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Contiki Holidays

Australia Including East Coast, Northern Territory & Diving 2011\12

Australia Travellers Guide 2011/12 Legendary for a reason

Legendary for a reason\ Your travel guide to Contiki & Australia


See more with Contiki\ Experience Contiki in Asia\ Great value tours covering China, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos & Thailand\ GREAT WALL OF CHINA

BEIJING

CHINA

XI’AN SHANGHAI China

GUILIN

YANGSHUO

HONG KONG

VIETNAM Vietnam

PAKBENG

HANOI

LUANG PRABANG

HALONG BAY

Laos LAOS

CHIANG RAI

VANG VIENG CHIANG MAI

VIENTIANE HUE DA NANG

THAILAND Thailand

HOI AN

SIEM REAP

BANGKOK

CAMBODIA Cambodia

NHA TRANG

PHNOM PENH HO CHI MINH CITY

KOH TAO KOH PHA NGAN KOH SAMUI

PHUKET ANDAMAN SEA

MEKONG DELTA

SOUTH CHINA SEA

KRABI KOH PHI PHI

7 amazing tours to pick from\ For detailed information on every one of Contiki’s Asia tours go to contiki.com\ Vietnam Highlights 10 days\ Vietnam Experience

12 days\

Asian Adventure

14 days\

Big Indochina Adventure

25 days\

Thai Island Hopper West

9 days\

Thai Island Hopper East China Adventure

9 days\ 12 days\

Download an e-brochure at contiki.com\

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Welcome to Contiki\ Thanks for choosing to holiday with Contiki! We can’t wait to meet you and guide you through one of the most beautiful places on earth (no we are not biased!). Before you get here, please take some time to read through this Travellers Guide – it’s crammed full of useful information on Australia and your tour. Contiki has been running tours for nearly 50 years and picked up some pretty useful tips...what to pack, where to meet your tour and handy phone numbers are all here - the more we can help you prepare for your tour the better. On behalf of all the Contiki Team - have a great trip!

Greg Reid General Manager Tour Operations

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Online check-in\ Save yourself time & Check-in online Want to jump the line & get on with having fun on the first day of your tour? You can. Take advantage of Contiki’s easy-to-use online Check-in service before you start your tour & skip the paperwork on day 1. It takes less than 5 minutes & it’s simple to use, all you need to do is: • Visit contiki.com/checkin • Follow the instructions on screen & enter all your essential details (like your booking reference, passport & insurance details) • You’re checked in - it’s that easy. You’ll also have access to all your essential tour information on your Contiki profile & a whole lot of cool other stuff on the Contiki Community.

Get connected\ Get advice, meet your trip mates, or become a fan! Join the Contiki Community online & connect with your tour mates before you jet off. Or meet & chat with our superknowledgeable Contiki team & past travellers for lots of handy travelling tips. Get answers to the big questions (like backpack or suitcase & how much money to take) & the small ones too. Jump in to the conversation, start your own or have a read of what others have posted. You’ll also find tons of great advice & articles in Contikipedia too. If you’re on Facebook or Twitter, remember to follow us for the latest fun & offers.

Join in now at contiki.com/community, Or follow us at: facebook.com/contiki

twitter.com/contiki

youtube.com/contiki flickr flickr.com/contikiholidays

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Finding your way around\ Before you go 6-12 • Map of Australia • What to pack • Baggage allowance • Checklist • Check-in online • Flying hints • Electricity & voltage • Insurance & security • Health/vacinations • Money matters • Access to money • Credit cards • Travellers cheques • ATMs • eKit • Budgeting • Optional activities • Calling home Other information 14-16 • Your Contiki crew • Accommodation & meals • Transport • Your share • Smoking • Music • Health & hygiene • Photography • Tipping • Laundry facilities Where your tour starts 17-20 • Alice & Uluru - ex Alice Springs • Alice & Kakadu - ex Alice Springs & Darwin • Territory & Outback - ex Alice Springs & Darwin • Sydney Explorer • Sydney New Year • Coast & Whitsundays - ex Sydney & Whitsundays • Cairns Sunshine Trail - ex Surfers Paradise & Cairns • Great Barrier Reef Diving Adventures: Learn to Dive, Dive to Adventure & Snorkel to Adventure - ex Cairns • Magical Tropics - ex Whitsundays & Cairns • Islands & Rainforests - ex Whitsundays & Cairns • Beaches & Reefs - ex Sydney & Cairns • Reefs & Rainforests ex Sydney & Cairns • Rainforest Adventure - ex Cairns • City to Surf - ex Sydney • Aussie Explorer - Sydney & Darwin Places we travel to 22-43 • Whitsunday sailing adventure • Sydney • Darwin • Alice Springs • Cairns • Surfers Paradise • Whitsundays General information 44-53 • Calendar 2011-2012 • Weekends & public holidays • The travellers ten commandments • Australia information • Geography • Climate • European history • Northern Territory • Queensland • New South Wales • Australian Capital Territory • South Australia • Victoria • Tasmania

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Map of Australia\

DARWIN

KAKADU

LITCHFIELD N.P

KATHERINE

MATARANKA

DALY WATERS

TENNANT CREEK DEVILS MARBLES WYCLIFFE WELL

NORTHERN TE TI TREE SIMPSONS GAP

KINGS CANYON

ALI

KATA TJUTA

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

ULURU

SOUTH

A

Great Australian Bight

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AKADU N.P Gulf of Carpentaria

CAPE TRIBULATION

MOSSMAN GORGE

PORT DOUGLAS

Coral Sea

CAIRNS TULLY

Great Barrier Reef

TOWNSVILLE SHUTE HARBOUR

RN TERRITORY

AIRLIE BEACH

WHITSUNDAYS (DAYDREAM ISLAND) MACKAY

QUEENSLAND

ALICE SPRINGS

CAPRICORN COAST

CATTLE STATION

FRASER ISLAND NOOSA TH

SURFERS PARADISE

AUSTRALIA

BRISBANE CURRUMBIN

BYRON BAY COFFS HARBOUR NEW SOUTH WALES PORT MACQUARIE

SYDNEY Tasman Sea

VICTORIA

TASMANIA

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Before you go\ What to pack Below is a suggested list of what you may need. It is worth remembering that June, July and August are the Australian winter months, and you’ll need more warm clothes, especially in the Northern Territory (The Outback). Even in summer, it can be cool in the evenings, particularly in the Southern States. Baggage Allowance Decide how many clothes you want to take - halve the amount and that’s how much you’ll need! You may bring on tour with you one reasonable sized bag or suitcase (73cm x 50cm x 25cm/29” x 20’ x 10’) with a maximum weight of 20kg (44 lb) and one piece of hand luggage (to carry on the coach/airplane with you) with a maximum weight of 7kg (15lb). Please ensure you pack to these weights as it’s required by Australian safety regulations. Remember, if your tour includes a flight you are also subject to airline baggage restrictions. There is very limited space available for luggage on our Whitsunday sailing adventure, Fraser Island 4WD option and Cape Tribulation. Therefore, we would suggest that you take a small bag on the yachts/specialist vehicles. Your regular luggage will be safely stored during this time. ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏

Camera/extra memory stick 1 Rain jacket 1 Warm jacket 2 Pairs of jeans Shorts/skirts 3 Casual shirts 2 T-shirts Jacket & trousers Dresses (for evenings out) 1 Warm sweater Tracksuit Socks Underwear Sandals/Thongs 1 pair of comfortable shoes (for outdoor activities & hikes)

❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏

1 small bath towel Toilet bag and contents Sunglasses Suntan lotion Insect repellent Aspirin/medicines etc. Hankies/tissues Washing powder Pegs Sewing Kit Writing material Address book Nightwear Swimwear and towel 1 Pair of good shoes Flashlight 1 pair of smart casual shoes for evenings

Remember to bring your supplies of any pills and medicines you normally might need - like antibiotics or antihistamines.

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9 Checklist Have you got your: ❏

Travel Insurance

Camera & memory stick

Passport

Contiki Tour Vouchers

Visas (if applicable)

Hotel Vouchers

Credit Cards

NB: Don’t pack your passport or money in your suitcase. Passports, visas and electronic travel authority Visa requirements vary. Please check with your travel agent to make sure you have the necessary documents. Don’t forget your passport. It is compulsory to carry a passport for presentation when arriving or leaving Australia. You can apply for an ETA instead of a visa over the internet. Check out this website for details: http://www.eta.immi.gov.au/index.html Check-in online Give us your details and tell us what you’re interested in before you start your tour. It’ll save you time, so you can get on with having fun as soon as you arrive. Visit contiki.com/checkin for details or see page 4 for more. Flying hints Ensure you carry all your travel documentation in your hand luggage, which also includes camera, memory stick, toiletries, paperbacks etc. Make sure you take advantage of duty free shopping, but check the current duty free limits that apply. You should also check current airline carry-on luggage restrictions. Please make sure that you leave photocopies of your important documents (eg passports & visas) with someone at home. The longer flights can be a little more enjoyable by wearing loose clothing, comfy shoes as well as walking the aisles regularly, eating sensibly and drinking plenty of fluids. Try to get some sleep and upon arrival, adjust easily into local time by waiting until the evening before sleeping - this should relieve the effects of jet lag. Travellers should be familiar with any health and travel information published by airlines and/or government agencies. Electricity and voltage Australia operates on 240v, and clients travelling from outside New Zealand or Australia will require an adaptor which allows you to plug into a 3 pin power socket.

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10 Insurance and security It is essential that you are always security conscious. Your most important possessions such as your passport, money and camera should be carefully guarded at all times. Loss of such items could ruin your holiday, so only bring your essential valuables along. It is strongly recommended that all Contiki Travellers are adequately covered for Cancellation and Curtailment Insurance prior to their tour departure, and we strongly advise insurance against loss of or damage to baggage & loss of personal money too. Health/vaccinations It is strongly recommended that all Contiki travellers are adequately covered by medical insurance prior to their tour departure. Please purchase your Insurance from your travel agent prior to your tour departure. If you suffer from any form of illness, be sure to have an adequate supply of medicines with you on tour. It’s important to advise us through your travel agent of any important medical conditions you may have, before departure. Vaccinations are not required unless a traveller has travelled through an infected area within 14 days of arrival in Australia. Embassy Contact Information Canadian Embassy Sydney Consulate General of Canada Level 5, 111 Harrington Street Sydney, NSW 2000 (P) 02 9364 3000 www.international.gc.ca/ australia U.S Consular Services Sydney U.S. Consulate General MLC Canter, Level 59 19-29 Martin Place, Sydney, NSW 2000 (P) 02 9373 9200 www.canberra.usembassy. gov/ British High Commission Canberra Commonwealth Avenue Yarralumba ACT 2600 (P) 02 6270 6666 www.ukinaustralia.fco.gov.uk/

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German Embassy Canberra 119 Empire Circuit Yarralumba, ACT 2600 (P) 6270 1911 www.canberra.diplo.de South African High Commission Corner of State Circle & Rhodes Place Yarralumba, ACT 2600 (02) 6272 7300 www.sahc.org.au New Zealand High Commission Sydney New Zealand Passport Office Level 10, 55 Hunter Street Sydney, NSW 2000 www.nzembassy.com/ australia

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Money in Australia\ In Australia there is one currency, the Australian dollar. In paper notes you’ll find $100, $50, $20, $10 & $5. The coins available are $2, $1, $.50, $.20, $.10 & $.05. Access to money We highly recommend that you carry money in a number of different ways (cash & credit cards) so that you have access to money at all times while you’re on tour. Credit cards Most credit cards such as American Express, Diners Club, Visa and Mastercard are accepted in Australia. Optional activities can be paid by Visa, American Express and Mastercard or by Debit card. Your Tour Manager can advise you. Always remember to guard your card, even on holiday: • Check the expiry date of your card when making travel plans. • Ensure you know your P.I.N. number. Memorise it. Do not write it down. • Ensure that your card is kept in view at all times when paying for goods and services. • Ensure that the total amount of your purchase is entered on the sales voucher before you sign it. • Retain all copies of sales vouchers until you have verified them against your statements. • Insist that all ‘spoiled’ sales vouchers are destroyed in your presence. • Carry your card on you or in your hand luggage. • Never leave your cards unattended in your hotel room, vehicle or any other place. • Treat your cards as you would cash. • Report immediately the loss or theft of your credit cards. Following are Australian credit card contact details: MasterCard: 1800 120 113 Visa: 1800 125 440 American Express: 1300 132 639 Diners: 1300 360 060 Travelex Cash Passport Cash Passport will change the way you think about your money when travelling. Providing all the security of travellers cheques with the convenience of plastic, it allows you to preload your travel money for safe and convenient use at 1.4 million ATMs as well as shops and restaurants worldwide. www.cashpassport.com

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12 ATMs Automatic Teller machines are found everywhere throughout Australia providing easy access to cash. Prior to leaving home check your bank’s credit/debit card will work in Australian ATMs. ekit Save on International Calls. Look out for your Contiki Global Phonecard in your travel documents. It even comes charged with enough credit to make a 5 minute call from practically anywhere in the world! Budgeting This is a difficult subject to give advice on because the amount varies from person to person and a lot depends on how much you spend on shopping, entertainment, drinks and Explore More optional activities. To cover extra expenses such as optional activities, lunch, nights out, drinks and souvenirs, we suggest you allow around (or up to) A$80.00 per day. This amount will obviously vary depending on individual tastes and spending habits. Optional activities An Australian tour with Contiki is all about experiencing ‘once in a lifetime’ outdoor adventures. Lots of these are included in the tour price. However, there is also available a wide range of other exciting activities both on tour and in the gateway cities before and after your tour. To assist you with planning your budget, you will be sent (with your final documents) a comprehensive day by day itinerary including full details and costs of the awesome optional activities available on your tour. As mentioned on page 12, most optional activities can be paid by credit/debit card or Travelex Cash Passport. Your Tour Manager can advise you. Note: Contiki does not operate nor has any liability for any listed activity, but all are the responsibility of Third Party Operators. Please remember that all adventure activities are undertaken at your own risk. For any that you choose, the Tour Manager will make firm bookings in advance and you will be liable for the costs then. Calling home Making international calls is easy: dial the access number for Australia (see your card for details or visit www.contiki.ekit. com for a list of all access numbers). Enter your ekit account number and pin (see the back of your phonecard) and listen to the prompts. Dial the country code (e.g. UK 44, Germany 49 or America 1), area code (without the leading zero) and the phone number you wish to call. Some of the properties we stay in will have a telephone in your room and a connection fee will generally be charged. Sometimes, room phones will be barred unless a credit card imprint is left for security.

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Other info\ Your Contiki Team\ Tour Manager Think of your Tour Manager as your walking, talking guidebook. They’re there to help you make the most of each day. They’ve been on an intensive training trip so they really know their stuff and are looking forward to sharing their expert knowledge with you. Best of all they take care of all the organising – accommodation, sightseeing, optional activities, etc – so that you don’t have to. Tour Driver Our Tour Drivers are well trained to handle jam-packed streets and busy motorways. They know their way around, so you can sit back and relax. Best of all, they’ll drop you right at your door so you won’t have to lug your bags around. Accommodation & meals Whether you’re touring the coast or the Outback, you’ll stay in some amazing spots especially chosen for you to experience the real Australia. Ranging from resorts offering lodge or hotelstyle accommodation to hotels in towns and city centres, each nightspot is as varied as the place you’ll visit. Accommodation is based on quad share and twin share (according to your booking). On the ‘Territory & Outback’, ‘Alice & Uluru’ and ‘Aussie Explorer’ tours, we spend a night in an outback bushcamp. Here we sleep under the stars in a traditional Aussie ‘swag’. All equipment and sleeping bags are supplied. Your tour includes breakfast and dinner as per the itinerary. Some lunches are also provided (eg. on the Whitsunday Sailing Adventure). You also have the opportunity to experience special meals out which are not included in your tour price.

Getting around\ Your coach Our modern air-conditioned coaches are some of the best in the South Pacific and we update our fleet regularly to make sure they’re environmentally friendly. Then there are the Contiki extra’s like panoramic windows, a stereo sound system, reclining seats, a toilet, and power points for ‘charging on the go’ (don’t forget your power adaptor). Since you’ll spend a bit of time on the coach travelling from place to place, your Tour Manager will explain the best ways of enjoying your time and keeping the coach comfortable for everybody on-board. Your comfort is our top concern and the toilet on the coach is for everyone to use. We do make frequent stops every few hours where you will have the opportunity to buy a drink or snack, smoke (if you do) and use other toilets.

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15 We do not have set seating on our tours, however, out of consideration for others, front and window seats should not be monopolised, which is perfect for mixing it up with your new travel buddies. Smoking Smoking is not permitted on Australian touring coaches. However, during each journey frequent stops are made, when you can smoke if you wish. Smoking is also not permitted inside public places like as restaurants & hotels. Music All our coaches are fitted with state of the art audio and DVD systems. We have a supply of music on-board but we invite our travellers to bring their iPods or mp3’s to play on-board. You’ll be able to take it in turns to choose the music. A guitar is welcome too - but it is your own responsibility. Health and hygiene Life on a Contiki tour can get quite hectic with early morning starts and late nights which makes it easy for you to catch a common cold or flu. Also, different air, water, food and lifestyle can reduce your resistance to sickness and you may find a course of vitamins will help you. Please keep these points in mind while travelling - sickness can spoil a wonderful holiday. If you feel unwell, do not hesitate to let your Tour Manager know and he/she will assist you in contacting a doctor for consultation if necessary. If you are on a regular course of medicine/contraception, it is a good idea to bring a supply sufficient for the whole time you are away from home, as your particular medicine and/ or brand may not be readily available. Everyday medications e.g. band aids and aspirin are not carried on the coach and are your own responsibility. Note: Any traveller found using illegal drugs will immediately be told to leave the tour. Photography Ensure you have plenty of film or memory cards. Your Tour Manager will endeavour to allow as much time as possible for the taking of photographs, but on occasions, particularly when travelling in the coach, this can be difficult & impractical. Please be aware that Aboriginal people are sensitive about their image or specific sites being captured on film - ask your Contiki Team if a situation involving Aboriginal people is appropriate to photograph if you are unsure.

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16 Tipping In all areas of the service industry from restaurants, bars & hotels, it’s becoming increasingly common practice to tip if you feel that the service received has been excellent. The same goes for your Contiki Team. If you feel that your Tour Manager & Driver’s service has been exceptional, then feel free to tip them. Our travellers often ask what is a reasonable tip for a Contiki Team that have done an excellent job of looking after them. Around AU$3 per person per day is what we suggest. Remember that tipping (and how much you tip) is entirely optional - it’s entirely up to you. Laundry facilities Depending on the length of your tour, it’s a good idea to start the tour with enough clothes to keep you going for at least a week, so if it does take you a while to get the opportunity to do washing, you won’t be caught out. Laundry services are available at extra cost, so ask your Tour Manager for any info on accommodation where laundry facilities are available.

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Where your tour starts\ Alice & Uluru - ex Alice Springs (AEAD) Start: 8.00am from the All Seasons Oasis, 10 Gap Road, ALICE SPRINGS, N.T. 0870. Tel: (08) 8652 1444 Fax: (08) 8952 3776. Finish: 5.00pm at the All Seasons Oasis, ALICE SPRINGS (Australia & New Zealand bookings). Finish: 9.00am at the All Seasons Oasis, ALICE SPRINGS (Rest of World bookings). Alice & Uluru ex Alice Springs (AEDA) Start: 1.30pm from the All Seasons Oasis, 10 Gap Road, ALICE SPRINGS, N.T. 0870. Tel: (08) 8652 1444 Fax: (08) 8952 3776 Finish: 5.00pm at the All Seasons Oasis, ALICE SPRINGS (Australia & New Zealand bookings). Finish: 9.00am at the All Seasons Oasis, ALICE SPRINGS (Rest of World bookings). Alice & Kakadu - ex Alice Springs Start: 9.00am from the All Seasons Oasis, 10 Gap Road, ALICE SPRINGS, N.T. 0870. Tel: (08) 8652 1444 Fax: (08) 8952 3776 Finish: 6.00pm at the Quality Frontier Darwin, DARWIN. Alice & Kakadu - ex Darwin Start: 7.30am from the Quality Frontier Darwin, 3 Buffalo Court, DARWIN, NT 0800. Tel: (08) 8981 5333 Fax: (08) 8941 0909 Finish: 2.00pm at the All Seasons Oasis, ALICE SPRINGS. Territory & Outback - ex Alice Springs Start: 8.00am from the All Seasons Oasis, 10 Gap Road, ALICE SPRINGS, N.T. 0870. Tel: (08) 8652 1444 Fax: (08) 8952 3776. Finish: 6.00pm at the Quality Frontier Darwin, DARWIN. Territory & Outback - ex Darwin Start: 7.30am from the Quality Frontier Darwin, 3 Buffalo Court, DARWIN, NT 0800. Tel: (08) 8981 5333 Fax: (08) 8941 0909. Finish: 9.00am at the All Seasons Oasis, ALICE SPRINGS. Sydney Explorer Check-in from: 3.00pm at the Holiday Inn Potts Point, 203 Victoria Street, Potts Point, NSW 2011 Tel: (02) 9368 4000 Fax: (02) 8356 9111 Check-out: 10.00am from the Holiday Inn Potts Point, Sydney.

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18 Sydney New Year Start: 5.00pm (check-in from 3.00pm) at the Holiday Inn Potts Point, 203 Victoria Street, Potts Point, NSW 2011 Tel: (02) 9368 4000 Fax: (02) 8356 9111 Check-out: 10.00am from the Holiday Inn Potts Point, SYDNEY. Coast & Whitsundays - ex Sydney Start: 7.00am from the Holiday Inn Potts Point, 203 Victoria Street, Potts Point, NSW 2011 Tel: (02) 9368 4000 Fax: (02) 8356 9111 Finish: 8.00am at Daydream Island Resort, WHITSUNDAYS. Coast & Whitsundays - ex Whitsundays Start: 5.00pm from Daydream Island Resort, WHITSUNDAY PASSAGE, QLD. Tel: (07) 4948 8488 Fax: (07) 4948 8499 Finish: 6pm at the Holiday Inn Potts Point, SYDNEY. Note: Clients who have booked the Whitsunday sailing option must check in at the Pro Sail office at shop 1, 4 The Esplanade, Airlie Beach from 3.00pm. Cairns Sunshine Trail - ex Surfers Paradise Start: 4.30pm from Australis Sovereign Resort, 138 Ferny Avenue, SURFERS PARADISE, QLD 4217 Tel: (07) 5579 3888 Fax: (07) 5579 3877 Finish: 9.00am at the Rydges Esplanade Resort, CAIRNS. Cairns Sunshine Trail - ex Cairns Start: 2.00pm from Rydges Esplanade Resort, CAIRNS, Corner The Esplanade & Kerwin Street, CAIRNS, QLD 4870 Tel: (07) 4044 9000 Fax: (07) 4044 9002 Finish: 8.00am at Australis Sovereign Resort, SURFERS PARADISE. Cairns Underwater Discoveries - Great Barrier Reef Diving Adventures: Learn to Dive, Dive to Adventure & Snorkel to Adventure - ex Cairns Transfers to/from your accommodation to either the Prodive Training Centre or to the Dive Boat are included. Please contact Prodive (07) 4031 5255 at least the day prior to advise accommodation details and confirm pick up times. Magical Tropics - ex Whitsundays Start: 5.00pm from Daydream Island Resort, WHITSUNDAY PASSAGE, QLD. Tel: (07) 4948 8488 Fax: (07) 4948 8499 Finish: 9.00am at Rydges Esplanade Resort, CAIRNS. Note Clients who have booked the Whitsunday sailing option must check in at the Pro Sail office at shop 1, 4 The Esplanade, Airlie Beach from 3.00pm.

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19 Magical Tropics - ex Cairns Start: 2.00pm from Rydges Esplanade Resort, CAIRNS, Corner The Esplanade & Kerwin Street, CAIRNS, QLD 4870 Tel: (07) 4044 9000 Fax: (07) 4044 9002 Finish: 8.00am at Daydream Island Resort, WHITSUNDAYS. Island & Rainforest - ex Whitsundays Start: 5.00pm from Daydream Island Resort, WHITSUNDAY PASSAGE, QLD. Tel: (07) 4948 8488 Fax: (07) 4948 8499 Finish: 4.00pm at Rydges Esplanade Resort, CAIRNS. Note: Clients who have booked the Whitsunday sailing option must check in at the Pro Sail office at shop 1, 4 The Esplanade, Airlie Beach from 3.00pm. Island & Rainforest - ex Cairns Start: 7.30am from Rydges Esplanade Resort, CAIRNS, Corner The Esplanade & Kerwin Street, CAIRNS, QLD 4870 Tel: (07) 4044 9000 Fax: (07) 4044 9002 Finish: 8.00am at Daydream Island Resort, WHITSUNDAYS. Beaches & Reefs - ex Sydney Start: 7.00am from the Holiday Inn Potts Point, 203 Victoria Street, Potts Point, NSW 2011 Tel: (02) 9368 4000 Fax: (02) 8356 9111 Finish: 9.00am at Rydges Esplanade Resort, CAIRNS. Beaches & Reefs - ex Cairns 2.00pm from Rydges Esplanade Resort, CAIRNS, Corner Start: The Esplanade & Kerwin Street, CAIRNS, QLD 4870 Tel: (07) 4044 9000 Fax: (07) 4044 9002 Finish: 6.00pm at the Holiday Inn Potts Point, SYDNEY. Reefs & Rainforests - ex Sydney Start: 7.00am from the Holiday Inn Potts Point, 203 Victoria Street, Potts Point, NSW 2011 Tel: (02) 9368 4000 Fax: (02) 8356 9111 Finish: 4.00pm at Rydges Esplanade Resort, CAIRNS. Reefs & Rainforests - ex Cairns 7.30am from Rydges Esplanade Resort, CAIRNS, Corner Start: The Esplanade & Kerwin Street, CAIRNS, QLD 4870 Tel: (07) 4044 9000 Fax: (07) 4044 9002 Finish: 6.00pm at the Holiday Inn Potts Point, SYDNEY. Rainforest Adventure - ex Cairns Start: 7.30am from the Cairns Colonial Club Resort, 18-26 Cannon Street, CAIRNS, QLD 4870. Tel: (07) 4053 5111 Fax: (07) 4053 7072 Finish: 5.00pm at the Cairns Colonial Club Resort, CAIRNS.

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20 City to Surf - ex Sydney Start: 7.00am from the Holiday Inn Potts Point, 203 Victoria Street, Potts Point, NSW 2011 Tel: (02) 9368 4000 Fax: (02) 8356 9111 Finish: 8.00am at the Australis Sovereign Resort, SURFERS PARADISE. Aussie Explorer - ex Sydney Start: Start: 7.00am from the Holiday Inn Potts Point, 203 Victoria Street, Potts Point, NSW 2011 Tel: (02) 9368 4000 Fax: (02) 8356 9111 Finish: 6.00pm at the Quality Frontier Darwin, DARWIN. Aussie Explorer - ex Darwin Start: 7.30am from the Quality Frontier Darwin, 3 Buffalo Court, DARWIN, NT 0800 Tel: (08) 8981 5333 Fax: (08) 8941 0909 Finish: 6.00pm at the Holiday Inn Potts Point, SYDNEY.

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Places we travel to\ Your pre tour Kick-start meetings A Kick-start meeting is generally organised for tours commencing in Sydney, Cairns, Darwin and Alice Springs the evening prior to the tour departs. The venue and timings for this meeting will be posted on the Contiki notice board of the hotel lobby. This meeting is organised by the Contiki Tour Manager and is a great opportunity to meet your fellow travellers. If you miss the coach Clients should contact Reception staff at the departure hotel as soon as possible. All possible assistance will be given to help clients catch up with their tour. On some tours, the actual departure day is spent sightseeing in the gateway city and its surrounds. Therefore if you do miss the coach, please check into the hotel and you will be able to catch up with your tour when they return in the afternoon. N.B: Any cost incurred if you miss the coach will be at your own expense.

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The Whitsundays\ Whitsundays sailing adventure If you are joining a tour in the Whitsundays and have booked and paid for the Whitsundays Sailing Option, please check in at Pro Sail office, shop 1, 4 The Esplanade, Airlie Beach. Tel: 1800 810 116 or (07) 4946 7533. The Sailing Option starts at 4.00pm (please check-in from 3.00pm). Please note that once the yachts depart the mainland, there is no opportunity to purchase supplies. Therefore it is important that you are prepared and prior to departure have with you all you need for the 2 nights sailing including a small overnight bag (larger pieces of luggage can’t be taken on-board). What you take is up to you, but may we suggest items such as bottled drinking water, snacks and soft drinks, sufficient sun screen and any items that you’ll require on-board. Please also note that alcohol is not sold on the yachts.

Sydney information\ Contiki’s accommodation in Sydney: Holiday Inn Potts Point, 203 Victoria Street, Potts Point, NSW 2011, Tel: +61 2 9368 4000 Fax: +61 2 8356 9111 How to get there: The Holiday Inn Potts Point is 16 km (10 miles) from Sydney International Airport. Shuttle buses meet all incoming flights and will drop off at the hotel on request (from approx. A$13). Also available is the airport link rail service which travels to Sydney Central Station then change trains for Kings Cross Station - located directly under the hotel (approx. A$15.80). The taxi fare from the airport terminals to the Holiday Inn Potts Point is approx. A$35.

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24 Useful information Shopping: Normal shopping hours in Sydney are generally 9.00am to 5.30pm Monday to Friday and 9.00am to 4.00pm on weekends. There is late night shopping till 9.00pm on Thursday nights and most tourist shops and department stores are open on Sunday. The main shopping area in Sydney is bounded by George and Elizabeth Streets and Martin Place and Park Street. Banks: Open 9.00am to 4.00pm Monday to Thursday and 9.00am to 5.00pm Friday. Useful telephone numbers: Emergency Police, Ambulance, Fire Flight arrivals and departures Qantas Virgin Blue Jetstar Air New Zealand Singapore Airlines British Airways Cathay Pacific United Airlines Thai Airlines Canadian Consulate British Consulate American Consulate New Zealand Consulate Sydney Entertainment Centre Australia Directory Assistance

000 13 1223 13 1313 13 6789 13 1528 13 2476 13 1011 13 00 360 060 13 1747 13 1777 13 00 651 960 (02) 9364 3000 (02) 9247 7521 (02) 9373 9200 (02) 9247 1344 (02) 9320 4200 12456

Main tourist sights In one of the most beautiful cities in the world it’s hard to limit our suggestions of what to do. Probably the best thing we can recommend is doubling the amount of time you were going to spend here! Check out our 4 day Sydney Explorer package at www.contiki.com/tours/73-sydney-explorer. Here’s a small taste of what’s on offer: Bondi Beach You can’t do Sydney without a visit to Bondi Beach. Whether you’re into swimming, surfing or having a cold beer by the water, Bondi Beach is the place to be. There’s a ton of surfwear shops for those in need of retail therapy, and the people watching is out of this world. If you’re in Sydney for the weekend, schedule your Bondi visit for a Sunday – the Bondi markets run on this day and are great for picking up cheap jewellery and clothes. A cab from Potts Point to Bondi Beach will cost around A$25, or you can take a train from Kings Cross Station to the Bondi Junction transport interchange and then a 381 or 389 bus to Bondi Beach.

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25 Bondi - Coogee walk Feeling energetic? Then do the walk from Bondi to Coogee – it takes a couple of hours but is well worth it. Pretty much the entire walk is along the cliff face of the Pacific Ocean and you’ll pass great Sydney beaches along the way including Tamarama, Bronte and Clovelly – each with its own distinct personality. And here’s a tip, if you can pick up a cheap snorkel and mask, do! Clovelly Beach is a marine reserve and the true beauty of the beach is underwater. Kings Cross Ahh.. what visit to Sydney would be complete without a peek at Sydney’s underbelly? Kings Cross is a colourful mix of street workers, the eccentric and strip clubs. Ironically it is also home to some of Sydney’s ‘uber cool’ bars including Hugos Lounge & Soho and has some fantastic places to eat. Paddington The area for serious shoppers. Paddington’s golden mile of Oxford Street features some of Australia’s great designer stores including Wayne Cooper, Marcs and Morrisey. Arthurs Pizza is an institution amongst the locals and if you are after a piece of Australian art, make sure you pop into Dinosaur Design where handcrafted resin homeware and jewellery are on offer. It would be worth your while to plan your visit to Paddington on a Saturday – that’s when the Paddington Markets take place. The Markets are about a 1.5km walk from Potts Point or a cab costs under A$10. Paddys Market Not to be confused with the Paddington Market, Paddys Market runs Friday, Saturdays and Sundays near Darling Harbour. If you’re after cheap sheepskins, Ugg boots, cellphone covers or bags, this market was made for you. Watsons Bay Another thing we can’t talk up enough is Sydney’s Harbour. We’d recommend catching the Watson’s Bay ferry - the trip takes about 40 minutes from Circular Quay (area where the Sydney Opera House is located) and ends up at Watsons Bay. Here you can visit Watsons Bay Hotel for a bbq meal and cold beer by the water’s edge. Circular Quay, The Rocks & Sydney Opera House OK, this is about as touristy as it gets, but well worth the visit if you’re new to Sydney. Circular Quay is located at the bottom of the CBD and can be reached by walking in a straight line towards the water down any of Sydney’s main CBD streets. When you get there grab a gelato from Gelatissimo and head towards the Opera House. Take in this Aussie icon under your own steam, or join a 60 minute tour for A$35.00. To the left of Circular Quay is the famous Rocks area.

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26 Avoid the markets here unless you are looking for overpriced trinkets. Instead explore the back streets, grab some lunch, then walk over the Sydney Harbour Bridge. The walk will take about 30 minutes each way and best of all it’s free! Chinatown Hay St and Dixon St offer over 30 different restaurants serving hundreds of different oriental dishes. Taronga Park Zoo Taronga Park Zoo is situated on one of the most amazing sites overlooking Sydney Harbour. Not only is it home to a collection of rare animals from around the world, it also has a huge selection of Australian wildlife with almost 4000 animals. The largest selection of the zoo is devoted to Australian animals such as kangaroos, platypus, echidnas and, of course koalas! You’ll need to catch a ferry from Circular Quay to the zoo, and you can save a bit of cash if you purchase a Zoo Pass from the ferry terminal covering your ferry ride and zoo entry. Sydney Observatory The Observatory comes into its own at night. View the ‘Southern Skies’ through a high-powered telescope in the copper dome. Bookings essential. Tel: 9217 0485.

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27 Sydney Aquarium One of the largest and most spectacular aquariums in the world is at Darling Harbour. Experience the sharks, rays and fish of all shapes from tunnels under the harbour, and if you have never experienced the Great Barrier Reef…. then this is your chance to see the magic of the reef and its brilliant colours of live coral and tropical fish! Other special features are crocodiles, a touch pool and micro aquariums, platypus and penguins. Open 7 days from 9.30am to 10pm. AAT Kings If you have a half or full day spare, AAT Kings has some great day trips to the Hunter Valley or Blue Mountains. Mention you’re a Contiki customer and you’ll receive a 10% discount. Bookings can be made by calling (02) 9700 0133. The Australian Museum The Australian Museum houses examples of everything that is unique to Australia – the oldest continent on earth. Check out the best collection of South Pacific ethnography in the world - the traditional culture of Australian Aborigines, the people of Papua New Guinea and Pacific Islands. Located on the corner of William and College Sts (see map on page 30). Open 7 days from 9.30am – 5.00pm. Powerhouse Museum The Powerhouse is created from the shell of a former power station and isn’t like your run of the mill museum. Over 25 exhibitions give you an insight into human achievement, science and technology, the decorative arts, and everyday lives of Australians. From a NASA space station to a 1930s cinema, the Boulton and Watt rotative steam engine, to Sandra Rhodes ball gown, all can be found amongst the museum’s diverse displays. Located at 100 Harris St, Ultimo (see map on page 29). Open 7 days from 10.00am – 5.00pm. Hyde Park Barracks Designed and built in 1819 by convicts for convicts. Now it is a museum, & a spooky one at that! Located in Queens Square, Macquarie Street the Barracks are open 7 days from 10.00am to 5.00pm. Museum of Sydney A multi-media experience on the site of the first Government House. The museum tells the many stories of the colony’s first days. Located on the corner of Philip & Bridge Streets, the Museum is open 7 days from 10.00am to 5.00pm.

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28 Queen Victoria Building To call the QVB a shopping arcade is a major understatement. Over 200 boutiques and galleries including major chains and unique speciality shops. Just window shopping is a treat. Open 7 days, 24 hours. Sydney Harbour Bridge If you really want to get to know the bridge, walk over it, either by way of the free public walk way on the eastern side of the bridge or over the arch, with the help of BridgeClimb. BridgeClimb offers those with a sense of adventure the chance to climb to the top. Operating 7 days and evenings a week, bookings are essential. Call (02) 8274 7777 for further information or for those finishing a tour in Sydney ask your Tour Manager for assistance.

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29

11 9 WALSH BAY

7

13

14

SYDNEY COVE ARGYLE ST

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6

FARM COVE

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2

WOOLLOOMOOLOO BAY

3 CA

HI

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EX

PITT ST

PR

8

ES

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VICTORIA STREET

STREET GEORGE

DARLING HARBOUR

MACQUARIES ST

GE ST BRID

ST YORK

N ROAD HICKSO

T ST KEN

ALFRED ST

AY

MARTIN PLACE

QUEENS SQUARE

5

IS RR HA ST

TIM UL

AV E

STREET

HAY ST

CATHEDRAL

WILLIAM STREET

1

STANLEY STREET

LIVERPOOL ST

15

10

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PARK

GEORGE

ST

GOULB

PARK ST

WE NT WO RT H

IS RR HA

BATHURST ST

HYDE

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McELHONE STREET

T ST

16

Holiday Inn Potts Point

LIVERPOOL ST OX FO RD ST LBU

DA RL ING HU RS TR OA D

MARKE

PYRMONT BRID GE

BUNN ST

COLLEGE

MURRAY ST

UNION ST

AV E

12

HA IG

ST

ELIZABETH STREET

KING

RN S T

T OS

18

1

Australian Museum

10 Powerhouse Museum

2

Australia Square

11 Sydney Harbour Bridge

3

Conservatorium of Music

12 Sydney Tower

4

Government House

13 The Wharf Theatre

5

Town Hall

14 Mrs Macquarie’s Chair

6

Observatory

15 Chinatown

7

Opera House

16 Queen Victoria Building

8

Parliament

17 Museum of Sydney

9

Pier One

18 Central Station

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Darwin information\ Contiki’s accommodation in Darwin: Quality Frontier Darwin, 3 Buffalo Court, DARWIN, NT 0800 Tel: (08) 8981 5333 Fax: (08) 8941 0909 How to get there: The Quality Frontier Darwin is 6 km (4 miles) from Darwin International Airport. Darwin Airport Shuttle Service meets all incoming flights and will drop off at the hotel on request (approx. A$11). A taxi fare is approx. A$25. Useful information: Shopping: Monday to Saturday 9.00am to 5.00pm, with late night hours on Thursday at the Smith Street Mall and Friday at Casuarina. Most tourist shops are open on Sunday. Banks: Open between 9.30am and 4.00pm Monday to Thursday and 9.30am to 5.00pm Friday. Main tourist sights The top of the Northern Territory is warm and tropical year round, with the bustling cosmopolitan city of Darwin as its focal point. Darwin boasts a casino and offers a variety of unique attractions, most of which are visited on your coach sightseeing tour. Don’t forget to buy one or two of the famous Darwin Stubbies, the largest bottles of beer in the world. They contain 2 litres of locally brewed Northern Territory Draught Beer. Doctor’s Gully Watch and participate in the feeding of fish at Doctor’s Gully on the high tides. Indo Pacific Marine This exhibition allows you to view the live coral, tropical fish and marine animals, without getting your feet wet!

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Alice Springs information\ Contiki’s accommodation in Alice Springs: All Seasons Oasis, 10 Gap Road, ALICE SPRINGS NT 0870 Tel: (08) 8952 1444 Fax: (08) 8952 3776 How to get there The All Seasons Oasis is 12 km (7 miles) from Alice Springs Airport. The Airport Shuttle Service meets all incoming flights and will drop off at the hotel on request (approx. A$15). A taxi to the hotel costs approx. A$30. Useful information Shopping Normal shopping hours are 9.00am to 5.30pm Monday to Friday and 9.00am to 12 noon on Saturday. However, some shops are open until 9.00pm on Friday and K-Mart and Coles are open Saturday and Sunday from 9.00am to 5.30pm. Banks Monday to Thursday 9.30am to 4.00pm and Friday 9.30am to 5.00pm. Main tourist sights Located in what is almost the geographic centre of this vast continent is Alice Springs, the Northern Territory’s second largest town.

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33 Not surprisingly, the area around Alice Springs is known simply as ‘The Centre’. Alice Springs boasts a casino and offers a variety of unique attractions, most of which are visited on your coach sightseeing tour. One-day Palm Valley 4 wheel-drive trip Take the opportunity to experience a unique part of Central Australia, accessible only by 4-wheel drive. Travel through Hermannsburg, then down the Finke River, one of the oldest watercourses in the world. See spectacular rock forms, white sands and an oasis of rock pools and palm trees. Visit the nearby spectacular rock formation known as the Amphitheatre and relax by a waterhole shaded by numerous tall palms. The full day excursion includes morning tea, picnic lunch and afternoon tea. Book through your Tour Manager or call AAT Kings on 1300 556 100. Old Gaol Situated between the courthouse and the police station is Alice Springs’ first gaol, one of the original buildings of the town. It was preserved at the request of the National Trust when the new courthouse was built. Diarama Village This brilliant attraction traces the myths and legends of the Australian Aboriginal people. An excellent selection of art is also on display. Panorama Guth Panorama ‘Guth’ - 360 degrees, 6 metres high and 60 metres in circumference, a painted landscape of the best known beauty spots of the centre. Painted by Dutch born Alice Springs artist, Henck Guth.

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Cairns information\ Contiki’s accommodation in Cairns: Rydges Esplanade Resort, CAIRNS, Corner The Esplanade & Kerwin Street, CAIRNS, QLD 4870 Tel: (07) 4044 9000 Fax: (07) 4044 9002 How to get there The Rydges Esplanade Resort Cairns is about 6km (4 miles) from Cairns International Airport. A taxi to the hotel is approx. A$15, or you can book a transfer at the ‘Australian Sun Palm’ transfer desk in the baggage hall of Cairns International Airport for approx. A$7.50 Useful information Shopping: Shops are open Monday to Friday 9.00am to 5.30pm with late night shopping Thursday night till 9.00pm, Saturday morning to 12noon. Banks: Hours 9.00am to 4.00pm Monday to Thursday and 9.00am to 5.00pm Friday. Main tourist sights Cairns in Northern Queensland is a relaxed tropical city of over 120,000 people, close to the Great Barrier Reef, Cape York and the beautiful tablelands of the north. Marlin fishing and scuba diving are big attractions in the area. The city and surroundings offer a variety of unique attractions, most of which are visited on your coach sightseeing tour. These include the optional Outer Barrier Reef cruise, and the chance to visit the village of Kuranda by Skyrail or the Scenic Train. Atherton Tableland: West of Cairns, an area of great scenic beauty, endowed with crystal, sparkling waterfalls, tropical vegetation and mysterious crater lakes. Green Island: You can spend a pleasant relaxing day on this small coral cay, with its inviting white beaches and tropical environm.ent. Take a Great Adventures fast catamaran. Port Douglas: This once sleepy village is now the playground of millionaires, tourists and locals, who come to enjoy its casual but spectacular sights. Laze on the beach, walk through the markets or drink coffee in one of the chic cafés.

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CHOOSE FROM 4 SPECTACULAR COASTAL DROP ZONES!! CAIRNS - MISSION BEACH BYRON BAY - COFFS HARBOUR

VE SKYD AUSTRALIA Australia’s Highest Skydive

t4FFZPVS$POUJLJ5PVS.BOBHFSUPCPPLOPX t+VNQXJUIZPVSNBUFTPVUPGPVSTFBUBJSDSBGU t'SFF5SBOTGFST t)JHIFTURVBMJUZWJEFPQIPUPPQUJPOT

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Surfers Paradise information\ Contiki’s accommodation in Surfers Paradise: Australis Sovereign Resort, 138 Ferny Avenue SURFERS PARADISE, QLD, 4217. Tel: (07) 5579 3888 Fax: (07) 5579 3877 How to get there There are two airports servicing Surfers Paradise. Gold Coast airport is approx. 22 km (14 miles) or 30 minutes drive south, and transfer shuttles cost approx. A$18 one way. Brisbane airport is approx. 90 km (56 miles) or one and a half hours north, and transfer shuttles cost approx. A$39 one way. There is also an airport train to the Gold Coast, costing A$26. Alight at Nerang Station then it’s a 12 km taxi ride into Surfers Paradise. Useful information Shopping: Monday to Saturday 9.00am to 5.00pm with late night shopping on Thursday. Most tourist shops in Surfers Paradise are open till late every night and all weekend. Banks: Open between 9.30am and 4.00pm Monday to Thursday and 9.30am to 5.00pm Friday. Main tourist sights Beaches: The name says it all, as some of the best and most famous surf beaches in the world are in close proximity to Surfers Paradise. Long stretches of golden sand make for the perfect mix of relaxation and action – you can do as much or as little as you like! Cavill Avenue: The main walking mall is the shopping hub and nightlife centre. Plenty of tourist shops and arcades for the day, and many places to dance the night away later on. Attractions: With many theme parks, adventure activities and guided tours, there is never a lack of options in Surfers Paradise.

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Whitsundays information\ Contiki’s accommodation in the Whitsundays: Daydream Island Resort, Whitsundays Passage QLD 4802. Tel: (07) 4948 8488 Fax: (07) 4948 8499 Daydream Island is located about 1,200 km from Queensland’s capital, Brisbane. The Whitsundays are a group of 74 islands set in the beauty of the Great Barrier Reef. Daydream Island Resort is situated about 7km, or 15 minutes by water taxi, from Shute Harbour on the mainland or 30 minutes by water taxi from Hamilton Island. Proserpine is the closest large mainland centre. How to get there By Air: Cruise Whitsundays meet flights for a 30 minute catamaran cruise to Daydream Island, departing from the jetty located directly at the airport. The cost of this transfer is not included in the tour price but may be ticketed in conjunction with flights (approx. cost A$55). From Whitsunday Coast Airport (PPP) at Proserpine, Cruise Whitsundays offer a streamlined transfer with a coach connection directly from the airport to Abel Point Marina in Airlie Beach, where a connecting ferry transfers guests to Daydream Island, approx. A$55.

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43 By Road: If you have travelled by road to Shute Harbour or Abel Point Marina, Cruise Whitsundays provide daily transfers to Daydream Island Resort. For further information on transfers, timetables and costs, call Cruise Whitsundays – (07) 4946 4662. Transfer costs are from A$29. Whitsunday sailing adventure If you have booked and paid for the Whitsunday Sailing Option, check in is at the Pro Sail office, shop 1, 4 The Esplanade, Airlie Beach. From Great Barrier Reef Airport (HTI) on Hamilton Island, Cruise Whitsundays meet flights for a 30 minute catamaran cruise to Abel Point Marina, Airlie Beach, departing from the jetty located directly at the airport. The cost of this transfer is not included in the tour price but may be ticketed in conjunction with flights (approx. cost A$55). From Whitsunday Coast Airport (PPP) at Proserpine, Whitsunday Transit Coaches meet all flights for a transfer to Airlie Beach (approx. A$15). Clients should call Pro Sail on 1800 810 116 or 07 4946 7533 if there are any problems. Our Whitsundays Sailing Option departs at 4.00pm. Please check in by 3.00pm.

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44

General information\ CALENDAR 2011 January

February

S

M

T

W

30 2 9 16 23

31 3 10 17 24

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

T

F

S

1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

April

S

M

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

March

T

W

1 8 15 22

2 9 16 23

T

F

S

3 4 5 10 11 12 17 18 19 24 25 26

May

S

M

T

W

3 10 17 24

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

T

F

S

1 2 7 8 9 14 15 16 21 22 23 28 29 30

July M

T

W

31 3 10 17 24

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

T

F

S

1 2 7 8 9 14 15 16 21 22 23 28 29 30

October

M

T

W

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

T

F

S

5 6 7 12 13 14 19 20 21 26 27 28

M

T

W

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

T

F

S

1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

T

W

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

T

F

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3 4 5 10 11 12 17 18 19 24 25 26 31

S

M

T

W

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

T

F

S

2 3 4 9 10 11 16 17 18 23 24 25 30

September

S

M

T

W

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24 31

T

F

S

4 5 6 11 12 13 18 19 20 25 26 27

November

S

M

June

S

August

S

S 6 13 20 27

S

M

T

W

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

T

F

S

1 2 3 8 9 10 15 16 17 22 23 24 29 30

December

S

M

T

W

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

T

F

S

3 4 5 10 11 12 17 18 19 24 25 26

S

M

T

W

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

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1 2 3 8 9 10 15 16 17 22 23 24 29 30 31

CALENDAR 2012 January

February

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M

T

W

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

T

F

S

5 6 7 12 13 14 19 20 21 26 27 28

April M

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1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24

4 11 18 25

T

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5 6 7 12 13 14 19 20 21 26 27 28

July M

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1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

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5 6 7 12 13 14 19 20 21 26 27 28

October 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 29

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5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

M

T

W

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

T

F

S

2 3 4 9 10 11 16 17 18 23 24 25

S 6 13 20 27

F

S

3 4 5 10 11 12 17 18 19 24 25 26 31

W

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24 31

T

F

S

M

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W

T

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

4 5 6 11 12 13 18 19 20 25 26 27

S 4 11 18 25

M 5 12 19 26

M

T

W

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

T

W

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F

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1 2 3 8 9 10 15 16 17 22 23 24 29 30 31

S 3 10 17 24

M 4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

T

F

S

1 2 7 8 9 14 15 16 21 22 23 28 29 30

September

S

F

S

3 4 10 11 17 18 24 25 31

November

T

S 4 11 18 25

June T

August

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M

M

May

S

S

March

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T 6 13 20 27

S

M

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W

30 2 9 16 23

3 10 17 24

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

T

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1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

December W

7 14 21 28

T

F

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1 2 3 8 9 10 15 16 17 22 23 24 29 30

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31 3 10 17 24

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W 5 12 19 26

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1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

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45 Weekends and public holidays It is unavoidable to have a touring programme that is not in certain places on weekends, public holidays and on days of closure for public buildings, shops and museums. We regret you may miss certain opportunities but these are kept to a minimum. Public holidays 2011 1 January New Year’s Day

Australia

26 January

Australia Day

Australia

22 April

Good Friday

Australia

23 April

Easter Saturday

Australia

26 April (tues.)

Easter Monday

Australia

26 April

Anzac Day

Australia,

3 May

May Day/Labour Day

QLD, NT

13 June

Queen’s Birthday

Australia

1 August

Picnic Day

NT

17 August

Royal Queensland Show

QLD

3 October

Labour Day

NSW

25 December

Christmas Day

Australia

26 December

Boxing Day

Australia

27 December

Christmas Day Public Holiday Australia

NB: There may also be local holidays which may affect a single town or city. Public holidays 2012 1 January New Year’s Day

Australia

26 January

Australia Day

Australia

6 April

Good Friday

Australia

7 April

Easter Saturday

Australia

8 April

Easter Monday

Australia

25 April

Anzac Day

Australia,

2 May

May Day/Labour Day

QLD, NT

11 June

Queen’s Birthday

Australia

6 August

Picnic Day

NT

15 August

Royal Queensland Show

QLD

1 October

Labour Day

NSW

25 December

Christmas Day

Australia

26 December

Boxing Day

Australia

NB: There may also be local holidays which may affect a single town or city.

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46 The Traveller’s Ten Commandments 1. Thou shalt not expect to find things as they are at home for thou hast left home to find things different. 2. Thou shalt not take things too seriously, for a carefree mind is the beginning of a carefree holiday. 3. Thou shalt not let other tourists get on thy nerves as we are all here for the same reason and thou art paying good money to enjoy thyself. 4. Thou must know at all times where thy passport lies, for a person without a passport is a person without a country. 5. Thou shalt not worry, for he that worrieth hath no pleasure. 6. Remember that thou art a guest in other lands and he that treateth his host with respect shall in turn be respected. To learn to speaketh ‘please’ and ‘thank-you’ in thy host’s tongue will make thee thy host’s friend. 7. Thou shalt not judge the entire people of a country by one person who was a poor host. 8. Thou shalt remember that to err is human and to forgive is divine. 9. When in Rome, thou shalt be prepared to do as the Romans do. 10. Thou shouldst remember that if thou was expected to stay in one place, thou would have been created with roots. Anon.

Australia information\ The following pages contain background notes on the history and geography of Australia. We hope you will find it useful and interesting. Size: 4025 kms - East to West, 3220 kms - North to South Area: 7,686,884 sq kms Population: 22.5 million Federal capital: Canberra, ACT Geography Australia is the largest of islands and smallest of continents. Located in the Southern Hemisphere, South of Asia, the coastline is 36,735 kms and is washed by 3 oceans and 4 seas. About 40% of the continent is in the tropics. It is almost the same size as mainland United States and half as large again as Europe, excluding the former USSR. Australia is the only continent entirely occupied by one nation. The landscape has variety - tortured red desert to green rainforest. Geologically, Australia is the oldest of continents, and is a vast storehouse of the world’s prized minerals and gemstones, including the famous Black Opal. Australia is the flattest continent with the only mountains over 1,600 metres being in the southwest where the highest peak, Mt Kosciusko, rises above 2,200 metres.

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47 Climate Australia is the driest continent, but in parts the average annual rainfall exceeds 375cms. The rainfall is uneven in distribution and areas, but generally speaking the highest rainfall is found in the Western Tasmanian highlands and the North Queensland ranges. In the tropics, summer and autumn are the ‘wet’ seasons, and the winter and spring the ‘dry’. In the temperate south, falls are more even with most rain generally falling in winter and spring. Except in the high country of the south east and in Tasmania, severe winter spells are unusual. Except again for the south east, summers can be extremely hot with temperatures above 38oC being common inland. The record highest temperature in Australia was 58oC in Cloncurry in Western Queensland in 1889, but Marble Bar in Western Australia consistently has temperatures above 50oC. In the ‘wet’ season, the northern third of the continent is occasionally visited by cyclones with wind exceeding 160 kms per hour. They are accompanied by rains causing severe floodings and disruption to road andrail communications. A slice of history... 1606: William Jansz in the ‘Duyfken’ discovered and chartered 200 miles off the Northern Australian Coast. 1616:

Dirk Hartog made the first recorded landfall on the Australian Coast.

1644:

Abel Tasman discovered Australia and New Zealand.

1770:

Captain James Cook landed at Botany Bay.

1788:

Captain Arthur Phillip set up a penal colony on the site of the present-day Sydney, New South Wales.

1803:

Convict settlement sited at Hobart, Tasmania.

1824:

Another convict settlement was begun at Moreton Bay, now known as Brisbane in Queensland.

1829:

The British Government formed a new colony in Western Australia with its capital at Perth.

1835:

John Batman ‘purchased’ land from the Aborigines to pasture sheep. That land is now known as Melbourne.

1836:

Adelaide, the capital of South Australia was founded.

1851:

Edward Hargraves became the ‘discoverer’ of gold in Australia after panning a small quantity near Bathurst. Over the next 50 odd years the ‘gold rush’ brought a population explosion and prosperity to Australia.

1901:

The Commonwealth of Australia came into being as a federation of the States.

1988:

Australian Bicentenary.

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48

Northern Territory Alice Springs: Located in almost the geographical centre of Australia and 1,000 kilometres from the nearest capital city, Alice Springs is the gateway to the Northern Territory’s biggest tourist attraction, Uluru and is a modern oasis in the MacDonnell Ranges. Alice Springs was discovered by William Whitfield Mills in 1871 while surveying a route for Overland Telegraph lines between Adelaide and Darwin and was named in honour of Lady Alice Todd, wife of the Superintendent of Telegraphs. Uluru (Ayers Rock): Uluru is known as the most famous landmark of the Australian Outback. This monolith is of great spiritual significance to the Aboriginal people and its name translates to a place of shade. Uluru is a spectacular sight at any time of day, but particularly amazing at sunrise or sunset when the colours change. Rising dramatically out of the vast plain, Uluru is 3.6 km long (2.2 miles) and 348 metres high (1141 ft). Darwin: The capital of the Northern Territory and principal port of entry from Europe and Asia. Port Darwin was discovered in 1839 and named after Charles Darwin. It was not chosen as a town site until 1866 and not permanently populated until 1869. The new town was originally named Palmerston and was so known until 1911 when the name was officially changed to Darwin. In early days, Darwin’s growth was slow, however, the mineral and pastoral wealth in the Northern Territory has made Darwin into the prosperous city it is today. Karlu Karlu (Devils Marbles): 96 kilometres south of Tennant Creek giant boulders, many almost spherical, pile perilously upon each other. They are huge, red, black and sand coloured boulders looking like old-fashioned cottage loaves. Their formation has been the result of erosion of a great granite outcrop cracking and weathering. Kakadu National Park: Kakadu, one of the most scenic parks in Australia, contains two kinds of wilderness: the black soil flood plains and paperbark lagoons of the Alligator River system, and the rugged walls of the Arnhem Land escarpment which is deeply indented with gorges, streams and waterfalls. At the northern end of Kakadu is a series of shallow lagoons and billabongs which attract thousands of water birds. Also in this area is Cannon Hill, the Aboriginal ‘art gallery’ of Arnhem Land. Katherine: Along the Stuart Highway known as ‘the track’, 354 kilometres south of Darwin is the town of Katherine and the spectacular Katherine Gorge National Park. Here the clear river flows between towering, brilliantly coloured walls to form one of the most fascinating river canyons in Australia. The Katherine River was named after the daughter of one of the sponsors of John McDougall Stuart, who was the first man to find it in 1862.

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49 Kings Canyon: The spectacular Kings Canyon, 100 kilometres to the south west of Alice Springs. A climb to the rim of the Canyon will be rewarded with a view of the ‘Lost City’ weathered rock which resembles the ruins of an ancient city; and the ‘Gardens of Eden’, a valley where permanent waterholes are overgrown with ancient cycad palms. Litchfield National Park: Litchfield Park, west of Batchelor in the Tabletop Range, is a huge sandstone plateau cloaked with dry woodlands and forests. Close to the edge of the escarpment, springs bubble into creeks that have their ultimate destination within the rainforest valleys below, making spectacular waterfalls which flow throughout the year. Parts of the park are accessible in the dry season by two-wheel drive tracks, while Sandy Creek Falls and the Lost City, an area of fantastic sandstone formations - are at the end of four-wheel drive tracks. Mataranka: Further south from Katherine is the Mataranka Pool Reserve, near the Mataranka Homestead. Thermal springs are surrounded by lush tropical forest and the water is always at body temperature.

Queensland Brisbane: With a population of over 1 million people, Brisbane is the capital city of the State of Queensland. The centre of Brisbane is situated on the Brisbane River, 34 kms upstream from Moreton Bay. A penal colony was the first settlement here in 1824, but those ‘days of old’ are now days of gold. Brisbane has a tropical climate, and was the Host City for World Expo in 1988. Make sure to visit Queen Street Mall, the shopping hub of the city, or South Bank, the extensively redeveloped site of Expo ‘88’. Cairns: Undoubtedly Queensland’s most casual, exciting and colourful city, ‘capital’ of the tropical north. The city was more or less founded in 1876, with a settlement which grew on Trinity Bay to service gold and tin fields up-country. Sugar cane growing was established in the 1880’s. Cairns was proclaimed a town in 1903, and a city in 1923. Modern Cairns still relies heavily on sugar for its prosperity. Daydream Island Resort: This modern resort is set on its own exclusive island in the heart of the Whitsundays. Theres a terrific range of watersports like kayaks and sailing catamarans, plus beach games and educational marine talks, or just go snorkeling off one of the pristine beaches. Maybe try the resort’s tennis courts, gym, or chill out around the pool with nightly entertainment including a unique open air cinema. Fraser Island: This is the largest sand island in the world. The island takes its name as a consequence of a shipwreck in May 1836; a passenger, Mrs Eliza Fraser, reached the island and her subsequent tales of her days spent there with the Aborigines meant that her name was applied to the area.

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50 In the 1970’s, a battle between sandminers and conservationists, led by John Sinclair, resulted in a federal government ban on the mining of its sand. A successful crusade saw logging banned in 1991 and in 1993 Fraser Island was added to the World Heritage list. The island is known for its dunes, freshwater lakes, crystal creeks, wetlands and rainforests. Hervey Bay: The bay was named by Captain Cook in 1770 and Matthew Flinders landed here in 1799. Today, Hervey Bay is a major tourist attraction with passenger cruises and car ferries departing from here for Fraser Island. The bay is one of the best fishing areas on the Queensland coast. From mid August to mid October, families of humpback whales stop in the bay to rest and play, returning south to Antarctica after calving in northern waters. Kuranda: The railway line from Cairns climbs through 15 tunnels and superb scenery to Kuranda, at the top of the Macalister Range, 34 kms from Cairns. Kuranda’s picture postcard railway station, decked out in tropical flowers and ferns, is justly famous. Other attractions of this quaint village on the edge of the Atherton Tableland include the colourful morning markets, with produce and coral arts and crafts on display - there’s quite a large ‘alternative’ establishment living in Kuranda.

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51 Noosa Heads: Noosa Heads is the most northerly of the Sunshine Coast resorts, and is unique in terms of its natural scenery and atmosphere. A combination of the Noosa National Park, a protected main beach facing north, and a fashionable resort town without Gold Coast-style highrise development. Port Douglas: In the early days of the far north’s development, Port Douglas was actually a rival for Cairns. It eventually became a quiet, little fishing town, until people began to realise what a delightful, laid back little place it was. Now it’s quite a busy tourist centre. It’s 67 kms north of Cairns, along the Cook Highway. Sunshine Coast: The Sunshine Coast is a 48 kilometre long series of magnificent beaches, punctuated by rocky headlands and river mouths that stretch north from Caloundra to Noosa Heads, one or two hours drive from Brisbane. Following the coastal highway from Caloundra the main beaches are Currimundi, Mooloolaba, Alexandra Headland, Maroochydore, Mudjimba, Marcoola, Coolum, Peregian, Sunshine Beach and Noosa Heads. Surfing is excellent almost anywhere, but the resorts themselves vary from being very casual to quite sophisticated. The Sunshine Coast, often called the North Coast by Brisbane people, tends to be quieter and more natural than the more highly developed Gold (or South) Coast strip, with interesting and varied scenery in the Hinterland. Surfers Paradise: Surfers Paradise is undoubtedly the brightest star along the 30 odd kilometres of beaches, relaxation and development that makes up the Gold Coast. In 1936, Mr Jim Cavill built a hotel at a quiet spot 9 kilometres south of Southport, at a place called Umbi-Gumbi by the Aborigines, meaning ‘the place of the ant’. Mr Cavill called his establishment the Surfers Paradise Hotel and it still stands today, although somewhat lost among the spectacular high-rise development that exploded in the late 1950’s and 1960’s. Surfers Paradise is famous for its surfing beaches and great weather. Townsville: In 1864, a progressive sea captain named Robert Towns commissioned James Melton Black to build a wharf and established a settlement on Cleveland Bay to service the new cattle industry inland. Townsville was gazetted in 1865, and declared a city in 1903. Today, Townsville is Queensland’s third largest city and still rapidly expanding. Whitsunday Islands: The Whitsunday group of islands off the coast of central Queensland (Mackay to Proserpine), enjoy the same latitude as Tahiti and Samoa. It is a cluster of 74 islands, (including Daydream Island where we stay) six of which are resorts and the remaining 68 uninhabited. They were discovered by Captain Cook on Whit Sunday, June 3, 1770.

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New South Wales Byron Bay: Surfers from near and far gravitate to Watego’s Beach, on Cape Byron. It is one of the best beaches for surfboard riding on the east coast. Australia’s most powerful lighthouse is situated nearby at Cape Byron, the most easterly point of the Australian mainland. Sydney: The capital of New South Wales and Australia’s oldest and largest city. Sydney was discovered by Captain Cook in 1770 and first settled by Europeans in 1788 by Captain Arthur Phillip as a penal colony. The city grew in chaos for many years until 1810 when Governor Macquarie set about restoring order and improving roads and communications. The city soon became a major shipping and trading centre for the south west Pacific. Today, Sydney has the world’s best natural harbour with 55 sq kilometres of water catering for 4,000 vessels each year. Newcastle: With a population of 260,000, Newcastle is NSW’s second largest city and one of the largest in Australia. Situated 167 kms north of Sydney at the mouth of the Hunter River, it’s a major industrial and commercial centre. Coffs Harbour: Capital of the NSW ‘Banana Republic’ Coffs Harbour with its population of 66,000 is one of the most popular northern coastal resort towns. The main industries are tourism, bananas, avocados and tropical fruits.

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Australian Capital Territory Canberra: In 1927, Federal Parliament transferred from its temporary seat in Melbourne to Canberra and in 1988 (Australia’s bicentennial year), Parliament made its last move from the famous old Parliament House to the quite radically designed ‘new’ and permanent building, opened by Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II.

South Australia Adelaide: The city of Adelaide was named by Colonel William Light in 1836, after Queen Adelaide, the wife of King William IV of England. The capital of South Australia, Adelaide is situated on the Torrens River and is Australia’s fourth largest city.

Victoria Melbourne: The first permanent settlement on the Yarra River was established in 1836 and in 1837 was named Melbourne, in honour of the British Prime Minister, Lord Melbourne. From Federation in 1901 until the establishment of a national capital at Canberra in 1927, Melbourne was the seat of Federal Government. Today Melbourne is the capital of the state of Victoria.

Tasmania Hobart: Hobart is an enchanting little city built around a beautiful yacht-studded harbour in the shadow of majestic Mt Wellington. A strong sea-faring flavour and sense of the past gives Hobart an almost European air. This feeling is heightened in summer when Hobart gets plenty of sparkling blue days but temperatures rarely exceed 25oC. Many of Hobart’s beautiful early colonial sandstone buildings were erected by the sweat and blood of the unfortunate convicts who formed the majority of the first settlers in 1803. Hobart’s deepwater harbour on the estuary of the Derwent River is a thriving seaport.

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My notes\

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My notes\

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Worldwide offices\ AUSTRALIA Travel House, Level 3, 35 Grafton Street, Bondi Junction, NSW 2022 Telephone: +61 (0) 2 9511 2200 contiki@contiki.com.au UNITED KINGDOM Wells House, 15 Elmfield Road Bromley, Kent, BR1 1LS Telephone: +44 (0) 20 8225 4200 travel@contiki.co.uk EUROPE Avenue Louis-CasaĂŻ 58, 1216 Cointrin, Geneva, Switzerland contiki.geneva@bookttcuk.com NEW ZEALAND 2nd Floor, 15-17 Day Street Newton, Auckland Telephone: + 64 (0) 9 300 1601 contiki@contiki.co.nz AMERICA 801 East Katella Avenue, 3rd Floor Anaheim, CA 92805 Telephone: +1 714 935 0808 contiki@contiki.com CANADA 33 Kern Road, Toronto, ON M3B 1S9, Telephone: +1 416 932 9377 contactus@contiki.ca SOUTH AFRICA 6 Hood Avenue Rosebank 2196 Johannesburg Telephone: +27 11 280 8400 reservations.sa@contiki.com ASIA 3 Pickering Street China Square Central (Nanking Row), #02-28/29, Singapore 048660 Telephone: +65 6337 8166 contiki@pacific.net.sg

contiki.com If you choose to write to Contiki via the Internet, please provide your home address so we are able to reply to you in writing. The information in this booklet was, to the best of our knowledge, correct at the time of going to print but we cannot be held responsible for any subsequent changes to the contents of it. Edition 2011 Š Contiki Australia all rights reserved.

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Contiki Australia Travel Guide (2011-12)  

Contiki Australia Travel Guide (2011-12)

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