Page 1

A U G •2 0 1 8 B AC K-TO -S C H O O L

CROSSTOWN HIGH OPENS

PLUS

LOCAL STUDENT WINS NATIONAL AWARD TALKING ABOUT BULLYING AND MORE INSIDE!


One Campus

for Sr. K–Grade 12 in the Heart of the City Life with children is busy. We want to help. Our co-ed campus for sr. kindergarten–grade 12 offers a one-stop shop in the heart of East Memphis. Do you need care before and after school? We’ve got it 7:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m. Schedule a tour to see firsthand how we build strong students in a diverse Christian environment.

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AUGUST 2018

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Discover toe-tapping family fun in Music City! Now – September 3, 2018

Book Your Summer Getaway Today!

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Create memories to cherish this summer at Gaylord Opryland. • Heart-pounding live performances at the NEW “Music, Magic & Memories” atrium show presented by bubly™ • Scavenger hunt and musical art tour in the resort’s indoor gardens • Hootenanny Hoedown with line dancing, limbo and kids’ karaoke • General Jackson Showboat and Delta Riverboat cruises • An array of dining events, including Junior Chefs Camps • Award-winning spa, golf course, bubly™ Pool Party and more!

3


memphisparent

ADHD

Memphis

THIS MONTH 10

Coaching, Testing & Diagnosis

14

ADHD Coaching • • • • • •

Adults, children, adolescents, students, parents, families Coaching, in-office and via video or phone Learn about ADHD and your own version of ADHD Learn how to analyze and understand your ADHD problems Learn methods to overcome and succeed with ADHD Learn your ADHD superpowers and how to use them

16

Registering Now - call for more information

(901) 209-9425

READY, SET, READ

MEMPHIS MECH WARRIORS

NEW KIDS ON THE BLOCK

Crosstown High welcomes its first group of 9th graders By Shara Clark

7-8:30pm for 8 weeks

• For parents of children ages 4 to mid-adolescent (14+/-) • Learn about ADHD and your child’s own version of ADHD • Reinvent home life by learning coaching methods for improving your child’s behaviors and school performance • Share challenges and successes with other parents

22

OSARUGUE OTEBELE’S JOURNEY

Memphian wins national award for her collection of poetry By Julia Baker

adhdmemphis.com

DEPARTMENTS 6 901 Fun Glow, learn, and get ready for back-toschool 8 Dear Teacher The road to having children succeed in math

12 Health Matters Let’s talk about bullying 18 Outstanding Teacher Developing future leaders

OUR STAFF Editor Michelle McKissack

AM UG AU Y S2T0 1280 1 8

Managing Editor Shara Clark

Exhausted from back to school? Sit back, relax, donate blood and have dinner on us! Donate August 5-11 and receive a $25 Darden Restaurant gift card through the online rewards store and a “Beat the Heat” T-shirt! Please allow 72 hours for point and gift card availability. All blood types are needed to sustain a healthy blood supply.

Art Director Bryan Rollins Advertising Art Director Christopher Myers Graphic Designer Jeremiah Matthews Advertising Manager Sheryl Butler Account Executive Mary Ballard

Abe with his dad Jeff, mom Andria, and step-sister Anna. Abe’s favorite subjects are science and history, and he enjoys playing basketball. He won the “Hustle Award” at this summer’s Jr. Grizzlies camp.

Photographer: Bryan Rollins 20 What’s Cookin’ Recipes for overripe bananas 24 Calendar and Events End-of-summer fun for the family 30 Favorite Moments Kid funnies and photos

Memphis Parent is published by Contemporary Media, Inc. CEO Kenneth Neill Director of New Business Development Jeffrey A. Goldberg Editorial Director Bruce VanWyngarden Special Projects Director Molly Willmott Email Marketing Manager Britt Ervin Distribution Manager Carrie O’Guin Controller Leila Zetchi IT Director Joseph Carey

Production Operations Director Margie Neal

www.lifeblood.org | 888-543-3256 4 4

OUR COVER KID

Library robotics team exposes kids to STEM By Tony Jones

Coaching / Support Groups for Parents of ADHD Children • Next Start Date: Tuesday 9/4/18

memphisparent

Start the school year off right with the Volunteer State Book Award By Jennifer Boren

ADHD Testing and Diagnosis (ages 4 - adult)

• Testing appointments scheduled within 2 weeks • Diagnosis required to receive accommodations for schools and standardized testing (ACT/SAT, certification, licensure) • Psychological/Psychoeducational testing also available

memphis-parent

Calendar Editor Meena Viswanathan

Memphis, TN 38103 p: 901.521.9000 • f: 901.521.0129

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE Memphis Parent strives to provide information of value to all who are invested in our children’s future.

Send advertising queries to: sheryl@memphisparent.com Visit us online at memphisparent.com


EDITOR’S NOTE

SO LONG, SWEET SUMMER

Well, that went by fast, didn’t it? Between all the pool parties, picnics, cookouts, fireworks, trips to the lake and beach — my social media feeds were filled with evidence of everyone’s family fun — time has flown and summer is coming to a close. We hope you all made the most of it with friends, family, and quality time spent together.

Happy Parenting! Shara Clark Managing Editor

WITH YOUR

COMMUNITY

OUR 18 LOCATIONS HOST EVENTS FOR EVERY AGE AND INTEREST.

HERE ARE JUST A FEW:

READING, WRITING, AND RIDING THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD Screening of the documentary “Underground Railroad: The William Still Story” as well as a Q&A with Elaine Turner of Heritage Tours and Shelby Crosby of the English Department at the University of Memphis.

AUG 27 | 6

PM

Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library Meeting Room C 3030 Poplar Ave.

SUMMER MOVIE SERIES: GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY AUG 8 | 5:30

PM -

7:30

PM

Cordova Library 8457 Trinity Rd.

GADGET LAB FOR KIDS AUG 21 | 4

PM

-5

PM

Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library

Ages 6 weeks - PreK Monday- Friday 7 a.m.- 6 p.m.

Open Year-Round with Year-Round Enrollment and Sibling Discounts Offering the Frog Street Press Curriculum

Ask for the MEMPHIS PARENT DISCOUNT 8601 Trinity Road Cordova, TN 38018 (901) 737-6091

RALEIGH BRANCH SCIENCE CLUB Every Monday | 4

PM

Raleigh Library 3157 Powers Rd.

BACK TO SCHOOL MUSIC FESTIVAL AUG 11 | 11

AM

-2

PM

Cornelia Crenshaw Library 531 Vance Ave.

#STARTHERE MEMPHISLIBRARIES.ORG

M E M PH I SPA R ENT.COM

Now that August has reared its lovely head, it’s time to switch gears from fun-filled, carefree days back to the grit and grind of the schoolyear routine. Get ready to grab those backpacks and pack those lunches — you can almost hear that first-period bell ringing now, can’t you? With this issue, we hope to alleviate some of your back-to-schoolseason woes. Inside, you’ll find a few reading suggestions for kids — grades K-12 — to get them back into the groove. “Ready, Set, Read” (page 10) outlines a few of the 2017-2018 Volunteer State Book Award winners — chosen by student readers — as well as nominees for 20182019. Your children are sure to love them. We also cover something parents may tend to stray away from discussing, but something that is oh, so important to address as the new school year begins: bullying. In “Let’s Talk About Bullying” (page 12), we speak with a local school counselor who expresses the significance of having this conversation with your child, recognizing changes in their behavior, and what to do if they experience or witness bullying. While we like to think it can’t or won’t happen to our children — or that our children would never be the ones to dole it out — it’s a topic that’s crucial to talk through. In news we’re totally excited about: Crosstown High School has opened its doors and is welcoming its first batch of 9th graders as we speak. Read about the new school and its goals for the future in “New Kids on the Block” on page 16. We’re also very proud of one of our local recent high school graduates, 16-year-old Osarugue Otebele, whose collection of poetry placed her among 16 contestants (out of 346,000 entrants!) to be honored with a prestigious Scholastic Art and Writing Award and a $10,000 scholarship. Read all about her achievement (and one of her poems) in “Osarugue Otebele’s Journey” on page 22. As always, our calendar of events (beginning on page 24) is jampacked with things to do, including end-of-summer fun to help you squeeze every last, hot drop of freedom out of your days before the school bell rings. Before you flip the page, please join us in wishing Memphis Parent editor Michelle McKissack luck this election day as she rallies for a position on the Shelby County school board. We’re all rooting for you, Michelle!

TO CONNECT

5


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Glow, learn, and get ready for back-to-school with these upcoming events.

AUGUST

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From 7 to 9:30 p.m. on Friday, August 10th, Memphis Botanic Garden (MBG) hosts the end-of-summer Firefly Glow Party. Get your glow on at the Glo Med Illumination Station and visit the Glow Lab to discover and explore nature under luminescent black lights. Don’t forget to bring your light-up toys for an evening dance party featuring a variety of performances, including an LED hula-hoop show. MBG members/$12; non-members/$15. Food trucks and concessions available. Reservations required. Visit memphisbotanicgarden.com or call 636-4100 for more info.

Call Us Today! 901-360-9000

Friday, August 24th 8:00am-7:00pm

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Saturday, August 25th 8:00am-12:00 noon

Gently Used Name Brand Fall Clothing Children’s Shoes - Baby Equipment & Furniture Infant/Toddler Toys & Outdoor Toys

DROP THE MIC POETRY SLAM

Recommended for ages 14 and above, this event features competing poets performing original works before an audience and judging panel. Judges will select winners from three age categories for a chance to win cash prizes. Seasoned poets and musical artists will perform and serve as hosts. An artist marketplace will feature book signings, with recordings and merchandise available for purchase. The event, held Saturday, August 18th, at Paradise Entertainment Center (645 E. Georgia Avenue, 38126) is free to attend but registration is required. Visit civilrightsmuseum.org/drop-the-mic to register.

AUGUST 2018

AUGUST 2018

18

A co-ed, 2-year-old – 8th grade independent schoolin the heart of East Memphis. woodlandschool.org ©2017 Woodland Presbyterian School. All rights reserved.

6

BUILD A COMMUNITY: BACK-TO-SCHOOL EVENT

On Saturday, August 11th, Macedonia MB Church (1814 Fields Road, 38109) hosts this free back-to school event from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Presented by the Macedonia Youth Departments, the event will feature music by DJ KG, food, games, and giveaways, which include (while supplies last) backpacks with supplies and a school uniform giveaway — one per child (child must be present). Visit Macedonia’s Facebook page for details or call 785-4900.

Many items half price on Saturday ACCEPTED

Woodland combines small class sizes, dedicated teachers, and personalized instruction to help grow your child’s success. Call 901-685-0976 to schedule a tour, or email admissions@ woodlandschool.org.

FIREFLY GLOW PARTY

6

22

DONATE LIFE - ECHO: MOVIE SCREENING

The Mid-South Transplant Foundation has partnered with local churches to present a family-friendly educational movie screening to discuss the crossroads of faith/religious beliefs and organ donation and to raise awareness about the impact of donation in the African-American community. A Question of Faith will show at Brown Baptist Church at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, August 22nd. Visit midsouthtransplant.org or call 328-4438 for details.


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DEAR TEACHER By PEGGY GISLER AND MARGE EBERTS

THE ROAD TO HAVING CHILDREN SUCCEED IN MATH Q Being good at mathematics is such an

important life skill. What can I do to help my young children have success in math?

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AUGUST 2018

BUILDING A BETTER WORLD ONE STUDENT AT A TIME

At St. Francis of Assisi Catholic School, we offer four academic programs to meet the specific needs of your child. From our Gifted Program that challenges advanced students to our PLUS Program that offers differentiated instruction for children with learning differences, we are here to help your child succeed at learning!

Grades PreK-8, Part-time program ages 2-4

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A

Believe it or not, there is one major thing that parents can do to put their children on the road to success in math. It is your attitude toward math. It must be a positive one that promotes a “can do” attitude. Your young children will then more than likely have the same attitude. You must avoid saying that you hated math in school and could never handle math, as your children will also absorb this negative attitude. And your positive attitude must remain evident as your children progress through school. Once your children are in school, you should praise your children — not for their talent in doing math but for their efforts, especially in using strategies to solve problems. This will encourage them to try hard. With effort, most children can master mathematics. While it is true that students learn math at school, it should also be part of your life at home. Before your children get to kindergarten, help them learn to count. They can count shoes, socks, and books. This is real-world mathematics. They can also sing counting songs with you as well as play games that require them to count a few spaces in order to move around a game board. Once your children are in elementary school, help your children develop instant recall (three seconds or less) of basic addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division facts. Oral practice is just as effective as flashcards. Games and apps can provide solid practice, too. Finally, talk about and show them how math is used in our daily lives. And remember that it is practice, practice, practice that supports success in math. So, support and encourage their efforts to do their math homework. Compass Syndicate Corporation, 2018. Distributed by King Features Syndicate

I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y B R YA N R O L L I N S

— Very Curious


Introduce your children ages 8 and under to music, dance, and multicultural arts in an informal concert setting at GPAC. Tickets $8 per child (includes 2 free adults per ticket).

September 22 Obruni Dance Band 9:30am & 10:30am

October 6

Zoo Jamboroo 9:30am & 10:30am

November 17

Tap, Rhythm & Rhyme 9:30am & 10:30am

INFORMATION & TICKETS & GPACWEB.COM | BOX OFFICE 901.751.7500

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OCTOBER 25

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2 0 1 8 G R A D U AT I N G S E N I O R C L A S S

9


FEATURE

READY, SET, READ

Start the school year off right with the Volunteer State Book Award by JENNIFER BOREN The Volunteer State Book Award (VSBA) contrasts from other literary awards such as the Newberry and Caldecott because students choose the winning books. This year marks the 40th anniversary of the award, which strives to promote literacy, lifelong reading habits, and a broader understanding of humanity. Twenty contemporary titles are nominated by librarians each year in four grade bands: K-2nd, 3rd-5th, 6th-8th, and 9th-12th. Nominated books must have been published in the five years prior to voting and the author must reside within the United States. All public and private schools and public libraries can participate, however library media specialists conduct the voting. Students who read or listen to at least three of the nominated titles are eligible to vote for their favorite books in late spring. The statewide votes are tabulated electronically and the winning author is

Has your child’s teacher added books to their school supply list? If not, get ready to read this school year along with children all over Tennessee. Last year, more than 37,000 students across the state participated in the Volunteer State Book Award, which is sponsored annually by the Tennessee Library Association and the Tennessee Association of School Librarians.

presented with a plaque and invited to the Tennessee Association of School Librarians conference in the fall. Ginger Kirchmeyer, a national board certified teacher and librarian at DuPont Hadley Middle Prep in Nashville explains, “The award keeps literacy on the forefront of our conversations and it makes it fun for kids because it has the element of competition.” Professional librarians and educators who currently work with students in grades K-12 nominate books for the award. Lynn Rushdi, librarian at Sycamore Elementary School, serves on the intermediate nominating committee (3rd-5th). When searching for potential nominees, she says, “I try to read books through the eyes of my students and then give them to my students to read. I ask for their feedback and use this when nominating a book.” She reads book reviews, blogs, and author websites and solicits suggestions from

AUGUST 2018

2017-2018 VOLUNTEER STATE BOOK AWARD WINNERS: PRIMARY K-2: Stick and Stone written by Beth Ferry and illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld; Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2015. INTERMEDIATE 3-5: Serafina and the Black Cloak written by Robert Beatty; Disney Hyperion, 2015.

MIDDLE SCHOOL 6-8: The War that Saved My Life written by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley; Dial, 2015.

HIGH SCHOOL 9-12: The Red Queen written by Victoria Aveyard; HarperTeen, 2015.

teachers and students. “My goal as a librarian is to find the perfect book for every child and ignite the love of literature in that child. By reading for the VSBA nominating committee, I am exposed to the best of the best in children’s literature and can share those books with students, expanding our circle of readers.” Many schools use the VSBA list for school-wide reading challenges and book clubs. Several schools across Shelby County participate in Battle of the Books, and many times these literary challenges center around the Volunteer State Book Award. For a complete list of VSBA books, go to tasltn.org/vsba or check with your school or public library. Some titles are also available on Tennessee R.E.A.D.S, the statewide eBook and audiobook download system. Download the Libby App to borrow books from Tennessee R.E.A.D.S on your tablet or cell phone.

CHECK OUT THESE TITLES NOMINATED FOR THE 2018-2019 VOLUNTEER STATE BOOK AWARD: PRIMARY K-2: MIDDLE SCHOOL 6-8: The Quickest Kid in Save Me a Seat Clarksville written written by Sarah by Pat Zietlow Weeks and Gita Miller; Chronicle Varadarajan; Books, 2016. Scholastic, 2016. INTERMEDIATE 3-5: HIGH SCHOOL 9-12: The Wild Robot, Born a Crime: Stories written by Peter from a South African Brown; Little Brown Childhood written by and Company, 2016. Trevor Noah; Spiegel and Grau, 2016.

Jennifer Boren is the lead library media specialist for Collierville Schools and blogs at bookjabber.wordpress.com. 10


Join us for an Early Childhood Open House November 8, 9:00am

If you’ve noticed a change in academic performance, an eye exam can help rule out undiagnosed problems with your child’s vision. Make an appointment today with the Pediatric Service at The Eye Center at Southern College of Optometry or learn more at eyecentermemphis.com.

Courtesy of the Pediatric Primary Care Service of

1225 Madison Ave., in the Midtown Medical District

901-722-3250 www.eyecentermemphis.com

M E M PH I SPA R ENT.COM

Start the school year with an eye exam.

11


HEALTH MATTERS

LET’S TALK ABOUT BULLYING The conversation to have with your child before the school year begins By TONYA THOMPSON © E V G E N YATA M A N E N KO | D R E A M S T I M E .C O M

AUGUST 2018

Fourteen-year-old honors student, Ja’Meya Jackson, dreaded the hour-long bus ride each morning between school and her home in rural Yazoo County, Mississippi. Quiet by nature, Ja’Meya was relentlessly teased and threatened by a group of nine boys who — seeing her shyness as a target — refused to leave her alone, despite her mother’s multiple complaints to the school’s administration and bus driver. In desperation to end the bullying, Ja’Meya made a decision one morning that would change her life forever — she snuck her mother’s loaded handgun in her backpack. The video footage from the camera on the bus shows a chaotic scene of Ja’Meya pacing the middle aisle, pointing the handgun wildly at her tormentors, and telling them to stop. No one was hurt in that incident but Ja’Meya would now face 45 felony charges of kidnapping and aggravated assault that could lock her away for life. Ja’Meya’s story, as revealed on Bully, a 2011 documentary produced by Lee Hirsch and Cynthia Lowen, illustrates a problem facing our youth that transcends race, socioeconomics, and geographic borders. And it’s one that can have potentially tragic consequences, as the recent news stories of school violence and suicide have proven. So how can parents give their children the tools needed to face it as the new school year starts? A longtime school counselor with Shelby County Schools suggests that the best thing parents can do to give their child the emotional tools needed this school year is to

keep the lines of communication open. “I think it is important for parents to talk to their kids about what bullying is, how to help prevent it, and what to do if they personally experience bullying behaviors or witness them,” she says. These lines of communication should also include discussions of cyberbullying, and she advises parents to monitor their child’s social media accounts closely. One way to do this is to be “friends” with your child. Another way is to set security filters for them. However, the most important thing a parent can do to protect their child from cyberbullying is to pay attention. “Parents should also not underestimate the power of actively noticing your child,” she says. “If you notice changes in online/social media behavior, emotions, attitudes, or time spent with friends — investigate. Take time to talk about the changes with your child.” For parents who aren’t exactly sure of what to say, or who were raised in a world where “toughen up” or “it’s just part of life” were catchphrases their own parents taught, the counselor suggests that discussing the power imbalance that occurs with bullying is a good place to start.

“One of the most powerful ways to combat bullying is to empower the bystanders,” she says, “so one important thing to talk to your child about is what to do when they witness bullying. Depending on the situation, your child can tell the bully to stop, invite the victim to come play/talk with them, find a way to include the victim in an activity away from the bully, tell an adult, and then keep telling adults until it stops. If your child is the victim, they need to tell someone and keep telling until the bullying stops. You can also help them practice what they would say or do if they are bullied.” The counselor also notes that parents, who often feel helpless in controlling what happens while their child is at school, can play a large role in helping their child establish positive connections despite the bullies. “It is clear that a sense of connectedness, belonging, and a culture of inclusion are important deterrents to self-destructive and outwardly violent behavior,” she says. “Find a group, club, or sport that matches your child’s interests. Kids who feel they have a place to belong are more confident and more resilient. Strong social connections can help prevent bullying.” Beyond the resources offered by school counselors, parents can also visit stopbullying.gov and tolerance.org for additional advice on helping young people cope with bullies. Thebullyproject.com, which is connected to the documentary Bully, is also a great resource, with stories about individuals’ experiences with bullying.

A Middle Tennessee native, Tonya Thompson now lives in Southaven, MS with her three kids and their crazy pets. 12


Building a foundation that lasts a lifetime

Coed Pre-K2 – 8th grade

Open House

Sunday, October 14, 2018 1:30 – 3:00 pm

Explore. Passion can’t be taught. But it can be nurtured and directed.Our balanced approach to education encourages your child to find and follow her passion to places she may never have dreamed. To schedule a tour, call 901.765.4605 or visit www.briarcrest.com.

4841 Park Avenue Memphis, TN 38117 901.685.1231 www.holyrosarymemphis.org

Swimming Lessons

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• Group Lessons • Private Swim Lessons • Adult Swim Lessons • Baby & Me Classes -Ages 2mo and Up

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FEATURE

MEMPHIS MECH WARRIORS Library robotics team exposes kids to STEM By TONY JONES

AUGUST 2018

Welcome to the brave new world of the Memphis Mech Warriors, a communitybased robotics skills team sponsored by the Cloud901 Center at the library. Now in its fifth year, the after-hours program is seeking 30 new team members for the 2018-2019 school year. Mech Warriors coach Marion Anderson says the process is open to any striving students. “First, they have to be willing to work hard,” Anderson says. “Second, they have to maintain a minimum B average, and most importantly, they must have respect for themselves and their parents. If you’re the type of child that doesn’t listen to your parents, you’re not going to listen to me.” The stringent adherence to old-school values derives from Anderson’s upbringing in Inverness, Mississippi, where her mother taught school for 47 years. Mom’s example led to a major in engineering at the University of Memphis, where she credits mentoring as her push into robotics, which she taught at East High School. Shelby County Schools once had four

Silence has been the trademark of libraries for centuries, but imagine stepping out of the elevator into the lobby of the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library and — whoosh! — you step right into what appears to be a miniaturized version of tune-up day at a NASCAR track, complete with a cheering pit crew rushing behind the car and driver.

robotics courses, but the program was downgraded, much to her regret. “But then I was contacted by the library to create a community-based program, which is my dream,” she says. “We need to expose more kids to STEM, so they can function in this advanced world of technology. They must understand and be prepared for global competition. That is what Mech Warriors is focused upon.” Meeting the kids conducting the surprise test drive is certainly fascinating. Central High School student Greydon Morris is a perfect example of what they’re striving for. “I met Miss Anderson at a summer camp my mother forced me to go to. I really didn’t like it, but I liked Miss Anderson,” Morris says. “It felt like another opportunity to get in trouble, but when I found out that she had a class at the school I was to go to I got interested. I saw her the first day of school and that was all she wrote.” He stayed. “I’m kinda like the electrical lead, so all the wiring was done by me. That’s my specialty,” says Morris. “Electrical engineering is my thing.” “We had six weeks to build the robot for the first robotics competition,” White Station’s Olivia Edgington, who serves as a co-captain, explains as she monitors the test drive. “It’s really fast!” Her mother Maryann Edgington serves as lead mentor to the team. The robot is also quite nimble. Driver for the day Jonathan Kagoo, a student at St. George’s Independent School, has the contraption doing everything but the moves to “Thriller.” Miles Thomas, fellow programmer and student at Hollis F. Price Middle College High School, monitors every

command with a laptop. “I wrote the steering command,” says Kagoo. “We work in Java code, in commands and subsystems, and then pair them with different commands with the controller, which connects to the Wi-Fi point to allow the computer to communicate with the robot.” “I do a little bit of everything except coding,” Thomas adds quietly through the interruption of his laser focus on his task. “I’m not that good at driving, so I’m monitoring today.” It’s considered off season now for the Mech Warriors, and those interested in joining the team can drop by the library. Build season is from January to April, and who knows what they’re planning this year. “The team works in subgroups: mechanical, programming, electronics, marketing,” coach Anderson explains. “Everyone works on a different concentration and then I steer them to their best strengths.” Initial skeptic Morris makes the best recommendation of the program in one of the YouTube videos they’ve made: “I can’t think of any other place I’d rather be.”

Writer and publicist Tony Jones has been featured in Memphis magazine, Memphis Flyer, Tri-State Defender, and other publications. 14


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S E RV E

from local missions

Whatever your passions. Whatever your talents. Find your future at Evangelical Christian School.

Call today to schedule a tour. www.ecseagles.com/admissions | 901.754.7217

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TO GLOBAL IMPACT

15


COVER STORY

NEW KIDS ON THE BLOCK

Crosstown High welcomes its first group of 9th graders. By SHARA CLARK

AUGUST 2018

The Crosstown Concourse towers high over its neighbors and, since its revitalization after years of standing abandoned, flourishes. The sprawling space houses more than 40 businesses and nonprofits specializing in the arts, healthcare, dining, and more. And with the start of the new school year, new neighbors have moved into the 4th and 5th floors, beginning an exciting chapter for a fresh group of 9th graders, the first class of Crosstown High School.

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On a Friday in early July, the expanse of the school is not yet abuzz with the 150 students soon to come; the few voices in our group echo in the quiet hallways as we tour and talk about plans for this “school of the future.” The core building blocks are in place — tables, chairs, computers, equipment — but some work is still being done before the first school bell rings on July 30th for “disorientation week” (and the first official day of class on August 6th). In a windowed, technologycentered room, a recent Lausanne graduate and “augmented reality expert,” Ethan, works with a group of kids finishing up a weeklong AR camp, where activities included creating holograms and working with 3D printers. Come August, this is just one type of work in which students will be immersed. In addition to project-based learning in core classes, students will have an “X period,” one-hour class blocks designed for exploring their interests. “As students are accepted, they complete a survey asking about the things that they’re already doing and want to keep doing and get better at,” says Ginger Spickler, our tour guide and Crosstown High’s director of strategic partnerships and

projects, “and what are the things they’re incredible opportunity to think about what a curious about that they’d like to explore.” high school that was going to serve 21st These classes, where focus can range from century students could look like,” says culinary arts and graphic design to healthcare Spickler. and entrepreneurship, won’t be part of a The group was asked to talk with the student’s transcript but will allow students to people whom the school was going to affect. choose the projects they’re working on. “We talked to representatives from all of the “Those are projects that have been pitched by businesses that were going to be a part of the businesses and nonprofits — mostly right now Crosstown Concourse. We talked to in the building,” Spickler says. “One of the community leaders,” Spickler says. “Probably things we heard from students was that they most importantly we talked to about 200 wanted to be involved in real-world work, and students, either directly or through surveys a big part is finding opportunities for them to and focus groups. We talked to kids from 5th hone their skills and try things out. So by the grade up through young college students.” time they graduate, they can narrow in on They also spoke to educators in Memphis and what they might want to do with their lives, beyond, from different types of schools. and whatever their next steps are, it’s a better “Everything that became a part of the investment of their time.” model for the school originated from what Crosstown High School, a public charter we heard during those initial interviews,” she school, currently a one-school charter says. management organization (CMO), was born, Another point heard from those interviews in part, from the XQ Super School Project. — “from literally a fifth grader to a CEO,” says The XQ project was a contest to reimagine Spickler — is that students need to know how public high school and design “the school of to get along with people who are not just like the future,” sponsored by the Emerson them. Collective, a foundation of Learning Town “There’s a lot of segregation in the schools Jobs. “We saw this and thought it was a really in our community,” she notes. “They wanted


LEFT: CROSSTOWN HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL DR. CHANDRA SLEDGE M ATHIAS LOOKS FORWARD TO THE NEW SCHOOL YE AR.

us to get away from segregating based on academics, based on socio-economic status.” Crosstown High has a “Diverse by Design” school model, with aim for its students to reflect the diversity of the community. “We’re a charter school, so we don’t have any sort of application requirement. There are no GPA or test score requirements, no address [requirements]. It’s pure lottery,” says Spickler. “Anybody who applied was put in the lottery — if you were zoned to a Shelby County school. If you were zoned to a municipal school, you had to be at the bottom of the list just based on state law.” Spickler says a close eye was kept on where applications were coming from, and the school focused on outreach to different communities. “That was hard work. It’s going to continue to be hard work every year because we will continue to do that,” says Spickler. “We think it’s worth it because we want our students to learn with and from the cross-section of the diversity of Memphis.” Beyond the classroom, the school hopes to make use of its collaborative efforts and project-based learning platform to look at education as a way to impact and transform

the community. Dr. Chandra Sledge Mathias, Crosstown High School’s principal who relocated from Warrenton, North Carolina, where she was principal from 2014-2017 of Warren New Tech High School, a projectbased learning school and member of the New Tech Network, says this platform will also give the students empowerment. “Students are getting exposed to different opportunities. They’ll have their core curriculum, but outside of that they’ll have opportunities to explore their interests,” Mathias says. “Then there’s also the conversation of equity and social justice, and what do you do with this knowledge that you have? How will you use your power as a global citizen to have a real impact? What does it mean for a 14-year-old to do that? Who are the advocates you can reach out to? What resources are available to you? We’re building that time into our school day.” Mathias says she and the school’s group of teachers are excited to get started. “We’re a quirky bunch,” she says. “They’re all very adventurous and are coming with a variety of talents, both inside and outside of the classroom. We looked for people who have

other things that they can bring to the table outside of, ‘I teach English’ or ‘I teach history.’ “Do you teach English and also play the banjo while riding a hoverboard? You do? Awesome. You should work at Crosstown High,” Mathias says with a chuckle. The group looks forward to working with its first students. “We have a strong first class,” says Mathias. “They’re creative. They’re go-getters. We have some who are kind of shy. I’m excited to see them transition.” The school’s orientation — called “disorientation” — is July 30th through August 2nd. Students will begin working on projects during this time. The school’s first exhibition of projects will take place August 10th, from 5 to 7:30 p.m. “That’ll be their first showcase to show the community what they’ve been working on,” says Mathias. “We wanted to throw them in the deep end of the pool of project-based learning. We want them to be uncomfortable and to start problem-solving with each other. We want them to get frustrated and then work through those challenges. “I think some really exciting thing are going to come.”

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RIGHT: EMPT Y CL ASSROOMS IN THE 4TH AND 5TH FLOORS OF THE CROSSTOWN CONCOURSE AWAIT CXS’ FIRST 150 9TH GRADERS.

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K ATHRYN JASPER By SHARA CLARK

AUGUST 2018

As a freshman in college, Kathryn Jasper was a history major with a political science minor and was considering going into law. It was an elective course — educational psychology — that caused her to switch gears. She wrote a research paper on the effectiveness of Head Start programs, and “was fascinated by what I was finding,” she says. From there, she took more education coursework. “Those classes didn’t feel like work,” Jasper says. “It was fun. It was exciting. It was something that I was passionate about. I ended up really loving the classroom. My shadowing experience as an undergraduate helped me decide to go that route.” Jasper has been an educator, inside and outside of classrooms, for 12 years. She’s entering her seventh year at Hutchison, where she is the director of Hutchison Leads, a leadership development program for girls in 9th through 12th grades. “We focus on girls learning more about themselves as leaders,” she says, “figuring out their personal leadership style and how that is going to look for them as they journey through high school and then out into the real world.” As part of her job, Jasper conducts small group meetings with students, looking at things like

gender and leadership and the Hutchison, she has “fallen in love challenges and successes women with girls education; in seeing what it have. She also brings in speakers to does for our girls, how they’re able the school. Last year, as they looked to be independent and free to be at careers where women were themselves,” she says. “The underrepresented, they partnered instruction really caters to girls and with majority-women engineering how girls think.” and architecture firms to hold a But it’s the relationships Jasper panel event for the students. builds with students that she enjoys They also go on field trips the most, and seeing some throughout the city to see transform from introverted leadership in action. Among those “wallflowers” into leaders. “I’m field trips is an annual visit to working with the girls every day and Regional One Health, where they getting to know them,” she says. “I observe the NICU, “and the angle of work with them from freshman year leadership and civic engagement and all the way to senior year, and I keep policy,” says Jasper. in touch with a lot of them in college “We look at the area of public and beyond. The personal stories are health in the city and infant what drive me.” mortality, and what the NICU has Above all, her goal is to help done to combat that. It’s a educate girls for the modern world. fascinating case study.” “We want them to have this exposure Jasper has a 3-year-old daughter, and experience where they’re Ruthie, who attends pre-K at informed and engaged on a civic Hutchison, and another daughter on level,” she says, “where they are the way. Through her work at empowered.”

We want to shine a light on your child’s teacher, or even a teacher who made a difference in your life. Submit your nomination today by emailing teacher@memphisparent.com. 18


active learning

agile teaching

“The great end in religious instruction, is not to stamp our minds upon the young, but to stir up their own; not to make them see with our eyes,

to build disciplined minds, adventurous spirits, and brave hearts

but to look inquiringly and steadily with their own; not to give them a definite amount of knowledge, but to inspire a fervent love of truth….” — William Ellery Channing Unitarian Universalist

If you’re looking for a loving community to help your kids grow up to be open-minded, kind and respectful, and to stand up for what’s right, we invite you to join us.

ADMISSION OPEN HOUSES Lower School (grades PK-5) Germantown Campus | Thursday, Oct. 25 @ 9:00 am Memphis Campus | Thursday, Nov. 8 @ 8-10:00 am (drop-in)

Middle School and Upper School (grades 6-12)

ST. GEORGE’S First Unitarian Church of Memphis 292 Virginia Avenue West

INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

(next to the Big River Crossing)

sgis.org

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Collierville Campus l Sunday, Nov. 11 @ 2-3:30 pm

19


WHAT’S COOKIN’

GO BANANAS! Tasty recipes for overripe bananas By SHARA CLARK

Bananas are great for a quick, healthy, grab-and-go snack, but what do you do when a few in the bunch have browned a bit too much? No one wants a mushy, overripe banana — but don’t throw yours out! Try these simple recipes so your ’nanners don’t go to waste.

BANANA BREAD

A good go-to is banana bread, since you’ll likely have all the ingredients you need on-hand. This recipe is easy to follow, and even if you’ve never made banana bread, it’ll turn out great. To start, you’ll want two or three overripe bananas (three if you like your banana bread super moist; two is just right for my taste). The best part: If your bananas are perfectly overripe, you won’t need a mixer or blender; just mash them with a fork until there are no (or very few) lumps. Truthfully, lumps won’t hurt; you’ll hardly notice them in the finished product. Another plus: You won’t have to dirty too many dishes; just mix all the ingredients in one big bowl before transferring them to a buttered loaf pan.

AUGUST 2018

BANANA “NICE CREAM”

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What better to go with a warm slice of banana bread than a scoop of banana ice cream? The trick here though is you won’t actually need to use cream — this healthy alternative is good for those who can’t have dairy and makes an easy treat. You will need a blender or food processor for this recipe in order to reach the desired consistency.

INGREDIENTS:  2 or 3 overripe bananas, peeled  ⅓ cup of melted butter (use a non-dairy substitute, such as Smart Balance, if necessary)

 ¼ cup of brown sugar (if you don’t have brown sugar on hand, using white granulated sugar only is fine; with a total of no more than 1 cup of sugar)

 1 teaspoon of baking soda

 1 egg, beaten

 Pinch of salt

 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract

 ¾ cup of white granulated sugar

 1 ½ cups of all-purpose flour

DIRECTIONS: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and butter (or lightly oil) a loaf pan (approximately 4”x8” in size); set pan aside. In a large mixing bowl, mash bananas with a fork or potato masher until smooth, then stir in melted butter. Add in all remaining ingredients, stirring until combined. Pour batter into your prepared loaf pan and bake 50 minutes to an hour at 350 degrees until loaf rises and browns. As with cake, you can check the doneness by inserting a tester (a wooden skewer works well); when the tester comes out clean, you’re ready to remove the pan and let the bread cool. When cooled, slice and serve! Or even better, enjoy warm. INGREDIENTS:  About 4 overripe bananas; peeled, sliced, and frozen  Optional ingredients: for chocolate banana “nice cream,” incorporate 1 tablespoon of cocoa powder; for peanut butter banana “nice cream,” mix in a tablespoon or two of peanut butter.

DIRECTIONS: Peel your overripe bananas, cut into thin slices, and place pieces in a single layer on a parchment-lined plate or baking sheet. Freeze for one to two hours. Place frozen banana slices in a blender or food processor and puree them until you reach a smooth, creamy consistency. If necessary, you can use a tablespoon or so of milk to help smooth the mixture. Once mixture is completely blended, add in optional ingredients — cocoa powder or peanut butter; or both! — if desired. Serve immediately, or for a firmer “nice cream,” put back in the freezer until it hardens.


Leading the Mid-South in Teaching Students with Dyslexia to Read and Succeed Founded in 1972, Bodine School provides an excellent elementary school experience specifically designed for students in grades 1-6 who have dyslexia. In classes of 10 students or fewer, teachers deliver specialized instruction that is multisensory, direct, structured, and based on the unique needs of students. To learn more about our program, contact us to schedule a tour! 2432 Yester Oaks Drive Germantown, TN 38139 (901) 754-1800 www.bodineschool.org

Every HERO needs a mentor, every mentor

needs a GUIDE. memphisparent.com

FREE HOMESCHOOL DAYS at Memphis Brooks Museum of Art Activities

Fall 2018 schedule Full STE(A)M Ahead! Thursday, September 13: The Science of Sight Thursday, October 11: Energy + Technology Thursday, November 8: Shape It Up! 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. | Art studio opens at 10 a.m. | Tours begin at 10:30 and 11:15 a.m. No reservations needed to participate and the program is free of charge.

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FALL 2018

Drop-in art-making studio, guided tours, gallery guides and more.

21


CAN-DO KID

OSARUGUE OTEBELE’S JOURNEY Memphian wins prestigious national award for her collection of poetry By JULIA BAKER

Many literature greats, such as Truman Capote, Sylvia Plath, and just recently, Memphis’ own Osarugue Otebele, got their starts by being recognized in Scholastic’s Art and Writing Awards.

AUGUST 2018

In its 95th consecutive year, the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards, the nation’s longest running and most prestigious awards for young artists grades 7-12, recognizes top creators in 29 categories of expression from sculpture to poetry. Seventeen-year-old Osarugue Otebele, a recent graduate of Shelby County Schools’ Hollis F. Price Middle College High School, was one of 16 out of 346,000 contestants to be awarded a Gold Medal Portfolio award and a $10,000 scholarship for her collection of works. Her winning portfolio, entitled “The Journey,” contains eight poems and one personal essay/memoir. Her work within the portfolio mainly encompasses subject matter close to her, such as her experience as a Nigerian-American and her perspective

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P H OTO C O U R T E S Y O F A L L I A N C E F O R YO U N G ARTISTS & WRITERS

outlook on slavery and civil rights in the U.S. “Being from Nigeria, I feel like I have two different stories to tell. I can talk about issues in Nigeria that have an effect on me, and I can talk about issues in America that have an effect on me, too,” says Otebele, who moved to Memphis with her mother and two of her five siblings when she was 8 years old to join her father, who had moved to the U.S. when Osarugue was a baby. “[My parents’] plan for us was us having better opportunities for a good education,” Otebele says. “They knew coming here would set that standard for us. That platform would push us to want to go to [college] and make something of ourselves.” One of Otebele’s winning works, a memoir entitled “Moisture,” talks about her mother’s persistence in keeping her family in

touch with their Nigerian culture, despite being immersed in American culture. “But we’re here now,” says Otebele. “So we have to be as much into it as possible. We cannot keep ourselves away from it because we’re scared of what might happen. We have to live in this country. We have to work in this country. We have to go to school and make a life out of this country. We have to do it the best way we can and not be scared of what might happen.” Otebele found out about the Scholastic contest through her guidance counselor, and she submitted her portfolio in December to be blindly judged locally. In April, her work, which was judged on originality, technical skill, and emergence of personal vision or voice, was submitted to a panel of judges to be judged nationally. Shortly thereafter, Otebele received word that she had received top honors in the national competition. “I was so shocked,” Otebele says. “I literally had no words, which is weird. I’m a writer — I’m supposed to have all of the words in the world.” In June, Otebele set out for a weeklong awards celebration in New York City. Her work was put on exhibit at Parsons School of Design and Pratt Institute as part of the Art. Write.Now.2018 National Exhibition. During the weeklong celebration, Otebele participated in a Q&A seminar and attended a prom for the winners.


“I got to meet other people who were also writers and artists,” says Otebele. “It made me feel less nervous because I got to meet people who also write and make art like I do.” Before the awards ceremony at Carnegie Hall, Otebele and other winners got the chance to meet with special guest speakers Marc Brown (the mastermind behind the children’s book and television series Arthur), R.L. Stine (author of the Goosebumps series), and Ansel Egort (Golden Globe-nominated actor; The Fault in Our Stars, Baby Driver). “It was pretty exciting meeting the writers we grew up reading and who made our childhoods,” Otebele says. “They gave us advice about continuing on our journeys as writers. It was pretty amazing.” Otebele’s interests and skills span far beyond creative writing. Before her sophomore year, Otebele took virtual STEM classes at East High School. However, Otebele decided she would rather focus on her interests in creative writing. “I definitely think engineering helped me become a better writer because now I see a problem and I know how to fix it,” says Otebele. “In engineering there is no box, and that helped with my writing because I don’t see a box to try to keep myself in.” Additionally, Otebele has served as a youth ambassador for Memphis in May and has interned as a cinematographer for the Levitt Shell’s concert series. Some of Otebele’s future plans include becoming a screenwriter and teaching English and African-American history to college or high school students. Otebele is applying her $10,000 scholarship toward her freshman year at Spelman College, a liberal arts school for women, in Atlanta, Georgia. She begins classes this fall.

By Osarugue Otebele

I was trying to write a poem About trees How the darkest of bodies used to dangle off like loose keys I’m trying to write a poem about trees Because we only ever talk about the strange fruit hanging Never of how we turned nature into a sign of death How this tree so beautiful to black bodies it took their breath away The light vanished from their eyes Hands scratching at their necks Legs shaking, their mind racing But they were at a beautiful tree And they could look down one last time and say Forgive them for they do not know what they are doing Bring his friends and family to see the end of yet another tree’s innocences I was trying to write a poem about trees When I read it, it was a poem about an endangered species I was trying to write a poem about water About its beautiful color Then I heard the screams of men, women and children begging to be thrown overboard I was trying to write a poem about water About the stories that it carried, the stolen that it carried The ships it pushed The bodies packed so tightly They could smell the fear of each other’s lips I was going to write a poem about water But every time I started I couldn't breathe Salt on my lips Raindrops falling from my eyes Teardrops falling from the sky I was trying to write a poem about rain But freedom never did I was going to write a poem about God About his miracles How he turned water into wine

Chains into shoelaces Now we teach our generations how to tie I was trying to write a poem about Jesus, but When I read it, it was about a black woman About how her apples never fell from the tree I was trying to write a poem about bullets And how they seem to always have a name, GPS and a color chart to go with I was trying to write a poem about bullets but as I wrote it I pictured a boy asking his mother for a quarter And without question she will hand it to him He will put it in a machine, with his hands out he will collect the bullets He’ll learn how to protect and serve his own The officer will have a dollar in change The officer will have a dollar in change I was trying to write a poem about art How black is art How we’re not just good for music How we’re trapping because we’re trapped And if our music promotes violence what song was Christopher Columbus playing Because Yung Metro definitely don't trust em I was trying to write a poem about art But when the white girls read theirs they called them misunderstood but I was just angry I stopped trying and I finally wrote a poem about black men I wanted to say don't you know that you an endangered species, don't you know that tides have carried your history Pride has hidden your self hate Don't you know that you are kings And I wanted to say it’s okay to be weak Even Jesus wept I wanted to say these things but I was reminded That black men, black people, black art, don't have time to be weak

© A L L I A N C E F O R YO U N G A R T I S T S & W R I T E R S /S C H O L A S T I C A R T & W R I T I N G AWA R D S . USED WITH PERMISSION.

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TRYING

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AUGUST CALENDAR DUGOUT CANOES: PADDLING THROUGH THE AMERICAS THE PINK PALACE MUSEUM

Through September 14 Exhibit highlights include more than 100 museum artifacts from Florida to the Pacific Northwest, hands-on interactives, and four short films showcasing the dugout canoes. Remembering the Dream, Connections Exhibit 2018. Through January 27, 2019. 636-2362. 1 ∙ WEDNESDAY

Toddler Time. Universal Parenting Place (UPP) @ Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women. Meets Wednesdays from 10:30 a.m. until noon. Play group for parents and toddlers. Free. 227-9558. Wild Lunch at Lichterman. Lichterman Nature Center. Tuesday through Saturday at noon. Watch the Backyard Wildlife Center’s animal keepers feed the animals. Tuesday, Thursday & Saturday: Box Turtle. Wednesday: Hawk. Friday: Snakes. Free with admission. 636-2210.

2 ∙ THURSDAY

AUGUST 2018

Sprouts. Dixon Gallery and Gardens. Thursdays, 10:30-11 a.m. This new interactive program for toddlers and their caregivers encourages creative play. $8. Reservations required. 761-5250.

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Farm Park Farmers Market. Bobby Lanier Farm Park. June 7 through August 9. Thursdays, 4-7:30 p.m. Features fresh produce, live music, art, cooking demos, children’s activities. Free. Visit facebook. com/farmparkfarmersmarket for details. Whet Thursday: Dog Days of Summer. Metal Museum. 5-8 p.m. Features live music by Marcella & Her Lovers, adoptable dogs on site from ALIVE Rescue Memphis, paw print casting in the foundry, and food from Soi Number 9. Free. 774-6380.

3 ∙ FRIDAY

Fun Fridays: Campfire Tales. Memphis Botanic Garden (MBG). Fridays, from 10 a.m. until noon. Join for Fun Fridays in Tracks & Trails and Campfire Tales Idea Garden in My Big Backyard. Drop-in activity, free with admission. 636-4100. Food Truck Fridays. Dixon Gallery and Gardens. Fridays, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Admission is free to the gardens during Food Truck Fridays. 761-5250. Singing in the Rain Jr. Germantown Community Theatre. July 27 through August 12. Friday & Saturday, at 7:30 p.m. Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Join for this family musical adapted by Broadway legends Betty Comden and Adolph Green from the original screenplay of the movie. $20/adult. $15/child. Reservations required. 453-7447. 2018 Movie Mania. Central Park @ Carriage Crossing. Fridays at dusk. Premovie fun includes games and giveaways. Free. Visit shopcarriagecrossing.com for a complete schedule.

4 ∙ SATURDAY

Memphis Farmers Market (MFM) 2018 Season. MFM @ Central Train Station Pavilion. Through October 27. Saturdays from 8 a.m. until 1 p.m. Shop for fresh produce, take part in a children’s activity, listen to live music, and more! Free. Go to memphisfarmersmarket.org for details.

Chucalissa Family Day. C.H. Nash Museum at Chucalissa. Saturdays at 10 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. Family Day activities include museum tour, throwing darts with an atlatl, scavenger hunt, the hands-on-lab tour, an educational program, and creating a keepsake craft to take home. Family programs and craft activities change weekly. Aug. 4: Stone Tools & Weapons/ Talking Sticks. Aug. 11: Trash Talks/Snake Painting. Aug. 18: Mystery Box/Beading. Aug. 25: Music/Coloring Book. $6/adult. $4/child ages 4-11. Free for children 3 and under. 785-3160. Family Studio. Dixon Gallery and Gardens. 10:a.m. until noon. Families are invited to drop in at the Dixon to create works of art open-studio style. Free. 761-5250. Get Outside! Fitness: Free Yoga for Kids. Shelby Farms Park. Saturdays, from 11 a.m. until noon. Introduces children to yoga basics with music and movement. Free. 222-7275. Black Panther (2D repertory film). CTI 3D Giant Theater. Weekends in August at 4 p.m. Watch your favorite movies on the big screen at the Pink Palace. $10/adult. $8/ child ages 3 and up. 636-2362. Park After Dark: Outdoor Movie Night. Shelby Farms Park. On select Saturdays in August. August 4: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. August 11: Pirates of the Caribbean. 7-10 p.m. Experience the park after dark


By MEENA VISWANATHAN

6 ∙ MONDAY

Mudpie Mondays. MBG. Mondays, from 10 a.m. until noon. Join on the Little Garden Patio and use dishes, spoons, and nature’s decorations to “bake” your own pie creations. Drop-in activity, free with admission. 636-4100.

Tea & Toddlers. UPP @ Christ Community Health Services. Mondays from noon until 2:45 p.m. Parents are invited for a weekly parenting topic while tots enjoy toddler time over refreshments. Free. RSVP to brittany.hart@christchs.org or call 7012871 for details.

7 ∙ TUESDAY

Mini Masters. Dixon Gallery and Gardens. Tuesdays from 10:30 to 11:15 a.m. Parentchild workshop designed for toddlers features story time, art activity, and snack. $8/child. Call 761-5250 to pre-register and pre-pay by Monday noon before the class.

8 ∙ WEDNESDAY

Music for Aardvarks. UPP @ Christ Community Health Services. On select Wednesdays (August 8 & 22), from noon until 1 p.m. Early childhood music class for children ages 6 months to 6 years. Free. RSVP to brittany.hart@christchs.org or call 701-2871 for details. Open Rehearsals with The Memphis Boychoir & Girlchoir. Saint John’s Episcopal Church. On select days in August — August 8, 13, & 15, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Join afternoon rehearsals with the Memphis Boychoir & Girlchoir to experience a 30-year Memphis tradition. Free. 323-8597.

10 ∙ FRIDAY

Mom and Baby Yoga. UPP @ Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women. On select Fridays (August 10 & 24), 10-11 a.m. Geared for children ages 1 and under. A class where mom and baby can bond and increase emotional and physical well-being. Free. 227-9558.

Summer Movie Series. The Orpheum. On select Fridays & Saturdays. Friday, August 10, at 7 p.m.: Steel Magnolias (PG). Friday, August 17 at 7 p.m.: Love & Basketball (PG-13). Saturday, August 18, at 2 p.m.: Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Cinderella (G). Pre-movie activities begin at 6 p.m. and include a photo booth with special moviethemed props and quotes, and activities in the lobby. Costumes are encouraged. $8/ adult. $6/child ages 12 and under. 5253000. Firefly Glow Party. MBG. 7-9:30 p.m. Make yourself glow at the Glo Med Illumination Station, visit the Glow Lab to discover nature under black light, bring your light-up toys for a dance party featuring performances and an LED hoop show. $15. Food trucks and concessions available. 636-4100.

11 ∙ SATURDAY

Train Heritage Day. Morton Museum of Collierville History. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Celebrate Collierville’s long connection to trains by checking out model train displays and taking part in train-related crafts at the Morton Museum. Also tour the inside of the depot and train cars on Town Square. Free. 457-2650. Build a Community. Macedonia MB Church. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Macedonia Youth Departments presents this back-to-school event featuring music, food, games, bouncers, and giveaways. Backpack with supplies and school uniform giveaway — one per child (child must be present). While supplies last. Free. Visit Macedonia’s Facebook page for details.

17 ∙ FRIDAY

Drop the Mic Poetry Symposium. National Civil Rights Museum. 4-9 p.m. Recommended for ages 14 and above. Features workshops on key components on mechanics, expression, branding, and the impact art has on the community. Program includes a master class, keynote speaker, panel discussion, and light dinner. Free. Registration required. Visit civilrightsmuseum.org to register.

18 ∙ SATURDAY

Magic Carpet on Your Toes with Sugar Plum Fairy and Roudnev Youth Ballet. Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s School. 10 a.m. Children ages 2 to 8 are invited to don their tutus for a dancing adventure across the globe with Clara and her Nutcracker. $5/child. Free to adults. 537-1483. Drop the Mic Poetry Slam. Paradise Entertainment Center. 4-7 p.m. Recommended for ages 14 and above. Poetry Slam features competing poets performing original works before an audience and a judging panel. Judges pick winners from three age categories for a chance to win cash prizes. Seasoned poets and musical artists will perform and serve as hosts. An artist marketplace includes book signings with recordings and merchandise available for purchase. Free. Registration required. Visit civilrightsmuseum.org/drop-the-mic to register. Family Night OUT. Dixon Gallery and Gardens. 5-8 p.m. Families celebrate the end of summer at Dixon with activities, performances, and games. Free. 761-5250. Park After Dark: Stargazing. Shelby Farms Park. 7:45-10 p.m. Memphis Astronomical Society (MAS) provides telescopes to help view constellations, planets, and star clusters. Free. 222-7275.

22 ∙ WEDNESDAY

Donate Life ECHO - summer movie screening. Brown Baptist Church. 6 p.m. The Mid-South Transplant Foundation presents this family-friendly event to raise awareness of organ and tissue donation in multicultural communities. Visit midsouthtransplant.org for details.

25 ∙ SATURDAY

Music on the Porch Day. MBG. 10-10:45 a.m. Play Music on the Porch Day is a national movement to revive the tradition of gathering for music in our communities. Join the Hutchison School students as they play old-fashioned cigar box guitar tunes

M E M PH I SPA R ENT.COM

watching an outdoor movie overlooking Hyde Lake. $10/car. 222-7275.

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FOR EVERY STAGE OF YOUR CHILD’S LIFE

FRE

For Ch E EXAM ild (a $62ren Under Two!

Value )

Pediatric Dentists

Steven J. Fuson, D.D.S., M.S., John A. Acosta, D.D.S., Toddrick Smith, D.D.S., Dr. Nathaniel Denson, D.D.S., M.D.S.

Call for Deta Only. Expils. New Patien ts ires 8/31 Additiona /18. l fees

Family Dentists Orthodontists

Gregg Bouldien, D.D.S., M.S., Dr. Taylor Collazo, D.D.S., M.S.D.

www.pdg4kids.com

Olive Branch

662.371.4123

Memphis

Southaven

901.363.8192

Delta Fair & Music Festival 2018. The Agricenter. Through September 9. Features 60 carnival rides, music, attractions, livestock, crafts, culinary & collectibles, Demolition Derby, contests, and fair food. $10/adult. $5/child ages 5-12. Free for children 4 and under. Wristband: $25/person. Family Fun Pack discounts available at Kroger. Visit deltafest.com or call 8677007 for details.

ONGOING EVENTS The Pink Palace Museum. Dugout Canoes: Paddling Through the Americas. Through September 14. Exhibit highlights include more than 100 museum artifacts from Florida to the Pacific Northwest, hands-on interactives, and four short films showcasing the dugout canoes. Remembering the Dream, Connections Exhibit 2018. Through January 27, 2019. 636-2362.

Clayton Floriani, D.D.S., Adam Fitzhugh, D.D.S., Natalie Carruth, DDS.

Germantown

31 ∙ FRIDAY

MUSEUMS AND EXHIBITS

in individmay be incurred ual case s.

901.805.2127

on the porches of Playhouse Lane in My Big Backyard. Free with admission. 636-4119.

CTI 3D Giant Theater. America’s Musical Journey 3D. August 11 through November 16. A cross-country adventure explores the musical heritage of America and the cultural cities where music was born. Journey to the South Pacific 3D. Through November 16. Dream Big 3D. Through November 16. 636-2362.

662.269.6852

READY. SET. GOddard! We help children explore and discover their interests through play in a safe environment. We provide ample opportunities for fun learning experiences, promoting a lifelong love of learning in literacy, science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics.

AutoZone Dome at the Sharpe Planetarium. Phantom of the Universe. Through September 30. Show explores dark matter from the Big Bang to its anticipated discovery at the Large Hadron Collider. Seasonal Stargazing. Ongoing. Perfect Little Planet. Until further notice. One World, One Sky: Big Bird’s Adventure. Until further notice. 636-2362.

OTHER PROGRAMS

Mallory-Neely House Tour. Mallory-Neely House, 652 Adams Avenue. Fridays & Saturdays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $9/adult. $5/child (ages 3 and up). 523-1484.

AUGUST 2018

Magevney House Tour. Magevney House. Open first Saturday (August 4), 1-4 p.m. Admission is free. 523-1484.

CALL TODAY! COLLIERVILLE^ • 901-861-0108 CORDOVA • 901-708-3338 ^

GoddardSchool.com

INFANT THROUGH PRE-K The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. Goddard Systems, Inc. program is AdvancED accredited. © Goddard Systems, Inc. 2018

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^

Mid-South Hunting & Fishing Extravaganza. The Agricenter. August 10-12. Friday, 2-9 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sunday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Features duck calling contest, big buck contest, kids trout pond, and more. $10/adult. $5/child ages 5-12 Free for kids ages 4 and under. Visit memphishuntshow.com or call 867-7007 for details. 30 Thursdays: Trails and Tails. Memphis Botanic Garden. Thursday, August 30, at 6 p.m. Bring your four-legged friend for a walk along our trails and pathways. Wood River Animal Rescue will be there with rescue dogs and information. Free with admission. 636-4100.


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Registration Opens for The After School Acting Program (ASAP). Playhouse on the Square. Open now until August 31. For grades 3-8. Fall sessions begin September 3. Call 7250776 for details.

Mid-Day Mindfulness in Motion Yoga. UPP @ Christ Community Health Services. On select Fridays (August 3 & 17), from noon until 1 p.m. Free. RSVP to brittany.hart@ christchs.org or call 701-2871 for details.

Make Your Own: Resin Casting. Metal Museum. Saturday, August 25, from 10 a.m. until noon. Children ages 7 and up learn how to cast dried bugs, plants and other objects into resin to create a custom pendant, magnet, or keepsake. $10/project. Reservations required. 774-6380.

FUND-RAISERS

Art of Dinner. Church Health Nutrition Hub. Friday, August 3, at 6 p.m. In this interactive cooking class, chef Joshua House guides participants through a three-course menu. $65. Benefits the nutrition programming at the Church Health Nutrition Hub. Go to churchhealth.org/event/ AODChefJosh for tickets.

T:6.1”

Kaleidoscope Club. Leatherman Art Studio @ Dixon Gallery and Gardens. Wednesdays, 4-5 p.m. Ages 5-9. $8. Snack provided. Call 7615250 to register.

communitycooking to register.

LIVE FRIDAY SEPT 7 8 | 7C STANDUPTOCANCER.ORG

American Lung Association’s LUNG FORCE, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Canadian Cancer Society, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Cancer Stem Cell Consortium, Farrah Fawcett Foundation, Genome Canada, Laura Ziskin Family Trust, LUNGevity Foundation, National Ovarian Cancer Coalition, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Ovarian Cancer Research Fund Alliance, Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer

Football Kickoff Party. Junior Saturday Morning Unwind STAND UP TO CANCER IS A DIVISION OF THE ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY FOUNDATION, A 501(C)(3) CHARITABLE ORGANIZATION. IMAGES ARE FROM STAND UP TO CANCER TELECASTS AND EVENTS. League of Memphis Community Sessions. Church Health THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR CANCER RESEARCH (AACR) IS STAND UP TO CANCER’S SCIENTIFIC PARTNER. Meditation Chapel. Saturdays at Resource Center. Saturday, August 18, 2-6 p.m. Families will 9:30 a.m. Unwind and refocus put on their game day gear and with instructors Greg Graber and Rob Dove every week. Free. join for an afternoon of tailgating, lawn games, and a Go to churchhealth.org/events “Fight Song Off!” for details. 1 $10/person. SU2C_TuneIn_2018_ENG_4.575x6.1_R6.indd Admission is free for children 13 by eric.whitaker / Eric Whitaker from LANDLA-DMX1629 Saved at 7-16-2018 1:21 PM Saturday Sketch. Dixon Gallery and under. $50/tent (represent Job info Approvals Fonts & Images your school with tailgate tent and Gardens. Saturday, August Job Art Director Fonts None Tune-In 2018 on the lawn). No outside 11, 10-11 a.m. Ages 15 and up. Client Copywriter Univers (67 Bold Condensed, 57 Condensed, None SU2Cfood, Account Mgr 75 Black), Helvetica Neue (67 Medium ConMedia Type Page Ad A Moncure coolers, or beverages. Benefits Free with admission. 761-5250. Live Studio Artist densed, 75 Bold) E Whitaker None Proofreader M Miller 4.575” x 6.1” Junior League Trim of Memphis Images Bleed None SU2C 10 Year Logo_Transparent BG_TM.eps Pubs None Community Programs serving African Family Drum Circle. Notes (11.38%), Network Logos USA_5Rows_ None the Berclair, Highland Heights, UPP @ Christ Community V6.psd (RGB; 1321 ppi; 22.7%), DonorLogos. psd (RGB; 551 ppi; 108.81%), SU2C_LA_Masand Binghampton Health Services. On select ter_ENG_DaileyR1_Quarert_4rows_ExtraBleed.psd (RGB; 596 ppi; 50.32%) neighborhoods. Visit the Junior Tuesdays (August 14 & 28), League of Memphis’ College 1:30-2:30 p.m. Free. RSVP to Inks Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, Black Football Kickoff Party event brittany.hart@christchs.org or page on Facebook for ticket call 701-2871 for details. reservations. Community Culinary Medicine AUDITIONS Cooking Class. Church Health Auditions of 2018 production Nutrition Hub. August 21 of Peter Pan. Playhouse on the through September 25, Square. Saturday, August 4, at 1 Tuesdays from 10 a.m. until p.m. Ages 7-16. Learn a song noon and 6-8 p.m. Choose and dance to audition for the morning or evening session. show. Contact Courtney Oliver Learn how to make meals that at 725-0776 to make are nutritious and delicious. Go reservations. to churchhealth.org/

Can you imagine... a world without children?

Printed At

We Can’t.

Call 1-800-996-4100 to help.

www.stjude.org

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CLASSES & WORKSHOPS

27


THEATRE PERFORMANCES

Life is why we encourage you to take care of yourself as you take care of your loved ones.

Bring It! Live. The Orpheum. Thursday, August 2, at 7:30 p.m. Miss D and her Dancing Dolls, stars of the Lifetime’s hit series Bring It!, return to the Orpheum for an all-new Bring It! Live 2018 summer tour. $35.75-$104.75 (VIP). 525-3000. Vishal and Shekhar. The Orpheum. Saturday, August 4, at 8 p.m. Vishal and Shekhar, composers for the film Jhankar Beats, will perform from their latest hits Bang Bang and Happy New Year. $52-$253 (VIP). 525-3000.

AUGUST 2018

Elvis: Remembering the King. Halloran Centre at the Orpheum. Friday, August 10, at noon. Southern California native Elvis Tribute Artists Jacob Roman and 2009 Ultimate Elvis Tribute Artist Contest winner Bill Cherry kicks off KWICK Production’s 2018 Memphis Elvis Week Concert Series. $45-$55. VIP: $225. Call 525-3000 for tickets.

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My daughter is why. Everyone has a reason to live a longer and healthier life. What is yours?

at noon. Victor Trevino Jr., Ann Margret look alike Laura West, and 2017 Ultimate Elvis Tribute Artist Contest third place finisher Ben Thompson will be performing musical numbers from Hollywood hits as part of the 2018 Memphis Elvis Week Concert Series. $45-$55. VIP: $225. Call 525-3000 for tickets. Cody Ray Slaughter: Live in Memphis. Halloran Centre at the Orpheum. Monday, August 13, at 7 p.m. Cody Ray Slaughter, star of the Tony Award-winning Broadway musical Million Dollar Quartet will be performing hits alongside David Fontana, son of Elvis’ drummer DJ Fontana as part of the 2018 Memphis Elvis Week Concert Series. $45-$55. VIP: $225. Call 525-3000 for tickets. ’68 Miles to Vegas. Halloran Centre at the Orpheum. Tuesday, August 14, at 3 p.m. Award-winning Ted Torres Martin will wrap the 2018 Memphis Elvis Week Concert Series. $45-$55. VIP: $225. Call 525-3000 for tickets.

3 Kings. Halloran Centre at the Ostrander Awards Ceremony. Orpheum. Saturday, August 11, The Orpheum. Sunday, August at 3 p.m. Jacob Roman, Joseph 26, at 6 p.m. This annual awards Hall (Top Ten on America’s Got event highlights the best Talent), and Doug Church will performances of the 2017-2018 take the stage as part of the theater season and recognizes 2018 Memphis Elvis Week the top talents in local Concert Series. $45-$55. VIP: community and college theater. $225. Call 525-3000 for tickets. Go to facebook.com/ ostranderawards for ticket Elvis: Ultimate Gospel. information. Halloran Centre at the Orpheum. Sunday, August 12, at STORY TIME AT AREA BOOKSTORES AND 10 a.m. 2015 Ultimate Elvis MUSEUMS Tribute Artist Contest Grand Champion David Lee brings you Barnes & Noble Booksellers The Avenue Carriage Crossing the best of Elvis Gospel as part of the 2018 Memphis Elvis Week Mall, 853-3264 Saturdays at 11 a.m. Ages 1-6. Concert Series. $45-$55. VIP: $225. Call 525-3000 for tickets. Barnes & Noble Booksellers 2774 N. Germantown Pkwy., Elvis: Hollywood to Vegas. 386-2468 Halloran Centre at the Tuesdays and Saturdays at 11 a.m. Orpheum. Monday, August 13,


Ages Pre K - 6. BARTLETT ★ August 4 & 7: Cece Loves 6382 Stage Rd., 386-8968 Science. ★ Children’s Beading. ★ August 11 & 14: A is for Wednesday, August 8, 4-5 Astronaut and A Place for Pluto. p.m. Children ages 6-12 learn ★ August 18 & 21: The Dinosaur how to make critters out of Expert. beads. ★ August 29: We Don’t Eat Our Classmates. CORDOVA 8457 Trinity Rd., 754-8443 Character Story Time: Curious ★ Family Picnic Day. Saturday, George. Sunday, August 19, August 4, 11 a.m. until noon. 3-3:30 p.m. Meet Curious Listen to stories, launch George and hear a story. Free. mini-rockets, and enjoy snow cones and popcorn. Story Time at Morton Museum ★ Kids Cook. Saturday, August of Collierville History 11, from 11 a.m. until noon. 196 N. Main St., 457-2650 Children learn to make On Fridays, 10:30-11 a.m. Ages 5 healthy after-school snacks. and under. Enjoy a new story ★ Glue Batik T-Shirt. Thursday, theme each week with songs, August 23, 4-6 p.m. Children related craft, and snack. Free. ages 6-12 design a batik T-Shirt using glue and paint.

Stop by your local branch or go to memphislibrary.org for a complete listing of library events. CENTRAL 3030 Poplar Ave., 415-2700 CLOUD901 Classes & Events: CLOUD901 is the library’s state-of-the-art Teen Learning Lab that includes a music studio, a video production lab, an art studio, Makerspace, gaming zone, and a performance stage. Open to teens ages 13-18 with a Memphis library card. Go to memphislibrary.org/cloud901 for a class list. ★ Crafternoon. Thursdays, 4-5 p.m. Children ages 6-12 enjoy stories and crafts. Registration required for groups. ★ International Story Time. Saturday, August 4, from 11 a.m. until noon. Learn about the country of Germany with stories, crafts, games, and snacks. ★ Gadget Lab for Kids. Tuesdays, 4-5 p.m. Children ages 6-12 learn about apps and games available on the library’s gadgets.

FRAYSER 3712 Argonne St., 357-4115 ★ Art Escape for Children. Thursday, August 30, 4-5 p.m. Children ages 6-12 create art using masking tape.

Grace-St. Luke’s Episcopal School is a coed, independent school located in the heart of Midtown’s beautiful Central Gardens neighborhood. Since 1947, GSL has been preparing boys and girls to become creative problem solvers, confident lifelong learners, and responsible citizens in their communities and the world. Come explore our preschool, including the outdoor classroom complete with a mud kitchen, garden, music wall, and so much more. Schedule a tour today!

PRESCHOOL

Little Lukers (Age 2) Pre-Kindergarten (Age 3) Junior Kindergarten (Age 4)

LOWER SCHOOL

Senior Kindergarten-4th Grade

MIDDLE SCHOOL 5th-8th Grade

Coed | Age 2 - Grade 8 | Midtown gslschool.org • 246 S. Belvedere Blvd., Memphis, TN 38104 901.278.0200 • learnmore@gslschool.org

GASTON PARK 1040 S. Third St., 942-0836 ★ STEAM Program: Crystal Climbers. Saturday, August 25, 1-2 p.m. Children create colorful, sparkling structures. RALEIGH 3157 Powers Rd., 386-5333 ★ Raleigh Branch Science Club. On Mondays, 1-2 p.m. Children ages 5 and under build Rube machines, try marshmallow engineering, and check out the aerodynamics of aircraft. ★ Poetry Workshop. Tuesday, August 14, 1-2:55 p.m. Explore poets and their works and then create your own poetry to share at the Poetry Slam. ★ Poetry Slam. Tuesday, August 14, 3-4 p.m. Children share the poetry created at the poetry workshop.

M E M PH I SPA R ENT.COM

MEMPHIS LIBRARY EVENTS

An Anchor for Life!

29


YOUR CHILD SHOULD BE HERE!

AUGUST 2018

Send us your kid funnies, photos, or artwork via email with Favorite Moments in the subject line to michelle@memphisparent.com

30


Join representatives from public, private, charter, y it n u m m o c r e th o d an l, ia h c paro schools at the first-ever Mid-South School Expo!

SATURDAY

Oct 27

9am until NOON For more info, please visit

memphisparentschoolexpo.com

M E M PH I SPA R ENT.COM

M E M P H I S B OTA N I C G A R D E N S I N H A R D I N H A L L

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As a Top 10 heart hospital, we reach higher. We all want the best for kids. At Le Bonheur, we’re proud to be recognized as one of the nation’s Top 10 pediatric heart programs by U.S. News & World Report. We are the only children’s hospital in the Southeast to earn this distinction.

Where Every Child Matters lebonheur.org

Memphis Parent, August 2018  

Here's our back to school edition! Plus, new kids on the block with Crosstown High opening, local student wins national award, talking about...

Memphis Parent, August 2018  

Here's our back to school edition! Plus, new kids on the block with Crosstown High opening, local student wins national award, talking about...