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APRIL 2013

Maxillofacial Surgery Center of Central Arkansas

Providing better oral health and attractive smiles for nearly 20 years. FULL STORY, PAGE 4.

Meet the Maxillofacial Surgery Center staff (left to right): Priscilla Bockelman, R.N.; Kristen Sherman, Patient Accounts Coordinator; J. Lee Rogers, Surgical Benefits Coordinator; Carol Scott, Patient Care Coordinator; David Riggs, R.D.A.; Mitchell L. Collins, D.D.S., M.D.; Lee Cardimona, R.D.A.; Jennifer Greene, C.D.A., R.D.A.; Hannah Balch, Office Assistant; and Anne Sims, Accounts Payable Coordinator. Not Pictured: Clay Rougeau, C.R.N.A.; Ashleigh Collins, Office Assistant; and Tonya Sexton, Office Assistant.


‘Conway is Calling’ promotes CoMMUNITY

New recruitment tool helps employers sell Conway to job seekers

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he Conway Area Chamber of Commerce has developed a program that assists area employers in their nationwide recruitment efforts. “Conway is Calling” gives job seekers information about Conway and promotes the fastgrowing, affordable city as an ideal place for young, educated professionals to make their start. Brad Lacy, president and CEO of the Conway Area Chamber of Commerce, said the Chamber has a role to play in helping businesses recruit new talent to Conway. “It’s a team approach,” Lacy said. “The company provides good information about itself and the Chamber provides good information about the community. I think this is the model for recruiting a modern workforce.”

The Chamber developed the initiative in response to companies requesting deliverable

What’s that gonna be? Young-Wise Memorial Stadium

The 1,500-seat stadium will be open in time for the return of Hendrix Warrior football on Sept. 7. The approximately $8 million project will also host the football, men’s lacrosse, men’s and women’s track and field programs. It will also serve intramural programs, ultimate Frisbee and provide a venue for general student benefit. Other spaces in the complex include: a new field house that will serve more than 300 student athletes with weight rooms, locker rooms and training facilities. Where is that? Behind the Hendrix Wellness and Athletic Center. The west side of the track and football field. When is it gonna open? Late summer 2013 Who’s building it? East-Harding Construction 2 | FAULKNER COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL

information about Conway. Corporations such as Hewlett-Packard and Acxiom

already display Conway is Calling materials when they visit college career fairs across

the country. The website ConwayIsCalling.com gives professionals insight into Conway’s demographics, location and overall economy. Questions about moving to Conway fielded through the website are answered by Chamber staff. The effort will also have an active social media presence. “Today’s professional wants to know as much about the community as they do about the company,” Lacy said. “The good news is we’ve got a great community and a great story to tell. Conway is Calling helps us tell that story in a relevant way.”

Kimberly-Clark next stop for 13-in-13 program Kimberly-Clark Corporation is the site of the Conway Area Chamber of Commerce’s next 13in-13 visit, which will take place Thursday, May 30, from 9-11 a.m. The 13-in-13 program gives individuals an inside look into 13 businesses that have had a significant role in developing Conway’s economy. At each visit, 13 attendees will gain insight into the history and operations of some of Conway’s largest employers. Previous visits have included Hewlett-Packard and Acxiom. Kimberly-Clark has operations in 36 countries, and its well-known global brands – such as Kleenex, Scott, Huggies, Poise and Depend – are sold in more than 150 countries. The company posted sales of $19.7 billion in 2010. Participants in the 13-in-13 program will receive a tour of Kimberly-Clark’s 524,000-squarefoot Conway facility, which opened in 1970 and now has 550 employees and 130 contingent workers.

“The 13 in 13 program gives people a unique opportunity to learn more about the community where they live and work,” said Lindsay Wygal, senior vice president of Chamber operations. “It’s a value-added benefit to our members and an opportunity to get a behind-the-scenes look at the organizations that have helped shape the Conway economy.” Future visits with the following businesses are scheduled for this year: Central Baptist College, Conway Public Schools, Conway Regional Health System, Nabholz Construction, RockTenn, Snap-on Equipment, Southwestern Energy, The Village at Hendrix, the University of Central Arkansas, and Virco Manufacturing. The 13-in-13 program is free to the employees of Chamber member businesses. Space is available on a first-come, first-served basis. For more information or to make a reservation, email Lindsay Wygal at Lindsay@ConwayArkansas. org.


Rogers Plaza to serve as attractive new entrance to downtown Conway

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Project made possible by public and private partnerships

he Conway Area Chamber of Commerce has unveiled plans for an attractive new entryway to downtown Conway. Rogers Plaza will be located at Oak and Court Streets and is named after the Earl Rogers family, who donated the property to the city of Conway. “Rogers Plaza is the perfect example of public and private partnership,” said Jeff Standridge, chairman of the Conway Area Chamber of Commerce board of directors. “The family donated the property – for which we are very thankful; the city and A&P Commission provided funds for construction; and the Chamber, Conway Downtown Partnership and Conway Development Corporation work together to provide vision and support.” Rogers Plaza will feature brick and concrete pavers, a

fountain and an archway that will serve as a gateway to the downtown area. Mayor Tab Townsell said the aesthetically pleasing plaza is part of creating a quality of place that

will appeal to residents and visitors. “Quality of life is important but is intensely personal. My quality of life is different from your quality of life,” Townsell

said. “But the one thing we as city, Chamber and A&P Commission can control is quality of place.” The plaza is part of an ongoing effort to invest in and revi-

talize downtown Conway and is one goal of Conway2025, the community’s long-range strategic plan. Brad Lacy, president and CEO of the Conway Area Chamber of Commerce, said Conway2025 was not just an exercise; it is a plan the Chamber and its community partners are committed to implementing goal by goal. “We’re grateful to the city council for investing in projects that make a difference in our ability to recruit companies here,” Lacy said. “In addition, we are thankful to the A&P Commission for recognizing an opportunity to promote the city in a different way.” Mary Louise Rogers, the wife of the late Earl Rogers, attended the announcement on April 5 and said she bugged her husband for years about donating the property. “Thank you all for your hard work,” Mrs. Rogers said. “I’m probably the happiest person in the room.” FAULKNER COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL | 3


COVER STORY

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Maxillofacial Surgery Center of Central Arkansas:

Providing better oral health and attractive smiles for nearly 20 years

ow going on 20 years, Dr. Mitchell Collins of Maxillofacial Surgery Center of Central Arkansas has served as Conway’s only board-certified oral and maxillofacial surgeon.

Oral and maxillofacial surgery is the specialty of dentistry that treats diseases, injuries or defects in the mouth, jaws and face. Dr. Collins’ unique oral and maxillofacial surgery training required dental school, medical school and a hospital-based residency in oral and maxillofacial surgery. With degrees in both dentistry and medicine, Dr. Collins is fully trained in all aspects of modern facial cosmetic surgery, major facial reconstructive surgery and oral surgery. After completing dental school at the University of Tennessee College of Dentistry and medical school at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, the Russellville native wanted to return to his home state to set up his practice. Jim Summerset – former president and CEO of Conway Regional Health System – realized Conway’s need for a surgeon specializing in facial trauma and recruited Collins to the hospital. “Jim was accommodating and wonderful and did a great job selling me on Conway,” Collins said. “And Conway sold itself.” When he first opened Maxillofacial Surgery Center in 1994, Dr. Collins was very interested in building a broad scope practice with a major emphasis on facial cosmetic surgery. He said his experience with cosmetic surgery has helped his oral surgery practice tremendously. “We perform a lot of orthognathic – or corrective jaw – surgery, which in my opinion, is one of the neatest things we do. The procedure not only makes the jaw function properly, but it 4 | FAULKNER COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL

This 87-year-old patient underwent the All-on-4 procedure to replace bad and missing teeth. “She has been an ambassador for our practice ever since,” said Dr. Mitch Collins.

Dr. Mitchell Collins of Maxillofacial Surgery Center has degrees in both dentistry and medicine and postdoctoral training in oral and maxillofacial surgery. can also transform a patient’s face. The facial cosmetic surgery experience has enabled me to use my expertise with these jaw surgery cases.” Maxillofacial Surgery Center has extensive experience in dental implants, which contributed to Dr. Collins’ decision to change the direction of his practice in 2008. “Our dental implant practice was growing, and that’s when I decided to streamline some things,” Collins said. “I’ve largely abandoned facial cosmetic surgery and now focus heavily on wisdom teeth extractions and all kinds of dental implant surgeries, including relatively straightforward to complicated cases.” Dental implants are longterm replacements for missing permanent teeth. Unlike other prosthetic devices, such as removable dentures and fixed bridges, dental implants do not rest on the gum line or use adjacent teeth as anchors. Rather,

Dr. Collins surgically places the implant in the jawbone. Dental implants can replace one front tooth broken off at the gum line or many teeth. Some patients who have worn dentures for several years have difficulty chewing their food properly or keeping their dentures in place. Dental implants can eliminate the frustrations and discomfort of ill-fitting dentures. “Some people think they are too old for dental implants,” Dr. Collins said. “I tell those patients that chewing food is a pretty important thing. The surgery is usually less extensive than patients think.” Maxillofacial Surgery Center of Central Arkansas offers a relatively new procedure, “Teeth in a Day” or the “All-on-4™” procedure. The All-on-4™ procedure is a technique that allows the placement of four dental implants and the patient leaves the office with “fixed teeth.” “The All-on-4™ procedure transitions someone from missing

or bad teeth to fixed teeth supported by implants,” Collins said. “It’s a major transition for patients who need dentures or other significant work done to their mouths.” The All-on-4™ teeth do not rest on the surgical sites, but are supported by the implants, usually causing less pain. It also offers immediate results. Patients are able to leave the office the day of the procedure with functional teeth that do not come out. After wearing the initial teeth for six months, the patient will then have a more permanent appliance made by their general dentist. “In the past, it took six months to a year to replace teeth with an implant-supported denture. Now it can happen immediately following surgery,” Dr. Collins said. “We have an 87-year-old patient who had several missing teeth. She proceeded with the All-on-4™ procedure for the top and bottom teeth and has been an

ambassador for our practice ever since!” Whether the procedure involves dental implants, wisdom teeth extractions or corrective jaw treatments, the experienced and trained staff at Maxillofacial Surgery Center can help meet patients’ needs. Dr. Collins said that multiple people on the staff of 13 have more than 15 years’ experience. “Training and innate intelligence is important, but experience is a big deal when it comes to surgical procedures,” he said. Maxillofacial Surgery Center has a full-time Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA) on staff to administer IV sedation, which Dr. Collins says is unique for oral surgery practices. All surgical staff are certified oral and maxillofacial surgical assistants. The center’s administrative personnel are well-versed in health and insurance policies and the day-to-day operations of the practice. Maxillofacial Surgery Center is located at the east entrance of Conway Regional Health System in Suite 204. For more information or to set up an appointment, call 501-336-8888. To learn more about the clinic, visit www. facesurgeon.com.


Local fly shop to launch nationwide TV show

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local fly-fishing shop is about to enter the national spotlight with the launch of a new TV show.

The Toad Fly has signed a contract with the Pursuit Channel to air its “Chasing Waters” fly-fishing series beginning in 2014. “Chasing Waters” documents a journey through 13 rivers and streams in Arkansas, highlighting the fly-fishing opportunities and species of fish that are available in the area. It will be broadcast into 40 million homes. Tim Bull, owner of The

Toad Fly, said the series will focus on short, local trips that anyone can take and how to take them on a budget. “We’re

all searching for that escape from the day-to-day struggle to get by. For us, that escape has been through the art of fly

surrounding states.” In addition to Bull, Chris Morris, Jordan Case and Paul Hoelscher of The Toad Fly will be featured in the series. Southface Media Group of Russellville produced the trailer, which can be viewed on the “Chasing Waters” Facebook page. Opened in July 2012, The Toad Fly is located at 1214 Clifton Street in Conway. The shop offers fly-fishing and flytying equipment and classes for people at all skill levels. For more information about The Toad Fly and “Chasing Waters,” call 501-499-6914 or visit www.thetoadfly.com.

fishing,” Bull said. “There are many opportunities for great fishing within a day’s drive of Arkansas and

TOP 5 RESIDENTIAL HOME SALES 40

Old Morrilton Hwy Gentry Lake

Robins Lake

Days

64 65

r

yli

Meadowlake Rd

64

Sk

Donaghey Ave

Gleason

D ne

Cadron Valley Country Club 319

65 65 64

1905 Sanders Street r St

1000 Reynolds Ave.

Tyle

Salem Rd

1025 Edinburgh

65 40

60

t

S ce

745 Bristol Lane

266

Donaghey Ave

Hendrix College

r St

Lake Carol-dan

M

Hark

Gatlin Park

ride

Centennial Valley Golf Club

Conway

Prin

Laurel Park

Caldwell St

60

Oak

Conway Country Club

Oak St

St60

E Oak St

60

65

Fifth Avenue Pa

4950 Prestonwood

Airport Park Central Baptist College

Dennis F Cantrell Field

Highway 60 W

Oak Grove Cemetery

S Salem Rd

60

University Of Central Arkansas

286

SH

286

arkri

Dave Ward Dr 286

t

S der 365

PRICE

6 | FAULKNER COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL

ADDRESS

BED/BA/HB SUBDIVISION

SQ. FT.

$/SQ. FT. BUILT

$403,166 1905 Sanders St.

3/3/1

The Village at Hendrix

2,481

$140.62

2012

$373,612 1000 Reynolds Ave.

3/3/1

The Village at Hendrix

2,102

$169.27

2012

$326,861 745 Bristol Lane

4/2/0

Bristol Place

2,400

$136.19

2013

$306,400 4950 Prestonwood

4/2/1

Westin Park

3,332

$96.04

2005

$304,500 1025 Edinburgh

3/2/0

Turnberry

2,430

$130.00

2012


Conway Economy at a Glance Unemployment Rate December 2012 US . ........................ 7.8% Arkansas................. 7.1% Faulkner County..... 6.6% Conway................... 6.3% *Faulkner County & Conway not Seasonally Adjusted Sales Tax Collections Conway* December 2012............. $2,164,894 2011............. $2,321,068 Percent Change -6.73% Annual* 2012........... $22,944,163 2011........... $22,366,464 2010........... $21,868,102 Percent Change (20132012) 2.6% *Tax Rate 1.75% Faulkner County* December 2012................ $765,541 2011................ $834,052 Percent Change -8.2% Annual* 2012............. $8,465,686 2011............. $8,279,301 2010............. $7,834,226 Percent Change (20132012) 2.3% *Tax Rate 0.5% Restaurant Sales* January 2013........... $12,623,587 2012........... $12,303,653 Percent Change (20132012) 2.6% Annual Sales 2012......... $153,412,988 2011......... $144,646,055 2010......... $134,082,891 Percent Change (201211) 6.1% *Not including mixed drink sales Hotel Sales January 2013............. $1,032,478 2012............. $1,357,319 2011............. $1,125,729 Percent Change (20122012) -23.9% Annual Sales 2012........... $18,683,676 2011........... $18,662,136 2010 ......... $17,590,242 Percent Change (201211) .12% Conway Building Permits Single Family Homes February 2013.............. 13 Permits 2012.............. 13 Permits 2011.............. 11 Permits 2010 ............ 19 Permits Percent Change (201312) 0%

Average Construction Cost* February 2013................ $264,515 2012................ $215,468 2011............... $188,718 Percent Change (201312) 22.8% Average Square Footage* February 2013...................... 3,245 2012...................... 2,914 2011...................... 2,509 Percent Change (201312) 11.4% Average Construction Cost Per Square Ft.* February 2013.................... $81.51 2012.................... $73.94 2011.................... $75.22 Percent Change (201312) 10.2% Annual 2012............ 186 Permits 2011............ 153 Permits 2010 .......... 223 Permits Percent Change (201211) 21.6% Average Construction Cost* Annual 2012................ $207,537 2011............... $204,387 2010................ $182,340 Percent Change (2012 -11) 1.5%. *Not including land or lot improvements Average Square Footage* Annual 2012...................... 2,910 2011...................... 2,814 2010...................... 2,722 Percent Change (201211) 3.4% Average Construction Cost Per Square Ft.* Annual 2012.................... $71.32 2011.................... $72.63 2010.................... $66.99 Percent Change (201312) -1.8% * Total under roof Lottery Sales Faulkner County February 2013............. $1,486,983 2012............. $1,776,507 2011............. $1,365,858 2010............. $1,771,377 Percent Change (201312) -16.3% Annual 2012........... $18,393,242 2011........... $16,788,678 2010........... $17,540,450 Percent Change (2012-

11) 9.6% Total State February 2012........... $40,574,842 2011........... $48,236,552 2010........... $44,982,226 Percent Change (201211) -15.9% Annual 2012 ........ $452,245,217 2011 ........ $474,879,701 2010......... $459,916,256 Percent Change (20212011) -4.8% Natural Gas Severance Tax Distribution February Faulkner County 2013.................. $14,395 2012.................... 13,599 Percent Change 5.9% Conway 2013.................. $17,789 2012.................. $16,844 Percent Change 5.6% Annual Faulkner County 2012................ $131,418 2011................ $204,052 Percent Change -35.6% Conway 2012................ $162,457 2011................ $254,822 Percent Change -36.2% Wellhead Price per MCF* December 2012 ..................... $3.35 2011 ..................... $3.14 2010 ..................... $4.68 2009...................... $4.66 2008...................... $5.94 2007...................... $6.87 Yearly Average 2012......................$2.66 2011......................$3.95 2010......................$4.48 2009......................$3.67 2008......................$7.97 2007......................$6.25 2006......................$6.39 2005......................$7.33 2004......................$5.46 2003......................$4.88 2002......................$2.95 *MCF=1000 cubic feet Number of Active Wells* Faulkner County....... 350 Total in Field ......... 4,481 *As of December 12, 2012 Estimated Life Time Value of Production* Total Field....................... $11,382,327,198 *As of September 30, 2012

Information provided by pulseofconway.com

By Roger Lewis “… nothing in this world can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.”- Benjamin Franklin For some, a version of the Franklin quote is, “I’m being taxed to death.” No one I know enjoys paying taxes and many think we should be taxed less. We may dislike taxes, but we do like good roads, quality educational systems, responsive public services and a safe environment. As for government regulation, many clamber for less of it, but everyone wants safe food to eat, safe travel, and safety from predators. Laws, regulations and enforcement require funds. And thus, taxes. Some consider paying taxes a privilege that produces the quality of life and freedoms that exist in this country. For many, the main concern is that we be taxed fairly and the revenue spent wisely. How do Arkansas taxes compare to other states? Tax codes differ widely from state to state. Some tax heavily in one area and lightly or not at all in another area. Other states are vice versa. And with the many exemptions in all tax areas by all states, precise comparisons are difficult. The old adage that the government will get its share one way or another is true; it is just a matter of how the taxes are apportioned among the revenue sources. The most reliable source of information is the Tax Foundation, a non-partisan 501(c)(3) tax research group in Washington, D.C. Founded in 1937, it is funded by voluntary contributions from philanthropic foundations, corporations, and individuals. The tax data comparisons that follow are from this source. Though probably the best single source, states and municipalities often challenge this data on particular points. Arkansans directly pay income taxes, sales taxes and real property taxes, but there are numerous indirect taxes paid on goods and services too. Examples include taxes on motor fuel, tobacco, soft drinks, alcohol and many other commodities and services. Also, there is a host of fees collected for various licenses, registrations and services. However, the major portion of state and local government operations are funded by the three direct taxes and the motor fuel tax fund. Income Taxes The income tax (both personal and corporate) is the major revenue sources for Arkansas, providing 56% of the state’s revenue. Nine states have no tax on earned income, and seven have a flat rate. Two states

Taxes

that have no tax on earned income do tax corporate dividends and interest. The remaining 34 states have income taxes that vary by income bracket. Arkansas’s personal income tax rate varies from 1% to 7% for six income brackets that range from $4,099 to $35,000. California, with a tax rate of 12.3% on income of $500,000 or more, has the highest rate. With 1 as the lowest rank for personal income taxes, Arkansas ranks 28th. Corporate income taxes are relatively higher putting us 37th among the states. No Arkansas municipalities levy an income tax, but seven school districts have an income tax surcharge. Property Taxes Arkansas’ property tax monies go to public schools and local governments; no property tax revenue goes to the state. To illustrate the calculation of property taxes, a $200,000 house is assessed at one-fifth of its value ($40,000). The tax is the assessed value times the millage rate. One mill is 1/10 of a cent. For Arkansas the average millage rate (all counties) is 47.86 mills. Thus, an assessed value of $40,000 and a millage rate of 47.86 produce a property tax of $1914. If the residence is owner-occupied a $350 homestead exemption brings the tax down to $1564. Among the states Arkansas has very low property taxes. In fact, Arkansas is the eighth lowest in property tax rates. Texas, which has no income tax, has the fifth highest property tax in the nation. New Mexico has the lowest rate and Connecticut has the highest rate. Sales Taxes Arkansas relies heavily on sales taxes for both state and local governments. The state sales tax is 6% and local sales tax average 2.5%. As a result, Arkansas ranks 16th highest in sales tax rates among the states. At the local level a sales tax is the only way to raise substantial revenue. Arkansas’s high sales tax rate is partly due to our legislative process. Any increase in taxes except for sales requires three-fourths approval in the House of Representatives and Senate. Increasing the sales tax, however, requires only a simple majority. Consequently, when new revenue is sought, sales taxes are often targeted. Five states have no sales tax. California has the highest rate, 7.5% plus local tax levies. Two states that have no sales tax have a gross receipts tax (GRT), which is like a sales tax but levied at the firm level and thus, incorporated into the price. Several states have both a sales tax and a gross receipts tax.

Motor Fuel Taxes Motor fuel taxes fund highway construction and maintenance and other transportation needs. Arkansas’s gasoline tax is 21.8 cents per gallon, which ranks 35th highest among the state, the average is 27.7. The federal gasoline tax adds an additional 18.4 cents. Gasoline taxes are based on consumption and not on price. In recent years our more efficient automobiles and reduced amount of driving due to the high cost of fuel have driven down fuel consumption and hence tax revenue. As a funding source gasoline taxes are waning. Taxes As A Whole When all of these taxes (income, property, sales and gasoline) are combined and compared to the other states, Arkansas is not heavily taxed. With #1 representing the most heavily taxed state Connecticut, Arkansas ranks #33 in the amount of taxes paid per capita. However, another way to look at taxes is as a percentage of income rather than the tax rate or dollar amount. This rendering paints a different picture. Arkansas has a low per capita income. Our $34,723 for 2012 ranks us near the bottom in 45th place (but significantly improved from 49th place in 2003). When comparing the percentage of income that goes for state and local taxes, Arkansas is among the more heavily taxed. It ranks #15. Cutting taxes, in my opinion, is not the answer to lowering our tax burden. A better solution is to invest in education and economic development. This raises per capita income, which results in a lower percentage of income spent on taxes. We have made significant advances in per capita income over the past ten years but more needs to be done. Incidentally, according to the Tax Foundation, tax freedom day is next Thursday April 18,. On tax freedom day the nation as a whole has earned enough money to pay its total tax bill for the year, including federal, state and local taxes. April 18 is the average of all states. Arkansas does a little better, reaching this milestone on April 9th. Louisiana and Mississippi do even better, arriving on March 29th. Connecticut takes the longest, reaching tax freedom day on May 13th. I thank my friend Chris Spatz for editing and helping me with this article. You can obtain more information on the economy of Conway and Faulkner County by going to the Pulse of Conway website (www. pulseofconway.com). FAULKNER COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNAL | 7


2013-04 Faulkner County Business Journal  

April 2013 Faulkner County Business Journal – Maxillofacial Surgery Center of Central Arkansas: Providing better oral health and attractive...

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