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A Special Supplement to Honor Our Local Veterans

HONORING ALL WHO SERVED NOVEMBER 2019

The Daily Reflector and The Rocky Mount Telegram have joined together this year to celebrate local veterans from Pitt, Nash and Edgecombe counties in this combined section. We hope you will enjoy the stories and photos that have been collected, honoring heroes from all across eastern North Carolina.


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THE DAILY REFLECTOR/ROCKY MOUNT TELEGRAM, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2019

VETERANS DAY SALUTE

Retried general reflects on Veterans Day BY WILLIAM F. WEST Staff Writer

A retired U.S. Army brigadier general said Veterans Day does not begin with him and what he has done. Arnold Gordon-Bray said he believes the yearly time to honor military veterans really is a reflection of his family because, from his grandparents all the way to him, a family member has served in uniform since the turn of the last century. “And we’ve had somebody in uniform in every war — and it talks about commitment and ownership,� Gordon-Bray said. “It talks about commitment to the nation and the ideals that are contained in our constitution. And it’s about ownership of saying that this is our land.� Gordon-Bray, 64, of Rocky Mount, presently works as a consultant in strategy, leadership and diversity. He served in the Army from 1978-2013 and his career included serving in the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) and in the 82nd Airborne Division. He is a veteran of the Iraq War and was in combat there. His service included helping raise the Iraqi Army from approximately 35,000 soldiers to approximately 300,000 soldiers, but he said he believes that, most importantly, he helped build a nation. As for Veterans Day, he said he always thinks about people like President George Washington and others, who weren’t even born in the U.S., but who committed to an ideal that would challenge Great Britain, which at that time was the greatest power on Earth. “And that’s pretty powerful,� he said. Additionally, he said he likes how the origin of Veterans Day has shifted from being just a period to celebrate the end of World War I to include all military veterans. He said while he and family members have been in combat, “There have been periods in our history where Americans — some Americans — raised their right hand and never saw a shot fired in anger. But their service is no less powerful, because when a person raises their hand and they don’t run when their time is called, it’s the same commitment.� Gordon-Bray spoke of one his leaders expressing disappointment in never having had a chance to serve in the Vietnam War and spoke of telling the leader he did not run at a time when it was acceptable in some places not to serve in southeast Asia. “I said, ‘Even you though you didn’t get to go to Vietnam, you came in during the time period.’ And I said, ‘And some of us are going to serve in a conflict. And you will have trained us. And I said, ‘Your commitment still inspires me’,� Gordon-Bray said. “But I’ve long held that it doesn’t matter what you saw in your tenure of service,� Gordon-Bray said. “As long as you didn’t run, you made the same commitment that we made. Also, in combat, everybody that has a combat patch didn’t nec-

PHOTOS BY ALAN CAMPBELL/ROCKY MOUNT TELEGRAM

Retired Army Brig. Gen. Arnold N. Gordon-Bray poses for a portrait on Oct. 30 at the Rocky Mount Veterans Memorial at Jack Laughery Park. Below, Gordon-Bray holds his granddaughter Aria Gordon-Bray, 1, as they sit for a portrait on Oct. 30 at home in Rocky Mount.

essarily see a round fired in anger. And it doesn’t matter which war you’re in.� He said a World War II Army veteran told of his company having experienced some bloody fighting but of his platoon not directly seeing any of this until the Battle of the Bulge in Europe. “So, just imagine, had he been separated right before the Battle of the Bulge, his unit would have been talking about wars and fights and things that he never experienced,� he said. “It’s the same truth that holds in every war. Everybody that shows up, everybody that is part of a unit doesn’t have the same fights. “And more often than not, television makes every war look like every man was just barely avoiding death,� he said. “The reality is, every man that raised his hand avoids death by his placement where God puts him in the moment of conflict. Some they put very close, some they put in the middle,

others they put in proximity of the problem, but nothing happens. “And, so, to me that’s why Veterans Day is so appropriate,� he said. “Veterans Day is about those who raised their hand, put the uniform on, because what they raised their hand for was to support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic and to bear true faith and allegiance to the same.� Gordon-Bray grew up in Columbia, S.C., and he said that, fortunately, a cousin of his who also retired from the military got him to join the Boy Scouts. Gordon-Bray said this gave him the chance to look at some of the organization’s pseudo-military structure. “I liked it,� Gordon-Bray said. “And I was able to flourish in it.� By the early 1970s, he and his family ended up in Waynesville, Mo., which is along the Interstate 44 corri-

dor and in the Ozark Mountains. He enrolled at the University of Central Missouri, where he played basketball for four years for the university’s team, the Mules. The team’s schedule included having to play against powers such as the University of Kansas Jayhawks. After serving in the Reserve Officers Training

Corps program at Central Missouri, he entered the regular Army as a second lieutenant, worked his way up the ranks and achieved the rank of colonel by 2000. He achieved the rank of brigadier general by 2007. Of Gordon-Bray’s family members who served in the military, Gordon-Bray’s great-grandfather on mother’s side, Winfred McNeil

Sr., was in the Army during World War I. Gordon-Bray’s biological father, Felix Gordon Sr., served in the Navy and was aboard the USS Ticonderoga during World War II and when the ship was struck while in the Pacific Ocean. Gordon-Bray’s stepfather, Isiah Bray, was in the Army and served in the Korean and Vietnam wars. Although Gordon-Bray’s biological father and mother divorced, Gordon-Bray blended his present last name together in recognition of both his biological father and his stepfather. As for how he ended up living in the Twin Counties area, Gordon-Bray said the decline of housing prices in Rocky Mount made the city the perfect place to be within an hour of Raleigh-Durham International Airport so he can travel throughout the nation doing his consulting work. Additionally, an uncle of his and a fellow Army veteran, Johnnie Sloan Gordon, lives in the Nash County countryside and actually was the first one to tell him he should live in Rocky Mount. Gordon served both in the 1965 U.S. intervention in the Dominican Republic and in Vietnam. And Gordon-Bray said, “We go to the movies every Tuesday here in Rocky Mount.�

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THE DAILY REFLECTOR/ROCKY MOUNT TELEGRAM, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2019

VETERANS DAY SALUTE

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World War II veterans shrug off ‘hero’ moniker BY JOHN H. WALKER Staff Writer

Veterans Day honors all of those who have served the country in war or peace, dead or alive — although it’s largely intended to thank living veterans for their sacrifices. It had its beginning as Armistice Day after World War I — called at that time “the war to end all wars.� In Edgecombe County, two World War II veterans still reside and are known and respected by many — Buck Price and Norfleet Sugg. Both men would blush at being called American heroes, but the fact remains that each took part in events that are seminal in the history of the world as we know it. Price, 93, participated in the battle memorialized in the book and movie, “The Longest Day,� while he downplays his role as doing nothing more than he was trained and sent to do. On July 1, 1943, the Tarboro native enlisted in the U.S. Navy and at the age of 17, served as a helmsman

FILE PHOTOS/ROCKY MOUNT TELEGRAM

World War II veteran Buck Price poses for a portrait at his home in Tarboro.

Buck Price, left, and Norfleet Sugg served their country during World War II.

of LST (Landing Ship Tank) 285. On D-Day, he helped ferry troops and military equipment to Omaha Beach and made three rounds trips on D-Day. “We were busy loading and unloading and cleaning up,� he said. He remembered the 300-foot-long LST as be-

ing open and the men as easy targets. After moving in to the beach, dropping its door and unloading its troops, the LST had to wait for a rise on the tide to head back out and pick up another load. In August 1945, after the Normandy invasion, he went on to take part in the

invasion of the southern coast of France, which resulting in the Allies breaking the so-called “Atlantic Wall,� an extensive system of coastal defense and fortifications built by Nazi Germany between 1942 and 1944. Price was discharged on March 20, 1946, as a seaman first class. In commemoration of the 70th Anniversary of D-Day in June 2014, he was one of eight Americans chosen to re-live that battle on the beach-

es in Normandy. He was awarded the French Legion of Honor Medal in 2017 — the highest honor that can be awarded by France. This past August, he and his son were part of a group who were in Normandy for the 75th anniversary of the battle and he said the welcome was worth remembering. “They were so appreciative and gracious,� Price said of the French in an interview earlier this year. Sugg, at 94, is the younger

of the two, as he tells it with a chuckle. Sugg is a Navy veteran who served 22 months in the Pacific Theater during World War II, primarily on the USS Sabine, which was a heavily armed tanker. While his duty station was the engine room, he manned a 20mm anti-aircraft gun when the call to battle stations sounded. Sugg saw battle action in late 1944 with the Third Fleet in the Philippines, later participated in the invasion of Okinawa and anchored in Tokyo Bay on Sept. 18, 1945, following Japan’s surrender and the end of hostilities. Like Price, Sugg eschews any call as a hero. “It was what we were trained to do and told to do. That’s what you did,� he said, matter-of-factly. But he does acknowledge the significance of having two living World War II veterans no more than 15 miles apart. “There aren’t many of us (World War II veterans) left,� Sugg said. “To have two from right here in Edgecombe County is really something.�

What veterans should know about going after caregiver jobs StatePoint Media

Today, there are over 18 million U.S. veterans, many of whom are seeking civilian jobs. Experts say that the caregiving industry — which is expected to grow rapidly in the coming years due to an aging population — is particularly well-suited to the skills and experience of those who’ve served their country. “Veterans bring many valuable attributes to the table that make them amazing candidates for caregiving careers,� says Jennifer Sheets, president and chief executive officer of Caring Brands International and Interim HealthCare Inc. “Given their tried and true ability to lead, think critically and solve problems in a demanding environment, as well as a service-focused mindset, it’s often a

ing some tips and information to help veterans know what to look for before taking a position in the caregiving industry. ■A track record of hiring veterans: Companies with a proven track record of hiring veterans may be more likely to value the skills veterans bring with them, and may be more likely to accept military training in place of civilian training. ■ Diverse opportunities: Veterans should seek employment with companies that offer opportunities for growth, as well as exclusive benefits to veterans. In STATEPOINT MEDIA the case of Interim HealthCare for example, the company offers Veterans make them amazing candidates for caregiving careers, said Jennifer Sheets, president and chief executive officer of Caring comprehensive continuing education and in-service programs, and Brands International and Interim HealthCare Inc. is actively seeking veterans to fill great fit.� ebrated Nov. 11, the experts at office and field staff jobs. In honor of Veterans Day, cel- Interim HealthCare Inc. are offer■ Support: Does the company

offer resource groups for veterans? Look for signs that you will be supported once you are hired. ■Meaningful, interesting work: After having served one’s country, finding work that’s meaningful is of importance to many veterans. Helping patients stay vital and healthy has a positive impact on individuals, families and communities, and for many in the industry, is an immensely rewarding career path. What’s more, caregiver jobs are interesting and dynamic and no two days are the same. For job opportunities, visit interimhealthcare.com/careers. With veteran unemployment on the rise and a growing need for home health aides, veterans should consider how a job in the home-based healthcare industry might be right for them.

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THE DAILY REFLECTOR/ROCKY MOUNT TELEGRAM, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2019

THANK YOU! THE ROCKY MOUNT TELEGRAM WOULD LIKE TO THANK OUR LOCAL VETERANS AND THOSE WHO SUBMITTED PHOTOS.

ALSTON Nathan

ANTHONY SR Malton R.

ASHLEY Margo Whitaker

AVENT, M.D. John T.

AVENT, JR. Willie Leader

AVENT Madylin Hinton

BASS Samuel Manin

BATTLE Camryn A.

BATTLE Crait M.

BATTLE JR. Claude

BATTLE II Frank Gorham

BATTLE, JR. Rayvon

BATTLE SR. Samuel K.

BEDGOOD Eddie Lee

BETHUNE Richard F.

BLACKMON William B.

BRASWELL James H.

BRASWELL Lonnie

BRASWELL Thomas

BRIDGERS JR Luther Ernest

Army Artillery 1st Lieutenant 1961-1963 - Cuban Missile Crisis

Marine Corps Sgt. 1968-1972

BODDIE Sam Leon

BROUGHTON Wm. Earl “Bill”

BROWN JR. Earnest L.

BROWN JR. Thurman Lee

BRYANT William A.

BULLUCK Howard

BULLUCK Johnnie Lee

BULLUCK Willie J.

BUNN JR. Benjamin

BURTON Doris

CALHOUN Raymond Cecil

CAMERON Talmond

CARPENTER Bobby

CHERRY David

COKER, JR. Theodore

COOPER Reginald Carlton

COOPER Roy Rogers

DAVIS Bobby Ray

DAVIS Donald Ray

DEATON John

DEMPSEY William H.

DICKENS, JR. Felton

DICKENS Odell

ESTELLE Chalonda J. “CJ”

ESTELLE Davon E.

EVERETT Donald T.

EZZELL Charles

FARLOW Jesse Quinton “Buck”

FREER JR Arthur

Army E4 1954-1961

Navy E-3 2 Years of Service

Army PFC 3 ½ Years of Service

Army Sgt 2 Years of Service (KIA)

Marines 2 Years of Service

Marines PFC 1 ½ Years of Service (KIA)

Army 6 Years of Service

Army E-5 5 Years of Service

Air Force E8 26 ½ Years of Service

Army PFC 1949-1952

Army 4 Years of Service

Army Captain 8 Years of Service

Army E5 1977-180

Marines PFC 1959-1963

Air Force E4 Sergeant 4 Years of Service

Army & National Guard Staff Sgt 7 Years of Service

Air Force Sgt 4 Years of Service

Air Force Colonel 30 Years of Service

Army Captain 9 Years of Service

Air Force Major 1968-1975

Army PFC 1945-1947

Army Private E2 1969 (Vietnam Veteran)

Army Master Sgt. 24 Years of Service

Army Administrative NCO 1944-1946

Air Force Airman 1st Class 1965-1969

Army / Army National Guard Lt. Colonal / Commander 1965-1968 (Vietnam Veteran)

Army SFC Quartermaster Corps 20 Years of Service

Army Staff Sgt. 2005-2012

Navy 1940-1944

Army Master Sergeant 26 Years of Service

Marines Cpl Vietnam Veteran

Army E-5 2 Years of Service

Army SFC 1956-1977

Army LTC Nurse Corps 16 Years of Service

Army E-8 24 Years of Service

Army 1940-1944

Air Force Staff Sergeant 24 Years of Service

Army PFC 1961-1964

Army E2 1950-1953

Navy Petty Officer 1941-1982

Army Specialist 4 1967-1969 - Vietnam Veteran

Navy GM3C 8 Years of Service

Army 1st Lieutenant 2 Years of Service

Army Sergeant 10 Years of Service

Army Cpl. 3 Years of Service

Army Cpl 1975-1980

Army Sergeant 2 Years of Service


THE DAILY REFLECTOR/ROCKY MOUNT TELEGRAM, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2019

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THE DAILY REFLECTOR/ROCKY MOUNT TELEGRAM, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2019

ROCKY MOUNT TELEGRAM

FREER James A.

FREER James R.

GAGLIANO Charles

GONZALEZ Silas

GORDON-BRAY Arnold N.

GREGORY, JR. Dolphus L.

HAMMOND James A.

HARGROVE Ronald

HARPER Boice

HARRIS Harvey Lee

HART Benjamin

HART William K.

HAWKINS Linda Powell

HEDGEPETH Keith L.

HENDRIX Kenneth R.

HINTON, JR Jesse J.

HOBBS William L.

HOWARD, JR. Joe Louis

HUNTER Julius

JEFFERSON, JR. George

JOHNSON Bryson

JOHNSON Leenae

JOHNSON Reginald

JONES Dennis

JONES J.B.

JOYNER Alton F.

JOYNER SR Harold C.

JOYNER JR Harold C.

JOYNER Zy’Keith M.

KENNEDY Andrew Jackson

KENNEDY JR. Andrew (Jack)

KENNEDY James Henry

KENNEDY Robert Dean (Bobby)

KENNEDY Theodore

KING John

KING Kenneth Albert

LAMM James Ray

LAMM John T.

LEE Eugene

LEGGETTE L. Nelson

Air Force/Army Col. 24 Year of Service

LEWIS, JR. Antonio D.

Army (Airborne) Private E2 March 2019 - Active Duty at Fort Bragg

LEWIS Clarence H.

LEWIS Levern N.

LEWIS Micheal E.

LONG SR. William L.

LONG JR. William L.

LUCAS Brandon

Navy Lieutenant 6 Years of Service

LUCAS Brandy

Navy Lieutenant 8 Years of Service

LUCAS Raymond

MANN Calvin Q.

MANN Reginald A.

MANZEL Charles H.

MATTHEWS James W.

MITCHELL, JR. Kester

MITCHELL Roy

MITCHELL Warren

Air Force Sgt. 2 Years of Service

Army SP-4 1986-1992

Army Colonel 1964-1988

Air Force AIC 4 Years of Service

Army 14 G Air Defense 2015-Currently Serving

Army Corporal 1953-1955 - German Occupation Forces

Army Sgt. 2 Years of Service

Navy E6 1979-1983

Air Force Sgt. 4 Years of Service

Navy GM63 4 Years of Service

Infantry/Airborne/Special Forces 23 Years of Service

Army National Guard SGT (Ret) 1976-1996

Army World War I 1918-1919

Air Force Sgt. 8 Years of Service

Army/Air Force Sgt E7 20 Years of Service

Navy E6 1980-1985

Army 22 Years of Service 1959-1980

Air Force 22 Years of Service

Army E4 2 Years of Service

Army Reserve 1980-1985

Army CPL 3 Years of Service

Air Force July 2018-Currently Serving

Army Sgt 3 Years of Service

Marines & National Guard PFC 1988-1993

Army Staff Sergeant 20 Years of Service

Army Corporal 1944-1946

Army Army Private, Company L, 38th In- 1940-1944 fantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division , 1942-1944 (KIA)

Army PFC 1941-1945

Navy HTC 20 Years of Service

Army Sgt E5 1966-1968

Army Sgt 221 Aviation Company 1 ½ Years of Service Vietnam Veteran

Army BG 34 Years of Service

Navy 1940-1970

Air Force 30 Years of Service

Marine Corps 2 Years of Service

Air Force Airman 1st Class 1951-1955

Army E3 1944-1946

Army E-6, SSGT 20 ½ Years of Service

Army Reserve SFC 1980-2000

Army SFC (Ret) 23 Years of Service

Army Spec 4 1966-1968

Air Core PFC 1942-1945

Army 1942-1945

Air Force E6 1959-1979

Air Force Lt. Col. 21 Years of Service

Navy Petty Officer 4 Years of Service

Air Force Senior Airman 1996-2000

Army 1954-1961

Navy 1 Year of Service

Army Sgt 2 Years of Service

Army Tuskegee Airmen WWII Veteran


THE DAILY REFLECTOR/ROCKY MOUNT TELEGRAM, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2019

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ROCKY MOUNT TELEGRAM

MOORE Donald O.

MOORE Ronald L.

NEAL Harold

NICHOLSON George Thomas Army MP 4 Years of Service

NOEL Reginald

Marines E6 1981-1991

NORFLEET Brian

NORFLEET Norris

OWENS Cecil R.

PANARESE Adam F.

PARKER Alton

PARKER Darrell

PARKER JR. Harry

PARKER Jimmy

PEELE Leon

PERSON Arthur Lee

PINCKNEY Carl

PITTMAN Storkey T.

POWELL Clarence G. Army Cpl 1944-1949

POWELL John G.

Navy 1950-1954

POWELL Otis C.

POWELL Walter B.

POWELL Willie

PURVIS Elbert

PURVIS Michael

PURVIS Tina

QUIGLEY Thomas

RHODES Bobby D.

ROBERSON Ronald

ROBINSON William M.

ROSE James C.

SEARS Earl O.

SESSOMS Isaac Solomon Army PVT 2 Years of Service

SESSOMS, JR. Isaac Solomon

PFC 1 Year of Service (WWII Veteran)

SHARPE Jackson T.

SHARPE Milton A.

SHAW Ellis Mack

SHERROD Charlie J.

SHERROD Daniel Willie

SHRAGO Harry I.

SHRAGO William

SILVER Mark

SILVER Melvin

SMITH, JR. Earl

SMITH James L.

SMITH William Thomas

SPIVEY Derrick

TAYLOR Edward L.

THOMPSON Ronald

THORPE Joseph

THORPE Russell

TILLMAN Herbert B.

TILLMAN, JR. Willie C.

UNGER Peter E.

WALLACE Lawrence “Larry”

WARD JR. Willie H.

WATFORD Heyward W.

Army Staff Sgt 2 Years of Service

Army Cpl WWII Veteran

Army SSG (Retired) 1976-1999

Army 1950-1955

Army Sgt 1968-1970

Army Sgt. 2 Years of Service

Marines Private 4 years of Service

Navy 2 Years of Service

Marines 3rd Recon E5 2 Years of Service

Navy CDR 30 Years of Service

Army 1969-1971

Army SP-4 1969-1971

Army PFC 1944-1945 WW II

Army/ Marines Communication 6 Years of Service

Army Specialist First Class 1951-1952

Army Sgt E5 1963-1966

Army E2 1969-1971

Air Force MSGT 1955-1978

Army Sgt. 2 Years of Service

Army PFC 2010-2014

Army Cpl 2 Years of Service - Korean War

Air Force PFC Military Police 6 Years of Service

Coast Guard/Army TTC 23 Years of Service

Army PFC 1963-1966

Army Staff Sgt. 1990-2008

Army SP1 2000-Currently Serving

US Army WW I

Marines Sgt. 1991-1997

Navy 1967-1972

Army Sgt. E5 4 Years of Service

Marines Sgt. 8 Years of Service

Air Force 1st Lieutenant 1950-1953

Army SFC 1952-1953

Air Force Staff Sgt 1956-1960

Marines Lance Corporal 1986-1990

Air Force E3 1970-1974

Army Spec 5 1970-1971

Army Cpl. 1949-1952

Air Force AIC 4 Years of Service

Air Force 21 Years of Service

Army Command Sergeant Major 1969-1999

Army SFC 20+ Years of Service

Army E5 1950-1953

Army Spec 4 E4 3 Years Active/3 Years Reserve

Marines 1969-1972

Army Sergeant 9 Years of Service

Air Force E4 4 Years of Service

Air Force 21 Years of Service

Army 2 Years of Service

Army Specialist E4 1966-1970


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THE DAILY REFLECTOR/ROCKY MOUNT TELEGRAM, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2019

ROCKY MOUNT TELEGRAM

WATSON Audrey L.

WATSON McKinley C.

WATSON Milton

WEAVER Lester Eugene

WEST Alvin T.

WHITAKER James

WHITE Edith

WHITEHEAD Dan A.

WHITEHEAD Elbert S.

WHITEHEAD JR George

WHITEHEAD Selesta

WHITEHEAD, JR. Selesta

WHITEHURST Allen Kyle

WHITEHURST James Allen

WHITEHURST James Cecil

WILLIAMS W.T.

WILLIAMSBEASLEY Robert

Harrison_Ronald A.

Lewis Sr._Robert B. Phillips_Milton Marines Sergeant 8 Years of Service

Air Force Sgt 4 Years of Service

Whitaker_Alvin

Lynch_Glandus

Pullen_Phillip

Whitaker_Anthony

Army Reserve 1993-1999

Air Force Master Sgt 22 Years of Service

Air Force Tec/Sgt 20 Years of Service

Alston_Robert L. Air Force Sgt 27 Years of Service

Anthony_Malton Ray Army Sgt 4 Years of Service

Arrington_Kenneth Army SP4 2 Years of Service

Arrington_Russell Army SP4 3 Years of Service

Avent_Bronis

Army SP4 2 Years of Service

Battle_Anothy Marines Sgt 8 Years of Service

Battle_Garfield Army E5 2 Years of Service

Battle_Willie G. Army 3 Years of Service WW II Veteran

Beaufort_Clarence

Navy Army CS3 Sgt. 1st Class 1967-1999 (Vietnam Veteran) 22 Years of Service

Army Sergeant 1985-1989

Army E3 2 Years of Service

Air Force SMSGT 28 Years of Service

Army Lieutenant General 15 Years of Service

Cooper, Jr._James E. Gray_Courney Army SP/5 3 Years of Service

Crews_Otto M. Navy

Daniels_Clarence

Navy 4 Years of Service

Gray_Richard E. Army Sgt 2 Years of Service

Air Force Master Sgt. 24 Years of Service

Gray_Rodney

Daniels_Waverly

Gray_William Eddie

Army 1st Sgt Master Sgt. 24 Years of Service

Dancy_Larry

Army Sgt 3 Years of Service

Davis_Petronee Air Force Sgt 4 Years of Service

Dickens_Bobby E. Army Sgt 2 Years of Service

Dickens_Harry

Army SSG 3 Years of Service (Vietnam Veteran) Purple Heart

Dickens_Kary

Army Sgt

Army 1st Sgt. 24 Years of Service

Boone_Horace

Draughn_Kendra T.

Air Force Sgt 3 Years of Service

Army Sgt 13 Years of Service

Brown_Joseph

Evans_David W.

Army Sgt 3 Years of Service

Marines Sgt. E9 30 Years of Service

Bryant_James E.

Fox_Johnnie

Navy 4 Years of Service

Army PFC 4 Years of Service

Hagwood_L.B. Navy MoMM2 1943-1945

Hagwood_Lawrence M. Marines 1st Lieutenant 1976-1980

Hagwood_Nathan B. Marines CPL 2005-2009

Harper_Weldon Ray Army SP4 2 Years of Service

Harris_Jerome Marines Sergeant 2 Years of Service

Harris Sr._Marice B. Army 2 Years of Service

Harris Jr._Marice B. Air Force 2 Years of Service

Army Sgt. Major 43 Years of Service

Army SPC 3 1944-1946

Air Force SP4 3 Years of Service

Hedgepeth_ Jeremiah

Army PFC 3 Years of Service

Hill Sr._Archadle Army Sgt 3 Years of Service

Hines_Michael A. Navy / Army E4 / Sgt E5 4 Years of Service / 5 Years of Service

Hines_Thurman L. Army - 101st Airborne Sgt E5 3 Years of Service (Vietnam Veteran)

Hines, II_Thurman L. Army Spec 4 6 Years of Service

Horne_Larry

Army SP4 2 Years of Service

Hunter_Julius

Air Force Master Sgt 30 Years of Service

Johnson_Elvin U.

Jones_Percy Army

2 Years of Service

King_Charlie

Knight_Joe A.

Coley_Thomas

Grant Jr._Claude

Army Sgt 2 Years of Service

Cooper_David

Navy Sgt 25 Years of Service

Army Sgt 2 Years of Service

Gray_Chester T. Navy E5 3 Years of Service

Air Force Master Sgt. 18 Years of Service

Harrison_Robert M. Army E4 2 Years of Service

Air Force Sgt 20 Years of Service

Mercer_William Air Force Sgt 10 Years of Service

Milbourne_Rodney Army Sgt 3 Years of Service

Modlin_Ray A. Army Sgt 11 Years of Service

Moody_Willie Army Sgt 1966-1968

Army 2 Years of Service Army

Noel_Richard

Army Sgt 2 Years of Service

Norwood_Edward

Parker_Debra

Harris_Odessa Bryant

Harrison_Donald A.

Mercer_Debra

Knight_Ernest

Fox_Lorenzo

Air Force

Navy Sgt 4 Years of Service

Army 82nd Airborne Paratrooper 20 Years of Service

Bunn_James

Fuller_Joseph F.

Mann Sr._Calvin

Army Sgt 3 Years of Service Air Force Sgt 4 Years of Service

Army Sgt 2 Years of Service

Air Force Sgt. 4 Years of Service

Morgan Sr._Leodus

Army SP4 2 Years of Service

Navy 2 Years of Service

Coley_John

Lynch_Thomas

Jones_Lorenzo

Harris_Nathan

Army Sgt 20 Years of Service

Air Force S.M. Sgt. 22 ½ Years of Service

Moore_Malachi

Army Sgt 8 Years of Service Army SP4 1 Year of Service (KIA)

Army SP 4 2 Years of Service

Army Sergeant 20 Years of Service

Army SP4 6 Years of Service Air Force

Army SP-4 3 Years of Service

Marines Sgt 4 Years of Service

Knight_William Marines E5 5 Years of Service

League_Bob

Air Force 4 Years of Service

League_Will

Marine Corps 8 Years of Service

Army E4 3 Years of Service

Army Staff Sergeant E6 26 Years of Service

Navy IT2 7 Years of Service

Army Served in the Battle of the Bulge 1945-1946 (WWII Veteran)

Randolph_Dennis Earl Air Force Sgt 25 Years of Service

Randolph_Edgar Ray Army Sgt 3 Years of Service

Randolph_ Raymond

Army Sgt 25 Years of Service

Royster_Alton

Air Force Master Sgt 12 Years of Service

Sessoms_Carmillus Air Force Sgt 22 Years of Service

Silver_Floyd

Army Sgt 3 Years of Service

Spaton_Donald Army/Air Force Sgt 19 Years of Service

Speight_James E. Army Sgt 20 Years of Service

Stokes_Elton Air Force/Army Sergeant 20 Years

Taylor Sr_Melvin Air Force Sgt 8 Years of Service

Taylor Jr._Melvin

Air Force Sgt Parker_Donald Ray 4 Years of Service Air Force Airman 2nd Class Thorne Sr._Robert 1957-1961 Air Force Sgt Parker_Harold 4 Years of Service Army Sgt Thorpe_Hugh 3 Years of Service Army Sergeant Phillips_Colbert 2 Years of Service Army Sgt Washington_Coley 2 Years of Service Marines 2 Years of Service (KIA)

Army E8 Master Sgt. 1977-1997

Army Spec4 4 Years of Service

Army Sgt 3 Years of Service Army Sgt 3Years of Service

Whitakers_Garvin Army Sgt 4 Years of Service

Whitakers Sr._ Walter

Air Force Master Sgt 20 Years of Service

Whitehead_ Alexander

Army Sgt 2 Years of Service

Whitehead_Donald Army Sgt 20 Years of Service

Whitehead_Donald Navy Sgt 25 Years of Service

Whitehead_Frank D. Army Sgt 3 Years of Service

Whitehead_James D. Army Sgt 3 Years of Service

Whitehead_Marcus Army Sgt 10 Years of Service

William_Albert Air Force Sgt 15 Years of Service

William_Daryl

Army E6 20 Years of Service

William_David Army Sgt

William_Robert Air Force Sgt 4 Years of Service

William_William H. Army Sgt E7 23 Years of Service


THE DAILY REFLECTOR/ROCKY MOUNT TELEGRAM, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2019

VETERANS DAY SALUTE

A9

Air Force vet finds way to ECU to study mechanical design BY GRADY DILLON ECU News Services

East Carolina University student Sean Wear is a veteran with a passion for industrial engineering. Wear, a senior from Chicago, is majoring in industrial technology with a concentration in mechanical design. After high school, Wear decided to join the Air Force. “I honestly had no idea what I wanted to do coming out of high school,” Wear said. “I loved aircraft and enjoyed working with my hands, so it kind of came together for me.” During six years in the Air Force, Wear served as an aircraft mechanic and helped make sure that all the airplanes were ready for flight and combat. He mainly worked with KC10s, aerial refueling tankers that supply fuel to other aircrafts. “We supplied in-flight refueling to fighters and other cargo aircraft for both NATO and U.S. forces,” Wear said. After his military service, Wear began classes at Central Carolina Community College, where he received

KEN BUDAY/ECU NEWS SERVICES

East Carolina University industrial engineering student Sean Wear spent six years in the U.S. Air Force.Wear is the team co-lead for the ATMAE robotics team at ECU.

to stamp out sheet metal parts. “It was a lot of custom-build work and investment in fine-tuning the die to produce those quality parts,” Wear said. Before graduating, Wear met Amy Frank, ECU’s director of community college and military outreach. “She came down to visit me when I was at Central Carolina and convinced me to look into coming to ECU CLIFF HOLLIS/ECU NEWS SERVICES and give it a shot,” Wear an associate degree in ap- Wear also worked for Thry- said. plied science in comput- selius Stamping, where he Wear said he had the oper-integrated machining. helped build tool and die tion to take his courses on-

line but decided to come to campus and take traditional courses. “I was honestly fine with having to go to my classes because with the stuff that we were learning, it’s much easier to learn in person and it was the right choice,” Wear said. At ECU, Wear is a lab assistant for a computer numerical control (CNC) class and vice president of the ECU chapter of the Association of Technology, Management and Applied Engineering (ATMAE). Wear is also the team colead for the ATMAE robotics team. “We are actually finishing up our robotics build and are leaving on Nov. 5 for the ATMAE conference in Charlotte, where we will be competing with other schools and meeting industry professionals for networking opportunities,” Wear said. Wear said he enjoys how friendly everyone is at ECU and credited Student Veteran Services in helping connect him with other veterans on campus. Once he graduates in May, Wear said he plans to become an industrial engi-

neer with a focus on CNC and production.

Statistics Name: Sean Wear College: College of Engineering and Technology Major: Industrial technology, concentration in mechanical design Age: 30 Classification/Year: Senior Hometown: Chicago Hobbies/interests: Robotics, cars, aerospace, manufacturing, technology Clubs and Organizations: ATMAE Robotics

Favorites Favorite place to eat: Bad Daddy’s Burger Bar Favorite class: Design classes Professor who influenced you the most: Amy Frank Favorite band/musician: Dream Theater Favorite movie: “The Martian” Favorite website: reddit.com

Motivations Dream job: Engineer in the space industry Role model: My dad Your words to live by: Anything worth doing is worth doing with all you have

Navy reservist balances career at ECU, protecting U.S. maritime interests BY THEODORE QUINTANA Navy Office of Community Outreach

MILLINGTON, Tenn. — As Americans reflect on the service of military men and women this Veterans Day, some may not realize that they have neighbors who serve in the U.S. Navy Reserve. Master Chief Petty Officer Patrice Frede of Greenville is one of those neighbors. A staffing recruitment director at East Carolina University, Frede also supports and defends freedom around the world as a Navy quartermaster. Frede is a 1980 Valley View Junior/Senior High School graduate and native of Jessup, Pennsylvania. She earned a degree from East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania in 1984 majoring in psychology and criminal justice. Reservists like Frede seamlessly support and actively aid military missions while continuing to lead their own independent lives in the civilian world, according to Navy officials. “The Navy Reserve is a 100,000-strong team of sailors embedded across the fabric of society, loyal and dedicated patriots, serving both in uniform and civilian jobs, ready to defend the homeland and deploy across the world in a moment’s notice,” said Vice Adm. Luke McCollum, Chief of Navy Reserve. The Navy Reserve provides strategic depth to America’s Navy as it protects the American homeland and advances economic prosperity by preserving freedom of the seas.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Patrice Frede is a Navy reservist and a recruitment director at East Carolina University.

In addition to serving in the Navy Reserve, Frede has worked at East Carolina University since 2007. She is a regional Higher Education Recruitment Consortium director at ECU. “It gets more and more difficult to balance civilian and service life as you move up the ranks,” said Frede. “There is no way the demands of being a reservist can be fulfilled during one weekend per month.” As a Navy reservist, Frede serves

with Commander Naval Surface Forces Atlantic as the senior enlisted leader where her and her sailors provide support to the fleet. Frede is playing an important part in America’s focus on rebuilding military readiness, strengthening alliances and reforming business practices in support of the National Defense Strategy. The Navy’s mission is tied to America’s maritime needs, accord-

POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT

Special thanks to our Veterans for your service to our country.

Senator Don Davis Paid for by Don Davis for NC Senate Committee

ing to Navy officials, as the prosperity depends on the ability to operate freely on the world’s oceans. More than 70 percent of the Earth’s surface is covered by water; 80 percent of the world’s population lives close to a coast; and 90 percent of all global trade by volume travels by sea. “Our priorities center on people, capabilities and processes, and will be achieved by our focus on speed, value, results and partnerships,”

said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. “Readiness, lethality and modernization are the requirements driving these priorities.” Though there are many ways for sailors to earn distinction in their command, community and career, Frede is most proud of serving in Afghanistan, she said “Although my Navy career has been a roller coaster ride, I am most proud of serving on a Female Engagement Team in the Helmand Province,” she said. “I am proud to have attained qualification as an enlisted surface warfare specialist, expeditionary warfare specialist and to be a graduate of the Senior Enlisted Academy,” said Frede. ”Additionally I am proud of teaching at the Counterinsurgency Training Center in Kabul, Afghanistan, and serving as the senior enlisted advisor for the Friends of Africa Volunteers while deployed to the Horn of Africa.” As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied upon assets, Frede and other sailors know they are part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes providing the Navy the nation needs. “Serving in the Navy means contributing to the greater good, being part of something greater than yourself and first and foremost, mentoring the next generation of leaders in our Navy,” added Frede. Theodore Quintana is a mass communication specialist 2nd class in the U.S. Navy Office of Community Outreach.


A10

THE DAILY REFLECTOR/ROCKY MOUNT TELEGRAM, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2019

VETERANS DAY SALUTE

Veteran explains life before and after receiving service dog BY RACHAEL RILEY The Fayetteville Observer

FAYETTEVILLE — After serving 12 years in the Army, Raeford veteran Preston Jackson Jr. credits his canine to saving his life. It was just a couple of months ago that Jackson was paired with his service dog Pilot through K9s for Warriors. In just that short time-frame, Jackson credits Pilot for helping him cope with his post-traumatic stress disorder and wants to share with other veterans about how the canine has given him hope. Originally from South Philadelphia, Jackson was raised by his grandmother, Josephine Wilson, and godfather, Robert Ferrante. Jackson said he never got into trouble as a kid and worked various jobs that included even walking neighbor’s dogs. At the end of his 11th grade year in school, Jackson decided to drop out to “make money.” He soon found not having a diploma hindered his job opportunities for full-time positions he wanted. He says: “As a young man growing up in South Philadelphia, I was always told the military wasn’t the place for a black man and I sort of believed that growing up until I saw a few of the older brothers that I knew of, and they were in the military and came back in their Class A-s, and I always wish that I could do it.” Jackson went to night school and earned his diploma in two months. He joined the Army on May 10, 1995, starting out with field artillery. After training at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and going through airborne school at Fort Benning, Georgia, his first duty station was at Camp Casey, Korea. He was assigned to Fort Bragg in 1996, where he changed his military occupation specialty to be-

THE FAYETTEVILLE OBSERVER

Raeford veteran Preston Jackson Jr. was paired with his service dog Pilot through K9s for Warriors.

come an armament crew member for Kiowa OH-58 helicopters. His next duty station in 1999 was in Germany. By that time, he had his first son, Kytel Collins-Jackson. His second son, Nyjel, was born in December 1999. After the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, Jackson was assigned to Macedonia, returned back to Fort Bragg in 2002 and was assigned to a Black Hawk helicopter unit to deploy to Kandahar, Afghanistan at the end of 2002. “I experienced a lot of things there. I won’t get into too much detail, but it was the first time I lost somebody. We lost our captain over there,” Jackson said. After the deployment, he’d deploy with a Kiowa unit to Iraq in 2006 and was stationed in Mosul. “When I was there, I had sniper fire many times, mortar rounds — constantly getting 8 to 10 mortars a day the whole time I was there,” Jackson said. After returning back to the states in June 2007, Jackson made the decision to not reenlist, as he had surgery at Camp Qatar from a meniscus

knee tear he had from an airborne jump right before the deployment. Jackson got out of the Army at the end of September 2007. While he was in the Army, his wife at the time had completed a basic law enforcement training course, and found a job in Scotland County. Jackson told the sheriff at the time he would work for him, because the sheriff hired his wife. After completing his own basic law enforcement training, Jackson was hired as a bailiff in November 2008, and became a school resource officer for more than four years because he requested a job that would allow him to work with children. By 2014 a new sheriff was elected, and Jackson said 16 people including himself and his wife were let go. “I didn’t talk a lot, and I didn’t take a lot of nonsense. They were trying to figure out what was wrong with me,” he said of a few coworkers. “At the time I didn’t even know that PTSD was causing these problems — the snapping, yelling at folks, having short patience, not wanting to be around groups.”

Jackson went back to Sandhills Community College, where he had gone through his basic law enforcement training, and went through the culinary program. Though starting to feel physical pain, he wanted to motivate younger classmates and didn’t wear his knee braces to class. During an evaluation in his senior year, he fell in the kitchen and asked his classmates to bring him the ingredients so he could finish the project. Soon after, Jackson was going through a divorce and said he sunk into a deep depression and isolated, as both his sons were in college. “I was talking to other people like the medicine wasn’t working. The classes wasn’t working. What about other options?” Jackson said another veteran he met at the Fayetteville Veterans Affairs Health Care Center, told him about service dogs. His son looked online and found K9 for Warriors. Founded in 2011 by Shari Duval, K9s For Warriors is a national nonprofit that takes eligible shelter dogs and trains them to be service dogs for post 9/11 veterans and service members with symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, and/ or military sexual trauma. After applying for the program, Jackson left for the three-week, inhouse training program in Florida that is no cost to veterans. “You go through an interview process again to make sure they got the right dog,” Jackson said. Jackson believes he found that “right dog,” in Pilot, who was a dog surrendered to the Bradford County Animal Control in Florida and sponsored by the Karpus Family Foundation. “As soon as I saw him, he jumped up in my arms,” Jackson said. “I got down and we connected like bam! I mean literally we connected right

then and there, and I felt this sense of relief like, ‘Wow I finally got here.’ I was crying,” Jackson said. Jackson remembers the first day of training was rough on his back and knees, but an instructor encouraged him to “fight through,” it if he wanted the dog. Jackson said he believes Pilot is able to pick up on his emotions and gives him cues if needs to leave a situation, or has woken him up during the night when he’s forgotten to wear his sleep apnea machine. “The things I was having problems — being around people, trusting society, bracing myself — these are all the things he can do, looking out for me, not allowing me to engage in the stuff that’s going to cause me to be depressed or have high anxiety,” Jackson said. Jackson said as a service dog, when Pilot has on his vest, strangers and friends should not pet or feed Pilot. “The reason why we ask you to not touch the dog is so that you don’t distract him from doing his job,” Jackson said. “And the whole thing is as severe as my PTSD is — a sound, a smell, a person yelling, a person’s sight reminds me of somebody else — can have go back to I’m on guard now.” Jackson said Pilot is also causing him to get out of his house, which is why he credits K9s for Warriors and wears the organization’s logos on shirts to tell other veterans about it. “I don’t want you to walk away from me as somebody who got a dog and be like well he got his dog and he doesn’t care about me,” Jackson said. And Jackson said he believes more veterans and soldiers could benefit from service dogs. “We wouldn’t have to euthanize dogs and soldiers’ lives would be saved,” he said.

Service dogs support veterans after they return home ■ Reduce social anxiety ■ Decrease reliance on prescription drugs ■ Help veterans return to work or attend college ■ Strengthen personal relationships ■ Provide security, protection and unconditional love

Family Features

Service dogs offer countless benefits to help combat symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, but they can also be instrumental in rebuilding and uniting families after veterans come home from serving their country. According to the National Institutes of Health, up to 30 percent of American military veterans experience PTSD after returning home from combat. Yet only about 40 percent of those individuals ever seek help. Service animals are recognized under the Americans with Disabilities Act. The designation is limited to dogs who are trained to do work or perform tasks for a person with a disability. In some cases, these tasks are highly physical in nature, such as guiding a person who is blind or pulling a wheelchair.

Up to the Task RAYCHEL K. YOUNG-PORTER

Service dogs help combat veterans adjust to civilian life, rebuild and unite families.

Other roles service dogs play may be less immediately visible, such as providing a calming presence to a person with PTSD who is experiencing an anxiety attack.

of life. Veterans who utilize service dogs report lower levels of depression and anxiety, fewer hospitalizations and a reduction in medical and psychiatric costs, among other benefits. what these canines More Than a Companion Beyond help prevent, consider these exService dogs are highly amples of what they empower: trained to assist military veter■ Ease loneliness and ans in achieving better quality stress

Just like the members of the armed forces they help, service dogs are highly trained professionals with an important job to do, including tasks such as these: ■ Turn on lights and open doors before a veteran enters his or her home ■ Nudging, pawing or licking to interrupt flashbacks or nightmares ■ Utilizing body weight as a grounding mechanism to reduce anxiety or alleviate panic ■ Retrieve bags with medications or a list of num-

bers to call during a medical emergency ■ Provide security and reduce hypervigilance in public places ■ Pick up dropped items and assist with mobility and ambulation

When You See a Service Dog Service dogs are often large breeds that stand out in a crowd, and their calm demeanor can make it seem perfectly appropriate to approach and pet them. However, it’s important to remember that service dogs are at work and distractions can prevent them from providing the service their owners need. The International Association of Canine Professionals offers these etiquette tips for interacting with service dogs and their owners:

■ Remember that a service dog is there as support for a person with a physical or health disability, which may or may not be readily apparent. ■ Respect that health conditions are private matters most people prefer not to discuss with strangers. ■ Just as you would not stare or point at a person in a wheelchair, avoid calling unnecessary attention to a person with a service dog. ■ If you must interact, always focus your attention on the handler, not the dog, so the dog can stay focused on its job. Avoid whistling, clapping or otherwise distracting the dog. ■ Teach children not to approach service dogs. Although most are trained to avoid aggression, a perceived threat to their handlers could result in warning growls or barks that may scare a child.

Cell: (252) 917-9898 Lynn Sugg

Farm Bureau Agent

Honoring our service men and women on Veterans Day

Honoring and Acknowledging the Service of Men and Women who have Served in our Military.

We accept walk-ins and new patients! We participate in the Veterans Community Care Program, accept TRICARE and other insurance and offer care on a sliding fee scale to patients who qualify. Se habla español.

261 Belvoir Highway | Greenville, NC 252-695-6352 | greenecountyhealthcare.com

Town of Farmville

3672 North Main Street 252-753-5116 / farmvillenc.gov


THE DAILY REFLECTOR/ROCKY MOUNT TELEGRAM, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2019

A11

THANK YOU! THE DAILY REFLECTOR WOULD LIKE TO THANK OUR LOCAL VETERANS AND THOSE WHO SUBMITTED PHOTOS.

BAKER James

BANKARD Barry V.

BANKARD Harry V.

BASS Robert W., Sr.

BENNETT Karna

BAKER Bob

BOTTOMS D.

BOYD JR. J.D

BOYD Ronnie

BRINKLEY William Benjamin

BROWN Lisa

BUCK Charles

BURGESS Cain D., Sr.

CASEY, JR Woodrow “Don”

CHAMBERS Lloyd

CHAPMAN James Allen, Jr.

COFFIELD James

COTTER Michael G.

COX Leslie R.

COX Samuel Hubert, Jr.

DAVENPORT J. Paul, III

DAVIS Donald G. 

DUNCAN Gregory

EDWARDS Rial T.

EVERETT Jarvis Ray

FARRIS Charles

FIRKUS Raymond E.

Army SP/5 46th Engineer Battalion Vietnam ‘68, ‘69, ‘70

FROLEICH Thomas Martin

US Navy E6, Corpsman

GASKINS Greg

GRIFFIN Alvin

HAMMEREN Ronald

HANNA Paul M.

Navy Lieutenant Commander Years of Service: 20

HARRISON Elton J.

United States Air Force CMSgt 23 years

HEATH Bobby Odell, Jr.

HEATH Bobby Odell, Sr.

HENDERSON Calvin

HIATT Edward Carlman

HILLIARD Fred D.

HOELL Henry W.

HOWARD Waverly G.

ISLEY II Bill J.

ISLEY Bill J.

JARMAN Major L

JONES Linwood

JESSE SR. Thomas J.

KOONCE Matthew

LACOUR Edward

LANGLEY Wilton

MAJORS Charles

US Army Staff Sergeant 22 years

U.S. Air Force S/MSGT./Retire 28 and a half years

US Army Corporal

Served 8 years active duty, USAF 1993-2001. He had a regular commission & was promoted to the rank of Captain.

US Army Specialist (P) Military Police

USAF Airman 2nd Class 6 years

USMC Cpl

USAF Captain 1970 – 1974

A / 1C U.S. Air Force 4 years service

US Army Spec 4

US Navy Captain 1970 - 2005

Army 9th Infantry Division 1968-1969

Branch: US Navy Rank: Chief Petty Officer Years of Service: 1941-1962 (21 years)

US Army SFC. E7 22 years

US Air Force Colonel 1943 – 1970

U.S. Army Staff Sergeant 4 years

US Navy Chief Petty Officer 1958-1978

Co. “E”, 1st Regmt, N.C. Cavalry, CSA Rank: Bugler 4 years’ service

Army, 221st Signal Corps-Pictoral SFC., Retired

US Army Staff Sgt 21 years

Army, Specialist E3 4 years of service (Korean War) Born: 12/29/31 - Passed: 9/17/17

US Army PFC 2 years

US Navy E5 11 years

US Navy/US Air Force Chief Master Sargent 1946-1968

Baranch: Army WWII Rank: Seargent E5 Years of Service:  3

US Army Sgt E-5 1969-1972

US Army Specialist E-4 4 years

USAF MSgt 1953 - 1973

U.S.Air Force Master Sergeant 20 years

E5 - U.S. Army 6 years

United States Army Staff Sergeant (E6) 25 years

US Navy

US Army SFC 13 Years

US Army PFC

United States Air Force Airmen First Class 1951-1955

U.S. Army E-4 1989 – 1993

CPL United States Marine Corps 1996-2000.

US Army Corporal

US Army First Sergeant

T5 US Army WWII 238th Combat Engineers  DDay Utah Beach 3 years service due to injury 

US Air Force Lt. Col. 1959-1981

U.S. Army E-4 1954 – 1957

AT1 United States Navy 1974-1998

US Army AF Staff Sgt. 1942 – 1945


A12

THE DAILY REFLECTOR/ROCKY MOUNT TELEGRAM, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2019

THE DAILY REFLECTOR

MERCER Henry Nathaniel

MOORE Bryant

MOORE Charlie, Jr. U.S. Navy E-3 4 Years

MOORE Thomas E.

U.S. Army, Sergeant First Class (Retired), 23 Years of Service (8/21/86-4/1/10)

MOZINGO SR. Charles A

NEWTON Glenn A.

NEWTON W. R.

PEARCE, SR. Jerome

PENN Sandra Martin

PHILLIPS Bill

POWELL Mari

POWELL Mary W

POWELL Raymond

POWELL Robert E

POWELL Trevor

POWELL Douglas E

PUGH Willie E

RAMEY Robert “ Bob “ L.

REAVES Amber N.

REAVES Kelvin

REAVES Ricky D

RODGERS Frederick

ROGERS John M. (Johnny)

ROSE James

ROUSE Edward

SALISBURY Walter

SANDERS Coy

SATCHELL Richard

SCHWARTZ Charles F

SHAE Elizabeth

SHERWOOD Daniel Lowell

SQUIRES Eddie

STANDFORD Allen

US Army Sergeant First Class 1951-1971

STEPHENSON Tommy T.

ARMY, STAFF SGT. 33YRS.

THOMPSON Stevan

TRIPP Katherine

TURNER Curtis

VINES Harold

WARREN Wilmer

WATERS SJ

WHICHARD J. Edward

WHICHARD John S. (Jack)

WHITEHURST Judy

WHITEHURST Marshal Dixon

WILKINS Belinda

WILKINS William

WYRICK D.R. (Bobby)

US Army Spec. 4

US Army, Sgt. Major, Ret. 24+ service

US Navy Seaman

US Army SP4

Army Signal Corps 1st Lieutenant 1957-1965

982nd Combat Camera, Army Reserves Ssgt.

US Army (USAR) Sgt. 1st Class 30 years

US Army Srgt 22 years

Belhaven, NC US Army, CPL (Corporal) 1972-1974 and 1990-1994

USAF MSgt

U.S. Army Captain 1966 – 1970

USMC E3/LCpl 4 years

US Marines E1

C.S.A., 3rd Cavalry Sergeant 4 years (1861-1865)

Wars Served: World War II, 1939-1946 Branch of Service US Army

US Navy Petty Officer Third Class

US Army 1st Lt.

US Navy Commander 27 years

US Army E4

US Army Reserves SGT 14 years

USAF Airman 1st Class

Army Air Corp CPL 1943-1945

USMC, Cpl, 1962-1966 Vietnam Veteran

United States Army SPC-4 1971-1979  

US Army Specialist E-5 3 years

US Army Reserves CW4 34 years

SGT 1942 - 1945 USAAF-WWII

US Air Force Airman 1st Class

Army Private First Class

Army Reserve Specialist E4

U. S. Army PFC

U.S.M.C. L/CPL 1963 - 1968

US NAVY Seaman First Class (SFC) 2 years

US Air Force CWO-4

US Army E6 10 years

US Army Sergeant First Class 20 years

USCG Retired Lieutenant 1967 – 1996

NC Army National Guard Sergeant 1966-1972

US Air Force TSgt

US Army (USAR) SSgt 20 years

United States Army Corporal

US Army COL 1986-2012

US Army 1st Lt. 1951-1953

Profile for APG-ENC

Veterans Day - Honoring All Who Served  

A Collaboration special section between the Rocky Mount Telegram and The Daily Reflector to celebrate local veterans from Nash, Edgecombe an...

Veterans Day - Honoring All Who Served  

A Collaboration special section between the Rocky Mount Telegram and The Daily Reflector to celebrate local veterans from Nash, Edgecombe an...