What’s that?” asked the questioner. “They’re installing a new security system in our building today,” replied Rabbi Rosen. “They are just testing the alarms. Nothing to worry about.” “Thank you so much, Rabbi. Happy Passover.” Now it was really time to leave. Rabbi Rosen had to get ready for the seder. His wife was out doing some last minute grocery shopping with the kids and they were expecting him to be home when they arrived. The telephone rang. “OK last one,” Rabbi Rosen said under his breath. “COR Passover hotline.” “Hi Rabbi, I’m so glad I caught you. Um…so tooth paste. I read somewhere that it needs to be kosher for Pesach?” “It has to be chametz free,” replied Rabbi Rosen. “Colgate or Sensodyne toothpastes are all chametz free. If you use any of them, rest assured you will have clean teeth and a clean soul!” “Oh, well my son likes something called ‘Jolly Jim’s Cookie Flavoured Toothpaste for Kids’. Is that OK?” “Um…I don’t have any information on that toothpaste.” The building alarm rang again. “What’s that?” “Oh, they’re installing a new security system in our office building. Anyway, I really have to go.” “But Jolly Jim’s Toothpaste?” “Sorry, I’m not sure. But have a Jolly Passover!” Then, Rabbi Rosen heard a knock at the front office door. He ran over to open it. “Tatty!” It was his wife and kids, bags in toe from their trip to the grocery store. “We came to get you!” “That’s so nice of you. I was just about to get my stuff and go.” Just then, the alarm sounded again. His kids got startled. “Don’t worry. The building is putting in a new alarm system. 100 KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA | 416-635-9550 | WWW.COR.CA

It’s actually a really high tech one that locks all of the doors to the building in case there’s an intruder alert.” “Intruder?” asked his son Elchonon. “A bad guy,” Rabbi Rosen responded. “Like Paroh?” Yaacov asked. “Ya, like Paroh,” Rabbi Rosen replied. This time, the alarm continued to ring, and in a pulsing manner. “OK, let’s go everyone,” Rabbi Rosen said, unconcerned. He locked the door to the COR office and they went to the elevator. But it wasn’t working. He went to the door to the stairs, but it wouldn’t open. It was locked electronically. Then, came an announcement on the building intercom: “Good afternoon. We are having some difficulties installing our new security system. The intruder safety feature appears to be malfunctioning. This means that all doors into and out of the building have been locked. We are working to remedy the situation. Please return to your offices and we will provide you with more information when we are able to do so. We apologize for any inconvenience.” The Rosens looked at each other in disbelief. “Inconvenience?!” Mrs. Rosen said. “Don’t they realize that Pesach is coming?!” “OK everyone, let’s go back into the office,” Rabbi Rosen reassured. “I’m sure that they’ll


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have this fixed in no time. Just think, when they open the doors we might be able to envision how the Jews felt when they were released from slavery in Egypt! In every generation a person has to feel like he is leaving Egypt. Lucky for us, this building will be like our own little Mitzraim!” Rabbi Rosen smiled broadly at his family. But they weren’t feeling it. They just waited nervously. The phone rang. “I might as well answer it,” said Rabbi Rosen. “COR Pesach Hotline.” “Hi, can I go to Tim Horton’s or Starbucks and get a cup of coffee on Pesach?” “No we don’t recommend that. Not at all,” answered Rabbi Rosen. “But I thought black coffee was OK?” “Not on Pesach in a store where they make things like muffins and donuts.” Finally, an announcement on the building intercom: “Good afternoon ladies and gentlemen…” “Sorry gotta go, coffee guy. Chag Kasher V’Sameach,” said Rabbi Rosen quickly as he hung up the phone. “…We have been advised by the security company that they need to have specialized technicians

from their head office resolve this issue. They are estimating that it will take them a few hours to fix the problem…” “A few hours!” exclaimed Mrs. Rosen. “That means we will get home just before Pesach starts!” … “Unfortunately, the closest technician isn’t in the city at the moment but apparently they are sending him to the airport to board a plane sometime soon. We are hoping to have everyone out of the building by late this evening. We sincerely apologize for the inconvenience.” “Dovid, tell him to stop saying ‘inconvenience’!” hollered Mrs. Rosen. “An inconvenience is getting a coconut macaroon when you wanted chocolate chip. This is a plague!” Rabbi Rosen took a deep breath. “OK everyone. You know how you’ve always wanted to go away somewhere interesting for Pesach. Well, we’re going somewhere interesting for Pesach! To the COR office!” “What are we going to eat?” asked his daughter Esti. “You guys went grocery shopping “Don’t worry. didn’t you?” Rabbi ing Rosen said as he The building is putt

em. in a new alarm syst high It’s actually a really s tech one that lock the all of the doors to building in case there’s an intruder alert.”

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pointed to all of the bags of groceries. “Where are we going to cook?” asked his daughter Rivki. “In the office kitchen,” replied Rabbi Rosen. “Where are we going to sleep”? asked his daughter Tzippora. “In my office. Rosen family sleepover!” They all looked at each other, not sure what to make of the situation. “Listen,” said Rabbi Rosen softly. “I know that this is not how you envisioned spending your Pesach seder, but some of the most meaningful experiences can happen in the most challenging of circumstances. Just think of the Jews who left Mitzrayim.” With that, everyone got to work. The boys started preparing the boardroom table to look more like a seder table. They set the table, made some artwork and did whatever else they needed to do to transform the boardroom into to a dining room. The girls got busy in the kitchen, which fortunately had already been kashered for Pesach. 102 KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA | 416-635-9550 | WWW.COR.CA

They made do with whatever they could find amongst their groceries. Fortunately, they had enough matzah and grape juice to go around. But they didn’t have other staples like eggs or potatoes. “We can’t have egg and salt water Tatty, what should we do?” asked Nechama. “Well we have apples,” Rabbi Rosen replied. “Who doesn’t love apples and salt water?!” Whatever obstacle they came across, the Rosens found a way to overcome it. As candle lighting approached, the phone rang. “Maybe it’s important news,” Rabbi Rosen offered. “Hello?” “Ya, Hi. I was wondering if the following lip sticks are OK to use on Pesach: Clinique Long Last Glosswear, CoverGirl Black Flipstick, MAC Retro Huggable Lipcolour, Maybeline Color Sensational Creamy Matte Lip Color…” “Sorry to interrupt you but do you know that candle lighting is in ten minutes?” asked Rabbi Rosen. “Oh,” replied the questioner. “Do you want me to


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call back later?” “I’m sorry, I have to go, but there are some lipstick options in the COR Pesach magazine. Otherwise, take a picture of the ingredients in your lipsticks and email it to questions@cor.ca and we’ll get back to you during Chol Hamoed.” Mrs. Rosen lit her makeshift candles and everyone gathered around the table. If it wasn’t an office building, this boardroom would look like any of the other millions of Jewish homes celebrating Passover around the world. The Rosens began to sing: “Kadesh, urchatz, karpas yachatz…” Soon, there was a knock at the door. Rabbi Rosen answered it. There were two men standing there. “Sorry to disturb you,” said one of the men, “but we couldn’t help hearing that you are having a Pesach seder. We’re in the office down the hall. We were wondering if we could join you?” “Of course!” said Rabbi Rosen warmly. “Please come in! You know what the Hagaddah says: all who are hungry let them come and eat!” Their two new guests took a seat at the table. Then a strange thing happened. As the seder continued, more people from the “Sorry to building came in, and more, to the point where by the time they got ,” u to the meal, the boardroom was entirely full. disturb yo “Tatty you were right,” Adina said to her father. , said one of the men “Right about what?” he asked elp “The most meaningful experiences happen in the most “but we couldn’t h e ar u yo challenging of circumstances.” at hearing th

der. having a Pesach se We’re in the office down the hall. g We were wonderin if we could join you?”

COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 103


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r e n R O Comic C THE BUNNY RABBI Rabbi, when was I supposed to stop eating chometz today?

By: Mordechai Schmutter

Illustrated by: Yishaya Suval Why not?

Well, the zman was…

I feel like whatever I eat, it just sticks with me.

I know when the zman was. But I can’t help thinking that I probably shouldn’t have wolfed down all that chometz right before the zman.

You don’t chew your food? Not when I’m in a rush to get rid of it. I kind of just unhinge my jaw.

“I had the same problem when I was dieting.” You ate the chocolate cake, didn’t you?

I don’t know why I do it. It all tastes like dirt to me anyway. Hey!

Um…

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106 KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA | 416-635-9550 | WWW.COR.CA


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THE BUNNY RABBI

By: Mordechai Schmutter

One shoe. Who went home with one shoe?

Never mind that. Who went home without pants?

Illustrated by: Yishaya Suval

Umbrella?

Or who staggered to shul with one shoe, and then said, “Whoops!” and left it here?

Just add it to the pile.

I think someone left part of their bedikas chometz kit. Why?

I think the feather’s mine.

And a spoon!

Who brings a spoon to shul?

I found a feather.

It’s yours, isn’t it?

No. Mine’s in my tallis bag.

Maybe someone has it in case a kiddush breaks out.

Do the things we find really become property of the shul?

No, it’s a motivator. What would the shul do with one pair of pants?

Keep it around in case a chazzan needs it?

Is that a shofar, or is it just someone’s horn?

107


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Tips for a Fun, er d e S y l d n e i r F y l i m Fa

hics”.

der table is our “hieroglyp

g aspects of our se One of the most interestin

By Miriam Kleiman

W

e are commanded both to teach our children about the Exodus from Egypt and to feel as though we ourselves are being redeemed. When children are small this can be a challenge, but over the years I’ve added many elements to create a fun, family-friendly seder. So, I would like to share some of my personal experiences with you and hopefully enrich your seders. Before the seder we transform our dining/living room to make it feel like Egypt. How? We use corrugated white plastic board – the ones used to cover counters – and make pictures. My daughter, who is a very talented artist, made many of the pictures. We have one of pharaoh and another of pharaoh with boils (kind of like a before and after), a camel, a pyramid, a huge frog, a woman in mud and Moses parting the sea (among others). Some of these are used to cover up the book cases that we have not cleaned for Pesach so they can be multipurpose. One of the most interesting aspects is our “hieroglyphics”. My son transformed the story of the Exodus from Egypt into hieroglyphics on two “pillars” on either side of the entrance to the dining room. Before the seder he translates the hieroglyphics for all of the guests. We also have plastic animals, bugs, frogs, cattle – you name it everywhere as well as some funky sunglasses for the plague of darkness. For the last few years my husband has transformed the dining room into a tent by stapling materiel loosely draped to the ceiling. We also make flames with red and orange tissue paper. On the front door and above the entrance to the dining room we have signs that read “Welcome to Egypt”. A few weeks before the Seder, each guest is

108 KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA | 416-635-9550 | WWW.COR.CA

assigned a plague which they are to present the night of the seder (if we have more than 10 guests then we get people to team up). There is a prize for the best plague and the guests vote for the winner. Some of the presentations are fun and some are serious but all are creative and interesting. For seder night, each guest receives a personalized book mark for their Haggadah. This helps keep your place but also serves as a message that we want everyone to take turns reading. When the children were small we used to start the seder with a short 5 minute skit which the children created. Everyone at the table would have to close their eyes while my husband would set the scene. This gave the children enough time to sneak away from the table and get prepared for their skit. Once they were ready my husband would tell everyone to open their eyes and the skit would begin. We prepare questions in advance which my husband asks (easy ones for the little children and more difficult ones for the adults). Answer a question correctly and win a chocolate frog! Before long the children start coming up with their own questions and with all of the sugar there’s no chance that a child will fall asleep at the seder. These chocolate incentives also drastically improve the quality of the questions! These are some of the things we do at our seder to help keep everyone engaged. We started small but over time, we’ve created something beautiful. So much so that my children, who are now 16 and 20, refuse to leave home for the seders! I hope some of these tips can help you have fun and learn with your children. From our family to yours have an insightful, exciting, and fun family seder. MIRIAM KLEIMAN IS AN ACCOUNT MANAGER AT COR- KASHRUTH COUNCIL OF CANADA


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DON’T ASK By Mordechai Schmutter

Renowned humour columnist Mordechai Schmutter is jealous of the COR rabbis who answer your questions. If he could answer some of your non-food related questions, this is what he’d say…

At the COR we get literally thousands of questions come Pesach time. Most of them are food related, but it may surprise you to learn that some of them are not. The COR has actually forwarded these non-food related questions to me this year, and here’s a selection of those questions and my answers:

. Do

g Dear Rabbi, Pesach cleanin y b d e lm e h rw ry ove I find that I’m ve ggestions? you have any su cuum Cleaner

Looking for the Va

could afford? My Dear Looking, ggest house you bi e th g yin bu , I say that you re you thinking use on a deadline. ho e tir e, What on Earth we en e th ing all and manageabl ink of it as clean with something sm , ch sa advice is to not th en Pe th re d fo an , be er uple of months rub down the draw should start, a co out, make piles, sc ing you keep yth If er . er ev aw ke dr Ta . xt er on to the ne e ov m like a single draw s en Th l. lle aning for six week ck in so it’s para at you’ve been cle th ze g put everything ba ali hin re l et u’l m yo so y me across little, eventuall you have yet to co d an doing that, little by s, u er yo aw at dr wh of idea the same set and you have no and you’re still on od for that matter, fo en you change ev do or n z, te et of w om s, because ho er that is actually ch aw dr a jam pa ting with your were thinking star ing visible food, shov your pajamas? ers, throwing out aw dr e u tir yo en h t hic ou r Pesach. W e pace, dumping back to them afte t ge l So you pick up th ’t u’l dn yo di at u th yo en and promising t entire drawers wh everything back in, chance to clean ou a d th, rather than wi ha er ing ev be u to yo if ay properly aw s ing will not, because th t pu to right part of the o have a chance d their way to the fin ’ll ey have to, you’d als th ng pi ho the drawer and Pesach again. shoving them into u know it, it will be yo re fo be d An s. lve eating and drawer by themse ch panting and sw sa Pe o int e m co l ve time to be at in the end, you’l ing, you didn’t ha ov sh d But my point is th an ng pi m all that fury of du realizing that amid overwhelmed.

COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 109


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eady Dear Rabbi, me that they alr g in ll te n e e b ave My neighbors h ld I be worried? u o h S . h c sa e P for started cooking r Still Looking for

ne

the Vacuum Clea

w much can you ok on most of it. Ho co to ed ow all e around and eat ay, and you’r on Pesach but sit ing It’s an 8-day holid th no do le op no one is going ntly, some pe for 2 months, and ing ok eat, really? Appare co s wa I g. . (“Keep eatin for 8 days straight er!”) once Pesach is ov is to want to eat th

Dear Still,

g bi, somethin g in v a h Dear Rab is tz rgartener a “chome d My kinde e ll a c ed l in schoo e suppos ’r e w h ic r wh we party,” fo ods that o f y n a to send in id of. There’s et r id of that r need to g t e g o t need s. nothing I for 25 kid f o h g u o y someu I have en b d n a t go ou Should I To Ask thing? now How ’t K

ho Doesn

The One W

that is One, Dear The e chometz th ll a e s u and on, beca , pretzels, reat questi – cookies y rt our a y p That’s a g n a o at up to send to t hard to e o n thing re e appropriate a m – o find s xample to e d r n fo u , ro rs a e crack rooting send in? lessly, while So what should you I’d own, mind f. o d d crumbs? ik to get ri uns? Brea b ets and g tl o u chometzd d c t n o chicke kets? H to c in a p s l b a m e bringing d cru Oatm g the brea e kid who’s in th k h a it m w t s ll e e sugg t’ll go w ose in. Tha sending th ni salad. in macaro

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Dear Rabbi, I would like to mak e the Seder more interesting for my What do you think kids. of getting props fo r the ten plagues? Monotone Voice Dear Monotone, A lot of articles I’ve read recommend bu ying plague props as For example, you ca a way of making the n buy something ca Seder “more fun”. lled a “Bag of Plagu you would ever want es ”, which does not so to buy unless you kn un d like something ow the context. You Puppets” or even “Te can also buy “Ten Pla n Plagues Masks,” so gues Finger you can pretend to cow. be the various plagu es, such as a dead But these people for get that the plagues are like two lines in picture hagaddah, ten the middle of maggid. pages that you have Or, if you have a to turn really quickly you’re trying not to ge with wine on your pin t wine on your ten fin ky. Meanwhile, ger puppets, you’re teenager is yelling, “W constantly switching ait! I have a dvar tor masks, and your ah on dever!” Using maggid take longer, toys for the plagues and your kids want will actually make to get to shulchan ore living room. ch already so they ca n go play in the And of all the parts to make fun, you’re picking the plagues all pouring out wine ? The plagues are alr because we don’t wa eady fun! Also, we’re nt to have so much look! A cute little de fun at this point – pe ad first born puppet! ople got hurt – but And if you want to se ll puppets, why not make puppets of thi the seder? Where are ngs that can keep co my Four Sons pupp ming up throughout ets? Or my Pharaoh puppet, actual size (with whip)?

Dear Rabbi, e middle matzah for th k ea br to ay w st lf? What’s the be half and a smaller ha er gg bi a t ge u yo at yachatz so th Fifteen Shards

Dear Fifteen, it is in six easy steps: The best way to break ddah. This is why they y do in the picture haga the like e, fac r you of nt fro 1. Grasp the matzah in kids awake. s. That, and keeping the ah dd ga ha e tur pic make ly where you want it to the matzah, approximate d hin be it t pu d an mb e thu 2. Very carefully take on break. ed hole in middle kes a small, thumb-shap ma it t tha so rd wa for r thumb re interesting for the 3. Very slowly, push you tely made the seder mo fini de It es. tim 8 st lea this at of the matzah. I’ve done kids. between the other smaller, and goes back y arl cle is dle mid the out of nerally made with no 4. The little piece that fell oman bag, which is ge afik r you o int fit to s ha matzah to use the bigger matzas. The rest of the know you’re supposed le op pe ese Th h. tza actual ma regard to the size of an half, right? so it fits in the bag. into a million tiny shards your kids steal 5. Break the bigger half re’s no way you can let the x, bo a cks bu y fift r your kittel. Fo 6. Stick the afikoman in put it? where they’re going to ws kno this matzah. Who Got a question for the

seder. Rabbi? Save it for the COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 111


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Complete the crossword below 1 2 3

4 5

6

7

8

9

10

11 12

13

14

Created with TheTeachersCo rner.net Cro sswo rd

Across 3. number of days of chol hamoed 5. triangular structure 7. days of the omer 9. Shabbat __________: the shabbat before Pesach 12. the book of the Torah where the story of Pesach can be found 13. hebrew month when Pesach occurs 14 . Moshe's spokesperson

Down

1. Third chapter of the seder 2. the seventh plague 4 . where Moshe fled after killing th 6. matzah that's tricky to find 8. number of minutes it takes for fl begin the leavening process 10. main ingredient in charoset 11. the area of Egypt where the Je lived

COR 2017-5777 PASSOVER GUIDE 113


Answers: CROSSWORD: ACROSS: 3. four 5. pyramid 7. fortynine 9. hagadol 12. shemot 13. nissan 14. aaron DOWN: 1. karpas 2. hail 4. midyan 6. afikoman 8. eighteen 10. apples 11. goshen FLOUR MEASURE: There is more than one way to do this. But one solution is: Fill the 5 cup bucket. Pour it into the 3 cup bucket. This leaves 2 cups in the 5 cup bucket. Dump out the 3 cup bucket. Now pour the 2 cups from the 5 cup into the 3 cup. Refill the 5 cup. Now pour the 5 cup into the 3 cup until the 3 cup is full. That will leave exactly 4 cups in the 5 cup bucket! EGYPTZEN: Secret hidden word: jxp/

MATZAH BOXES:

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Questions@cor.ca Questions Hotline: 416.635.9550 x 100

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COR Passover Magazine (2017)  

Passover Guide from COR - Kashruth Council of Canada

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