Page 1

Memphis • THE CITY MAGAZINE • W W W.MEMPHISMAGAZINE.COM

FASHION: BLACK IS STREET GREAT HOMES: THE MAN 901 HEALTH: HOW TO THE NEW BLACK! RACING CAVE OF YOUR DREAMS AGE GRACEFULLY

THE CITY MAGAZINE

our second a nnua l

VOL XL NO 8 | NOVEMBER 2015

Homegrown

Holiday

Gift Guide

USA $4.99

1 1 —1 5 DISPLAY UNTIL DECEMBER 10, 2015

C01_MM11_2015_Cover_v3A.indd 1

10/20/15 2:16 PM


T:9” S:7.875”

The all-new BMW 7 Series

roadshowbmw.com 901-365-2584

S:9.875”

THE MOST INNOVATIVE VEHICLE IN ITS CLASS. Experience uncompromised luxury and cutting-edge technology, with 13 innovations found in no other luxury vehicle. And with its lighter Carbon Core frame and 445-horsepower* engine, this BMW delivers exactly the kind of performance you’d expect from the Ultimate Driving Machine.®

Special lease and finance offers will be available through BMW Financial Services.

Roadshow BMW | 405 N. Germantown Parkway | Memphis-Cordova, TN 38018 | 901-365-2584 | roadshowbmw.com * 445 horsepower based on the 750i xDrive Sedan. ©2015 BMW of North America, LLC. The BMW name, model names and logo are registered trademarks.

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/7/15 8:55 AM

T:10.875”

INTRODUCING THE ALL-NEW BMW 7 SERIES.


Guilloche Ciselé Slate Grey The deep matte surface in slate grey combined with the shimmering engraved Herringbone pattern creates a unique and feel. The highly polished D E S I G N E D T O B E H E L D very D E Apleasant R rhodium plated cap, end piece and grip contrast beautifully with the engraved barrel.

G U I L L O C H E C I S E L É S L AT E G R E Y

Guilloche Ciselé Slate Grey Guilloche Ciselé Slate Grey

The deep matte surface in slate grey combined with the shimmering engraved The deep matte surface in slate grey Herringbone pattern creates a unique and combined with the shimmering engraved very pleasant feel. The highly polished Herringbone pattern creates a unique and rhodium plated cap, end piece and grip contrast very pleasant feel. The highly polished beautifully with the engraved barrel. rhodium plated cap, end piece and grip contrast beautifully with the engraved barrel. HANDMADE IN GERMANY

The deep matte surface in slate grey combined with the shimmering engraved herringbone pattern creates a unique and very pleasant feel. The highly polished Rhodium plated cap, end piece, and grip contrast beautifully with th engraved barrel.

901.761.3580

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

P O P L A R AV E N U E AT R I D G E WAY I N R E G A L I A

OAKHALL.COM

10/15/15 7:53 AM


THE CL ASSICAL WATCH BY ROLE X

the cellini collection celebrates the eternal elegance of traditional timepieces with a contempor ary t wist. the es sence of a timeles s cl assic, the cellini time with a

39

mm case in

18

ct white gold displ ays

the hour, minute and seconds as if nothing was of importance but the present moment.

MM_DoublePageSpread_18x25_11x125.indd 2

10/10/15 12:13 PM


cellini time

rolex

MM_DoublePageSpread_18x25_11x125.indd 3

and cellini are trademarks.

10/10/15 12:13 PM


Jeanne Arthur

Paige Arnold

Helen Akin

Tommie Criswell Assistant Broker

Tom Kimbrough Broker

Fontaine Taylor

Fontaine Brown

Joy Kimbrough

Nan Lee

Megan Stout

433 Goodland Cr. Jeanne Arthur

$229,000 901.634.2800

135 N. Goodlett St. Paige Arnold

$229,900 901.870.7653

Carol O. Stout

Carol K. Stout

crye-leike.com • 901-766-9004 • 585 South Perkins • Memphis,TN 38117

Toni Martello

Kathryn Anne Matheny

Suzanne Plyler

700 Keough Dr. Christine McBee

$749,000 901.233.8980

232 N. Sanga St. $329,000 Kathryn Ann Matheny 901.848.2033

We proudly sell homes in all price ranges, however, we also sell 3 times more homes over $350,000 than our nearest competitor! Christine McBee

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

Jim Pascover

®

®

Leslie O’Leary

10/16/15 8:22 AM


S:8”

S:9.875”

There’s “nice” and there’s “Winter Event nice.” The Mercedes-Benz Winter Event. You’ve been good this year. Really, REALLY good. So head to the Mercedes-Benz Winter Event now, and treat yourself and your loved ones to that Mercedes-Benz on your wish list. Get incredible offers on the sporty, dazzling CLA; the exhilaratingly efficient C 300 Sedan; the versatile GLA; the safe and secure GLE; or the stunning E 350 — one of the most advanced luxury vehicles on the road today. But hurry, this “nice” opportunity disappears fast. See your authorized dealer today. MBUSA.com/WinterEvent

THE 2016

GLA

STARTING AT

32,500*

$

Mercedes-Benz of Memphis 5389 Poplar Avenue, Memphis, TN (901) 345-6211 www.mbofmemphis.com

Mercedes-Benz of Collierville 4651 S. Houston Levee Road, Collierville, TN (901) 316-3535 www.mbcollierville.com

Optional equipment shown. *MSRP excludes all options, taxes, title, registration, transportation charge and dealer prep. Options, model availability and actual dealer price may vary. See dealer for details. ©2015 Authorized Mercedes-Benz Dealers For more information, call 1-800-FOR-MERCEDES, or visit MBUSA.com.

HEADLINE: 34 pt. • BODY COPY: 9 pt. MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

200 Varick St. New York, NY 10014 : Phone 212-805-7500

10/20/15 8:24 AM


Joint replacement recovery — without the hospital food. If you’re considering joint replacement, skip the cafeteria trays and go home hours after your surgery. Call 901.759.5400 today to schedule your same-day joint replacement.

Hip Replacement | Knee Replacement | Shoulder Replacement | Ankle Replacement ©2015 Campbell Clinic P.C. All rights reserved. Campbell Clinic is a registered trademark of Campbell Clinic P.C.

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1 CAMP-0130 OP TJR Ad Cafeteria MM 9x10.875.indd 1

10/15/15 10/12/15 7:54 1:54 AM PM


Charles Lloyd on the cover

26

The Second Annual Homegrown Holiday Gift Guide (see page 37) PHOTOGRAPH BY DMYTOL | DREAMSTIME

Memphis (ISSN 1622-820x) is published monthly for $15 per year by Contemporary Media, Inc., 460 Tennessee Street, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101 © 2015. Telephone: 901-521-9000. For subscription info, please call 901-521-9000. Subscription customer service mailing address is Memphis magazine, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. All rights reserved. • Periodicals Postage Paid at Memphis, TN. Postmasters: send address changes to Memphis, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101.

our second annua l

VOL XL NO 8 | NOVEMBER 2015

Up Front

28

Homegrown

Holiday

Gift Guide

37

14 in the beginning 16 spotlight 20 fine print 22 city journal 24 out and about 26 front and center 28 fashion

Features

37 Made in Memphis

Our second annual Homegrown Holiday Gift Guide.

~ compiled by shara clark

48 The Main Drag

Fast cars in the dirty South. ~ by eileen townsend

65 Great Homes: “Modern” Medicine

Dr. Jonathan McCullers’ home in Central Gardens.

~ by anne cunningham o’neill

71 901 Health

Fitness tips for various life stages, and more.

Columns/Departments 100 ask vance

Morton Mystery Our trivia expert solves local mysteries of who, what, when, where, why, and why not. ~ by vance lauderdale

102 dining out

102

All in the Family Chef Josh Steiner shoos away a corner curse at Strano, presenting exuberant updates of Sicilian food. ~ by pamela denney

104 city dining

Tidbits: Chautauqua at Wiseacre Brewing Company; plus the city’s most extensive dining listings.

112 last stand

Mayor Strickland, Meet Coach Fuente What could city government’s CEO learn from a football coach? More than you might think. ~ by frank murtaugh

104 NOV EMBER 20 15 • MEMPHISMAGA ZINE.COM • 7

007_MM11_2015_TOC.indd 7

10/21/15 10:04 AM


BONUS

Realized.

Your Idea...

In This Issue W H AT ’S H AU T E

pages 34-35 Terrific products from our area’s leading retailers will keep you stylish and on trend for the upcoming events of the holiday season.

GIF T GUIDE pages 62-63 A selection of the best hand-crafted gifts for the holiday season, from some of our area’s favorite shops, artists, and craftsmen.

2015 MEMPHIS FI V E S TA R W E A LT H M A N AGERS:

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

2015 Memphis

Five Star Wealth Managers A Select

Award

Finding a wealth manager who suits your needs can be a daunting task. In fact, many consumers have a hard time figuring out where to even begin.

Sometimes, a few simple questions can set one off on the right path. Asking a wealth manager what makes working with him or her a unique experience can help you understand how they work and if their style meshes with your own. Further, asking a financial advisor to talk about any specialties they might have can help uncover skills you might find useful. Ultimately, how do you find an experienced wealth manager who you feel comfortable working with? One who has high retention rates? One who has undergone a thorough complaint and regulatory review? One who has tenure in the industry? Memphis magazine and Five Star Professional partnered to find wealth managers who satisfy 10 objective eligibility and evaluation criteria. Among many distinguishing attributes, the average one-year client retention rate for this year’s award winners is more than 96 percent. Although this list is a useful tool for anyone looking for help in managing their financial world or implementing aspects of their financial strategies, it should not be considered exhaustive. Undoubtedly, there are many excellent wealth managers who, for one reason or another, are not on this year’s list. In order to consider a broad population of high-quality wealth managers, award candidates are identified by one of three sources: firm nomination, peer nomination or pre-qualification based on industry standing. Self-nominations are not accepted. Memphis award candidates were identified using internal and external research data.

3075 Forest Hill Irene Road, Germantown • 901.753.8515 • www.chestnuthall.com

Determination

of Award Winners

Award candidates who satisfied 10 objective eligibility and evaluation criteria were named 2015 Five Star Wealth Managers.

Eligibility Criteria – Required

Evaluation Criteria – Considered

1. Credentialed as an investment advisory representative or a registered investment advisor.

7. Five-year client retention rate.

6. One-year client retention rate.

2. Actively employed as a credentialed professional in the financial services industry for a minimum of five years.

8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered.

3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review.

9. Number of client households served.

4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal firm standards.

10. Education and professional designations.

5. Accepting new clients.

Research

Disclosures

• Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. • The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. • Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their clients’ assets.

• The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or Memphis magazine. • Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. • Five Star Professional is not an advisory firm, and the content of this article should not be considered financial advice. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to www.fivestarprofessional.com. • 690 award candidates in the Memphis area were considered for the Five Star Wealth Manager award. 143 (approximately 21 percent of the award candidates) were named 2015 Five Star Wealth Managers.

Regulatory Review As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not: • Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine. • Had more than a total of three customer complaints filed against them (settled or pending) with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. • Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint filed with a regulatory authority. • Filed for personal bankruptcy. • Been convicted of a felony.

O NE O F T HE L ARGEST S ELECTIONS O F E NGAGEMENT R INGS A ND B ANDS I N T HE M ID S OUTH

Five Star Professional conducts a regulatory review of each nominated wealth manager using the Investment Adviser Public Disclosure (IAPD) website. Five Star Professional also uses multiple supporting processes to help ensure that a favorable regulatory and complaint history exists. Data submitted through these processes was applied per the above criteria: • Each wealth manager who passes the Five Star Professional regulatory review must attest that they meet the definition of favorable regulatory history, based upon the criteria listed above. • Five Star Professional promotes via local advertising the opportunity for consumers to confidentially submit complaints regarding a wealth manager. • Five Star Professional contacted approximately 1 in 12 households identified as having a high propensity to use the services of wealth managers in order to provide consumers the opportunity to submit complaints regarding a wealth manager.

For more information on the program, go to www.fivestarprofessional.com/wm_program.

www.fivestarprofessional.com — FS

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

•1

The 2015 Memphis Five Star Wealth Managers as chosen by their peers (see page 89: “Determination Of Award Winners”)

10/7/15 9:02 AM

Coming in January HOME ED DESIGN ESIGN AWARD AWARD WINNERS | CLASSIC COLLIERVILLE | A WEDDING WEDD DING TO REME REMEMBER Memphis • THE CITY MAG A ZINE • W W W.MEMPHISMAG A ZINE.COM

THE CITY MAGAZINE

VOL XXXIX NO 10 | JANUARY 2015

2015

HOME RESOURCE GUIDE *7 *7

HOME RE SOURCE GUIDE An issue packed with tips and techniques for maintaining and enhancing your home, inside and out.

IT’S EVERYTHING YOU’RE LOOKING FOR!

USA $4.99

0 1

—1 5

DISPLAY UNTIL FEBRUARY 10, 2015

Walnut Grove Lake

Coming in February T HE RE S TAUR A N T GUIDE exclusively at

DIAMOND BROKERS of MEMPHIS

Presenting the results of our annual Readers Restaurant Poll, the only definitive guide in town.

5134 POPLAR AVENUE

682-3426

www.diamondbrokersofmemphis.com

For more information on advertising or our upcoming special sections, please contact Margie Neal at margie@memphismagazine.com

8 • MEMPHISMAGA ZINE.COM • NOV EMBER 20 15

007_MM11_2015_TOC.indd 8

10/21/15 10:04 AM


ANN TAYLOR ANTHROPOLOGIE APPLE STORE BANANA REPUBLIC BRIGHTON BROOKS BROTHERS CHICO’S COACH FRANCESCA’S FREE PEOPLE GYMBOREE INDIGO J.CREW J. JILL JANIE AND JACK KENDRA SCOTT OPENS 11/9 LILY RAIN LOFT LUCKY BRAND JEANS MADEWELL MARMI SHOES MICHAEL KORS MONSOON CHILDREN ORIGINS SOFT SURROUNDINGS OPENS 11/13 STONEY RIVER TALBOTS

of your list

TEAVANA VERA BRADLEY WHITE HOUSE | BLACK MARKET

Black Friday

Season of Wishes at Saddle Creek Tree Lighting

November 27 | 8 AM – 9 PM

December 8th – 11th

‘Tis the season of giving at Saddle Creek, it’s easy to find the gifts smart Santa's seek. Relax and escape the black friday traffic with our revitalized shopping experience and find the gifts that are worthy of your list!

Help us ensure no deserving child goes without a wish by making a contribution this holiday season. As donations are collected, lights are lit on the Make-A-Wish tree to track our progress. Every dollar counts! Stop by the Season of Wishes tent at Saddle Creek to make your contribution.

th

Help light the Make A Wish Tree! December 11th | 5 – 7 PM Enjoy the sights and sounds of the season during the finale of Season of Wishes. There will be fun and excitement for the entire family with Santa, Mrs. Claus, the elves and more!

Poplar & West Farmington, Germantown | 901.753.4264 | shopsofsaddlecreek.com

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/19/15 1:43 PM


Memphis T H E CIT Y M AG AZIN E

General Excellence Grand Award Winner City and Regional Magazine Association 2007, 2008, 2010, 2014

&7

PUBLISHER/EDITOR kenneth neill SENIOR EDITOR michael finger MANAGING EDITOR frank murtaugh ARTS & LIFESTYLE EDITOR anne cunningham o’neill FASHION EDITOR augusta campbell FOOD EDITOR pamela denney ASSOCIATE EDITORS shara clark, eileen townsend CONTRIBUTING EDITORS richard alley, john branston,

chris davis, tom jones

4

CREATIVE DIRECTOR brian groppe PRODUCTION OPERATIONS DIRECTOR margie neal ADVERTISING ART DIRECTOR christopher myers ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR carrie beasley GRAPHIC DESIGNERS dominique pere, bryan rollins PHOTOGRAPHY brian anderson, justin fox burks,

larry kuzniewski, don perry, steve roberts

4

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES joy bateman,

shaina guttman, sloane patteson taylor ADVERTISING ASSISTANT shawna gardner

4

HOLIDAYS AT THE P!NK PALACE • Nov 14 - Dec 31

published by contemporary media, inc. 460 tennessee street, memphis, tn 38103 901-521-9000 p • 901-521-0129 f subscriptions: 901-521-9000

4

TE

-FLI

I PED

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER kenneth neill

Santa Lands • Pink Palace Lawn Saturday, November 14 • 9AM

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER molly willmott CONTROLLER ashley haeger DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT jeffrey a. goldberg EDITORIAL DIRECTOR bruce vanwyngarden DIGITAL MANAGER kevin lipe DISTRIBUTION MANAGER lynn sparagowski EVENTS MANAGER jackie sparks-davila MARKETING/COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER kendrea collins EMAIL MARKETING MANAGER britt ervin IT DIRECTOR joseph carey OFFICE MANAGER celeste dixon

&7

november 2015

P!NK PALACE MUSEUM

member: City and Regional Magazine Association member: Circulation Verification Council

10 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

007_MM11_2015_TOC.indd 10

10/21/15 10:05 AM


MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/20/15 4:19 PM


You Know She’s Worth It

ON THE WEB

Highlights from memphismagazine.com Our revised, revamped, and reader-friendly website is designed to supplement the printed magazine you are holding in your hands. For further reading by writers in this issue, use the “Archives” link on our website:

“ T HE GL ORY OF BE V ERLY H A LL ,” by anne cunningham o’neill (May 2012)

“A PRIL F OOL S: OUR CIT Y ’S F OIBLE S, F OLLIE S, A ND FI A SCOS,” by vance lauderdale (April 2009)

Our Blogs For a closer look at Memphis — past and present — visit our regular blogs:

901

Compiled by the staff of Memphis magazine, this is where readers can find tidbits relating to all facets of life in the Bluff City. memphismagazine.com/Blogs/901

MEMPHIS S T E W

We celebrate our city’s community table and the people who grow, cook, and eat the best Memphis food. memphismagazine.com/Blogs/Memphis-Stew

A SK VA NCE

The South’s leader in Estate Jewelry and Diamond Solitaires Located in Historic Downtown New Albany, MS

1.866.VANATKINS vanatkins.com

Lauren Harkins Wiuff

Vance Lauderdale, our man-about-town and history columnist, talks about who, what, when, where, why — and why not. memphismagazine.com/Blogs/Ask-Vance

S T Y LE WAT CH

Tips and techniques for looking good in Memphis. memphismagazine.com/Blogs/Style-Watch

SPO TL IGHT

Snaps from parties and events around Memphis. memphismagazine.com/Blogs/Party-Pix

GE T T ING OU T

The online magazine offers a complete events calendar, accessible on the home page, searchable by date and type of event.

E AT ING OU T

(901) 682-1868 (901) 859-3565 www.laurenharkinswiuff.com

For the most comprehensive RESTAURANT LISTINGS in town — arranged by their name, location, neighborhood, and even the type of food served — go to memphismagazine.com

12 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

007_MM11_2015_TOC.indd 12

10/20/15 4:20 PM


Š2014 Porsche Cars North America, Inc. Porsche recommends seat belt usage and observance of all traffic laws at all times.

Adrenaline shots. Now administered via ignition key. The rush is immediate. A 340-horsepower twin-turbo V6. Standard PDK double-clutch transmission. Active all-wheel drive with Porsche Traction Management for maximum grip in varying driving conditions. The new Porsche Macan S is built around our defining belief that every drive should be unforgettable. And every car should be a sports car. Discover a more adrenalized life with a test drive. Porsche. There is no substitute.

The new 2015 Macan S

Gossett Porsche 1875 Covington Pike Memphis TN 38128 (901) 388-8989 www.gossett.porschedealer.com

Porsche recommends

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/12/15 9:04 AM


IN THE BEGINNING | by kenneth neill

Good Day Sunshine

E

Vote now in the annual Memphis magazine Readers Restaurant Poll!

GO TO

MemphisMagazine.com TO VOTE NOW!

verybody knows this one. One of many timeless hits on the Beatles’ 1966 Revolver album, “Good Day Sunshine” is a Lennon/McCartney classic, a song that as one critic says “radiates optimism and good vibes.”

No wonder I found myself singing the lyrics Readers Restaurant Poll, which every year to myself while basking in the bright Octogives Memphians a chance to vote for their ber sunshine in the Liberty Bowl a couple of favorite restaurants in the Mid-South. Check Saturdays ago, alongside 60,000 of my closout the details in the column on the left. est friends. And talk about “good vibes”; the For well over two decades now, the Memphis University of Memphis’ clinical demolition of magazine Readers Restaurant Poll has been SEC powerhouse Ole Miss provided enough something of a gold standard among such of them to keep Tiger Lane opinion surveys in this marketrocking long into the night. place. No similar survey better (For more on that famous footreflects what the “foodies” of ball victory, see “Last Stand” Memphis think of the peoon p. 112.) ple and places that shape the October was full of such fabric of the culinary scene in vibes. In the first full week of this city and region. Voting is the month, the voters of this strictly monitored to minimize city elected City Councilman ballot stuffing, and as always, Jim Strickland as our next mayno advertising considerations or. And while Strickland’s vicare involved in the determinatory was not exactly a shock, tion of category winners. The it was achieved with a margin polls will close on November that was, like the Tigers’ vic30th, so vote early; just don’t January 1995 tory over Ole Miss, somewhat try to vote often! shocking. That’s a good thing for all of us. For And one final thought. You’ll note that this better or worse, Memphians seemed ready for issue is our second annual “Homegrown Hola new face in City Hall, and the even better iday Gift Guide,” in which we feature a wide variety of gift ideas that are made right here news coming out of this election was that in Memphis. I would remiss if I did not menmost voters didn’t seem to care what color tion one particular “homegrown” local prodthat face was. Gracious (as always) in defeat, uct, that being the magazine you’re holding Mayor A C Wharton promised a smooth transition, and this time around that’s likely to be in your hands. A one-year gift subscription exactly what happens. to Memphis magazine is but $15, and it comes this year with a box of salted caramels from Not that Strickland is about to celebrate his victory with unbridled jubilation. As Tom Shotwell Candy Company (local, of course). Jones points out in his “City Journal” column Check out all the details on the gift-subscripthis month (p. 22), the new mayor’s first term tion card in this issue. in office is likely to be one of the toughest in Thanksgiving is just around the corner, the city’s history, “somewhere between the so allow me to thank each and every one of plagues of Exodus and the suffering of Job.” you for your support during 2015. Without Not exactly the best of weather forecasts. the support of our readers and advertisers, But Mayor-elect Strickland seems ready for we would not have survived a fraction of the the job, and certainly unafraid of the chalfour decades that Memphis magazine has been lenges it presents. All of us at Contemporary publishing every month. Stay tuned; we look Media wish him well in the months and years forward to celebrating our Fortieth Anniverahead, and an abundance of “sunshiny” days. sary Year throughout 2016.   Speaking of elections, we are launching one ourselves, starting November 1st. That’s Kenneth Neill publisher/editor when the online polls will open for our annual

We apologize for several errors in our October issue. In the “Fall Faves” style section, the silver bracelet worn by our model on the “black + white” page is from Debra | Jill. Also in that issue, we misidentified the husband of Sharron Johnson in the “Women’s Work” feature; his name is Rex Johnson. And in the “Screen Gems” story on Indie Memphis, which is now in its 18th year, we said Craig Brewer “withdrew from the board of directors”; he instead stepped down as president of the board but has remained on the board. The festival lost money in 2013 and 2014, not 2012.

14 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

007_MM11_2015_TOC.indd 14

10/21/15 5:35 PM


Memphis Minded Alyssa Tews Each year, 75 percent of Rhodes students complete internships and fellowships throughout Memphis, and the college considers the city a laboratory for learning. Alyssa Tews, a biology major from Colorado, was drawn to Rhodes due in part to its strong partnership with the Memphis Zoo. While at Rhodes, she has participated in an elephant behavior project, as well as a fellowship in the biodiversity research lab studying how polar bears deal with heat stress. “My research on and off campus has been an integral part of my college experience. Rhodes and the zoo have allowed me to find my niche and be proud of who I am and what I’ve become.”

Celebrating 90 years in Memphis

rhodes.edu

Memphis Minded Ad Campaign.indd 3 MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/12/15 9:54 AM 10/13/15 3:57 PM


SPOTLIGHT | A Summons to Memphis | The Peabody | September 14, 2015 | Photography by Don Perry 1

2

3

4

5

M

magazine celebrated its 3rd annual A Summons to Memphis event by “summoning” Mayor Mick Cornett of Oklahoma City to The Peabody. Mayor Cornett, in a tradition that previously welcomed the mayors of New Orleans and Nashville, was introduced by Mayor A C Wharton and spoke on topics of urban design, economic development, culture, the outlook of Oklahoma City, and that city’s drive to encourage its citizens to become more physically fit and lose a collective 1 million pounds. emphis

6

1 Mayor Mick Cornett 2 Miranda Griffin, Tammy Zurak 3 Congressman Steve Cohen 4 The audience enjoyed time to mingle and network. 5 George Monger, Henry Turley, Sonia Walker 6 Lauren Taylor, Jeanne Arthur, Gretchen McLennon 7 Linn Sitler, Doug Browne, Beth Flanagan 8 Jared Bulluck, Jennie Robbins, Ken Hall

7

8

16 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

016_MM11_2015_Spotlight01_Summons.indd 16

10/16/15 8:26 AM


the magic of comes to life

featuring

Nov. 20, 2015 - Jan. 2, 2016 • More than 2 million lights and 9 acres of stunning décor • ICE! featuring The Nutcracker - 2 million pounds of colorful, hand-carved ice sculptures and slides • NEW - Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas! The Musical • NEW - Larry Gatlin & The Gatlin Brothers Christmas Dinner Show • NEW - The Elf on the Shelf® Scavenger Hunt • Gingerbread Decorating Corner sponsored by PEEPS®

The Holiday Tradition

• Carriage rides, snow tubing, outdoor ice skating and more NASHVILLE, TN

PEPSI_H1_NB_SM_4C (FOR USE .25” 1.5" )

ChristmasAtGaylordOpryland.com

CMYK

| (888) 677-9872

PRESENTED BY

ICE! PRESENTED BY

Pepsi and Pepsi Globe are registered trademarks of PepsiCo, Inc. TM & © 1957, 2015 Dr. Seuss Enterprises, L.P. The Elf on the Shelf® and © 2015 CCA and B, LLC. All Rights Reserved. PEEPS ® trademark Just Born, Inc. © 2015. All rights reserved. PEPSI_H1_NB_MEDIUM_4C (FOR USE 1.5" TO 4") CMYK

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/7/15 8:56 AM


SPOTLIGHT | IMB Innovation Awards | Holiday Inn/U of M | September 24, 2015 | Photography by Don Perry 1

2

3

7

T

4

he 3rd annual Innovation Awards from our sister publication Inside Memphis Business was held Sept. 24th at the Holiday Inn on the University of Memphis campus. In conjunction with the Fogelman College of Business & Economics, the magazine welcomed winners — AgSmarts, Dr. Lisa Jennings of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, the Levitt Shell, and Chuck Dunn with Tru-D SmartUVC — and guests to a celebration of vision and endurance in our city. 1 Clayton Plymill, co-founder of AgSmarts 2 Dr. Lisa Jennings with the University of Tennessee Health Science Center 3 The Levitt Shell team: Debra Czestochowski, Ken Steinberg, Liz Levitt Hirsch, Henry Nelson, Anne Pitts, Amy Carney, Sharon Yazowski, Janet Hooks, Patti Topete, Lisa Hume 4 Chuck Dunn, founder of Tru-D Smart UVC

18 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

018_MM11_2015_Spotlight02_Innovation.indd 18

10/15/15 7:52 AM


MEM Passion, perseverance, heart. This is what we call “grind” in Memphis. It’s not new to this city; it’s a rite of passage. It’s with this grit and grind that Memphis International Airport’s reinvention takes off. More airlines, more flights to more destinations and lower ticket prices are just the beginning. There’s a lot more in store, Memphis.

We’re YOUR airport. And now, find every Memphis flight on one website, the NEW flymemphis.com.

MemphisMag_November2015.indd 1 MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/15/15 4:24 PM 10/16/15 1:41 PM


FINE PRINT

Beating the Odds Sure it’s a gamble. But does the lottery really pay off for the students supposed to benefit from it?

I

t never mattered who would win the election for mayor when it came to one thing: The next four years will be a time of Biblical proportions. Somewhere between the plagues of Exodus and the sufferings of Job. The legal question was resolved by drafting an amendment to the state constitution. The moral question was settled by approval of that amendment by a majority of the voters. In hindsight, the fuss back then seems quaint, like moral objections to drinking or rock-and-roll, because the lottery is now so thoroughly embedded in Tennessee daily life. Buying a lottery ticket at one of the 5,000 outlets is as easy as buying a tank of gas or a can of soda, and “fun” lottery advertisements saturate the airwaves. Earlier this year, the governor of Alabama, which does not have a lottery, said he would not support one because it is “like leisure suits — 30 years old and everybody already has one” and therefore Alabama would not reap any new money from nonresidents. In other words, state-sanctioned gambling has gone from being ungodly to simply unfashionable in less than 15 years.

A secular analysis is also open to different interpretations. Every year the Tennessee Higher Education Commission puts out a statistics-choked annual report The head honchos of the lottery, on the scholarships. Here are — what else? — the odds. sometimes known as the TennesThe odds of winning the Powsee Education Lottery, boast of awarding more than $3 billion erball and getting six numbers in college scholarships aimed right are 175,233,504 to 1. The odds at keeping the state’s “best and of a kind-hearted former monk brightest” students in Tennessee doing this as opposed to, say, a public and private colleges. The mean-spirited, wealthy hedgeamount wagered is four times that fund manager, are astronomical. much. In 2014 alone, total sales The odds of a lottery retailer were $1.417 billion. People don’t being black or Asian are 50-50. like to be taxed but And the odds are In other words, they have no objecgood that there is state-sanctioned tion to taxing thema lottery retailer in your neighborselves if there is even gambling has gone the remotest possihood. You can plug from ungodly to bility of a payoff and in your Zip code on the thrill of playing unfashionable in less the Tennessee Lotthe game. tery web page and than 15 years. Last year, a Knoxfind out. ville man won $259.8 million on a The chances of a freshman scholarship recipient finishing Powerball ticket, the biggest prize in Tennessee Lottery history. The college in five years or less with fact that he was a former Episcohis or her scholarship intact are 31 pal monk suggested to some that out of 100. To put this in perspecthere was some kind of divine tive, the chances of a freshman scholarship recipient graduatsanction (“answered prayers”) to the enterprise. ing in four years with or without

the scholarship are 23 out of 100. Of the freshmen who lose their scholarship, 62 percent return to college for their sophomore year. To retain the scholarship students must maintain a 2.75 grade-point average. The scholarship can be renewed for a maximum of five years. Bottom line: Starting college and finishing college are very different things. The ratio of female to male scholarship recipients is 60-40, which is in line with the percentage of female and male students in college nationally. When the lottery started 40,000 students were on scholarship but by 2013 there were 100,000. Since 2004 the family-income profile has changed, with fewer students coming from families with under $36,000 in adjusted gross income and more from families with at least $96,000. The biggest income group (31 percent) is families with over $96,000 income. Students with higher family income have higher scholarship renewal rates. Conversely, students from poor families are least likely to keep their scholarships. The lottery scholarships have been tweaked so many times that it is impossible to list them all. In general, there are more types of scholarships in different amounts aimed at low-income students, high-performing students, and students with high grades but low test scores. Most likely to receive and keep a lottery scholarship are students with high family income, an ACT score of 23 or higher, and a GPA of at least 3.7. The base award is $4,000 a year, but merit can bump that to as much as $8,250, which covers approximately 90 percent of tuition and fees at a public college. From a financial perspective, then, those most likely to benefit from the lottery are those least likely to need it.  

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY TENNESSEE LOTTERY

by john branston

20 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

020_MM11_2015_FinePrint.indd 20

10/13/15 4:12 PM


MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/13/15 5:42 PM


CITY JOURNAL

Tough Times Ahead? by tom jones

S

the 239 PILOT projects whose city taxes have been waived to the tune of $35 million a year: 75 projects by EDGE, 101 by Downtown Memphis Commission, and 63 by Health, Educational, and Housing Facilities Board. In comparison, Nashville has granted 15 PILOTs, Knoxville 14, and Chattanooga 60. But even more than PILOTs, the city’s revenues are diminished by universities, hospitals, ernment will also need to pay risand the array of nonprofits which ing debt costs, which by 2019 will are tax-exempt. In Memphis, be $40 million more than today. about 7 percent of all parcels do not pay taxes, compared to three As if city government needed percent in Nashville. any more reality checks, Brooki ng s I nstit ution W h i le bud get r a n k s Memph i s pressures will re“Put simply, the 88th among the 100 quire the patience next four years largest metro areas of Job in City Hall, for recovery from they pale in comwill be a time of the Great Recesparison to the bigausterity.” sion, and projects gest challenge of that the Memphis all: convincing a MSA won’t get back to pre-reskeptical public that city govcession levels for jobs and ecoernment can in fact lead Memnomic until the last quarter of phis to better days. In a Com2017. mercial Appeal poll, only one in Add to this the budget complithree Memphians said the city cations that stem from the fact is headed in the right direction, that so much of the land inside and other polling indicates that the city limits doesn’t pay propwhat Memphians want most erty taxes. There are of course from City Hall is a compelling

omewhere between the plagues of Exodus and the suffering of Job. That’s because the mayor’s term starting January 1st will be the toughest in the modern history of Memphis. The locusts will come in the form of higher bond payments, a slowly recovering economy, ballooning pension obligations, and slow growing revenues, not to mention the reality that the budgets of only two of city government’s 12 divisions — police and fire — are $70 million more than all of the sales and property taxes together.

PHOTOGRAPH BY CLEWISLEAKE | DREAMSTIME

Put simply, the next four years will be a time of austerity. There will be little money for new programs, there will probably be budget cuts to some services to pay balloon notes coming due, and after a campaign dominated by talk about crime, it’s a safe bet that police budgets will rise yet again. Then there are pension payments. Spurred on by a letter from Tennessee Comptroller Justin Wilson demanding full funding of these liabilities, city government increased pension payments in the last two years from $20 million a year to $46.5 million, but it has to reach a total of $75 million within this term of office. If that’s not enough, city gov-

vision backed by a well-defined agenda that paints a clear picture of what Memphis will look like as a result. On the campaign trail, all candidates for mayor agreed that crime, poverty, blight, and jobs are top priorities for city government, but in the face of the city’s budget realities, the real test for city elected officials is how to make substantial progress without any money. More and more, they will look to philanthropies and neighborhood activists to drive change, which is why all the work these days by guerilla urbanists and pop-up leaders could not have come at a better time. The best news is that they give an alternative narrative to “metric Memphis,” where a stream of urban data shows that Memphis is running in place and remains toward the bottom in the rankings for the 51 largest metros in talent, patents, educational attainment, income, and poverty. In “anecdotal Memphis,” where upbeat stories of grassroots trailblazers and young leaders seem endless, there is a powerful undercurrent of optimism, creativity, and action. These people shirk off the tradition in Memphis of looking to government for answers to every problem. They ask no one for permission, they genuflect to no authority, they express their opinions honestly, and best of all, they are working hard to create the city in which they would want to live. They act on the belief that they can accomplish whatever they set out to do, and they show little patience for rehashing the past or undermining progress with a negative attitude about their hometown. But what they do best is act with a palpable sense of urgency. It’s an example that City Hall would be wise to emulate.  

PHOTOGRAPH BY BRIAN ANDERSON

Memphis faces a challenging future and budget woes are just part of the problem, but there’s still room for optimism.

22 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

022_MM11_2015_CityJournal.indd 22

10/21/15 5:03 PM


MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/19/15 1:45 PM


OU T A ND A BOU T |

11.2015

compiled by eileen townsend

11.7

OUTLoud Comedy Showcase

A still from But For the Grace, directed by Memphis filmmaker Emmanuel Amido.

11.3 - 11.10

Indie Memphis Film Festival

T

he city’s flagship independent film festival returns for its 18th year to screen some of the best new cinema from around the world. This year’s lineup includes a look inside the Memphis Zoo (The Keepers) and a documentary exploration of “Elvis Lives!” lore (Orion). Filmmaker Craig Brewer, a longtime board member and former president of the festival, will present the Emerging Filmmaker Award to the best new talent.

Various venues, indiememphis.com

11.4

11.6 - 11.21

The “Queen of hip-hop soul” returns to Memphis following the release of her 2015 album, My Life II… the Journey Continues. Blige, who has been credited with marrying hip-hop and R&B, has nine Grammys under her belt, and shows no signs of slowing down anytime soon. In a recent collaboration with Drake, she sings as soulfully as ever: “Bad boys ain’t no good. Good boys ain’t no fun.” The Orpheum Theatre, 203 S. Main, 525-3000

The award-winning drama about a questionable priest, a young student, and an unforgiving nun delves into moral questions that, come curtain call, remain largely unresolved. Meryl Streep and Philip Seymour Hoffman starred in the 2008 film adaptation. Theatre Memphis, 630 Perkins Extd., 682-8601

Mary J. Blige

11.6 - 12.5

Mi Sur/ My South

This show offers new work from Memphis-based Latina/o artists. Organized by Centro Cultural, the artists aim to “amplify the artistic voices that have largely been ignored” but that disrupt the “binary racial understanding of the South.” Crosstown Arts Gallery, 422 N. Cleveland, crosstownarts.org

Doubt: A Parable

11.7

India Fest

A talent show, a food and shopping bazaar, family activities, and an evening cultural showcase all make this celebration of Indian cuisine and culture into a beloved yearly event. Last year, the festival drew more than 10,000 Memphians, who enjoyed traditional dance, a variety of regional culinary specialties, and immersion in a unique global community. Agricenter International, 7777 Walnut Grove, 626-7995

11.7

Memphis Symphony Orchestra presents The Planets

If you’re a classical music fan, you’re probably well-versed in Gustav Holst’s famed orchestral suite, The Planets. There are some compositions so genius that they never get old, which is all the better reason to see the Memphis Symphony Orchestra perform “Jupiter, the Bringer of Jollity.” Cannon Center for the Performing Arts, 255 N. Main, 576-1269

ornaments and handpainted signs. Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, 1934 Poplar Ave., 544-6200

Local comedians take on life, love, and daily disaster in this event. The funniest fast-talkers on the MGLCC circuit promise to deliver the usual pithy observations. Memphis Gay and Lesbian Community Center, 892 S. Cooper, mglcc.org

11.9

Goner Presents: FUZZ, Ex-Cult and Aquarian Blood

Staple garage rockers from the Goner house take on the Hi-Tone stage this November. If you’re a fan of FUZZ and Ex-Cult, make sure to check out Aquarian Blood, whose album Savage Mind recalls The Lost Sounds in the best way. Hi-Tone Cafe, 412-414 N. Cleveland, hitonememphis.com

11.11

Grizzlies v. Golden State Warriors

The rematch we’ve been waiting for is finally here: The Grizz face off again with last year’s reigning NBA champions. Loyal fans will remember that last year’s play-off series was hardfought, with Golden State prevailing 4-2 in the semifinals. No doubt the Grizzlies are ready to show the West Coast who is boss. FedExForum, 191 Beale Street, 323-3600

The Wedding of the Turtle Doves, a folk sculpture by turn-of-thecentury artist John Scholl.

11.7 - 2.28

Wonder, Whimsy, Wild: Folk Art in America Folk art has long been the redheaded stepchild of the fine art world. In recent decades, however, inventive creations from self-taught makers have been receiving their due. The Brooks display includes over 60 works including carousel

24 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

024_MM11_2015_Calendar_v2.indd 24

10/13/15 3:23 PM


Spillit Grand Slam: M-E-M-P-H-I-S.

11.12

Damien Rice

The Irish-born indie singer-songwriter arrives in Memphis with new music from his 2014 album, My Favourite Faded Fantasy. The show promises a slew of mournful love songs delivered in Rice’s raspy tenor. Minglewood Hall, 555 Madison Ave., 312-6058

11.14

University of Memphis Basketball v. Southern Miss

Coming off an 18-14 season, the Memphis Tigers hope to start a campaign that leads back to the NCAA tournament in March. They open the season against an old rival from Conference USA, the Southern Miss Golden Eagles. FedExForum, 191 Beale Street, gotigersgo.com

11.14

Mythbusters: Jamie and Adam Unleashed

Ever wonder whether placing popcorn in the middle of a pile of cell phones will really make it pop? Or if a combination of soda and Mentos can cause internal combustion?

These are the sorts of oddball questions that Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman, television’s beloved mythbusters, are best at answering. The Orpheum Theatre, 203 S. Main, 525-3000

11.20 - 22

Landscape Painting from Tierra del Fuego to the Arctic

Memphis Potters Guild Annual Holiday Show and Sale

Lend a little homegrown character to your holiday season by supporting local craftspeople. This annual show and sale highlights a broad selection of earthenware, stoneware, and porcelain pieces by a variety of Mid-South artisans. Memphis Botanic Garden, 750 Cherry Road, thememphispottersguild. com

TAKE AN EPIC JOURNEY Travel across the hemisphere through a century of landscape painting in this exhibition featuring more than 100 artworks by artists from both North and South America.

ONLY U.S. VENUE

11.20

Spillit Grand Slam: M-E-M-P-H-I-S

Get your best stories primed for this rapid-fire event. The good, the bad and the plain weird will all be regaled under one roof when the best of Memphis yarners gather to trade tall tales. Amurica Photo, 410 N. Cleveland, 606-2041 

$10 , FREE for Members & youth ages 18 & under Reserve tickets online or call 479.657.2335 S PONS OR ED BY

479.418.5700 CrystalBridges.org BENTONVILLE, ARK ANSAS

Terra Foundation for American Art Harlan and Kathy Crow Westrock Coffee Randy and Valorie Lawson/Lawco Inc. Mark and Diane Simmons Christie’s

Organized by the Art Gallery of Ontario, Pinacoteca do Estado de São Paulo, and the Terra Foundation for American Art, which is also recognized for its generous support. TOP LEFT: Lawren Stewart Harris, Grounded Icebergs (detail), ca. 1931, oil on canvas. Collection of the Art Gallery of Ontario, gift from the Estate of R. Fraser Elliott, 2005, 2005/156. © Estate of Lawren Harris. TOP RIGHT: Frederic Edwin Church, Cotopaxi (detail), 1855, oil on canvas. The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, museum purchase funded by the Hogg Brothers Collection, gift of Miss Ima Hogg, by exchange. BOTTOM LEFT: Albert Bierstadt, Yosemite Valley (detail), 1868, oil on canvas. Collection of the Oakland Museum of California, gift of Miss Marguerite Laird in memory of Mr. and Mrs. P.W. Laird. BOTTOM RIGHT: Martin Johnson Heade, Newburyport Marshes: Approaching Storm (detail), ca. 1871, oil on canvas. Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection.

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 25

024_MM11_2015_Calendar_v2.indd 25

10/13/15 3:23 PM


Charles Lloyd

with richard j. alley

Where did you go to school?

C

harles Lloyd was born in Memphis on March 15, 1938. In his formative years he played with B.B. King, Howlin’ Wolf, and Johnny Ace, among many others. It was a time of mentoring under Phineas Newborn Jr. and with the strains of Willie Mitchell’s horn in his ears, Lloyd left for California and USC before making

his way to New York. His 1966 album Forest Flower: Live at Monterey became a sensation and was one of the first jazz albums to sell a million copies. Along this meteoric rise, he was asked to play the Tallinn Jazz Festival in the Soviet Union in 1967 and his quartet was the first jazz group to play the storied Fillmore Auditorium in San Francisco. At the height of his career, in the early 1970s, he walked away from it all, retreating to Big Sur to lead a reclusive life. In the past years he’s come out of that self-imposed exile to again tour the country and the world. He is the subject of the 2012 documentary Arrows Into Infinity, was named an NEA Jazz Master earlier this year, and was invited last month to Rhodes College to work with students and to perform at the Levitt Shell. This interview about his early life in Memphis took place in his suite at the Madison Hotel with a view of the Mississippi River.

Nature seems to be an everpresent theme in your music. Herbie Hancock has compared your music to a “flowing river, cascading sound.” How has nature informed your playing?

I’m Pisces, you know, born on this river here. [Lloyd was born a year after the great Mississippi River flood of 1937.] It was set up for me to come. This is strong for me. When I play in New York, I stay at the Standard [Hotel] and we get a suite on the Hudson River. I try to always be near water because I’m water and my water flows like that. Tell me about growing up in Memphis.

Anywhere I go in the world, and people interview me and talk to me, they tell me later that I’m always talking about Memphis. You see, I was supposed to be born here because, quiet as it’s kept, I realize now what this is a “source place” like New Orleans is with

I went to the catholic school St. Augustine first through third grades, but there was no music there and the nuns would beat me on my hands. In the fourth grade I left there and we moved to Orange Mound [and went to Melrose]. A beautiful thing happened to me at Melrose. There was a teacher, Mrs. Handy, and she taught with such warmth and such humanity that I began to be a little genius in mathematics and stuff. All of the sudden it all worked because I had the facility, but I couldn’t do it from nuns beating me on my hands. It’s not an indictment of them, but it’s a plea for tenderness for children in education. Mrs. Handy was so wonderful and it ignited something in me, and then music came at the same time. How did the music come about?

Willie Mitchell had a big band playing like Dizzy Gillespie’s big band. Willie was a modernist, he was a genius and a special guy. I was in fourth grade and at lunch time there was a little assembly thing happening and Willie’s band was playing, and it just ignited me. I was maybe 8 or 9 years old, and I kept prodding my parents to get me a saxophone; they got me an alto finally. Then I was very blessed because my mother had a large house in Orange Mound and there weren’t adequate hotels for Duke Ellington, Lionel Hampton, and Count Basie, and all these bands that would come through, so these musicians would stay with us. I was in heaven, I couldn’t wait for these guys to wake up in the morning to pounce because I had questions.

And you ended up at Manassas High School. How did that come about?

At Melrose, Willie was far out of school, but he came over and blessed us with that music. I’d play around and I kept running into these young people who could play better than me, like Hank Crawford, Frank Strozier, George Coleman, and I found out they all went to Manassas. So I said, “I better get over there.” A teacher who taught at Manassas lived down the street from us and so I’d get a ride with her most mornings. Do you remember the first time you were recognized for music?

I played an amateur show at 9 or 10 years old at the Palace theatre down on Beale Street and I won first prize, and Phineas Newborn Jr. was standing in the wings but I didn’t know him. He was maybe 16 or 17, and he said, “You need lessons bad.” So he took me around the corner on Beale and Hernando to Mitchell’s Hotel and dropped me off at Irvin Reason’s room, and said, “He needs help.” And that was it. Delusions of grandeur got nipped in the bud, so I couldn’t enjoy my first-place standing. Fortunately I got stopped because it made me always strive to be better at what I’m doing. And so, he came at just the perfect time. I still think we should have a statue of Phineas somewhere around here because he was amazing. What was this drive for you and your peers to leave and become successful someplace else? Why not just stay and play on Beale Street?

Because we had heard Charlie Parker and we had heard Duke Ellington, and that music is the music of freedom and wonder. And our opportunities were limited here. We weren’t going to stay on Beale Street because that was commercial music, that was rhythm and blues what was going on, and while we are from that, and gospel music and all the music that is of this area, we were dreamers and we heard modernity.

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY CHARLES LLOYD

Louis Armstrong coming up down there. There are certain places that are source places, but what I was informed with here and what I took from it, it was grace playing with people like Bobby Blue Bland and Howlin’ Wolf and Junior Parker and Johnny Ace and B.B. and Roosevelt Sykes. So all those blues people I played with, that was very powerful stuff.

FRONT AND CENTER

26 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

026_MM11_2015_FandC.indd 26

10/16/15 1:38 PM


WHERE HOLIDAY MAGIC BEGINS

OVER 60 SHOPS & 10 DINING OPTIONS

4674 MERCHANTS PARK CIRCLE | COLLIERVILLE, TN | ShopCarriageCrossing.com

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1 1 CCR-5234-A97D AD1 Memphis Mag Print Ad.indd

10/7/15 AM PM 9/23/158:58 12:28


28 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

028_MM11_2015_Fashion.indd 28

10/20/15 3:24 PM


NOIR

FASHION

chic

F

all fashion draws its influence from around the globe, with details from far-reaching folksy corners of the world, disco

gypsy vibes, and a quirkiness that makes even the most unshakeable

fashionistas smile. But an underlying color is making a strong comeback — black. Nothing defines sophistication, mystery, and seduction quite like black does. The absence of light, black draws the eye and simultaneously projects confidence and independence. It’s no surprise that with cocktail affairs dotting the holiday calendar these chic styles will pop up at parties in the many incarnations of “the little black dress.” But even when black is the common factor, dresses take on new silhouettes and jumpsuits and elegant pants offer lots of style. Black is back, and here we show off some of the best looks in town.

^46 ^46

p h o t o g r a p hy by l a r r y k u z n i e w s k i fa s h i o n e d i t o r a u g u s ta c a m p b e l l

This beautiful color combination of black and nude is seductive but refined. Knockout jewelry adds even more drama. Stretch tulle and embroidered dress by For Love and Lemons, $281, from Baer’s Den in Laurelwood. Diamond and white gold bird earrings; pearl, pink tourmaline, and diamond ring; both from A. Shaw Antiques and Interiors in Chickasaw Oaks Plaza; call for price. Metallic pumps by Prada, $695, from Joseph in Laurelwood. N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 29

028_MM11_2015_Fashion.indd 29

10/20/15 3:24 PM


East meets West in this stunning kimono gown. Black crepe kimono gown by Diane Von Furstenberg, $998; black suede shoes with gold ankle straps by Aquazzura, $765; blue topaz earrings, $275; all from Joseph in Laurelwood.

30 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

028_MM11_2015_Fashion.indd 30

10/20/15 3:24 PM


Yes, those are metallic woven lizards attached to a super simple sheath. Playing with exotic animals is easy when you stick with common colors and mixing lizards with a leopard print menswear details worksRich really well dapper here. Lizard dress by colors, menswear details, Artelier byfashion Nicole Miller, $778; leopard and for fashion’s sake are all in mini audiere by Santi,Pinstripe $195; both from this ensemble. button-down, Kittie$680; Kyle.turtleneck Diamond,scarf emerald, and $790; sweater, Southboth Sea pearl earrings fromDenim A. Shaw by Rosetta Getty. skirt by Antiques and Interiors Chickasaw $1165; 3x1, $222; purse by in m2malletier, Plaza; call for allOaks from 20Twelve onprice. Broad Avenue. Shoes by Steve Madden, $120; from Macy’s Oak Court.

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 31

028_MM11_2015_Fashion.indd 31

10/20/15 3:24 PM


thank you Woodard Studios Nicole Forsythe, model AMAX Talent LucyBlack Hadskey, stylist from Secret Servicesand Salon makeshair everything pop here Emily Epps,way make-up artist fromshine Gia Marina whatVan better to add more than SusiebyReuter, digital layering the artist rhinestone top with a beaded jacket, multi-layered necklace and breathtaking earrings. Rhinestone, crepe, and silk jumpsuit by Alice + Olivia, $698; metallic embellished cocktail jacket by Parker, $528; gold Lucite bracelets by Alexis Bittar, $275 each; all from Oak Hall. Moonstone Quartz, freshwater pearl, and multi-chain “Party Necklace” by Brave Design, $198, from Spruce. Coral, diamond, and white gold Art Deco earrings from A. Shaw Antiques and Interiors in Chickasaw Oaks Plaza; call for price.

thank you Phil Woodard Melanie Towery leather Prevost, model Agency Leather orCOLORS the look of leather is Christopher Padgett, artist with everywhere and makeup black is the new Bobbiblack. BrownSo, cosmetics at Macy’s Oak black leather is kind ofCourt a big Scot Robinson, Pavothis Salon Spa deal right now and dress is pretty Susie Reuter, digital artistleather unstoppable. Isabel Marant dress, $305; shoes by Aquazurra, $715; sterling and brass earrings by Margaret Ellis, $310; brass and sterling ball necklace, $515; snakeskin clutch by Carlos Falchi, $850. Everything from Joseph in Laurelwood.

32 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

028_MM11_2015_Fashion.indd 32

10/20/15 3:24 PM


MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/16/15 8:27 AM


What’s Haute 1. Coloring Books for Grown-ups! These unique coloring books feature beautifully hand-drawn and whimsical illustrations. A wonderful way to reduce stress. Created by British artist, Johana Basford. $15.95. Art Center Supply Store, 1636 Union Ave., 901.276.6321, artcentermemphis.com.

2. Central BBQ was voted “Best Barbecue Sandwich” and “Best Barbecue Ribs” in Memphis magazine’s 2015 restaurant poll. Visit Central BBQ for competition-style ribs and BBQ. 4375 Summer Ave., 901.767.4672; 2249 Central Ave., 901.272.9377; 147 Butler Ave., 901.672.7760.

3. Plan now for the coming holiday season. Monograms are back!! 30 mm round in sterling silver $140.00 or in 14 karat $425.00. Various sizes and styles also available. Jewelers’ Choice, Inc., 5100 Wheelis Drive, Suite 211, Memphis, TN. 901.763.0195 or 800.264.4146.

4. FIT AND FAB in that little red dress! Get a 5. Dinstuhl’s can brighten your Thanksgiving with 6. RONALDO Designer Jewelry exclusively jumpstart on the holidays with Memphis’ only FDA an array of Chocolate Turkeys in many sizes. Stop available in Germantown at More Than Words. approved, non-surgical, UltraShape Fat Melting by Laurelwood, Germantown, or Pleasant View Handcrafted in 14 k Gold artist wire & device that targets tummy and small areas! The only to make your holiday table a little sweeter. Argentium Silver, each with symbolic meaning. FDA approved non-surgical Neck and Decollette’ www.dinstuhls.com 2123 West St, Germantown TN, 901.755.4388, UpLift available. Combination treatments, VOILA! www.morethanwords.com. Holiday prices start at $1,200. Mona Esthetics, 901.683.0048, at Laurelwood Shopping Center. SPECIAL ADVERT ISING SEC T ION

WhatsHaute_November15_redesign.indd 2

10/20/15 4:55 PM


What’s Haute

7. Holloway Furs, Memphis magazine’s 2014 & 2015 8. Since 1961, South’s Finest Boots. Offering Custom 9. The Woman’s Exchange has decked its halls Face of Furs, has the only on-site Master Furrier Boots. Lucchese. Sonora. Red Wing & more! with unique, hand-crafted items including in Memphis. Whether you’re looking to buy new Everything Filson and The Exclusive Memphis children’s clothing for holiday gift giving. Our Tea or update your older fur with a new look, Jim Dealer of Filson Watches. Hewlett & Dunn, Room is available for your holiday luncheons! Holloway and the staff at Holloway Furs is here to 111 N. Center, Collierville, TN 38017. 901.853.2636. 88 Racine Street, Memphis, TN 38111, assist you. 404 Perkins Ext., 901.685.FURS (3877). www.hewlettdunn.com 901.327.5681, womans-exchange.com.

10. Treat your family to a fun-filled evening at the 11. De La Belle Wellness & Spa combines luxurious opera! Family packages start at only $100! services and boutique gift retail. (Sleep shirt w/ Opera Memphis presents Mozart’s The Magic Flute, socks set $45) Perfect stop for holiday purchases November 20 & 21 at Germantown Performing Arts and gift certificates. 3086 Poplar Ave, Memphis, Center. OperaMemphis.org TN 38111, 901.433.9024, www.delabelle.net.

k.

OK E • BO

is bac

NC AS K VA

erd a le

T WO

he — as ste r y” d my . r y an bo ok hi sto se co nd te r of ith a “m as ne d w ne’s re t ur s ha se lf — wil l be.”

Laud

ER DA LE

an ce “A sk V

rs of

w w w. m

emph

ismag

azine

wo

er s from d A n sw xper t. on s an tory E Q ues ti e’s H is MOR E in az ale is M ag rd h p de Mem ce Lau B y Van

A, IN C.

ME DI

m or e.

R AR Y

ishe

m uc h

EM PO

uc h,

Book T

CO NT

ubl the p

LA UD

ne ver mos t e, and cit y’s der dal of ou r a Lau of one it h t he But w end a nt ing t hat. la st desc ines s of say ed bus , is fond con ceiv st i l l a m i lies on i l lnce is a nde red so Va to be, t u ne squ sub m itit used t r iv ia t nd a wha y t isto r e isn’ loca l h abo ut l ly ra n est ions ina or ig . g a zine ns t hat t of f, hi s ma colu m one lef hat t t ha n 50 e re pres ent ded mor s up whe a nd t he me pick 20 03 es such T h is volu wee n ex plor ed bet k Two pub lish – Boo u m ns Van ce xed , Ask of the d inde , one . on s pers Seba stianale Man sion mou s with fa t derd a s: e pose t he mos the Lau g Vanc Youn guarded bec a me ds who ies” who houn rem on Ea st e in a n v is. h i l lsid into a n Eyeuck ed r ine t four Gree men w n. yst a l sh red with orou s Com ed M idto hono in ists has been rds for Hum petit ion host of y. mot or Awa r i f ied ate com the Society shad e b atta cks. of an 11-st who ter rd of ic bom Chap ter ts, an Awa ma n” tary in from atom MidAtla nta mon key by the onal Jour nalis m from the citiz ens -foo t SPJ, prot ect it h a 14 Prof essi ishe d Jour nalis ter of the the plan to ra nt w Chap from s biza rre Dist ingu essional rest au awar d ion. Prof r Ave nue Book ” Sout h l Com miss Pop la “Bes t of Hist orica ned h is and the in one Coun ty o ado r a role Shelby d. play ed hat t ow n hea pa rk , Inc. t ra i ler at u re. ry Media Ave nue liter n Conte mporat, Suite 200 l. mer a by m ica Su A mer Hos pit Publis hed ssee Stree 38103 els in 460 Tenne Tenne ssee n Ga ston : st nov e at Joh Memp his, ce” blog g s/ ca l led Van plac e m/Blo took the “Ask i n e . c o sex y mov e t hat V isit h i s m a g a z w it h a a l m i racl at ion m e m p Ask -Van ce a sens w w w. cau sed rs who o da nce in.” v y Tra

an d m

12. For just $15 your gift recipient will receive 12 issues of Memphis magazine, including our annual Dining Guide and City Guide PLUS a package of delicious Shotwell Candy Co. Salted Caramels, 901.575.9470, memphismagazine.com .

.com

13. Vance Lauderdale delves into local history in two illustrated volumes, compilations of his “Ask Vance” columns from the pages of Memphis magazine. Book One is available for $19.99; Book Two is $24.95. Buy both for $39.99 (plus tax). 901.575.9470.

WhatsHaute_November15_redesign.indd 3

14. The Art of Dining in New Orleans 2 , This 15. Katie’s Kitchen Homemade rolls from unique Restaurant Guide, Art Book, & Cook the original Buntyn Café, sold exclusively Book all in one makes a perfect gift . In Memphis, at Katie’s Kitchen. 9056 Poplar Pike, Suite The Booksellers at Laurelwood, Menage 109, Germantown, TN 38138, 901.754.8444, Stationary & Fine Gifts , More Than Words and katieskitchengtown.com. Stovall collection. In Nola, best seller at Forever New Orleans and Roux Royale Gifts on Royal Street. www.joysartofdining.com SPECIAL ADVERT ISING SEC T ION

10/21/15 2:17 PM


OYSTER PERPETUAL GMT-MASTER II IN 18 KT WHITE GOLD

rolex

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

oyster perpetual and gmt-master ii are 速 trademarks.

10/13/15 3:58 PM


our second a nnua l

Homegrown

Holiday

’Tis the season! And if you haven‘t yet found the

perfect gifts for everyone on your list, now‘s the time. Here, we present you with a variety of options for the men, women, and children (and even pets!) in your life. The best part: The items in this list are

Gift Guide compiled by shar a clark and the memphis editorial staff

all produced locally! From food and music to art and accessories — and everything in between. This truly “homegrown” gift guide is sure to please the hard-to-buy-for people in your life while supporting our local crafters, cooks, and creators.

037_MM11_2015_HomeGrownGiftGuide_v1.indd 37

10/15/15 3:53 PM


Grizz Hearts by the Ca rpenter Art Ga rden kids This will be the season the Grizzlies go all the way. Believe, Memphis. You can put your undying faith in Gasol and the gang on display with a Grizz Heart yard sign. These hand-painted signs are created by 13-year-old Donte Davis and the kids of the Carpenter Art Garden. The money from each sale benefits the art garden, which provides art lessons and other skills classes to kids in Binghampton. $30. Available at Bingham & Broad (2563 Broad Avenue, 323-3008) or direct from the Carpenter Art Garden via carpenterartgarden2012@gmail.com.

Peanut Butter Pumpkin Dog Treats from The Exceptiona l Foundation of West Tennessee

Mississippi River Notepads from Popl a r Print

Don’t forget your furry friends this holiday season! Exceptional Treats are made with love by participants and staff at EFWT, a local day facility for individuals with intellectual disabilities and developmental delays. Made with all the delicious flavors pups enjoy, the treats are grain- and gluten-free. $10.

Designed by Memphian Jennifer Frey and printed on the German Heidelberg offset press at Peerless Printing — an 89-yearold Memphis printing company — these 100-sheet, thick-stock notepads will make a great gift for your hard-to-buy-for loved ones. The art is an old map depicting the meandering belt and alluvial flood plains of the lower Mississippi River prior to 1944. $16.

Available at Oak Hall,

Available at Peerless Printing

Millstone Market, Joseph,

(2896 Walnut Grove Road,

The Booksellers at

458-8152) and poplarprint.com.

Laurelwood, and Dazzle. efwtn.org.

38 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

037_MM11_2015_HomeGrownGiftGuide_v1.indd 38

10/15/15 3:53 PM


Cosmosimals Wall Art by Little K a ren Art Memphis artist Karen Mulford sees stars in living creatures. Using acrylic paint on canvas, she illustrates this via her Cosmosimals. If you’re looking to get a cosmic gift for an outof-this-world friend, choose an animal, splatter paint color, and canvas size. $30-$60, depending on size. Available for purchase directly from the artist via facebook.com/littlekarenart or littlekarenart.weebly.com.

Flower Crown from Holly & Iv y Flower crowns have become a popular fashion trend among festival-goers, but they can also liven up an outfit for special occasions or nights out. To craft these floral headdresses, Memphian Holly Writt, owner and designer at Holly & Ivy, uses high-quality silk flowers — garden roses and peonies with Queen Anne’s lace accents. They’re sure to make any woman feel like royalty. $60. 486-7544 . hollyandivyfloral.com.

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 39

037_MM11_2015_HomeGrownGiftGuide_v1.indd 39

10/15/15 3:54 PM


Lift Up! by Mighty Souls Br ass Ba nd Memphis’ Mighty Souls Brass Band, a rotating collective of composer-players versed in a multitude of musical traditions, isn’t a soul band, nor is it a funk band, a marching band, or a swing band. And yet, depending on where you catch them live, you’ll hear all of those influences, as well as more from around the globe, in the group’s music. Their debut album, Lift Up!, was released earlier this year.

Copper Baskets by Virginia Fisher Memphis metal artist Virginia Fisher hand-crafts these copper baskets, which can be used as wall art or, more functionally, to hold small items in any room in the home. All are finished with a food-safe coating that preserves the colors. The Memphis-style version has a patina line that represents the Mississippi River. Starting at $60 for the 8”x8” baskets. Available year ’round at the Metal Museum (374 Metal Museum

Available at various music retailers and on

Drive, 774-6380) and from Thanksgiving until Christmas Eve

CD for $14 .88 at archer-records.com.

at WinterArts. facebook.com/Copperbaskets.

Popcorn from Wolf River Popcorn You might think spicy barbecue and caramel popcorn mixed together would be an odd combination. Leave it to Memphians to bring the heat and sweet together in harmony. Wolf River Popcorn has done just that with their spicy Memphis Mix. Also available in not-as-hot Memphis Mix Mild, Classic Caramel, and Cheezy Cheddar. Comes in half-quart or quart bags, starting at $6. Gift tins available via special order online. Available at Miss Cordelia's, Superlo (Spottswood), The Booksellers at Laurelwood, Doc's Liquors, and other select locations. wolfriverpopcorn.com.

40 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

037_MM11_2015_HomeGrownGiftGuide_v1.indd 40

10/15/15 3:54 PM


bringing Persia to the mid-south STANDARD OF EXCELLENCE SINCE 1950

oushak rug (pictured)

9x12 $6350

for this month only

$2450

APPRAISALS • HANDWASH/CLEANING SALES • REWEAVING • REPAIRS • COLOR RUN RESTORATION PET AND OTHER STAIN REMOVALS • MOTH DAMAGE ODOR REMOVAL AND MUCH MORE 3554 Park Avenue, Memphis, TN • (901) 327-5033 • taghavirugs.com

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/19/15 1:49 PM


start your holiday gift shopping at

giambattista valli | stella mccartney | rosetta getty | marissa webb | m2malletier perrin paris | jerome dreyfuss | tom ford | aurelie bidermann | w. britt | bittersweet

2531 broad avenue, memphis, tn 38112 • 901.275.8784 • 20twelve.com

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/7/15 9:00 AM


Buckley vs. Vidal from The Devault- Gr aves Agency Conservative icon William F. Buckley Jr. and liberal author Gore Vidal exploded onto the political scene during the presidential conventions of 1968 when they debated 11 times on ABC News. They infamously blew up at each other during their penultimate debate in Chicago. The debates have not been shown or transcribed in their entirety since the original airings. Memphis’ Devault-Graves Agency exclusively brings you the complete, uncensored transcripts. Print edition, $14.95; E-book, $9.99. Available at Barnes & Noble and Amazon. devault-gravesagency.weebly.com.

Chocolate Silk Pie from Frost Ba ke Shop This heavenly decadent pie can soothe even the fiercest sweet tooth. The dessert masters at Frost combine butter, eggs, and the best cocoa available to make a rich, smooth filling that sits inside a flaky pastry crust. It’s topped with lightly sweetened heavy cream and grated chocolate. Share if you must (but you might not want to). 9-inch pie, $21.

Kettle Chips from Nikki’s Hot A**

394 S. Grove Park. 682-4545. frostbakeshop.com.

Cookbook from the Cupboa rd Restaur a nt Your friends and family can whip up their own delicious meat-and-two with this newly released cookbook from Charles Cavallo’s World Famous Cupboard Restaurant. Featuring customer favorites like chicken and dumplings, spaghetti gravy, and other classic Southern staples, the book will make a great gift for any home chef. $9. 1400 Union Avenue. 276-8015.

Memphian Nikki Schroeder (whose face you see screaming on the package) started selling her spicy, homemade season-all mix in 2011. The idea to distribute it widely came to her after having friends regularly ask to purchase bags of the “hot ass” seasoning. The name stuck. Today, she also offers kettle chips generously sprinkled with the stuff that started it all. A bag of this picante, crunchy goodness would fit nicely inside a holiday stocking. 1 oz. bags, $1; 7 oz. bags, $3.99. Available at local groceries, restaurants, and retail outlets. nikkishotass.com.

thecupboardrestaurant.com.

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 43

037_MM11_2015_HomeGrownGiftGuide_v1.indd 43

10/15/15 3:54 PM


Bow Ties from Doggone Bow Ties Give the men in your life the gift of style this season with a Doggone Bow Tie handmade by Memphian Courtenay Elliott. Simple, sleek, colorful, or creative — she’s got a bow tie for any guy. She’ll even refurbish an old sentimental necktie into a bow tie. $18-$55, depending on style.

Lucky or Strong by Ca leb Swe a zy Caleb Sweazy’s fourth studio album was recorded at Memphis’ Music+Arts Studio by producer Kevin Houston (Sid Selvidge, North Mississippi Allstars). Recorded completely live, Lucky or Strong finds Sweazy recalling bittersweet tales that cover everything from an old Model A Ford to WWI. Sweazy claims to like songs that make the listener feel happy and sad at the same time, and this collection of guitar-driven, bluesy folk rock is sure to do just that. Available at various music retailers and on CD for $14 .98 at archer-records.com.

Available locally at Guy’s Formal Wear (539 Perkins Extended), The Booksellers at Laurelwood, the Cotton Museum, and doggonebowties.com.

No Less Worthy by Dorchelle T. Spence Written by a lifelong Memphian, the young-adult novel is a brave comingof-age story that features many recognizable Memphis institutions while focusing on the broader theme of finding one’s place in the world. A great holiday gift idea for the grandparents, aunts, uncles, and friends of tweens and teens who seem to already have everything they want. $12.95. Available at Barnes & Noble and amazon.com.

Coffee from J. Brooks With over a decade of experience producing artisan coffees, the folks at J. Brooks melded their passion and potential to bring Memphians “the best coffee, period.” John Pitman (the “J”) is the roastmaster responsible for roasting each carefully sourced bean to perfection. The Spirit of Memphis is a medium roast, with full-bodied flavor and traces of sweetness. Starting at $10.38 for a 12 oz. bag. Available at Miss Cordelia’s, City Market, Whole Foods, High Point Grocery, and other select grocers and retailers. jbrookscoffeeroasters.com. 44 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

037_MM11_2015_HomeGrownGiftGuide_v1.indd 44

10/15/15 3:54 PM


Grit & Grind Cuff by Debr a | Jill This locally designed collection was created to benefit The Grizzlies Foundation — 20 percent of the proceeds from each cuff purchase goes to the organization. The etched wrist cuffs are crafted with sterling silver. The 18-diamond cuffs are available in sterling silver, rose gold, and yellow gold. This collection includes five designs for women and one for men. Starting at $260. Available online at debrajill.com.

Cake from Judy Pound Ca kes Memphian Judy Douglass has been baking pound cakes her whole life. Using her mother’s recipe, she often made cakes for friends and loved ones during the holidays, and offered them as comfort food when words simply wouldn’t work. Today, you can gift them, too. 6-inch round cake, $15; 10-inch round, $35. Available at High Point Grocery, Superlo Foods (Spottswood), Miss Cordelia’s, Pugh's Flowers (2435 Whitten Road), and judypoundcakes.com.

Hand-blown Wine Glasses from Cooper-Young Gl assworks & Gifts If you’ve ever seen a glassblower in action, you know it’s a pretty impressive art. And resident glass artist and Cooper-Young Glassworks & Gifts owner Robert Snyder gives the art a functional, fun twist with these handmade wine glasses. To make things even more interesting, you can go with the color-changing option — the glasses magically shift shades when they’re filled with red wine. Singles, $18-$45; also available in sets. 906 South Cooper. 272-2277. youngavenueglassworks.com.

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 45

037_MM11_2015_HomeGrownGiftGuide_v1.indd 45

10/15/15 3:55 PM


I Love Memphis Necklace from Pa nga e a Designs Your giftees will proudly rep’ our hometown with this Memphis-made necklace. A hand-sawed, Tennesseeshaped sterling silver pendant, stamped with a heart and everyone’s favorite area code, is available on either a cable or ball chain (18” or 20” length). $53. Originally designed for former I Love Memphis blogger Kerry Crawford, this piece of jewelry allows the wearer to keep Memphis close to their heart. Available at etsy.com/shop/PangaeaDesigns.

Vodka from Pyr a mid Vodk a Alexander and Winston Folk grew up in the family restaurant, Folk’s Folly. There they developed their love for crafted Southern spirits. The brothers officially bottled their first batch of Pyramid Vodka in November 2014. Today, Memphians can enjoy it, too. Alexander’s favorite Pyramid cocktail is the Basil Sour: 1.5 oz. of vodka, 1 oz. simple syrup, 1 oz. fresh lemon juice, and muddled fresh basil, shaken and served over ice. 750ml bottle, $19.99-$21.99. Available at Joe’s, The Corkscrew, Buster’s, and other local liquor stores. pyramidvodka.com.

Mugs by Pa per & Cl ay Modern H a ndm a de Cer a mics It’s tea time anytime with these beautifully simple, yet elegant handmade mugs. The Danish-inspired mugs are crafted in small batches by local designer/ artist Brit McDaniel who says she makes “each piece from start to finish with these two tiny hands.” Mugs are food-safe, microwaveable, and range slightly in size but hold 12 ounces. $44. 525 North Main. 679-4352. shoppaperandclay.com.

46 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

037_MM11_2015_HomeGrownGiftGuide_v1.indd 46

10/15/15 3:55 PM


for holiday & everyday! 430

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

PERKINS

EXTENDED

|

901.683.6809

|

MENAGESTATIONERY.COM

10/19/15 1:50 PM


The    

Main

DRAG

048_MM11_2015_Feature_StreetRacing+v02.indd 48

10/20/15 3:29 PM


G

I

by e i l e e n t o w n s e n d i l l u st r at i o n s by i a n h a r k e y

got interested in street racing circuitously. Literally circuitously, because I started with oval track racing, not straight-line drag racing. The first time I ever thought to drive a fast car was when I heard of The Rusty Wallace Driving Experience, a business that will fire-suit you up and put you behind the wheel of a stock car. A roommate of mine, a tobacco-chewing South Carolinian girl who grew up with more than a passing knowledge of NASCAR, tried out the Driving Experience at Memphis International Raceway. When she came back with custom-printed photos of herself in the pit, helmet in hand like a total badass, I thought, “I should try that.”

Fast Cars

So at 9 a.m. on a late summer morning this past August, I met a crowd of mostly older men in a small room for a one-hour crash course (no pun) in the ins-andouts of momentum driving. An instructor wearing cargo shorts and a company-issue grey polo drew a map on a whiteboard. “Here,” he pointed to a green box scribbled in dry erase marker across the big black circle I took to represent the track, “is where you start smelling the Goodyears heating up. The rubber is bouncing off your windshield and” — he looked around the room with a practiced dramatic pause — “then you’re really cooking.”

After being given earphones (so a spotter who, I was cautioned, “might sound like a total Boomhauer from West Virginia” could instruct me while I was behind the wheel) and a helmet (so I “wouldn’t see Jesus today”), I was packed into a small black car. Car is a general term, in that it both includes my Toyota Prius and the metal cage into which I was casually strapped by a skinny teenager, a “buckler” for Rusty Wallace. “Just breathe,” said the teenager assuredly. As soon as I hit the pavement, the spotter yelled, “Go! Go! Go!” in my ear and I was in fourth gear, passing slower cars, hitting my marks — green

in the

Dirty South N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 49

048_MM11_2015_Feature_StreetRacing+v02.indd 49

10/20/15 3:29 PM


for go, orange for let off the gas — lapping the track at what felt like a million miles an hour. I’m sure I wasn’t actually going that fast (I don’t really know how fast I went. I was too nervous to look down at the dash.) but it definitely wasn’t my usual Sunday afternoon fare. After six laps that felt simultaneously like nothing and an eternity, I pulled off onto the black cement apron, drenched in sweat and completely hooked. There’s a reason that when someone really wants something, they are called “driven.” As soon as I was out of the car, I wanted back in it.

I

t wasn’t a big leap to get interested in drag racing. Memphis is less a NASCAR town, more of a street scene. These things are hard to measure, but we purportedly have one of the biggest street racing communities in the country. Events are held every weekend around town, and some of the biggest Memphis races are attended by several thousand people. A handful of guys that could pass as Southern-fried versions of Vin Diesel were hanging around the Memphis International Raceway on a Friday night in early September. The Raceway, formerly known as Memphis Motorsports Park, is a multi-functional course located north of the city. A hairpin-like road course connects to a drag strip, which parallels a four-mile oval track, all of which are accessible via the oil-streaked “Victory Lane.” The venue hosts regular (legal) driving events called “Street Warriorz,” “Nitro Jam,” and “Test N Tune.” The return of the racetrack (it closed from 2009 until 2011) has been a boon for the racing community. “Five years ago,” one racer told me, “it just wasn’t poppin’ like it is now.” I was at an event called Midnight Madness with Yanni Manousakis, who has a much cooler car than me, a 2004 Volkswagen GLI turbo with lowered suspension. His car is slammed, as in, slammed to the ground. The lowered center of gravity allows for better handling. Manousakis is a 27-year-old Air Force veteran with long hair that he keeps pulled back in a loose bun. Though he’s worked in welding and in private security, teaching cops to hotwire cars, Manousakis’ style is more relaxed than it is Rambo. He grew up in

Nutbush, the neighborhood north of Summer Avenue’s long strip of automotive shops and secondhand stores. If you google “Nutbush Memphis” one of the first results is a heavily autotuned rap by a guy called Whiteboy Scott, the video for which is mostly just shots of people cleaning their cars. “We bendin’ through the city,” raps Whiteboy Scott while a bright blue car with raised suspension and impressive rims cruises down a side street, “headed to MLK park.” It is a good area to grow up in if you’re interested in learning your way around a garage, which Manousakis was. By the time he was in high school, he worked for Garvin

“Midnight Madness has a lot in common with the Delta Fair, if you replaced the roller coasters with drifting tracks.” Hershey, who runs Rod Shop of Memphis. “We had to fabricate a lot of parts at Rod Shop, stuff they don’t make anymore,” says Manousakis. “We were inventing things all the time.” He got into drag racing around the same time. Midnight Madness has a lot in common with the Delta Fair, if you replaced the roller coasters with drifting tracks and drags. A

long line of food vendors backed up to the drag strip, including a yellow Pronto Pups stand and a place where you could get around a dozen different kinds of stacked and fried meat plates. Nearby, a man wielding what looked to be a tire iron ushered people towards The Wall of Death, a silo-shaped wooden cylinder in which stunt motorcyclists were riding in centrifugal circles. We bought tickets to do ride-alongs with the drifters. Drifting (think: Tokyo Drift) is a style where drivers oversteer their cars, causing the rear wheels of the vehicles to lose traction and slip forward. The point is to angle your car so that your front wheels are pointed forward, while the vehicle itself is pointed sideways. If this makes no sense on paper, trust me, it makes no sense in action either. It is an unnatural feeling to face sideways in a car while you simultaneously move forward. My turn to ride came with a driver whose hood had been removed to reveal an arachnid-looking engine, tubes snaking in and out of a gleaming black body. Manousakis said, “Hey, if anything happens, just do this.” He crossed his arms in front of his face and lowered his head to his chest. I must have looked scared as he passed me a too-large loaner helmet because he followed that up with, “It’ll be fine.” It was fine. It was more than fine. It was great. The driver gunned it, then banked hard left, and we slid agilely in a nonsensical direction, only to pull out and do the same move all over again, reversed. “Did you see the driver’s feet?” Manousakis asked me after I exited the vehicle, heart pounding. I didn’t. “You should watch them next time. It’s really cool — kind of like a dance.” We headed towards the drag strip and past a music stage where a band of aging rockers billed as “Every Mother’s Nightmare” pounded out something heavy, Southern, and lovelorn. We found a place in the metal stands while cars lined up, two at a time, at the beginning of the quarter-mile run. Numbers flashed on jumbo screens near the end of the track. This was bracket racing, a measured and standardized version of the “grudge” racing that happens on the street. To an untrained eye, a few tribes stand out at the Raceway: Mustang guys, hyped on their V8 engines and custom plates. Other muscle-car people who drive Chevy Camaros or Pontiac Firebirds. Old school classic car

50 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

048_MM11_2015_Feature_StreetRacing+v02.indd 50

10/20/15 3:29 PM


Congratulations to our Quail Hollow Regional Headquarters Sales Leaders!!!

Jackie Alexander

Mark Bradley

Susan Brubaker

Danny Burke

Mikki Duffey

Jim Duke

Dempsey Fisher

Vicki Gandee

Robert Gorman

Carol Iverson

Bexley Jackson

Neal Jackson

C. Lauren Jones

Pat Lichterman

Christie May

Judy McLellan

Lila Mehdian

Stanley Mills

Saeed Nia

Linda Norton

Joan Robinson

Josh Spotts

Jimmie & Bob Tapley

Tayler Tapley

Melissa Thompson

Tim Van Horn

Chet & Judy Whitsitt

#1 in the Mid-South • #5 in the Nation • 901.756.8900 6525 Quail Hollow Road • Memphis, TN 38120

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/20/15 4:20 PM


DELTA STATE Working toward the next big idea, together.

ww.deltastate.edu/visit

ELTASTATE • FACEBOOK.COM/DELTASTATEUNIVERSITY www.deltastate.edu/visit @ D E LTASTAT E • FAC E B O O K .CO M / D E LTASTAT EU N I V E R S I T Y

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/16/15 8:28 AM


collectors whose vehicles sport massive hood scoops. Drifters with slick tires and no hoods, and crotch rocketers on Suzuki Hayabusas. More men than women, but a few women, especially on the bikes. Manousakis is into sleeper cars — low-budget, high-production models like the Honda Civic that have been retrofitted with bigger engines. Specifically, he likes Toyotas, so much that people call him “Mr. 2,” after the Toyota MR2. The cool thing about sleeper cars, he says, is that you have to put in work. The satisfaction is in winning against people who bought their speed, rather than sculpted it. The stands near the strip were full of ranks of teenage boys, families, women wearing “Proud Southern Gun Owner” shirts, military-looking older guys, and punk kids drinking sodas. Several people stood with their fingers pushed through the chainlink fence, as close to the action as possible. Cars grouped behind the drag strip, waiting in a mock traffic jam for their turn. A couple of shiny Chevys arrived on the slick black pavement. Behind me, I heard someone comment on “the Corvette sinkhole” and another person say, “That’s why this country is in debt.” We hadn’t been watching the races for long when blue police lights appeared in the distance, flashing over cars on a neighboring road. The crowd half paid attention. Seeing police at these events isn’t uncommon. “They shouldn’t look at plates out here,” says Manousakis. “But they probably do. Trying to catch people headed to street races.”

T

he Memphis races are no secret, at least not if you are curious. It’s easy enough to search on Youtube for “street races Memphis” and come across videos of drivers taking a strip at high speeds, an iPhone videographer offhandedly commenting on the action (“I’m not betting on anything but a Corvette” or “Y’all gotta fishtail out of here” or “You got them racing tires, son”). The pictures on these videos are mostly low quality, blurred by headlamps and street lights, but in some it is possible to make out crowds of people standing on the sidewalk, gathered to watch as the Mustangs or sleek Chevys pair off to gun it, to hook and go. Drag racing on the street is a Class B misdemeanor, defined as “the use of any motor vehicle for the purpose of ascertaining the maximum speed obtainable by the vehicle,” “comparing relative speeds,” “accepting a challenge,” and to participate illegally you don’t necessarily have to be in the car. You can be a facilitator, or the guy who shines the “go” light. If you hit someone while racing, the charge is upgraded to vehicular assault. If you kill someone, it becomes vehicular homicide,

Hunt Phelan

W

E D D I N G S

A N D

E

V E N T S

Ceremony & Reception Location Hunt Phelan, Photographer: Key Elements Photography, Catering: Simply Delicious Catering, Florist: Jamie Liebenrood, Bridal: Low’s Bridal, Bridal Formal: Jos. A Banks, Cake: The Cake Lady, Designer: Eddie Key, DJ: Disc Jockeys, Jewelry: Gold & Diamond Warehouse, Accommodations: The Peabody Hotel

533 BEALE STREET, MEMPHIS, TN 38103 (901) 786-8801 HUNTPHELAN.COM

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 53

048_MM11_2015_Feature_StreetRacing+v02.indd 53

10/20/15 3:29 PM


This is whaT a mulTi-asseT porTfolio looks like in real life...

a class C felony, the same class of felony in Tennessee as crimes of passion. “If something were to happen, we are risking everything,” says Tony Yeager, a drag racer who runs Mid-South Street Cars, a group that supports the local street racing community. The 33-year-old auto mechanic has been racing cars and bikes most of his life. He’s quick to say the sport is as much a passion as it is an addiction. “If we wrecked and killed somebody, well, guess what. We’re gone,” he says. “When an accident happens it is too late; you lose your life, your family, your business. “But then again,” he says, “it’s what we do.”

I Waddell and Associates exists to improve life by providing clarity to remove fear. we understand the fear and confusion that plague the big life decisions of building families, educating children, starting and divesting businesses, transitioning into retirement, processing divorce, designing estates, and more. we have faced them ourselves. we built this firm to help. we built this firm to provide you comfort. we do a lot of calculations at w&a, but everything we do starts with the heart... At W&A, we care for our clients and associates as family, and we hold ourselves accountable by practicing the planning and investment advice we implement for our clients.

memphis

nashville

www.waddellandassociates.com | phone 901.767.9187 | toll 800.527.7263

CNBC raNks W&a 29 iN Top 100 WealTh MaNageMeNT FirMs For 2015 * * Disclaimer: waddell & associates (“waddell”) is an seC-registered investment adviser. The “Top 100 fee-only wealth managers” is granted by CnBC, an independent association unaffiliated with waddell. The CnBC Digital Team, along with meridian-iQ created the Top 100 fee-only wealth management ranking based on scores for the following measures weighted according to a proprietary formula to arrive at a final total rank: aum, staff with professional designations, average account size, client segmentation, growth of assets, years in business and other key factors. additional information on the factors involved for inclusion in this ranking can be found at the following location: http://www.cnbc.com/id/102605785.

Broadway Pizza House Legendary Pizza Since 1977

2581 Broad Avenue (901) 454-7930

629 South Mendenhall (901) 207-1546

Memphis Magazine’s

THE 2015

FACE OF

PIZZA

first met Yeager at a South Memphis drag, hemmed in by drab administration buildings and dark factories, a few weeks after Midnight Madness. During the day, the street handles mostly truck traffic. The only visible clue to its more notorious purpose — its regular nighttime use — is a set of deep skid marks, the collective work of the thousands of drivers who have spun their wheels there in preparation for races. Maybe 40 people were there to watch a few cars do tests, one at a time. People had brought cars — “serious drag cars” says Yeager, as distinct from stock models — on trailers, and were loading and unloading them to run. Smoke from burnouts (when drivers lock their brake and floor the gas, causing the tires to spin and heat up) filled the air. I heard a mom shout, “Get out of there, Aiden!” and watched as a young kid, 12 years old at most, run from the street back to the sidewalk. I’d been hesitant to speak to people but Yeager, a straightforward guy with an Arkansas accent, introduced himself. Yeager’s group is mostly older, not “kids slinging donuts,” and they gamble: $500 to $1,000 a race. “More money, more risk,” he said. “The faster you are, the bigger risk you are taking in the street — 150, 160, 170 miles per hour in a quarter mile.” They are a more organized group than many, into the mechanics of racing over the party. “We’re gonna make sure everybody is safe before we do it,” Yeager told me. “We are breaking the law but we don’t look at it as breaking the law, we are looking at it as fun. No harm, no foul, that kind of thing.” We hadn’t been out there long, an hour at most, when a police officer showed up. Later, Yeager told me, “Right now the police are hot on it. They always come. They don’t usually write tickets but they always come. There are days we’ve been out there for 10 minutes and days we’ve been out there for 13 hours.” (Other people I asked corroborated: It depends on the officer and it depends on the night. A man I spoke to who came

54 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

048_MM11_2015_Feature_StreetRacing+v02.indd 54

10/20/15 4:05 PM


at the pyramid

Bass Pro Shops at the Pyramid is more than just a store; it’s an adventure. The massive destination experience offers something for everyone, from the serious outdoor enthusiast to families looking to have fun. There’s nothing else like it anywhere in the world.

memphis , tennessee basspro . com

• 1-800-bass pro

For reservations, visit big-cypress.com or call 1-800-225-6343

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

BP153039

10/10/15 12:16 PM


out to spectate told me, “I’ve seen them rope off the street and tow cars.”) The officer pulled up slowly, lights flashing through the clouded air, and told us via megaphone to clear the street. I remembered a video I’d watched online of a race that got broken up at a different spot in town, where an officer had pulled a driver out of his car. “Get on the ground, smartass!” the policeman yelled, out of frame. “Just get on the fucking ground.” This time, the interaction was over quickly — uneventful, standard. The officer left.

“If we wrecked and killed somebody, well, guess what, we’re gone. You lose your life, your family, your business.” A few minutes later, a couple of big SUVs pulled up beside each other, ready to race. Someone, probably Yeager, shouted, “Get that shit to Rivergate!,” referring to the other main industrial area where people race, near President’s Island, which has a reputation for being rowdier. The cars drove off.

I HORNE and WELLS, PLLC Murray B. Wells and Arthur E. Horne, III

Endless Pursuit of Justice If you have been injured, discriminated against or find yourself in trouble, call the trial attorneys that remember why they are here.

Arthur E. Horne, III

81 Monroe Ave., Suite 400, Memphis, TN 38103 901.507.2521 | HorneWells.com

Murray B. Wells

t was at the end of this same drag where Jessie Moore died, in an accident that crumpled the 20-year-old’s red Honda Civic and killed him instantaneously. At the time of Moore’s accident, which happened in the early hours of a Sunday morning in April 2013, a small group of racers and onlookers were on site. Friends and family say Moore had gone to try and sell his car. He spent the evening talking to other spectators, and possibly raced a few times. A little after 1 a.m., the Fayette County native attempted to make a U-turn on the dark street, not seeing in time the group of muscle cars that barreled towards him at 100 miles an hour. Ontario Brown, the driver of the Mustang that t-boned into Moore’s driver’s side door, remembers noticing two red lights in front of

56 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

048_MM11_2015_Feature_StreetRacing+v02.indd 56

10/20/15 3:29 PM


MORE THAN FINDING THE

Answer

I T ’ S

F I N D I N G

YOURSELF At Briarcrest, we believe in the journey of discovery. The stops and starts. The challenges and the breakthroughs. Whether it’s academics, athletics, fine arts, or missions, we are with every student all of the way.

www.briarcrest.com 901.765.4605

Open Houses: Elementary & Middle School–Tues. Oct. 13 @ 6:30 p.m. East Memphis Elementary–Thurs. Oct. 15 @ 9:30 a.m.

WONDER, WHIMSY, WILD:

FOLK ART IN AMERICA November 7, 2015 – February 28, 2016 a stupendously fun and surprising presentation of american folk art created between 1800 and 1925, ranging from vivid portraits, landscapes, still lifes, and allegorical paintings to sculpture and decorative arts that exemplify the breadth of american creativity.

Enjoy our newly extended FREE WEDNESDAYS. We’re all yours, all day and all evening long on Wednesdays! Free admission 10 am to 8 pm. The Wedding of the Turtle Doves, attributed to John Scholl (1827-1916), 1907-1915, white pine, wire, and paint. This exhibition is drawn from the barbara L. Gordon Collection and is organized and circulated by art Services International, alexandria, virginia.

DiA De los

Muertos

Day of the Dead Community Day

SaT Nov 7 12 pm - 3 pm Free Wednesdays sponsored by

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

with

AMERICAN FOLK ART

Peter GurAlniCk

Holiday artist Market

WeD Nov 11 7 pm

SuN DeC 6 11 am - 5 pm

SaT JaN 30 10 am - 2 pm

A ConversAtion

TM

brooksmuseum.org

CommuNITy Day

Wed 10 am - 8 pm | Thurs/Fri 10 am - 4 pm Sat 10 am - 5 pm | Sun 11 am - 5 pm

10/10/15 12:17 PM


him prior to the crash and banking left. The next thing he remembers is sitting in his car, unsure of how he got there or why a bone was poking out of his wrist. A photo taken after the crash shows Moore’s car, illuminated by red ambulance lights, metal peeled back around a collapsed frame. Brown’s orange-red Mustang sits nearby, its hood jammed towards its windshield. It wasn’t until half an hour later, as Brown was being transported away by a team of paramedics, that it hit him. He thought, “I really just hit some innocent dude.” The 22-year-old, who’d been street racing for years without incident, was in shock. A handful of accidents over the past decade can be attributed to the races. Most non-critical, the result of what Yeager refers to as “young punks doing stupid crap.” But fatal accidents do happen. Almost exactly a year after Moore’s accident, a 19-year-old named Keleian Braden died during a race, on a narrow strip in East Memphis. The infrequency of fatal drag racing accidents is outsized by the speed with which they happen, the drama augmented by the fact that there is usually a crowd, and people filming. As Michelle Smith, Jessie Moore’s mother, put it, “It can happen in a second,” she says. “A quick second. I wouldn’t wish this pain on anyone.”

T

TIS THE SEASON! Book your holiday event at ACRE Restaurant today. We also offer catering to your office, home, or event space. Where cuisine, ambience & service are second to none.

901 818-ACRE 690 S Perkins Rd. Memphis, TN acrememphis.com

he next and last time I went to the street races, on a Saturday night when there were more people out, I saw a bike almost clip another bike. A Suzuki had been racing and was returning to the start line, where another bike moved at the wrong time. It was a close call. “That would have been it right there,” commented a man near to me. I’d watched the race grow from a couple kids on bikes to a full-blown event. Before the cops arrived, scattering us quickly, a Mustang club was racing, ten cars thick. People sat on the hoods of their vehicles, drinking Coronas and leaning forward as the racers sped away. The feeling was remarkably different from at the track, at once more exciting and more relaxed. I remembered what Yeager had said: “It’s a different atmosphere. It’s a whole different way of life.” The whole street was blocked off; the sidewalk swarmed with people. It was cold and we all wore jackets. I chatted with a guy who said he’d come down just to watch for the past five years. His car was a cheap Honda, nothing to write home about. “I don’t really go to the club,” he shrugged. “I do this.” I thought about what he’d said minutes later, while I was ducking and running from the blue lights, hoping that this wasn’t one of the

58 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

048_MM11_2015_Feature_StreetRacing+v02.indd 58

10/20/15 3:29 PM


THE SCHOOL FOR ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE. THE SCHOOL FOR BOYS.

GRAD ES 7 - 1 2 | 6 1 9 1 PA R K AV E N U E , M E M P H I S , T N 3 8 1 1 9 (901) 260-1300 | MUSOWLS.ORG

Schedule your tour today.

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/16/15 8:29 AM


IN STONE

Aft er

Be for

e

CLEANING | SEALING | RESTORATION SERVICES . . . For All Your Stone Care Needs!

by Craig Brown, LLC

901-331-4435 Brick · Slate · Mex Tile · Crab Orchard · Blue Stone · Limestone · Marble · Granite · Concrete · and More!

Share the Pennies rounds your utility bill up to the next whole dollar amount and donates the difference to Project CARE, which assists elderly and disabled customers with energy-efficiency repairs to their homes. Sign up today at mlgw.com/share or call (901) 528-4887.

ARTISAN COFFEES

SCRATCH BAKERY - SODA FOUNTAIN

BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNER cafeeclectic.net Harbortown - Midtown - Highland

nights the police wanted to tow cars. There’s a lot of different kinds of fun in the world: You can go to the club, or you can do this.

I

f death is in the room,” said the writer George Saunders — talking about fiction, though he easily could have been talking about racing — “it is pretty interesting.” The allure of the sport exists in equal proportion to its hazards. Ontario Brown, the driver of the Mustang that t-boned into Moore’s driver’s side door, no longer has a license. He never went to trial for the vehicular homicide of Jessie Moore, but he will have the felony on his record for life. “Everybody goes in and they think, ‘Yeah, yeah, that could be dangerous,’” Brown says. “It’s not always about you. Sometimes it is about the next person driving.” Brown served several months in jail and is currently on probation. He is in school now, studying medical administration. He may one day be on the other side of the fence, working in a hospital when some kid comes in battered from a car accident. He got lucky. And he hasn’t lost his love of cars. “I’m not gonna sit here and lie,” Brown says. “I’m still gonna race at the track. It’s been a passion for me since I was a little kid, and it’s going to continue to be my passion probably ’til I’m gone. “It’s just something that’s born in you,” he says. “It’s in you.” Memphis is published monthly. Annual subscription $15. Publisher/Editor: Kenneth Neill. Managing Editor: Frank Murtaugh. Memphis is owned by Contemporary Media, Inc., P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101. Stockholders: Ward Archer Jr., 1902 Nelson, Memphis, TN 38114; Jack Belz, 100 Peabody Pl. #1400, Memphis, TN 38103; Kate Gooch, 2900 Garden Lane, Memphis, TN 38111; Ira Lipman, P.O. Box 45, Memphis, TN 38101; Kenneth Neill, P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101; Henry Turley Jr., 65 Union Ave., 12th Floor, Memphis, TN 38103. AVERAGE NUMBER COPIES EACH ISSUE DURING PRECEDING 12 MONTHS: Net press run- 19,685. Paid outside-county mail subscriptions- 3,146. Paid inside-county mail subscriptions- 11,537. Sales through dealers, carriers, street vendors, counter sales and other Non-USPS paid distribution- 1,156. Other classes mailed through the USPS- 0. Total paid distribution- 15,839 Free or Nominal rate outside-county copies- 147. Free or Nominal rate inside-county copies- 1,514. Free or Nominal rate copies mailed at other classes through the USPS- 0. Free or Nominal rate distribution outside the mail- 1,169. Total Free or Nominal distribution- 2,830. Total distribution- 18,669. Copies not distributed- 1,016. ACTUAL NUMBER COPIES SINGLE ISSUE NEAREST TO FILING DATE: Net press run- 21,460. Paid outside-county mail subscriptions3,344. Paid inside-county mail subscriptions- 12,671. Sales through dealers, carriers, street vendors, counter sales and other Non-USPS paid distribution- 919. Other classes mailed through the USPS- 0. Total paid distribution- 16,934. Free or Nominal rate outside-county copies- 147. Free or Nominal rate inside-county copies- 1,514. Free or Nominal rate copies mailed at other classes through the USPS- 0. Free or Nominal rate distribution outside the mail- 1,262. Total Free or Nominal distribution- 2,923. Total distribution- 19,857. Copies not distributed- 1,603.

60 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

048_MM11_2015_Feature_StreetRacing+v02.indd 60

10/20/15 3:29 PM


feathers smoothed daily

Presenting Feathers Spa at The Peabody. Never feel ruffled again. From deep tissue massage to facials, manicures and pedicures, Feathers Spa at The Peabody is the ultimate spa experience. Spa packages or single session treatments are available. Monday - Friday 9:00am - 8:00pm; Saturday 8:00am - 8:00pm; Sunday 9:00am - 6:00pm. For appointments: 901.261.4400.

149 Union Avenue . Memphis, TN 38103 . 901.261.4400 www.peabodymemphis.com

Don’t settle for less than brilliance. Stanley Steemer has cleaned area rugs in customer’s homes for years. We now utilize full submersion, the same process that makers of area rugs in Persia and throughout Asia use to flush dirt and excess dyes before shipping them to market, giving your area rug a gentle, deep cleaning which flushes the fibers and removes the most dirt, contaminants, and odor. Our quick drying time protects against browning, and fringes are cleaned and hand groomed to bring back your rug’s original artisan beauty. Give us a call for free pick-up and delivery. Protecting and safely handling your investment is our primary goal.

stanleysteemer.com

LIKE A WORK OF ART.

901.751.8111 or 1-800-STEEMER (783-3637) 1250 Big Orange Road, Memphis, TN 38108 INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/16/15 8:32 AM


Holiday Gift Guide 2015

Match Pewter Made in italy.

Coming to Collierville this fall One store - soon two locations! (901) 761-0078 • FleetFeetMemphis.com

4626 Poplar Avenue, Memphis, TN 38117 (901) 763-0700 | babcockgifts.com |

this winter, nurture your mind and body midtown massage & bodywork

the place to go for massage

Purchase GIFT CERTIFICATES and SCHEDULE online. 885 South Cooper • 901.596.3838 info@midtown-massage.com • midtown-massage.com 62 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

MM_HolidayGiftGuide_Nov15.indd 62

10/20/15 4:50 PM


Holiday Gift Guide 2015

The Gingerbread House A Sweet Shopping Extravaganza

Sushi • Hibachi • Oyster

presented by

ST. AGNES ACADEMY ST. DOMINIC SCHOOL 4830 WALNUT GROVE ROAD MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE

LADIES’ PREVIEW PARTY

Memphis’ Finest Asian Cuisine

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4 - 6:30-9:30pm

For advance tickets, contact sumallen@comcast.net

SATURDAY SHOPPING DAY

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 5 - 8:00am-4:00pm For more information, contact EBennett@SAA-SDS.ORG

750 Germantown Pkwy, Cordova, TN 38018 (901) 751-8888 • www.fridaytuna.com

If It’s Worth Framing, It’s Worth Framing Right. And 1910 Frameworks ... has and does more than framing.

stellaware.com 901.832.0184

One-of-a-kind gifts .... Scratch & Sniff sculpture by artist Govinder Nazran signed & numbered.

2029 Union Avenue | 901-274-1910 1910frameworks.com

Over 100 years experience framing memories

"Whatever it is, it's better in the wind." PERFORMANCE PLUS MOTORCYCLE SPECIALIST, INC.

PREMIER DEALERS OF BMW, SUZUKI, YAMAHA MOTORCYCLES & ATV'S FOR THE MID-SOUTH

Available at these fine retailers: • “Life is Good” on Main St. • “Stone Soup Cafe & Market” at South Cooper St. • Women’s Exchange on Racine St. • The Ivory Closet in Overton Square

5312 Pleasant View Rd. | 901.385.8296 | performancepluscycles.com

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 63

MM_HolidayGiftGuide_Nov15.indd 63

10/21/15 1:02 PM


YOU’LL be IMPRESSED with our GRAND STAIRCASE, but you’ll FALL IN LOVE WITH our FRONT DOOR.

60 landscaped acres waiting to greet you. Fascinating residents waiting to meet you.

Superlative amenities waiting to pamper you. Plus, the comfort and security of LifeCare. It’s all a part of the Kirby Pines lifestyle. A superior value in a naturally beautiful community filled with over 30 years of rich history. If you’ve been thinking

ACT NOW BEFORE for a limited time, you can enjoy great incentives on your new residence— PRICES INCREASE IN JANUARY 2016 if you act fast. To learn more, call us today. What are you waiting for? about making the move to Kirby Pines, now’s the time. That’s because

3535 Kirby Road | Memphis, Tennessee 38115 | (901) 369-7340 | kirbypines.com

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/20/15 8:25 AM


*7 *7

GR E AT HOM ES

“MODERN” MEDICINE

DR. JONATH A N MCCULLERS’ HOME IN CENTR A L GA R DENS by anne cunningham o’neill photography by steve roberts

W

hen Dr. Jonathan McCullers first moved into his Central Gardens townhouse adjacent to historic Clanlo Hall, he knew that he would need

some interior design help. Fortunately, he turned to Ami Austin, the principal in a nationally acclaimed design firm based here above: Colorful martini glasses set off McCullers’ souvenir shot glass collection, shown behind in their artfully designed display case.

in town, to update this three-bedroom home to better reflect his tastes and lifestyle. He had seen Austin’s work in the pages of this magazine and very much liked her style.

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 65

065_MM11_2015_Feature_GreatHomes_MCCULLER.indd 65

10/20/15 3:33 PM


above: McCullers takes time out from his busy schedule to relax with Peppy in the home’s lush backyard.

While it might be hard to imagine, in view of the photographs shown here, Austin says basically all she had to start with were two red couches, a lava lamp, a collection of shot glasses (more about those later), and a behemoth television set. McCullers is recently single, and clearly his somewhat spartan man cave needed a bit of work. As it turned out, he was an enthusiastic client and partner in the project every step of the way, freely admitting it was the first time he was able to pick and choose exactly what he wanted for his home environment. His vision for the décor was a rich palette of grey, purple, and red with bold and colorful art on the walls that would fill the living/dining room’s vaulted space. He wanted the look to be clean, uncluttered, and modern — “nothing fancy” — not to mention industrial strength, in view of the fact that McCullers has two young sons, ages 7 and 9, who are Presbyterian Day School students and unrelentingly active. No structural work was required — just small enhancements such as replacing the beadboard on the sunroom walls with plaster. Austin suggested removing the traditional wooden mantle and instead using honed

66 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

065_MM11_2015_Feature_GreatHomes_MCCULLER.indd 66

10/20/15 3:33 PM


MCCULLERS’ VISION FOR THE DÉCOR WAS A RICH PALETTE OF GREY, PURPLE, AND RED WITH BOLD AND COLORFUL ART ON THE WALLS THAT WOULD FILL THE LIVING/DINING ROOM’S VAULTED SPACE.

065_MM11_2015_Feature_GreatHomes_MCCULLER.indd 67

10/20/15 3:33 PM


THE WESTIN MEMPHIS BEALE STREET & BLEU HAVE SOME EXCITING HOLIDAY NEWS! We are already celebrating the season with a sleigh full of incentives for holiday party planners. Holiday revelers are encouraged to book now to secure desired dates. For more information please call Lorraine Chatman at 901.334.5924 or email Lorraine.chatman@westinmemphis.com The Westin Memphis Beale Street • 170 Lt. George W. Lee Ave., Memphis, TN 38103 • www.westin.com/bealestreet

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/7/15 8:59 AM


black tile for the fireplace surround; the firescreen was painted a gunmetal color to complete the tailored look. The walls were painted a sophisticated Benjamin Moore color, Nimbus Gray, the perfect background for the artwork. Austin bought all the art for the homeowner, and in order to keep the budget within reason the paintings are high-quality giclée reproductions purchased from a gallery on the west coast of Florida. For the uninitiated, myself included, giclée prints are fine art digital prints that have all the tonalities and hues of the original paintings. The guitar painting in the entrance hall by Ron Olson, well-known Memphis radio host, however, is an original. Although he played the piano his whole life, McCullers tells me sadly there is no piano in the new decorative scheme, so he has taken up the electric guitar. The eye-catching art over the entertainment center is an assortment of large silver globes, which take the eye up, up, and away from the television set below. Now as promised, back to those shot glasses, which McCullers has collected as souvenirs from his trips all over the world. They are showcased in a display case designed by Austin, who in turn collaborated with Lou

Kerns of Kerns-Wilchek to produce a cabinet that McCullers considers “a beautiful piece of art” in itself. Having moved to Memphis in 1996, it is so gratifying to hear that McCullers is a huge booster of the city. He tells me simply, “I wouldn’t live anywhere else.” He is a native of Virginia, the son of an aerospace engineer, and attended the University of Virginia in Charlottesville for his undergraduate degree before graduating from the University of Alabama’s medical school. In the course of their working together, Austin and McCullers have become the best of friends, and she is downright determined that everyone should know how lucky the city is to count among its citizens such an eminent doctor. However, the truth is that McCullers is far from being a hidden talent. He came to Memphis to work in the lab at St. Jude Childen’s contin u ed on page 99

top right: The large, bold giclée print on the wall adds drama to the dining area with its uncluttered simplicity. bottom left: This area of the living room has a clean, symmetrical look with four colorful prints hung over the bench upholstered in a masculine, pony print pattern. bottom right: A flamelike metal firescreen in front of honed black tile creates a thoroughly modern fireplace.

THE WALLS WERE PAINTED A SOPHISTICATED BENJAMIN MOORE COLOR, NIMBUS GRAY, THE PERFECT BACKGROUND FOR THE ARTWORK. N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 69

065_MM11_2015_Feature_GreatHomes_MCCULLER.indd 69

10/20/15 3:33 PM


PERCENT

of West Cancer Center patients with new metastatic cancer have the opportunity to receive extensive molecular testing.

Relentlessly progressive cancer care and research since 1979. Visit WestCancerCenter.org.

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/7/15 8:57 AM


A

S P E C I A L

S U P P L E M E N T

T O

M E M P H I S

M A G A Z I N E

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY COLORS AGENCY

{40s}

HOLLY CHARNES

A

Having fun in her forties.

self-described “health weirdo,” 44-year-old Holly Charnes admits, “I definitely feel the difference between now and 10 years ago.” You might never know it to look at her — Charnes was the swimsuit model for this magazine’s fashion shoot last summer — but she knows she has to work harder than ever to maintain her appearance and health.

A former career as a trauma nurse at Regional One Health and her current roles as full-time mom and pharmaceutical sales representative keep her busy. The secret to a healthy lifestyle, she says, is to constantly monitor what you eat, and to remain active. Charnes studied kinesiology at Mississippi State University and graduated from nursing school at Mississippi University for Women. “I know from my nurse’s training that proper diet and exercise go hand in hand,” she says. “I check the labels of everything I eat and avoid food with lots of sugar, sodium, and carbohydrates. I’m really not into red meat, so several times a week I eat salmon or tuna — they’re much better for you, and they are both packed with omega-3 oils, which are very healthy for you.” Charnes has two children, and it’s not easy when they visit friends’ homes and find the kitchen cabinets stuffed with what she calls “kid food” — Twix, Oreos, candy. “But we don’t have them in our house. If they’re not readily available, it’s a whole lot easier to avoid them.” And no Cokes or sugary drinks, she says. “I drink only water, all day long. I keep it with me all the time; I’ve got a bottle right now in my car.” She also recommends small meals throughout the day: an apple, a cup of yogurt, a pack of string cheese. “When I do eat out, I try to find places like Panera, because they have healthy items on their menu, especially their soups.” To maintain her model’s figure, Charnes stays active every day and, for that matter, every hour. “No matter where I am or what I’m doing, I can’t just sit still,” she says. “I’ve gotten pretty creative with ways to exercise. If I’m at work, or even while I’m cooking at home, I’ll find a hallway or someplace to do stretches, leg lifts, whatever I can do.” “I’ve been a runner since junior high,” she says, “and I still find time to do it every day.” At the same time, she emphasizes the importance of “interval” training. “Don’t get on a treadmill and run for a half-hour,” she says. “Your body gets used to that. Break it up by running two miles, then stop and do push-ups, run some more, stop and do sit-ups. It really makes a difference.” Charnes cautions about running long distances on concrete sidewalks or hard asphalt, which can damage knee joints, especially, but she laments that her own neighborhood doesn’t have suitable running trails. She also recommends that runners buy new shoes on a regular basis; even though they may still look okay, the padding wears out after several months. Every night, she lifts weights to strengthen her muscles and also her bones. “I’m constantly exercising,” she says. “I know some friends think I’m a health weirdo, but I enjoy the results because I can feel the results.” Her clients with Colors modeling agency have apparently noticed her hard work. She participates in many photo shoots and trunk shows for Joseph, Macy’s, Oak Hall, and other retailers. “I really love modeling because I get to dress up in wonderful clothes and pretend I’m somebody else for the day,” she says. “It’s just so much fun, and I’m glad I’m still able to get jobs that normally go to girls 20 years younger than I am.” — Michael Finger N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 71

071_MM11_2015_901Health.indd 71

10/13/15 3:49 PM


KEVIN ADAMS Avoiding “inflation” in his fifties.

K

evin Adams came of age playing Texas football. In the realm of the sport, that’s about as competitive as you get outside of going pro. He wore the jerseys of Stratford High School in Houston when they won the state 4A championship in 1978, and that of Southern Methodist University where he was linebacker

and fullback, as SMU finished in the top five in the 1981 and 1982 polls. Today, Adams carries the ball for CBRE Memphis where he is chief executive officer. And time has marched on from those Lone Star days, time that has seen a marriage and kids, days spent putting together deals, and networking over dinner and drinks. “When I got out of college, I knew I needed to do something to stay in shape or inflate,” Adams says. “Soon after that, I got married and had four kids, so I inflated.” He still managed to get in some exercise over the years — running and strength training — and then four years ago, at 51 years old, he got into competitive team cycling. “It stripped all the weight off of me and took away a lot of stress and everything else. I went from about 250 lbs. to 185 lbs.” Adams rides with Team CDV and Victory Test Team, both affiliated with Victory Bicycle Studio on Broad Avenue. He rides “about 200 to 300 miles per week,” he says, adding, “To get to that level, it’s really hard to do it on your own. You’ve got to have a group of committed men and women that do that, and you really need a coach who is able to give you a lot of specific direction and workout plans.” Clark Butcher, owner of Victory and a personal trainer, is that coach for Adams. The racing has taken him to locales such as Atlanta, back to Texas, and to the Leadville 100, a popular mountain bike race in Colorado. While he may have embraced cycling for the health benefits, there’s no doubt that this power player in Memphis commercial real estate is quite competitive as well. As on the football fields of his youth, such competition pits man against man, but Adams has also been known to go up against Mother Nature. In 2011, he “paddled his 14-foot kayak 679 miles from Memphis to the outskirts of New Orleans, in a transformational trip that took 16 days,” wrote John Branston in the November issue of Memphis that year. While he hasn’t tamed the Mississippi since, he and his son tackled Class IV rapids in Idaho over the summer. Adams spends his days selling Memphis. The rides afford him what he calls “clean thinking time.” “You’re able to think more about, not issues, but strategies if you want to go down that road. And then it’s real easy just to get your mind completely off of it, so you can kind of space out.” But it also allows him the chance to see his city in a different way. Instead of speeding down the road in a car, talking on the phone or listening to the radio, or any number of myriad distractions, cycling slows him down to admire more of what the city has to offer. “You just don’t realize or appreciate it as much as you can [while riding],” he says. “I can leave my house in Midtown and go ride 50 or 75 miles and really not have a lot of trouble with traffic or anything doing that, that’s just different. The Greenline is a great connector to get from one area to another.” Adams says he might be in better shape at 55 than he was 30 years ago, and he owes it to cycling as well as other factors. “Along with exercise, you’ve got to eat right and you can’t drink too much, you just can’t do it. If you don’t have your health, you don’t have anything, and you realize that the older you get. You have to take care of yourself and keep rolling.” — Richard J. Alley

PHOTOGRAPH BY LARRY KUZNIEWSKI

{ 50s}

9 0 1 h e a lt h c o n t i n u e d o n p a g e 7 6 72 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

071_MM11_2015_901Health.indd 72

10/13/15 3:49 PM


Pre-Christmas Sale Unbelievable Prices Something for everyone's budget.

STORE HOURS

Tuesday - Saturday 10AM-5PM 9387 Poplar Avenue • Germantown, TN 38138 901.758.8605 • dorismclendon.com (Located next door to the Germantown Fresh Market)

McLendon’s Jewelry is indpendently owned & operated — not affiliated with any other jeweler. A+

Layaway for Christmas

DON’T BE BLEU - THERE IS STILL TIME TO PLAN YOUR HOLIDAY PARTY AT BLEU RESTAURANT & LOUNGE. Call now for the preferred time and day you want. Our private Wine Room will seat parties up to 40 guests and we can seat parties of 8 to 20 in our main dining room. Contact Lorraine Chatman at 901.334.5924 for more information for a private lunch or dinner event in the Wine Room or call 901.344.5950 for reservations in our main dining room.

221 S. Third Street, Memphis, TN 38104 • bleu@downtownbleu.com

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/20/15 8:26 AM


UNDERSTANDING

MINIMALLY INVASIVE GASTRIC BYPASS SURGERY Memphis and the Mid-South areas are the epicenter for the disease of obesity in the United States. Those who suffer from obesity are not alone – nearly 40% of adults in this region are obese, and over two-thirds of adults are overweight. Obesity is a complex, multifactorial, chronic, metabolic disease, not just an excess of adipose tissue or lack of willpower. Fat accumulates in the body to the extent that health is impaired. Unfortunately, conventional methods of weight loss often do not work for the obese patient. While dietary modification and exercise can be effective for people who are modestly overweight, they typically do not work on patients who are significantly overweight or obese. This is due to complex hormonal changes and other metabolic issues that occur in obesity which make it nearly impossible to maintain weight loss. The good news is that there IS a treatment for obesity that works not only for weight loss, but for treating the diseases associated with obesity Bariatric Surgery - Bariatric, or weight loss surgery, is for patients who are severely obese, which is defined by a BMI of 40 or more, or a BMI of 35 or more in combination with other health-related conditions, such as diabetes, hypertension, or sleep apnea. BMI, or Body Mass Index, is a calculation based on height and weight. The two most common procedures performed in the U.S. are laparoscopic gastric bypass and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. Both are performed minimally invasively through small incisions. Gastric bypass is considered the gold standard procedure to which all other procedures are compared to for both weight loss and complication rates. This is because gastric bypass provides the most successful means of weight loss, and “cures” the diseases associated with obesity far more effectively than any other bariatric procedure. There is an overwhelming amount of evidence that supports gastric bypass above any other procedure. The STAMPEDE (Surgical Therapy and Medications Potentially Eradicate Diabetes Efficiently) trial is perhaps the most followed and respected study comparing bariatric procedures with medical therapy.

“The three-year data confirms that bariatric surgery maintains its superiority over medical therapy for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in severely obese patients”, said the study’s lead investigator from the Cleveland Clinic Bariatric and Metabolic Institute. “When compared to sleeve gastrectomy and medical therapy, gastric bypass patients achieved greater weight loss, were on fewer medications, had a higher success rate controlling diabetes, and had an improved quality of life.” “I was recently asked by a colleague why I perform so many laparoscopic gastric bypasses,” said Dr. Wegner. “I simply answered, ‘Because it works.’’ The Saint Francis Center for Surgical Weight Loss is a multidisciplinary surgical weight loss center, which means there are fellowship-trained surgeons, nurses, nurse practitioner, patient advocates, medical assistants, and bariatric-specific dieticians within the offices. The Center is fully accredited by the Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program as a Comprehensive Center with Adolescent Qualifications. The two surgeons, Dr. Robert Wegner and Dr. Virginia Weaver, perform a variety of procedures, including laparoscopic gastric bypass, laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, and converting gastric bands to bypasses, among others. They work closely with patients in determining which procedure would be best for each person. Laparoscopic gastric bypass is still the gold standard to which all other procedures are compared. That said, it’s also one of the most technically complex procedures and should only be done by a surgeon specifically trained to do it.

Dr. Wegner

Dr. Weaver

There is a local perception that gastric bypass is ‘risky’ and ‘unsafe,’ which could not be further from the truth. I am not saying it is without risk – every surgery has some risk involved. What I am saying is that gastric bypass is extremely safe and effective. On multiple levels gastric bypass is the most powerful weight-loss operation available and should be part of a bariatric surgeon’s skill set.” “Bariatric surgery is not done simply for weight loss or cosmetic reasons – it truly is potentially life-saving surgery to treat the disease of obesity,” says Dr. Weaver. “Obesity causes at least as many deaths as smoking. The diseases associated with obesity, such as diabetes and high cholesterol, can also be dangerous. The resultant improvement or eradication of these diseases after bariatric surgery are staggering – for example, diabetes is put into remission over 90% of the time after gastric bypass. Personal responsibility and lifestyle change are essential to lose weight and maintain it; the problem is that those things alone usually do not work once someone is already obese. But bariatric surgery in conjunction with lifestyle modifications do work – for losing weight and maintaining it for life.” If you are interested in learning more about weight loss surgery, please visit our website, MemphisWeightLossSurgery. com. There you can watch an online seminar discussing obesity and the surgical treatment options. You can register for a live seminar if you prefer, done by Dr. Wegner or Dr. Weaver. Call 901-765-1849 to sign up for a free seminar.

Saint Francis Center for Surgical Weight Loss | The O’Ryan Building 6005 Park Avenue, Suite 1010B Phone: (901) 881-0600 | memphisweightlosssurgery.com

MM_DoublePageSpread_18x25_11x125.indd 2

10/15/15 7:55 AM


MM_DoublePageSpread_18x25_11x125.indd 3

10/15/15 7:56 AM


PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDREA ZUCKER

{60s}

JANICE HOLDER

F

Staying focused in her sixties.

ormer Tennessee Chief Justice Janice Holder, a fourth-degree black belt in American combative martial arts, has always used the precepts of her martial arts practice to help her pursue her goals. “Focus, concentration, and proper breathing,” she says. “Those are the three things we learn the first day of martial arts class.” The retired judge maintains that anything is possible with a combination of physical and mental discipline, traits she has gleaned from 26 years of martial arts training. Despite her career successes, Judge Holder didn’t always know she wanted to go into law. The Pennsylvania native originally thought she might be a flight attendant or a paralegal. “I applied to one law school,” she says. “I decided I would go on more of a lark than anything.” Even when she began work as a lawyer, she was unsure whether she belonged in the field. But after clerking for a federal judge, her mind changed. “I decided that’s the job I wanted.” When Holder ran for office in 1990, after a year of martial arts training and a decade practicing civil and family law in Shelby County, she was encouraged and inspired by a story that her teacher, Patrick Wrenn, had told her about a time when he had neglected to complete a part of a martial arts routine. “What he did in the routine was good. But with what he left out it would have been better,” she remembers. “It just hit me. I thought: What’s going to happen 10 years down the road if I don’t run for office?” Holder went on to win her first election to become a Circuit Court Judge in Shelby County. Six years later, she joined the Tennessee

Supreme Court, eventually becoming the first female Chief Justice ever to serve in Tennessee. Today, the 66-year-old (who retired in September of 2014, after 18 years of service) is as active as ever. She works out every day and takes classes several times a week. “People say, ‘Haven’t you taken enough lessons?’” she says. “The answer is no. I haven’t taken enough lessons.” The American Combative System is a form designed and taught by Wrenn, a Memphian and a tenth-degree black belt. The system is designed to emphasize self defense and self reliance. Holder, who has studied with Wrenn since the beginning, now helps teach junior martial arts classes. “The things that you build your martial arts around, you can build your life around as well,” she says. The former Justice is also encouraging those who are newly curious about martial arts, or how to maintain their health in general. Though she has maintained a consistent schedule of fitness over the years, she believes it is never too late to start. She also believes that people should have fun with their exercise. “I love it when I see people out riding bicycles or walking,” she says. “It is never too late to become excellent at something you enjoy. If it is something you enjoy, you’ll do it. If it is not something you enjoy, you won’t do it. So pick something you enjoy and follow through.” “I think martial arts is the way to go,” she says with a laugh. “It’s not only a way to improve physical health but a way to improve mental health.” — Eileen Townsend 9 0 1 h e a lt h c o n t i n u e d o n p a g e 7 8

76 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

071_MM11_2015_901Health.indd 76

10/13/15 3:51 PM


Still the one. The only accredited* outpatient Pain Clinic in the Mid-South.

Period. Memphis Magazine’s

Mays & Schnapp

FACE

55 Humphreys Center Drive Suite 200 • Memphis, TN 901-747-0040

PAIN CLINIC AND REHABILITATION CENTER

THE 2015 OF

PAIN

*Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities

Moacir Schnapp, MD & Kit S. Mays, MD • maysandschnapp.com

MANAGEMENT

Dr. Ana Lucía Flores Promoting Healthy Vision Since 2003

www.MemphisEyeClinic.com

Specializing in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Disorders and Diseases of the Eye 6029 Walnut Grove Road Medical Plaza 3, Suite 101 Memphis, TN 38120

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

Ophthalmology & Retina Practice

901-747-3900 Conveniently located at Baptist East Hospital

10/13/15 4:00 PM


901 HE A LTH

PHOTOGRAPH BY FRANK MURTAUGH

{ 70s}

health care for women 901.682.0630 • 800.756.0630 • www.ruchclinic.com • Follow us on Facebook A division of Women’s Care Center, MPLLC

Our patients are very special to us. We are committed to offering the most advanced and compassionate gynecologic and obstetric care. We also offer: • MonaLisa Touch procedure • mammography • fertility management • menopause management • aesthetic services • bone densitometry assessment

NEAL CORDELL Living life to the fullest in his seventies.

A

This time of year is a time of Thanksgiving. We at Reed Family Dentistry are thankful for you, our wonderful patients. Whether things are falling into place or if it is time to turn over a new leaf, Reed Family Dentistry is here for you. We have been building relationships with individuals and families for over 60 years. We would like to take this time to thank you for trusting us to help with your oral health. 8020 Highway 51 North in Millington • 901-872-3391 or 1003 S. College St. in Covington 901-475-0805 • www.reedfamilydentistry.com

s the personal trainer and bodyguard for ZZ Top during their Eighties heyday, Neal Cordell incorporated some of the tackling skills he developed as an All-Memphis defensive lineman at South Side High School. After 186 concerts with the “little ole band from Texas,” Cordell has a Pavlovian reaction when certain classic rock songs burst from his radio speakers. Says Cordell, “They told me I inspired one of their songs: ‘Stages’ from Afterburner.” Cordell turned 72 in October and lives the life you might expect of a former ballplayer (outfielder at Memphis State), coach (football at Ridgeway High School, softball at Rhodes College), and health club owner (Cordell opened The Peabody’s facility in the early Eighties, where he met ZZ Top’s Billy Gibbons). Once a 220-pound football player (in high school), Cordell now checks in at 156 pounds

78 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

071_MM11_2015_901Health.indd 78

10/19/15 1:39 PM


901 HE A LTH

No Pain is Your Gain and Our Goal and says he wears the same size pants he did 50 years ago. The secret, it seems, is making fitness a habit. “I wanted to be a coach all my life,” says Cordell. “Our football coach [at South Side], Malcolm Phillips, advocated not drinking and not smoking. To this day, I’ve not touched alcohol or any tobacco products. When I got to college, I started working with weights and running, and doing it every day. When I got out of college and started coaching, I did the same thing. I’ll take a few rest days now, but I wouldn’t miss a day. I’d go three or four months in a row, at least an hour a day. I’ve got a few aches and pains, but I don’t stop.” Cordell’s regimen today has the same twin foundations of weights and cardio training. His preference is dumbbells (safer than barbells, as you don’t require a spotter) and running outside, as opposed to using treadmills or elliptical machines. “I always do my weights first,” says Cordell. “Weights help you run faster and longer, because the muscles support the bones. But a lot of runners don’t lift weights at all.” Cordell alternates his weight-lifting to focus on different muscle groups evenly: chest, back, and legs one day, then shoulders and arms the next. Cordell has completed a marathon (“One was enough,” he says with a smile), but generally runs close to an hour a day, roughly three miles. He feels there’s as much value in the time you spend running as the distance, the two variables increasing or decreasing based on the pace a runner prefers. As for diet, Cordell’s is centered on salads and chicken, and he pays relentless attention to portion sizes. “We eat right 90 percent of the time,” he says, “and 10 percent of the time it doesn’t make a bit of difference.” Cordell allows himself three strawberry milkshakes a year. He confesses an allergy to chocolate has helped in this area. “If there’s a blueberry pie,” he says, “I’ll eat a small piece and that satisfies me.” Cordell taught health and wellness at Southwest Tennessee Community College for 17 years and today is a personal trainer to five clients (most of them in their 40s). That habit of living healthy is quite permanent. “I don’t know if you can lengthen life [with attention to fitness],” says Cordell, “but quality of life can be so good. People ask me why I keep working out, and I tell them I want to look good in the casket. Try to live every day to the fullest. When I get up, I can go hiking, go running, and do whatever I need to do. Live for the day.” — Frank Murtaugh

Our experienced physicians are committed to providing exceptional patient care in Orthopedic Surgery, Sports Medicine, MAKOplasty & Physical Therapy. James T. Galyon, M.D. W. Lee Moffatt, M.D. Peter B. Lindy, M.D.

East Memphis Location Loewenberg Building 6005 Park Ave., St. 309

901.682.5642

Call to schedule your appointment today.

Bartlett Location

Medical Arts Pavillian 2996 Kate Bond Rd., St. 301

901.791.0347

www.eastmemphisortho.com YES! We can do something about hearing loss. A Cochlear Implant or Bone Anchored Hearing Aid might be the answer for you or a loved one in your care.

Memphis Magazine’s

THE 2015

FACE OF NEUROTOLOGY

For more information please visit:

http://sheaclinic.com/ear-doctorbrian-mckinnon.html For an appointment, please call:

901.761.9720 The Shea Ear Clinic 6133 Poplar Pike Memphis, TN 38119 N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 79

071_MM11_2015_901Health.indd 79

10/13/15 3:53 PM


901 HE A LTH

CENTRE OF MEMPHIS

POOR AIRWAYS CONTRIBUTE TO: TMJ disorder

crooked teeth

mouth breathing

poor posture

daytime fatigue

snoring

headaches

total body wellness

Our team at the

Better health through better eating.

T

Green Bean Casserole

his is a healthy, delicious take on a Thanksgiving staple. We promise you won’t be plagued with unwanted leftovers. Total Time: 60 minutes | Makes: 8 servings | Serving Size: 1/7th of casserole

TMJ & SLEEP THERAPY CENTRE OF MEMPHIS

takes a whole body approach to treatment and healing for the following:

COOKING FOR LIFE PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY CHURCH HEALTH CENTER

TMJ & SLEEP THERAPY

INGREDIENTS:

chronic mouth-breather profile

• Conservative care for TMJ Disorder and headaches • Total Wellness with Young Living Essential oils & supplements • Myofunctional Therapy (Correct tongue posture, chewing and swallowing ) • Better Sleep without a C-PAP! • We address airway problems and sleep apnea in children, teens and adults.

TMJ & SLEEP THERAPY CENTRE OF MEMPHIS

901-380-0734 8950 US HIGHWAY 64 | SUITE 104 | LAKELAND, TN 38002

Cooking spray 5 cups fresh sliced green beans, rinsed 4½ cups low-sodium chicken broth 1 cup Panko bread crumbs 1 cup grated Parmesan 1 tablespoon, plus 2 teaspoons canola oil 1½ cups diced onions 2 cups sliced baby bella mushrooms 2 tablespoons corn starch ½ cup reduced-fat sour cream ¼ teaspoon garlic powder ¼ teaspoon black pepper DIRECTIONS:

1. Pre-heat the oven to 350 degrees. 2. Boil green beans in chicken broth for about 20 minutes, and then drain, reserving about 1½ cups of the broth.

3. In a small bowl, mix together Panko breadcrumbs, Parmesan, and two teaspoons canola oil. Set aside.

4. In a large skillet over medium heat, heat 1 tablespoon of oil, then sauté the onions until softened (2-3 minutes). Add mushrooms to skillet and continue to cook for 3-4 minutes longer. Remove from heat. Add green beans to skillet. 5. Pour the reserved 1 ½ cups of chicken broth back into the pot the green beans boiled in and bring to boil. 6. As that is brought to a boil, whisk together the corn starch and ¼ cup of water into a small bowl. Slowly pour the mixture into the boiling chicken broth, whisking constantly as it thickens (~2 minutes). 7. Pour the thickened mixture into the skillet with the green beans and add sour cream. Mix in remaining seasoning and stir well.

contin u ed on page 82 80 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

071_MM11_2015_901Health.indd 80

10/21/15 2:19 PM


Regional One Health is creating a new concept for care at our new location in east Memphis, where 385 crosses Kirby Parkway. This modern and convenient health care campus will not only provide primary care, but specialty care, too. New services include internal medicine, cardiology, endocrinology, rheumatology, reproductive medicine, urogynecology, an outpatient rehabilitative medicine center, imaging center, and a pharmacy. It’s not just our job to create new, convenient services that help you live a healthier life; it’s what we love to do.

WE’RE PROUD TO ANNOUNCE

a new campus IN EAST MEMPHIS.

Learn more at RegionalOneHealth.org/East

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1 Pub: Memphis Magazine

Your life. Our passion. Regional One Health 10/19/15

2:21 PM


901 HE A LTH

8. Coat baking pan with cooking spray and pour mixture into pan. Sprinkle Panko and Parmesan mixture on top and bake for about 10 minutes or until mixture is hot, then broil until topping is slightly browned (1-2 minutes).

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY CHURCH HEALTH CENTER

Nutrition Facts (per serving): Calories: 203; Total Fat: 9.5 grams; Saturated Fat: 3.9 grams; Sodium: 412 mg; Carbohydrates: 19 grams; Fiber: 3.1 grams; Protein: 11 grams

WE’LL MAKE YOUR GOLDEN YEARS SHINE Grand Living in Midtown Memphis

Everything Smashed Potatoes

Ret ire me n t Living w it h In d ep en d e nc e & C hoic e

T

his staple side dish has been given a healthy makeover. Give it a whirl in place of traditionally fatladen mashed potatoes. Total Time: 30 minutes | Makes: 8 servings | Serving Size: about 3/4 cup

INGREDIENTS:

1550 North Parkway | Memphis, TN 38112 | 901.726.4881 | theglenmary.com

1 ½ pounds red potatoes, washed 3 cloves garlic, peeled 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 onion, washed, peeled, and sliced thinly 8 ounces low-fat cream cheese, softened 1 tablespoon poppy seeds 1 tablespoon sesame seeds ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper 2 pinches salt ¾ cup hot stock (chicken, vegetable, or beef) DIRECTIONS:

Fayette County Fixer-Upper.

Worth $1.2 million, buy for only $674,000, with 12 ac.s and Metal Barn, room for 12 stalls, nice Paddock area, Lighted, & concrete floor. House is main floor, 6,500 sf, with finished out basement, 5,500 sf, TOTALS: 12,000 SF FOR ONLY $674,000! Has brand new tab — architectural roof.

BEACH INVESTMENT

• www.beach-investment.com • 901.324.3700

1. Place the potatoes and garlic in a large stock pot and fill the pot with water to cover the vegetables. Place the pot on the stove burner and bring the water to a boil. Boil the potatoes and garlic until tender, about 15 minutes. Drain and return potatoes and garlic to the pot. 2. In a medium sauté pan, heat the oil over medium heat and add the onions. Allow the onions to cook slowly, stirring every so often, until they are golden and soft. 3. Add the softened cream cheese and onions and mash with the back of a spoon or potato masher. Add the poppy seeds, sesame seeds, salt, and pepper and mash more to incorporate. Add the stock, a little at a time, until the desired texture is reached. Serve hot. Nutrition Facts (per serving): Calories: 138; Total Fat: 5.1 grams; Saturated Fat: 0.9 grams; Sodium: 271 mg; Carbohydrates: 17.5 grams; Fiber: 2 grams; Protein: 6.3 grams

Recipes provided by Church Health Center.

82 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

071_MM11_2015_901Health.indd 82

10/16/15 8:34 AM


Methodist Healthcare

Mayo Clinic

Now working together for you. Methodist Healthcare is working with Mayo Clinic by joining the Mayo Clinic Care Network. This means you’re able to stay close to home with your trusted physician, while gaining additional expertise from Mayo Clinic specialists. This collaborative care comes at no added cost to you. And it’s one more way Methodist Healthcare is improving the health of people in the Mid South. To learn more, visit MethodistHealth.org/Mayo.

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/15/15 8:04 AM


901 HE A LTH

9293 Poplar Avenue Germantown, TN

(901) 757-4114

info@germantownplantation.com

Month-To-Month Rents!

   

Large, Upscale Apartments with Balconies Fine Dining with Chef Prepared Meals Dedicated Chapel Movie Theatre and Indoor Pool

   

Transportation to Doctors & Shopping 24-hour Licensed Nurses & Full-time RN Emergency Call Pendants Locally Owned and Operated

“a beau�ful community with a caring staff offering both independent and assisted living op�ons. . .” www.germantownplantation.com

HEALTHY HAPPENINGS compiled by shara clark

B

eing proactive with your health is a beneficial step in preventing a variety of major health issues. And staying active through the years allows us to age gracefully and be faced with fewer health risks. In the Mid-South, sports, races, educational classes, and more are happening throughout the year to help keep us fit and healthy.

Upcoming Events

In business over 50 years, but feeling 21. Maybe it’s the Botox.

For over 50 years, we’ve provided comprehensive care for women through a variety of gynecological treatments — like our Mona Lisa Touch™ procedure — along with wellness exams and health screenings — plus aesthetic treatments, like Botox.

To schedule an appointment, call (901) 767-3810.

9th annual True Blue 5k November 1st, 2 p.m. University of Memphis campus trueblue5k.racesonline.com The Mid-South DD 5k November 7th, 7 a.m. Rhodes College racesonline.com/events/themidsouthdd5k Race for Grace 5k & 1-Mile Walk/Run November 7th, 9 a.m. Shady Grove Presbyterian Church 5530 Shady Grove Road raceforgrace.racesonline.com Ride to Randolph November 7th, 9 a.m. Shelby Forest Baptist Church 1207 Locke Cuba Road, Millington, 38053 msrivertn.org Run the Farm Memphis 10k & 5k November 8th, 2 p.m. Agricenter Farmer’s Market 7777 Walnut Grove Road racesonline.com/events/runthefarmmemphis 15th Annual Race for Education 5k November 14th, 9 a.m. Agricenter International raceforeducation.racesonline.com

A division of Women’s Care Center of Memphis, MPLLC

www.adamspatterson.com

Sugar Run 5k November 14th, 10 a.m. W.C. Johnson Park 419 Johnson Park Drive Collierville, 38017 racesonline.com/events/sugar-run-5k

84 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

071_MM11_2015_901Health.indd 84

10/17/15 2:38 PM


Thousands of Gowns Sizes 2-32 | Special Plus Size Boutique Area | Personal Consultant for Each Bride

S E M I - A N NUA L 1 / 2 P R I C E S A L E DAT E S

December 26th - January 30th and July 7th - July 30th BRINKLEY, ARKANSAS

Appointment required. Please call 870.734.3244 and visit lowsbridal.com

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/13/15 4:00 PM


Who Has Venous Insufficiency?

HOW DO I KNOW IF I HAVE A VEIN PROBLEM IN MY LEGS? IS IT ONLY IF I HAVE BIG VARICOSE VEINS? Most vein problems are related to a medical condition called venous insufficiency. Very few people who suffer from venous insufficiency actually have the knobby, twisty-varicose veins on the surface of their legs that tend to be a cause of personal dissatisfaction with their appearance. Most people with venous insufficiency don't develop varicose veins. Instead, most people have legs that get tired especially after a long day, or their legs become swollen, achy, painful, or develop a bronze color at the ankles and calves. Night time leg cramps, charley horses, and restless legs that keep them awake at night are very frequent complaints. Many people think their night cramps are due to low potassium or dehydration when in reality this is commonly due to venous insufficiency.

WHY DO MY SPIDER VEINS KEEP COMING BACK AFTER SCLEROTHERAPY AND SURFACE LASER TREATMENT? IS THIS NORMAL? A very common sign of venous insufficiency is spider veins, especially ones that come back after sclerotherapy (treatment of spider veins). With venous insufficiency, the internal veins that you can’t see get stretched out and cause spider veins. Without treating the underlying internal veins the spider veins will continue to reappear. Once you get the venous insufficiency treated, the spider vein treatments will be much more effective and long-lasting.

Answer: ALL OF THEM HOW WOULD I KNOW IF I HAVE VENOUS INSUFFICIENCY? IS IT TREATABLE?

The good news is that venous insufficiency is diagnosed by a detailed ultrasound and physician visit. Best of all, it is frequently covered by insurance. It is treated with laser therapy called EndoVenous Laser Therapy (EVLT). During EVLT a small needle is placed in the diseased vein and a laser that produces heat closes the vein and forces blood to be re-directed into the healthier veins in the legs. Local topical anesthesia is used and our practice offers relaxing IV sedation; be sure to ask in advance if this is an offered service at the location you are considering for treatment. The procedure takes just a few minutes and the patient is up and walking immediately after treatment. The results are immediate and the relief it brings is remarkable for many people.

I SEE A LOT OF ADVERTISING IN MEMPHIS AND WEBSITES ABOUT VEIN TREATMENT… HOW DO I CHOOSE WHOM I SHOULD GO TO? There certainly seem to be many choices and it can be very difficult to tell one website from the next or one ad from another. Several things may help you with your choice. First, make sure to ask if the physician will be performing the entire procedure himself (in some offices a nurse, or even someone without any credentials, rather than a doctor does a significant portion, if not the entire procedure.) Second, make sure you go to a physician with specialized vascular training. Many physicians performing vein procedures have little to no formal training about veins, and yet claim to be “vein experts.” Find out: Are they board

certified specifically in vascular procedures? Where did they perform their vein training? Ideally, you should go to a physician who has vast expertise not only in veins but also in arteries as sometimes circulation issues are causing the leg symptoms and need to be addressed first. An interventional cardiologist who has specific expertise in vein and leg artery procedures is an excellent choice. Unfortunately, all too frequently, I see patients who have had previous procedures with a self-proclaimed vein expert with little training because they liked their ad or website. Proper vein care then becomes much more complex after having undergone such previous procedures. In the proper hands, vein treatment can be a very simple procedure but it still is a surgical procedure, that requires true expertise to diagnose and treat properly.

I WANT TO HAVE MY LEGS TREATED BUT I AM REALLY NERVOUS ABOUT THE PROCEDURE BEING PAINFUL. It is completely normal to be anxious about even minor procedures. Try to choose a physician who offers vein procedures with light IV sedation; it will make a world of difference to your experience. I hear all the time from patients who are surprised when we are finished at how easy it was, and they mention their friend or relative who had such a different experience at an office that did not offer IV sedation.

DR. MICHAEL A. NELSON

Board Certified in General Cardiology, Nuclear Cardiology, interventional Cardiology, Vascular Medicine and Endovascular Disease. Dr. Nelson performed his training at Yale, Emory and Harvard Schools of Medicine. Varicose vein evaluation & treatment covered by most insurance plans. Spider Vein treatments also available.

TOP 5 CARDIOLOGY PRACTICE

7751 Wolf River Blvd • Germantown, TN • 901.297.4000 • proactivehv.com MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/20/15 4:21 PM


901 HE A LTH

G E T YO U R N O R M A L BAC K 12th annual Meowathon 5k Run/Walk November 21st, 9 a.m. Overton Park houseofmews.com/meowathon

Above: LISA JAmeS, Semmes Murphey patient, free of spinal bone spurs and potential paralysis, artist who’s back to the drawing board

Chilly Chili 5k & Family 1-mile Fun Run November 21st, 9 a.m. Concord Academy at Mullins Methodist Church 4942 Walnut Grove Road runsignup.com/Race/Events/TN/Memphis/ChillyChili5K Harding Academy Happy in Memphis 5k November 21st, 9 a.m. Harding Academy 1100 Cherry Road happyinmemphis.racesonline.com Turkey Trot 4-Miler & Turkey Leg Relay November 26th, 9 a.m. Memphis Botanic Garden 750 Cherry Road memphisturkeytrot.racesonline.com Memphis Recovery Centers Recovery Run 5k November 28th, 9 a.m. Overton Park memphisrecovery5k.racesonline.com

semmes-murphey.com See her story at

6325 Humphreys Boulevard | Memphis, TN 38120 | (901) 522-7700 | Appts: (901) 522-7722 Additional Outclinics: Memphis, TN | Union City, TN | Jackson, TN | Desoto, MS | Grenada, MS | Tupelo, MS | Batesville, MS

Proclaim the Joy of the Season and make a difference with every gift.

Ongoing Sports & Fitness Events

“NOEL”, a woodcut print by celebrated artist TED FAIERS.

Cycling Memphis Hightailers Bicycle Club offers weekly bicycle rides and social events for all ages and skill levels. Many rides do not require membership. Fee: $25 per year for individuals and $40 per year for households. memphishightailers.com Mid-South Trails Association offers a calendar of racing and mountain-biking events, and detailed maps of Memphis-area trails. Members receive discounts at many area bicycle shops and work to promote off-road cycling. Fee: $30 per year for individuals and $45 per year for families. Family memberships include individual, spouse, and children 17 and under. midsouthtrails.com

SUGGESTED DONATION OF $10 per card

Mem.Christmas.Ad.10.13.15.indd 1

071_MM11_2015_901Health.indd 87

/Semmes.Murphey

To Order Call (901) 272-7170

2015 CHURCH HEALTH CENTER CHRISTMAS CARD

churchhealthcenter.org N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S 10/13/2015 M A G A Z I N11:03:02 E . C O MAM • 87

10/19/15 12:04 PM


901 HE A LTH

Soccer Greater Memphis Soccer Association offers men’s, women’s, and coed leagues for fall, spring, summer, and indoor for ages 16 and up. Fee: $128-$133 per season for individuals. memphissoccer.com Tennis Memphis Tennis Association offers year-round leagues for men and women age 18 and up. Runs the local USTA Tennis Leagues. memphista.com Track Memphis Runners Track Club offers a racing schedule of events, retail discounts for running merchandise, training, and weekly workouts. Fee: $25 per year, $45 for two years for individuals; $30 per year, $55 for two years for households. memphisrunners.com

Ongoing Wellness Events

Custom Compounding for People and Pets 785 Brookhaven Circle E • Office 901-682-2273 • Fax 901-682-4146 PeoplesCustomRx.com

THE PERFECT HOLIDAY GIFT JUST GOT BETTER. GIVE A ONE-YEAR SUBSCRIPTION TO MEMPHIS MAGAZINE!

For just $15 your gift recipient will receive 12 issues of the South’s best city magazine, PLUS a package of delicious Shotwell Candy Co. Salted Caramels. PLACE YOUR ORDER ONLINE AT MEMPHISMAGAZINE.COM OR CALL 901.521.9000. Orders must be received by Friday, December 18th to guarantee delivery by December 24th. USE CODE: HOLADV15

JUST $15! more than 80% off the newsstand cover price!

The Church Health Center offers free health education 5:30-7:30 p.m. each Monday at 1115 Union. Health Education will teach you how to manage hypertension, cholesterol, or obesity. It’s free and open to the community. Registration is not required. Can’t make it on Monday? They also offer a special session 9-11 a.m. the second Saturday of the month. Registration is required for the Saturday class. Call 901-259-4673 to sign up. The Church Health Center offers free Commit to Quit smoking cessation groups each month. Four-week group sessions start the first Tuesday of every month 6-7:15 p.m. at Church Health Center Wellness. Free healthy cooking classes are offered in the Nutrition Kitchen at Church Health Center Wellness, Tuesdays at 9 a.m. Recipes are inspired by fresh, seasonal produce. For more information, call 901-2594673 or visit ChurchHealthCenter.org. The Kroc Center offers monthly nutrition seminars at 800 East Parkway South. Hosted by registered dietitian Brooke Hall, seminars are open to the public and admission is $2. For more information, call 901-729-8032. For more Healthy Happenings, go to memphismagazine.com.

88 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

071_MM11_2015_901Health.indd 88

10/21/15 1:30 PM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

2015 Memphis

Five Star Wealth Managers A Select

Award

Finding a wealth manager who suits your needs can be a daunting task. In fact, many consumers have a hard time figuring out where to even begin.

Sometimes, a few simple questions can set one off on the right path. Asking a wealth manager what makes working with him or her a unique experience can help you understand how they work and if their style meshes with your own. Further, asking a financial advisor to talk about any specialties they might have can help uncover skills you might find useful. Ultimately, how do you find an experienced wealth manager who you feel comfortable working with? One who has high retention rates? One who has undergone a thorough complaint and regulatory review? One who has tenure in the industry? Memphis magazine and Five Star Professional partnered to find wealth managers who satisfy 10 objective eligibility and evaluation criteria. Among many distinguishing attributes, the average one-year client retention rate for this year’s award winners is more than 96 percent. Although this list is a useful tool for anyone looking for help in managing their financial world or implementing aspects of their financial strategies, it should not be considered exhaustive. Undoubtedly, there are many excellent wealth managers who, for one reason or another, are not on this year’s list. In order to consider a broad population of high-quality wealth managers, award candidates are identified by one of three sources: firm nomination, peer nomination or pre-qualification based on industry standing. Self-nominations are not accepted. Memphis award candidates were identified using internal and external research data.

Determination

of Award Winners

Award candidates who satisfied 10 objective eligibility and evaluation criteria were named 2015 Five Star Wealth Managers.

Eligibility Criteria – Required

Evaluation Criteria – Considered

1. Credentialed as an investment advisory representative or a registered investment advisor.

6. One-year client retention rate.

2. Actively employed as a credentialed professional in the financial services industry for a minimum of five years.

8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered.

7. Five-year client retention rate.

3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review.

9. Number of client households served.

4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal firm standards.

10. Education and professional designations.

5. Accepting new clients.

Research

Disclosures

• Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. • The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. • Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their clients’ assets.

• The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or Memphis magazine. • Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. • Five Star Professional is not an advisory firm, and the content of this article should not be considered financial advice. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to www.fivestarprofessional.com. • 690 award candidates in the Memphis area were considered for the Five Star Wealth Manager award. 143 (approximately 21 percent of the award candidates) were named 2015 Five Star Wealth Managers.

Regulatory Review As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not: • Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine. • Had more than a total of three customer complaints filed against them (settled or pending) with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. • Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint filed with a regulatory authority. • Filed for personal bankruptcy. • Been convicted of a felony.

Five Star Professional conducts a regulatory review of each nominated wealth manager using the Investment Adviser Public Disclosure (IAPD) website. Five Star Professional also uses multiple supporting processes to help ensure that a favorable regulatory and complaint history exists. Data submitted through these processes was applied per the above criteria: • Each wealth manager who passes the Five Star Professional regulatory review must attest that they meet the definition of favorable regulatory history, based upon the criteria listed above. • Five Star Professional promotes via local advertising the opportunity for consumers to confidentially submit complaints regarding a wealth manager. • Five Star Professional contacted approximately 1 in 12 households identified as having a high propensity to use the services of wealth managers in order to provide consumers the opportunity to submit complaints regarding a wealth manager.

For more information on the program, go to www.fivestarprofessional.com/wm_program.

www.fivestarprofessional.com — FS

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

•1

10/7/15 9:02 AM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Five Star Wealth Manager

McAdams Tax Advisory Group

TWO-YEAR WINNER Left to right: Standing: Peggy Mitchell; Rhonda Presley; Melissa Jarred; Tearesa Claiborne; Megan Hodges; Lenita Virdure; Lisa Stage; Gretchen Troyan Seated: Richard Burt; two-year winner David McAdams; Gary Osing

FS • 2 — www.fivestarprofessional.com The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Active as a credentialed professional in the financial services industry for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not: A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three customer complaints filed against them [settled or pending] with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one client’s experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint filed with a regulatory authority; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy; E. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their client’s assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 690 Memphis wealth managers were considered for the award; 143 (21 percent of candidates) were named 2015 Five Star Wealth Managers.

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/7/15 9:03 AM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Five Star Wealth Manager

TWO-YEAR WINNER Richard Burt Vice President

David McAdams President

Gary Osing Vice President

McAdams Tax Advisory Group, LLC is an independent advisory group specializing in issues concerning retirees. McAdams has an A+ rating with the Better Business Bureau and is a member of the Greater Memphis Chambers. McAdams has been recognized over the years for its outstanding service in the community and was also recognized as one of Forbes Magazine’s 2013 and 2014 Tennessee Financial Leaders. McAdams Tax Advisory Group is a firm focused on people, family and community. Our primary goal is providing solid financial guidance to our clients using a broad platform of diverse offerings, often based outside of the stock market. “I believe there’s really nothing we can’t do, by ourselves or by working with other advisors, to help our clients,” says Mr. McAdams. McAdams Tax Advisory Group offers clients a wealth of services and professionals under one roof: • Retirement and investment planning • Estate planning • Life insurance and long-term care planning • Income planning • Social Security planning McAdams Tax Advisory Group has differentiated itself from the competition in numerous ways. Our staff includes financial advisors who have Series 7, Series 6, Series 63 and Series 65 securities licenses and insurance licenses. By specializing in various strategies based on offerings outside of the stock market, as well as sharing a philosophy of not being married to any specific investment or strategy, we’ve been able to work with our clients to help create a road map of their future and give them a great deal of individual attention so they can focus on enjoying their lives.

98 Timber Creek Drive | Cordova, TN 38018 Phone: 901-737-3883 | Fax: 901-755-0420 www.mcadamstaxadvisory.com Securities offered through WFG Investments, Inc., Member of FINRA and SIPC. Investment advisory services offered through WFG Advisors, LP. Tax services offered through McAdams Tax Advisory Group, LLC. WFG Investments, Inc. does not provide tax advice.

We Believe the Best Client Is a Knowledgeable Client www.fivestarprofessional.com — FS

•3

The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Active as a credentialed professional in the financial services industry for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not: A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three customer complaints filed against them [settled or pending] with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one client’s experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint filed with a regulatory authority; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy; E. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their client’s assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 690 Memphis wealth managers were considered for the award; 143 (21 percent of candidates) were named 2015 Five Star Wealth Managers.

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/7/15 9:03 AM


Five Star Wealth Manager

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Guidingpoint Financial Group

Areas of Focus: Financial Solutions for: Baby Boomers, Gen X, Gen Y and Retirees Left to right: Standing: 2013 – 2015 winner Susan Babina, CFP®; 2012 – 2015 winner Darrell Douglas, CFP®; 2012 – 2015 winner Madeline Simonetti, CFP®; 2012 – 2015 winner Jimmy Shamoun; 2012 – 2015 winner Katie Cole, CFP®; 2012 – 2015 winner Michael Turner, CFP® Seated: 2012 – 2015 winner Julie Terry, CFP®; 2013 – 2015 winner Brian Douglas, CFP®, CRPC®, ADPA® (Not pictured: 2012 – 2015 winner Christopher Kauker, CFP®)

No matter the road you travel, we will be there with you. At Guidingpoint Financial Group, a financial advisory practice of Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc., we understand that you want knowledgeable and talented financial advisors to work with you. Our team is here for you when you need us with answers to the questions that are important to you. For some, retirement is the most important issue that they want to tackle and develop answers around. For you, it may be purchasing a

home, your employer-sponsored retirement plan, an old retirement account, saving for education or planning an investment strategy. We are here to help with these and many other of life’s everyday financial situations. As your financial advisors, we are available to you when you need us, in person, on the phone, via virtual meeting, online or via email. No matter the road you travel, we want to make it easier. The advisors of Guidingpoint Financial Group will be with you every step of the way.

138 Timber Creek Drive | Memphis, TN 38018 465 South Main Street | Memphis, TN 38103 Phone: 901-312-5099 www.guidingpointgroup.com Investors should conduct their own evaluation of a financial professional as working with a financial advisor is not a guarantee of future financial success. Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP®, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ and federally registered CFP (with flame design) in the U.S., which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board’s initial and ongoing certification requirements. Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc., Member FINRA and SIPC.

A Financial Advisory Practice of Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. FS • 4 — www.fivestarprofessional.com The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Active as a credentialed professional in the financial services industry for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not: A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three customer complaints filed against them [settled or pending] with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one client’s experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint filed with a regulatory authority; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy; E. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their client’s assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 690 Memphis wealth managers were considered for the award; 143 (21 percent of candidates) were named 2015 Five Star Wealth Managers.

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/7/15 9:04 AM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Five Star Wealth Manager

Kevin Kimery Senior Vice President, Financial Advisor Kevin joined Morgan Stanley in 2005 after working at Goldman Sachs and Merrill Lynch. He also served as president of Accuship, a local information management firm. His attention to detail gives his clients a sense of confidence that their wealth is in trusted hands. Today and tomorrow, the Kimery Group can help you plan, preserve and prosper.

• Helping busy people plan for the future and accomplish their life goals • Guiding investors through challenging markets • Advising families on multigenerational issues FOUR-YEAR WINNER Left to right: Matthew C. Heffington, Financial Advisor; 2012 – 2015 winner Kevin D. Kimery, Senior Vice President, Financial Advisor; Bailey Berry, Client Service Associate

A 2012 – 2015 Five Star Wealth Manager award winner with more than 20 years of industry experience, Kevin Kimery understands that his clients have their unique goals and challenges when it comes to growing and protecting their wealth. Kevin believes in a hands-on, personalized approach to helping clients plan for the future, preserve their wealth and prosper along the way. Drawing upon his extensive knowledge and experience, Kevin uses a progressive approach to design and implement a plan customized to each client’s situation.

The Kimery Group at Morgan Stanley 6410 Poplar Avenue, Suite 600 | Memphis, TN 38119 Phone: 901-766-8609 kevin.d.kimery@morganstanley.com www.morganstanleyfa.com/thekimerygroup

©2015 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC.

Plan. Preserve. Prosper.

Financial Resource Management

775 Ridge Lake Boulevard, Suite 150 Memphis, TN 38120 Phone: 901-767-5755 Fax: 901-767-5754 FOUR-YEAR WINNER

frmMail@frm-advisers.com www.frm-advisers.com

Left to right: Two-year winner Robert J. Fratesi; three-year winner J. Lee Greene, Jr.; four-year winner J. Kevin Johnston; Jonathan R. Fratesi

The goal of Financial Resource Management’s partners and staff is to build a long-term, beneficial, personal relationship with our clients and their families in order to deliver a concierge level of service, all focused on helping them accomplish those things that matter most in their lives. In the process of developing these important relationships, we help clients save, grow, protect, organize and manage their wealth. We also know the importance of building a strong family legacy. At FRM, we believe in helping you make your wealth work for you! Securities offered through Arete Wealth Management, LLC. Member SIPC/FINRA/NFA. Financial Resource Management – A Registered Investment Adviser.

www.fivestarprofessional.com — FS

•5

The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Active as a credentialed professional in the financial services industry for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not: A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three customer complaints filed against them [settled or pending] with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one client’s experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint filed with a regulatory authority; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy; E. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their client’s assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 690 Memphis wealth managers were considered for the award; 143 (21 percent of candidates) were named 2015 Five Star Wealth Managers.

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/7/15 9:04 AM


Five Star Wealth Manager

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

John T. Peterson Senior Vice President – Investments • Objective advice • Comprehensive preservation strategies • Committed to understanding your needs

6075 Poplar Avenue, Suite 650 Memphis, TN 38119

FOUR-YEAR WINNER

Direct: 901-818-1247 Toll-free: 800-238-6120

Left to right: Stephanie Gear, Senior Registered Client Service Associate; four-year winner John T. Peterson, Senior Vice President – Investments

In today’s complex, fast-moving world, most investors need a financial advisor to develop and pursue a comprehensive wealth management strategy. Backed by the superlative resources of Wells Fargo, a leader in brokerage and banking services, John has the ability to offer a vast range of investment solutions including: equities, fixed income, insurance, alternative investments and access to lending services available through affiliates of Wells Fargo. John is very proud to receive this recognition.

john.t.peterson@wfadvisors.com home.wellsfargoadvisors.com/John.T.Peterson Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC, Member SIPC, is a registered broker-dealer and a separate non-bank affiliate of Wells Fargo & Company. [CAR 0915-00958]. Investment and Insurance Products: NOT FDIC-Insured NO Bank Guarantee MAY Lose Value

Reliable Financial Advisor

The Bilsky Bridgmon Group at Morgan Stanley • Results-driven, not product-driven • Investing for your life and your legacy • Aiming to protect what you worked hard to earn Over the years, you will make many financial decisions. One in particular is likely to have a lasting impact on your well-being and that of your family: the choice of your financial advisor. Let us be yours. Becky Bridgmon, 2012 – 2015 Five Star Wealth Manager award winner, and Stanley Bilsky, 2012 – 2015 Five Star Wealth Manager award winner.

The Bilsky Bridgmon Group at Morgan Stanley 6410 Poplar Avenue, Suite 600 | Memphis, TN 38119 Office: 901-766-6129 FOUR-YEAR WINNER Left to right: Four-year winners Becky Bridgmon, CFP®, Vice President, Financial Advisor, and Stanley Bilsky, CIMA®, Senior Vice President, Wealth Advisor

becky.bridgmon@morganstanley.com | stanley.bilsky@morganstanley.com www.morganstanleyfa.com/thebilskybridgmongroup. ©2015 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC. Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP®, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ and federally registered CFP® (with flame design) in the U.S., which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board’s initial and ongoing certification requirements.

A Culture of Excellence With a Local Address

FS • 6 — www.fivestarprofessional.com The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Active as a credentialed professional in the financial services industry for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not: A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three customer complaints filed against them [settled or pending] with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one client’s experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint filed with a regulatory authority; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy; E. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their client’s assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 690 Memphis wealth managers were considered for the award; 143 (21 percent of candidates) were named 2015 Five Star Wealth Managers.

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/7/15 9:05 AM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Five Star Wealth Manager

J. Barry Jenkins Senior Vice President – Investments

• Thirty-plus years of experience in the financial services industry • Individual and corporate advisor • Comprehensive wealth management and estate planning strategies

FOUR-YEAR WINNER Left to right: Four-year winner J. Barry Jenkins, Sr. Vice President – Investments; Jessica Neal, Registered Client Associate

I believe investing should be simple and straightforward. I believe the most important factors in a successful investing strategy are allocation, correlation and rebalancing. I believe in minimizing risk and paying as little tax as necessary. Finally, I believe in doing business honestly and with integrity. Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC, Member SIPC. [CAR 0915-00642].

6075 Poplar Avenue, Suite 650 Memphis, TN 38119 Phone: 901-761-6340

Independent Wealth Management, LLC Independent Wealth Management is more than a name — it’s a commitment. We help you establish the foundation for your financial independence — as uniquely defined by your dreams and goals. Our core values guide us as we guide you: We treat you as we wish to be treated; we know you and your goals; we treat you as a person, not a portfolio balance; and we empower you to feel confident about your decisions and your financial future. FOUR-YEAR WINNER Left to right: Clayton Chapman; four-year winner Stacey S. Hyde, CPA, CFA, CFP®; two-year winner Hulon O. Warlick, CRC®; and four-year winner Hugh “Hank” Parks, CFP®

• We start with your goals • We develop a plan for your success • We implement your plan and suggest changes when needed Securities and Advisory Services offered through Commonwealth Financial Network®, Member FINRA/SIPC, a Registered Investment Adviser. Not FDIC Insured, No Bank Guarantee, May Lose Value.

5050 Poplar Avenue, Suite 2200 Memphis, TN 38157 Phone: 901-844-0382 info@i-wmonline.com www.i-wmonline.com

Planning for Your Financial Independence www.fivestarprofessional.com — FS

•7

The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Active as a credentialed professional in the financial services industry for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not: A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three customer complaints filed against them [settled or pending] with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one client’s experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint filed with a regulatory authority; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy; E. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their client’s assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 690 Memphis wealth managers were considered for the award; 143 (21 percent of candidates) were named 2015 Five Star Wealth Managers.

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/7/15 9:05 AM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Five Star Wealth Manager

William B. Howard, Jr.

John Paul “J.P.” Webber

ChFC®, CFP®, President

Accredited Investment Fiduciary®

William Howard & Co. Financial Advisors, Inc.

The Associated Agency

6410 Poplar Ave., Ste. 330 Memphis, TN 38119 Office: 901-761-5068 whoward@whcfa.com www.whcfa.com

5050 Poplar Ave., Ste. 1200 Memphis, TN 38157 Phone: 901-682-3301 Toll-free: 877-843-2776 jpwebber@associatedagency.com

FOUR-YEAR WINNER

• • • •

FOUR-YEAR WINNER

Comprehensive financial planning Focus on client goals and objectives Long-term advisory relationships built on trust and integrity Over 35 years of delivering sound financial advice

William Howard & Co. is an independent, fee-only financial planning and investment advisory firm. We are committed to providing excellent service to our clients by listening to them, working with them and crafting solutions that work for their future. Please contact us for more information.

• Integrated life planning for individuals and families • Business benefit and succession planning • Comprehensive investment and risk management As an independent financial advisor, I believe success is both a function of your present financial well-being as well as your confidence in the future. My mission is to help you achieve your vision through a collaborative planning process that provides an objective, actionable framework seeking financial security. This dynamic approach enables you to maintain a confident outlook regardless of what the future holds. Advisory services offered through Capital Analysts or Lincoln Investment, Registered Investment Advisors. Securities offered through Lincoln Investment, Broker Dealer, Member FINRA/SIPC. www.lincolninvestment.com. The Associated Agency and the above firms are independent, non-affiliated entities.

Your Vision Forms Our Mission John “Jack” Parker

Mark Alexander

Senior Vice President, Wealth Advisor

Senior Vice President, Financial Advisor

6410 Poplar Ave., Ste. 600 Memphis, TN 38119 Direct: 901-766-8638 Toll-free: 800-659-6659 jack.parker@morganstanley.com TWO-YEAR WINNER

• • • •

www.morganstanleyfa.com/jack.parker

Morgan Stanley consulting group services Retirement planning Fee-based investment advisory services Tax-efficient strategies

You need experience to deal with the complexity of the current markets. Let us help you meet your goals by providing access to seasoned and respected investment professionals, a premier trading and execution platform and a full spectrum of investment choices. Jack received the Five Star award in 2012 and 2015. MSSB and its Financial Advisors do not provide tax or legal advice. Individuals should seek advice based on their particular circumstances from an independent tax advisor. ©2015 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC.

Experience • Integrity • Service

The Chickasaw Oaks Group 6410 Poplar Ave., Ste. 600 Memphis, TN 38119 Phone: 901-766-6172 mark.alexander@morganstanley.com FOUR-YEAR WINNER

• Capital markets • Portfolio management • Financial planning The Chickasaw Oaks Group at Morgan Stanley was established to provide personalized wealth management services to our clients and their families. We accomplish this by developing strong, personal relationships based on the highest ethical standards of honesty, trust and respect. Backed by Morgan Stanley, one of the world’s pre-eminent brokerage and investment banking firms, our goal is to provide our clients with exceptional service and well-suited wealth management solutions. 2012 – 2015 Five Star award winner. ©2015 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC.

Personalized Service in a Family-Office Atmosphere

FS • 8 — www.fivestarprofessional.com The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Active as a credentialed professional in the financial services industry for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not: A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three customer complaints filed against them [settled or pending] with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one client’s experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint filed with a regulatory authority; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy; E. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their client’s assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 690 Memphis wealth managers were considered for the award; 143 (21 percent of candidates) were named 2015 Five Star Wealth Managers.

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/7/15 9:05 AM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Five Star Wealth Manager

Joseph “Chip” Crain

C. Robert Brown, Sr.

CFP®, Senior Vice President – Wealth Management

CLU®, LUTCF, Partner

UCL Financial Group, LLC 1755 N Kirby Pkwy., Ste. 300 Memphis, TN 38120 Phone: 800-527-8848 Phone: 901-758-1500 bobbrown@uclfinancial.com www.uclfinancial.com

FOUR-YEAR WINNER

• Insurance, investments* and employee benefit plans* • Employee benefits: communication and administration • Focused on client outcomes Bob has 42 years’ experience in the financial services industry designing innovative strategies for individuals and business owners in: retirement planning, succession planning, employee benefits and personal benefit planning.

6000 Poplar Ave., Ste. 150 Memphis, TN 38119 Office: 901-255-1381 ccrain@wundernet.com Wunderlichsecurities.com THREE-YEAR WINNER

With 20 years of experience in financial planning, my goal is to work with a client’s total financial situation, with an understanding of the client’s goals and dreams, to craft a strategy that provides the greatest opportunity for success while minimizing the risk.

Weldon T. “Bucky” Stewart Senior Vice President – Investments

C. Robert Brown, Investment Advisor Representative, *Securities and investment advisory services offered solely through Ameritas Investment Corp. (AIC). Member FINRA/SIPC. AIC and UCL Financial Group are not affiliated. Additional products and services may be available through C. Robert Brown or UCL Financial Group that are not offered through AIC. For *securities: cbrown@aicinvest.com.

6075 Poplar Ave., Ste. 650 Memphis, TN 38119 Phone: 901-761-8128 Toll-free: 866-431-3972 bucky.stewart@wfadvisors.com TWO-YEAR WINNER

“Financial planning is a holistic approach to financial well-being.”

As a financial advisor with Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC, my daily mission is to serve my clients. My clients’ needs always have and will continue to come first. Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC’s product line helps me customize the right fit for my clients.

— Five Star award winner Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC, Member SIPC. [CAR 0815-04581]. Jay Healy

Richard L. Pittman

President

CFP®, CLU®, Registered Principal

Century Wealth Management LLC 1770 Kirby Pkwy., Ste. 117 Memphis, TN 38138 Phone: 901-850-5532 Direct: 901-292-8470 jay@centurywealth.com www.centurywealth.com FOUR-YEAR WINNER E v e r y t h i n g w e d o a t C e n t u r y We a l t h Management is driven by the question: “What would I want if I were the client?” We specialize in working with entrepreneurs and professionals looking for a single-source solution to managing their family wealth. We take on the role of the “family CFO” and manage investments, implement advanced planning strategies and perform a variety of administrative functions to simplify our clients’ lives.

Diversified Financial Advisors, LLC 8275 Tournament Dr., Ste. 170 Memphis, TN 38125 Phone: 901-590-3824 Direct: 901-355-8877 rpittman@investorscapital.com Not all clients are the same, nor should be their financial plans. Working with individuals and businesses, Richard develops and implements comprehensive financial plans using a holistic approach to help clients discover and solve financial problems and achieve their life goals. Securities Offered Through Investors Capital Corporation Member FINRA/SIPC, Advisory Services Offered Through Investors Capital Advisory.

“Have a process for managing money that is not based on opinions, attitudes or emotions.” — Five Star award winner

www.fivestarprofessional.com — FS

•9

The Five Star Wealth Manager award, administered by Crescendo Business Services, LLC (dba Five Star Professional), is based on 10 objective criteria. Eligibility criteria – required: 1. Credentialed as a registered investment adviser or a registered investment adviser representative; 2. Active as a credentialed professional in the financial services industry for a minimum of 5 years; 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint history review (As defined by Five Star Professional, the wealth manager has not: A. Been subject to a regulatory action that resulted in a license being suspended or revoked, or payment of a fine; B. Had more than a total of three customer complaints filed against them [settled or pending] with any regulatory authority or Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process. Unfavorable feedback may have been discovered through a check of complaints registered with a regulatory authority or complaints registered through Five Star Professional’s consumer complaint process; feedback may not be representative of any one client’s experience; C. Individually contributed to a financial settlement of a customer complaint filed with a regulatory authority; D. Filed for personal bankruptcy; E. Been convicted of a felony); 4. Fulfilled their firm review based on internal standards; 5. Accepting new clients. Evaluation criteria – considered: 6. One-year client retention rate; 7. Five-year client retention rate; 8. Non-institutional discretionary and/or non-discretionary client assets administered; 9. Number of client households served; 10. Education and professional designations. Wealth managers do not pay a fee to be considered or placed on the final list of Five Star Wealth Managers. Award does not evaluate quality of services provided to clients. Once awarded, wealth managers may purchase additional profile ad space or promotional products. The Five Star award is not indicative of the wealth manager’s future performance. Wealth managers may or may not use discretion in their practice and therefore may not manage their client’s assets. The inclusion of a wealth manager on the Five Star Wealth Manager list should not be construed as an endorsement of the wealth manager by Five Star Professional or this publication. Working with a Five Star Wealth Manager or any wealth manager is no guarantee as to future investment success, nor is there any guarantee that the selected wealth managers will be awarded this accomplishment by Five Star Professional in the future. For more information on the Five Star award and the research/selection methodology, go to fivestarprofessional.com. 690 Memphis wealth managers were considered for the award; 143 (21 percent of candidates) were named 2015 Five Star Wealth Managers.

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/7/15 9:06 AM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Five Star Wealth Manager

Award winners listed by primary services and listed alphabetically by last name. Business Planning Jeffrey Barnes · Legacy Wealth Management Charles R. Brown · Ameritas Investment Page 9

Stacey Hyde · Independent Wealth Management Page 7

Investments

Brienne Smith Jackson · Legacy Wealth Management

Eric Baertels · Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC

Brian Kinney · Dominion Partners

Mark Alexander · Morgan Stanley

Page 8

Kevin Johnston · Financial Resource Management Page 5

John Barrios · Barrios Financial Services

Richard Jones · Capital Financial Advisors

William Bizot · Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC

Gary Dering · Voya Financial Advisors

Christopher Kauker · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Page 4

Emile Bizot III · Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC

Financial Planning

Owen Keith · FSG Investment Management

Estate Planning

Sudhir Agrawal · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc.

Marty Kelman · Kelman-Lazarov

Frank Allen · Shoemaker Financial

Ron Lazarov · Kelman-Lazarov

Lawson Arney · Raymond James & Associates

Joshua Mays · Calton & Associates

Susan Babina · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Page 4 Teresa Bailey · Pickler & Bailey Financial Planning

Gary Kieffner · Brandon Investments

Lindsey Bell Mazzola · Legacy Wealth Management David McAdams · McAdams Tax Advisory Group Page 2 & 3

Mark Billions · Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC

Becky Bridgmon · Morgan Stanley Page 6 Terry Brough · Raymond James & Associates

Arun Kulkarni · LPL Financial John Norfleet Laughlin · Summit Asset Management David Lee · David Lee Financial Robert Leger · First Heartland Consultants Hal Lewis · Stephens John Maiden · Raymond James & Associates Jerry McEwen · Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC Duncan L. Miller · Legacy Wealth Management

Russell Clack · Strategic Wealth Management

John Miller · Edward Jones

Charles Coe · Dominion Partners

Will Moore · Atkins Capital Management

Nancy Coe · Dominion Partners

Terry Morris · Raymond James & Associates

Christian Cornell · Carty & Company

Mark Saalfield Norris · Raymond James & Associates

David “Landon” Mills · Shoemaker Financial

Christy Cornell · Raymond James & Associates

Wilson Moore · Raymond James & Associates

Robert Cremerius · Cremerius Wealth Management

John Peterson · Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC Page 6

William C. Overcast · Legacy Wealth Management

Mark Cronin · Highland Capital Management

John Pettey · Raymond James & Associates

Ray Brandon · Brandon Investments E. Denby Brandon III · Brandon Financial Planning

Hugh Parks · Commonwealth Financial Network Page 7

William Deupree · Raymond James & Associates

Larry Clayton · Anchorpoint Financial

Hallie Peyton · Legacy Wealth Management

Katie Cole · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Page 4

John Phillips · Red Door Wealth Management

Richard Ditter · The Mutual Fund Store of Memphis

Joseph Crain · Wunderlich Securities Page 9

Richard Pittman · Diversified Financial Advisors Page 9

Lloyd V. Crawford · Financial Consulting Group

Rebecca Rawlinson · Legacy Wealth Management

Joseph DeLisi · Chartwell Financial Group

David Rochester · Shoemaker Financial

Robert Glenn Dingler · FSG Investment Management

James Shamoun · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Page 4

Brian Douglas · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Page 4

Cathy Ann Simmons · Legacy Wealth Management

Darrell Wayne Douglas · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Page 4

Shelly Baker · SunTrust Bank William Bell · Mid South Financial Group Stanley Bilsky · Morgan Stanley Page 6

Malcolm “Jerome” Franklin · Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC William Frazee · Frazee Investment Consulting

John Parker · Morgan Stanley

Page 8

Jeff Phillips · Raymond James Financial Services David Pickler · Pickler Wealth Managers Conrad Richards · Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC Ivan Rodriguez · New Southern Advisory Services Randall Roper · Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC Michael Rowland · LPL Financial

Cecil Godman III · Mercury Investment Group

Peggy Ryansmith · Strategic Wealth Management

Larry Goldsmith · Wunderlich Securities

Julia San Roman · Edward Jones

Robert D. Gooch · Raymond James & Associates

Michael Short · Wunderlich Securities

Walter Grant · Aegis Retirement Group

Robin K. Sievers · Legacy Wealth Management

Madeline R. Simonetti · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Page 4

Sarah Russell Haizlip · Summit Asset Management

Joseph Amery Staub · Summit Asset Management

Charles Emerson · Independent Planning Group

Patrick Sirayathorn · Eagle Strategies

Montie Beal Hart · Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC

Robert Stokes · Wunderlich Securities

Jason Fair · Wunderlich Securities

Julie Terry · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Page 4

Jay Healy · Century Wealth Management Page 9

Weldon Stewart · Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC Page 9

Vera Feldman · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc.

Lance Wayne Hollingsworth · Summit Asset Management

Edward Felsenthal · MetLife

Michael Turner · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Page 4

Robert Fratesi · Financial Resource Management Page 5

John Paul Webber · The Associated Agency Page 8

Scott Giles · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc.

Insurance

James J. Isaacs · Legacy Wealth Management

Ronald Goldner · LPL Financial

Robert Buckley · MetLife Premier Client Group

E. Charles Jalenak · Legacy Wealth Management

Stephen Harris · AXA Advisors

J. Barry Jenkins · Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC Page 7

J. Lee Greene · Financial Resource Management Page 5 Ellis Haddad · Raymond James & Associates William Howard · William Howard & Company Page 8 Charles C. Hudson, Jr. · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc.

Milton L. Knowlton, Jr. · MML Investors Services Mark Miller · UCL Financial Group/Ameritas Investment Corporation

Wallace Spencer Hope · Legacy Wealth Management Ricky Hunt · Raymond James & Associates

Edwardt Taylor II · Delta Asset Management Herbert Alonzo Taylor IV · Wunderlich Securities John S. Thompson · LPL Financial Samuel Alexander Thompson III · Summit Asset Management Hulon Warlick · Independent Wealth Management Page 7

Larry W. Karban · Atkins Capital Management Kevin Kimery · Morgan Stanley

William Stoddard · Wunderlich Securities

Anneliese Watts · Raymond James & Associates Kevin Wells · Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Madison Wells III · Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC

Page 5

James Whitehead · Shoemaker Financial

Timothy Moran · UCL Financial Group

Jenny King · Wunderlich Securities

Christopher Wiltse · Stephens

Sara Stevens · Kaiser Financial Group

Scott King · Raymond James & Associates

Steven Wishnia · Highland Capital Management

Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP®, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ and the federally registered CFP (with flame logo) in the U.S., which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board’s initial and ongoing certification requirements. The Chartered Financial Consultant credential [ChFC®] is a financial planning designation awarded by The American College.

FS • 10 — www.fivestarprofessional.com

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/7/15 9:06 AM


Every

HERO needs a

mentor, every mentor needs a GUIDE.

MEMPHIS

PARENT memphisparent.com

Ask for Lucy

Hadskey!

958 Reddoch Cove • Memphis, TN 38119 901.405.1296 Styling and UpDo’s Hair Extensions Keratin Complex Color/Color Correction Bridal Parties

*7 *7

GR E AT HOM ES contin u ed from page 69 Research Hospital along with Robert Webster, Ph.D., to research influenza viruses. McCullers now has a dual role as chair of the Department of Pediatrics for the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and Pediatrician-in-Chief at Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital. McCullers is proud of the fact that he and the “fabulous” Meri Armour are partners in running Le Bonheur, with Armour as president and CEO, and he as manager of the physicians. McCullers is often called upon to lecture around the world and not long ago he did just that in Singapore, Hong Kong, Thailand, and Japan. McCullers is dedicated to Le Bonheur’s mission to improve children’s healthcare here in Memphis where we have many chronic, poverty-related conditions, with pediatric asthma being a leading diagnosis. At the same time his goal is for Memphis to become a model for other cities as an “academic health center” that combines top clinical care, research, education, and advocacy. He takes great pleasure in the success story that is Le Bonheur, which is becoming a national destination for pediatricians; the hospital now recruits top talent from around the country, having added 75 new physicians and scientists in the past three years. McCullers explains that the hospital has expanded in a time of economic downturn and that now “it is nearly full all the time.” With reference to the welcoming big, red heart atop the hospital, McCullers reiterates that art is a transformative element in the hospital experience, not to mention an effective recruiting tool. He notes that Le Bonheur is the only hospital with a full-time director of art development, a position held by Linda Hill. On a personal level, whenever he has some free time, McCullers likes to hang out with Peppy, his little Chihuahua-mix rescue dog, in his home’s small backyard area. He then often heads over to nearby Cooper-Young for dinner at his favorite place, Karen Carrier’s Bar DKDC. The McCullers home is definitely a work in progress, and I am told that Austin often comes by to “tweak things.” For example, she tells me there is another piece of art which has not yet been mounted that utilizes swords — yes, swords — a reminder of McCullers’ fencing days. The next big project on the drawing board is a redo of the master bedroom and bathroom. For now, though, I guess we will have to stay tuned, and with luck we’ll be allowed to take another peek into the McCullers house down the road. Here’s hoping! 

3663 Appling Road · Bartlett 901.385.6440

GREAT PERFORMANCES AND MEMORABLE EVENTS 2015-2016 Performance Season Tickets On Sale Now!

Create your own season with our flexible attendance “Pick Ten” subscription tickets.

Upcoming season highlights include

Emi Sunshine

Sarah Darling

Rave On Buddy Holly Tribute featuring

Billy McGuigan

Barrage 8 To review the entire 2015-2016 Season visit www.bpacc.org or call the Box Office at 901.385.6440. N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 99

065_MM11_2015_Feature_GreatHomes_MCCULLER.indd 99

10/20/15 4:01 PM


ASK VANCE

Morton Mystery Our trivia expert solves local mysteries of who, what, when, where, why, and why not. Well, sometimes.

by vance lauderdale DEAR VANCE: This photo shows my grandfather’s barbershop in Memphis as it looked in the early 1920s. My grandfather, Charlie M. Morton, was born in 1899 and died in 1986. He is the man standing by the barber chair on the far right, and he told me his shop was located on either Main or Front Streets. Can you tell me where it was? — v.c., ripley, ms

DEAR V.C.: Years ago I wrote about the Troutt Brothers Barber Shop in Cooper-Young, but I was unable to locate an old photo of the establishment. So I was delighted that you sent along such a wonderful image. The picture shows four barbers standing alongside a row of ornate barber chairs, the shoe-shine operator with his kit, old-timey light fixtures and barber tools, various bottles and basins, an elaborate cash register, rather dangerous looking electrical wiring strung everywhere, a long mirror bracketed by nice columns, and a sink located oddly (if you ask me) in the middle of the room. Painted on the window is the name of the establishment — C.M. Morton Barber Shop. Right below that, in smaller letters, is “Pool Hall,” indicating that Morton owned or operated two businesses here. I thought this request would be easy: Find the address of the old shop, and then return to my eight-hour nap. And I knew the best way to approach this would be to pore over old city directories. As I’ve explained before, these are heavy tomes, published annually, that list every person, place, and company in our city, ar-

ranged by name, address, or type of business. In this case, I decided to begin in the 1920s, as V.C. suggested, and look through the “B” listings of the business section, year by year, until I found “Morton Barber Shop.” How hard could that be? But first, I needed to settle something with V.C. I’m no math whiz, but simple arithmetic tells me that if a fellow was born in 1899, in the early 1920s, he would also be in his early twenties. But look at the man at the right, which V.C. says is her grandfather. No disrespect to Mr. Morton, but that doesn’t appear to be a man in his twenties. If anything, he looks at least 30, maybe a bit older. And here’s something else. During the half-century or so that I have penned this column, I have scribbled about many establishments on Main or Front Street downtown, along with their neighboring businesses. During that entire time, I had never before encountered a combination barbershop and pool hall. When I mentioned this to V.C., she replied that her grandfather “never mentioned running a pool hall, but I don’t think he would have told his grandchildren about that. Pool halls had bad reputations. When we were kids, we were cautioned about even looking in the door if we had to walk past one.” Maybe so. But that wasn’t the only thing wrong with this picture, so to speak. In the 1920s, downtown Memphis was surprisingly sophisticated, with grand hotels and movie theatres and department stores. Despite the ornate columns flanking the mirror, the rest of the barbershop looks rather plain to me. The floor, especially, seems to be bare concrete, splotched with stains. In the

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY VICKI CHILDERS

right: Any customer needing a shave, haircut, or shoeshine obviously didn’t have to wait for a seat in this undated photograph of the C.M. Morton Barber Shop.

100 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

100_MM11_2015_Vance.indd 100

10/13/15 3:20 PM


1920s in downtown Memphis, I would have expected old books until the 1940s. Again, not a single mention of C.M. Morton’s Barber Shop. something fancier, like tiles or even marble. Once again, though, I made some interesting discovAnd though the view through the window doesn’t show much, the other building visible isn’t very far away. eries. In the early 1900s, Memphis had only one billiard The street seems far too narrow to be 1920s Main Street parlor — an establishment in the old Peabody Hotel or Front Street. with the curious name of Hyronemus & Company. By Nevertheless, I decided to begin my search. And I 1930, our city had more than 30 places to shoot pool, came up empty-handed. Looking carefully through the with such intriguing names as The Antlers (26 S. Main) business listings from 1920 to 1930, I found no mention and The Pastime (9 S. Main). Even more impressive was the growth of the barber of a Morton Barber Shop. I did the same for listings for “billiard parlors,” which is how the city directories industry. In 1920, 168 barbershops were listed in the would have handled pool halls. Again, no billiard par- phone books. By 1940, Memphis had 318 places to get a shave and a haircut. Every big lor run by anyone named MorThough Loeb Properties is ton. And when I looked under hotel had its own barbershop, “names” in the old city directoalong with train stations, the known today for its high-profile ries, even though “Morton” is Cotton Exchange, First Nationdevelopments, in the early 1920s not uncommon, I was a bit sural Bank, and the Catholic Club. company founder Henry Loeb was prised to find no C.M., Charles, All this was interesting, but or Charlie Morton, either. where was C.M. Morton’s? I beinvolved in all sorts of enterprises. I had a brief “Eureka!” mogan to suspect something wasn’t ment when I came across “Mack Morton, Barber” in right. On a hunch, using the excellent resources onthe 1924 city directory. But V.C. assures me her grand- line at Tom Leatherwood’s Shelby County Register of Deeds website, I searched birth certificates, marriage father was never called Mack, and besides, this fellow’s certificates, and even death certificates for C.M. Morbarbershop was located on South Cooper, which is ton: “No Results Found.” pretty far from Main or Front. My endeavors weren’t entirely wasted. For one thing, even though Loeb Properties is known today for their high-profile developments, in the early 1920s company founder Henry Loeb was involved in all sorts of enterprises. The city directories described the company as “men’s furnishings and shirt-makers, laundry, barber shops, and Turkish baths.” It also amused me, as I perused the “B” business listings from this period, to discover so many long-gone ventures. In the early 1900s, Memphis retailers offered bake ovens, balustrades, barrel covers, bath seats (huh?), brushes, burial caskets, birds (Memphis Bird Store, 211 Main), and — this was a surprise — burglar alarms. And not a single listing for barbecue! But back to the original query. When I contacted V.C. and told her something was amiss, she admitted, “I could be mistaken about the time frame.” Her grandThe Lauderdales are known throughout the land father, it seems, “never went into detail about his time for their “never-say-die” spirit, but I contacted V.C. in Memphis,” other than to say that at one point he also with this news. As far as I could tell, despite what her drove a streetcar, which was interesting but not rele- grandfather had once told her, I found no evidence that vant to our present search. “He and my grandmother he ever lived or worked in Memphis. She admitted that eloped and got married in 1924, and family stories get many members of her family came from Mississippi, changed over time. So it’s possible he ran the barber- and the more I studied this photo, the more it seemed to me like a small-town barbershop. Though she didn’t shop in the 1930s, instead of the 1920s.” Yes, it’s possible, except this picture doesn’t show a need to do so, V.C. actually apologized, saying, “I’m sorbarbershop in the 1930s. As my esteemed colleague ry I sent you on a wild goose chase. This has taught me a lesson to take old family stories with a grain of salt.” Richard J. Alley pointed out, a Google search of old So I thought that was the end of it, and I headed off barbershops turns up images of shops almost identical to this one, complete with the oddly positioned sink. to the La-Z-Boy for my much-needed nap. But someAnd every one of these photos was taken in the very thing about the photo kept nagging at me: Would a early 1920s. Barbershops in the 1930s just don’t look like small-town barbershop have four chairs? So, if anybody this. I mention this to acknowledge that Mr. Alley helps remembers this place, don’t “Ask Vance.” Tell me.  me out from time to time, and also because he likes to be called “esteemed.” Got a question for vance? So, even though I was doubtful of the results, I ex- EMAIL: askvance@memphismagazine.com panded my “journey” through the city directories. Heck, MAIL: Vance Lauderdale, Memphis magazine, 460 Tennessee Street #200, Memphis, TN 38103 I even started in 1900 (when her grandfather would presumably have been just a baby) and looked through the BLOG: memphismagazine.com/Blogs/Ask-Vance

left: An old snapshot taken years after the barbershop photo shows Charlie Morton, his wife Bessie, and adopted son Bobby outside their home in Ripley, Mississippi.

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 101

100_MM11_2015_Vance.indd 101

10/13/15 3:20 PM


DINING OUT

All in the Family Chef Josh Steiner shoos away a corner curse at Strano, presenting exuberant updates of Sicilian food.

by pamela denney | photography by justin fox burks

A

fire peeks through the grates of the kitchen’s wood grill when I arrive after lunch to watch Josh Steiner make wood-fired calamari, a big dish in size and flavor. The fire crackles and pops, friendly and inviting like Steiner himself, who looks more like a spry Eagle scout working his campfire than the talented chef/owner of Strano Sicilian Kitchen & Bar, located on the southeast corner of Cooper and Young.

“I built this myself,” Steiner says about the fresh herbs from the family’s Germantown not-so-makeshift grill, tossing in another vegetable garden. log from the stack of wood out back. Almost The calamari cooks quickly — three or four instantly, flames jump higher, minutes tops — and when it’s and Steiner starts to cook. His garnished with fresh parsley tools are simple: tongs and a and plated with marinara and perforated bun pan. So are his a field of mixed greens, I’m ingredients: Tomatoes, roasttransported to some magical ed garlic, red onions, julienned place where a pretty white zucchini and squash, sliced oak forest meets a calm and peppers — red, yellow, and salty sea. green — and calamari, fresh Like the calamari’s bountiand rosy like a redhead’s blush ful plate, dishes at Strano unand sliced into rings. fold with colorful stories, some “Watch for where the smoke imagined like mine and others Wood-fired calamari comes up through the holes. built with real life by Steiner’s That’s the fire’s hot spot,” Steinimmigrant family members er explains, shaking the pan’s ingredients now framed in photographs on the restauwith a handful of house seasoning made with rant’s dining room walls. Rosemary Strano PAM’S PICS

is among the group, Steiner’s late Sicilian grandmother, who brought him into the kitchen as a youngster where she expertly made pies, pastries, and pastas. When she died, she left more than 100 hand-written recipes, and those sauce-stained originals inform Steiner’s cooking today. Other family influences also dance across the menu. Jaqulean Laughter, Steiner’s Moroccan grandmother, steers Grandma’s Spinach Pie, a svelte slice of spinach, fontina, and cheddar in a flaky crust as robust as a muchloved casserole on a holiday table. Pomodoro sauce, bright and balanced, is another family favorite. So are the restaurant’s exceptionally good meatballs, heavily seared on the outside and than finished in sauce for half a day. Little wonder Steiner cooks without borders, mixing familial traditions from Morocco and Sicily with his Jewish upbringing in Memphis, his training at L’ecole Culinaire, and his work at The Beauty Shop, where he cooked with Karen Carrier’s team until opening Strano nearby in a location that has seen many other restaurants come and go. An early fan of the energetic young chef, I’ve eaten at Strano a number of times and

TOP THREE TO TRY

GENOVESE PESTO PIZZA: Toppings celebrate the seasons on this colorful pizza pie: fall (diced chicken, sun-dried tomatoes), winter (Kalamata olives, roasted peppers), spring (red onions and feta), and the taste of summer: pesto sauce.

CANNOLI: A simple start — pizza dough sweetened with sugar and cinnamon, wrapped around a tube, deep-fried, and filled with whipped ricotta — elevates to artistry with sculpted caramel, pistachio crumbs, and roses carved with citrus peel.

HANDCRAFTED COCKTAILS: Collaboration and whimsy create exceptional cocktails, including a fresh-squeezed blood orange Negroni, a limoncello and prosecco Sicilian 75, and Sage Smash, a heart-warming mix of tequila, lime juice, and muddled sage.

102 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

102_MM11_2015_DiningOut.indd 102

10/21/15 8:49 AM


STRANO SICILIAN KITCHEN & BAR 948 S. Cooper Ave. 901-275-8986 STARS: e

eee

FOOD: Modern cooking and seasonal ingredients meet

treasured family recipes. PRICES: They run the gamut: antipastos ($4 to $20);

salads ($8 to $10); pastas ($12-22); entrees ($15 to $32); pizzas and Panini’s ($9 to $23). DRINKS: Strano gets inventive with fresh-squeezed juices and unexpected extras like mint hiding inside ice cubes. Up next? Spiked milkshakes for adults. ATMOSPHERE: Pick between white tablecloths and windows for people watching in the dining room, a spacious bar, or tables on the patio. SERVICE: Servers are polished, friendly, and know their food. EXTRAS: The bar is especially festive when bands play outside at the corner of Cooper and Young. NOISE LEVEL: Table talk is easy with a low-key background of classic rock. RESERVATIONS: A good idea, especially on weekends. OPEN: Tuesday-Thursday 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday-Saturday 11 a.m. to midnight; Sunday 10 a.m.-9 p.m.

am happy to see Steiner banishing the location’s uneven history. More recently, my visits started in late summer when we celebrated a friend’s birthday with handcrafted cocktails mixed with house-made limoncello and chilled peach soup made with fennel and cream. Impulsively, we ordered another course before our entrees, an Italian mosaic of meats and cheeses. We ate with relish, mixing and matching prosciutto di Parma, two kinds of Geneva salami, Gloucester cheese, Havarti with caraway seeds, and a marbled Sage Derby with lavish accessories like house-made jam tucked under blueberries and an oversized spoonful of balsamic caviar, a nod from the kitchen to the magic of molecular gastronomy. For our entrees, we ordered across the menu. Some headed for wood-grilled comfort food such as expertly prepared tenderloin wrapped with prosciutto. Others like me selected the daily special: trout, nestled on Strano owner/chef Josh Steiner (center) with baker Emily Methvin (left) and sous-chef Cole Owen (right). creamy risotto and served with citrus reduction, micro greens, and its tail intact. Fixated on dessert (I’d seen tiramisu and gelato pass cream sauce. We lunched and brunched, puzzle of air bubbles inside, the garlic ciabatta is the best basket of bread in Memphis, my by), I carried most of my entree home, scram- too, on generously sized pizzas with a shredded five-cheese blend husband always said. Accolades go to Emily bling the trout with eggs the next day for a scrumptious sprinkled on the crust before Methvin, a self-taught wiz with a penchant Sunday breakfast. baking. A fluff y foursome of for baking. Along with sous chef Cole Owen, On later visits, the menu amaretto pancakes dunked in Steiner’s classmate at L’ecole Culinaire, the transitioned from summer to maple syrup? Yep. We tried trio are a Mod Squad of sorts, handling prep, fall. We embraced the cool those too, along with poached line, and plating for up to 250 customers on weather with a piping hot eggs in a bacon Benedict so busy weekend nights. bowl of butternut squash round and lovely they looked For Steiner, the three-person team is by bisque the color of golden like they popped out of an ice intent, ensuring collaboration, consistent ginkgo leaves and ravioli cream scoop. dishes, and the kitchen’s even-handed pace: stuffed with roasted chickTypically, we asked a bit “If you are rushing like crazy and cutting corAmaretto pancakes en, Buffalo mozzarella, and sheepishly for more bread. But ners, the food can tell, and the people can tell dunked in maple syrup. sun-dried tomatoes in pesto who wouldn’t? Crusty with a when they taste it.” N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 103

102_MM11_2015_DiningOut.indd 103

10/21/15 8:49 AM


PHOTOGRAPHS BY JUSTIN FOX BURKS

CityDining

OUR IN-DEP TH GUIDE TO MEMPHIS-A R E A R ESTAUR A NTS. TIDBITS

Chautauqua at Wiseacre Brewing Company

by eric bourgeois hautauqua, a popular educational movement for adults that peaked in the 1920s, brought entertainers, musicians, and speakers to rural America. Oftentimes, groups gathered together in tents in out-of-the-way places. A century later, the movement has found a new home in the Broad Avenue Historic Arts District with a newly constructed pavilion in Wiseacre’s back lot. Called Chautauqua like its namesake, the brewery’s outside venue includes a permanent tent and a wooden stage sandwiched between two 70-foot grain silos, relics from the site’s forgotten bread factory. Varnished wooden strips from the brewery’s reclaimed beer barrels add structure and detail to the venue’s fencing, trash cans, and high-top tables. “Chautauqua focused on appreciation of music and the arts,” says Wiseacre co-founder Frank Smith. “Here, we’ll have both.” Smith, who helped build the addition, said Chautauqua is a logical extension of the brewery’s unorthodox setting. “We’re surrounded by train tracks, next to a ditch, under an overpass,” Smith says, chuckling. “We’ve grown faster than we ever thought possible.” The taproom’s scheduling and space constraints spurred the idea for the all-season pavilion, which can comfortably accommodate 200 people. “Chautauqua allows us to offer events we never could before,” says Brittney Andres, the event planner at Wiseacre. The venue’s first event, for instance was an invite-only party for local event planners, followed by a grand opening community day with music and beer the following weekend. Private parties already are scheduled for the fall, along with springtime wedding receptions. While the space is well-suited for celebrating, Wiseacre education director Rebecca “Crebs” McQuary also envisions Chautauqua as a hub for education, specifically related to the history of beer and the unique science behind brewing it. “People like to drink and learn,” McQuary says, “and that will never go out of style.”

C

2783 Broad Ave. (901-888-7000)

clockwise from top: Kellan Bartosch, who directs sales and marketing at Wiseacre, and his brother Davin, head brew master, swing from a bridge made from a repurposed shipping container near the brewery’s new Chautauqua event space. | Chefs Andy Ticer and Michael Hudman of Andrew Michael Italian Kitchen helped open Wiseacre’s new space last month by manning the kitchen of the El Mero Taco food truck.

MEMPHIS STEW We celebrate our city’s community table and the people who grow, cook, and eat the best Memphis food. memphismagazine.com/Blogs/Memphis-Stew 104 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

104_MM11_2015_CDL.indd 104

10/19/15 3:06 PM


M

CIT Y DINING LIST

emphis magazine offers this restaurant listing as a service BONNE TERRE—This inn’s cafe features American cuisine with a flair, and a seasonal menu that changes monthly. Offers to its readers. The directory is not intended as a recommendation of the estab- Southern Angus steaks, duck, pasta, and seafood. Closed Sun.-Wed. 4715 lishments included, nor does it list every restaurant in town. It does, however, Church Rd. W. (Nesbit, MS). 662-781-5100. D, X, $-$$$ include most of the city’s finer restaurants, many specialty restaurants, and a representative BOOKSELLERS BISTRO—Serves soups, sandwiches, quiche, pasta, and seafood, including shrimp polenta; a specialty is pesto sampling of other Bluff City eating establishments. No fast-food facilities or cafeterias salads, pasta.  The Booksellers at Laurelwood, 387 Perkins Extd. 374-0881. are listed, nor have we included establishments that rely heavily on take-out business. B, L, D, WB, X, $-$$ BOSCOS—Tennessee’s first craft brewery serves a variety of freshly Restaurants are included regardless of whether they advertise in Memphis magazine. brewed beers as well as wood-fired oven pizzas, pasta, seafood,   The guide is updated regularly, but we recommend that you call ahead to check on hours, steaks, and sandwiches. 2120 Madison. 432-2222. L, D, SB (with live jazz), X, MRA, $-$$ prices, and other details. Suggestions from readers are welcome; please contact us. BOUNTY ON BROAD—Offering family-style dining, Bounty Email dining@memphismagazine.com. serves small plates and family-sized platters, with such specialties as grilled pork loin and stuffed quail. Closed Mon.  2519 Broad. 410BAR LOUIE—Serves small plates, flatbreads, sandwiches, ABUELO’S MEXICAN FOOD EMBASSY—Mejores de la 8131. D (Tues.-Sat.), SB, X, $-$$ burgers, salads, and such large plate entrees as blackened fish tacos casa — beef and stuffed shrimp — is a specialty here, along with BOZO’S HOT PIT BAR-B-Q— Barbecue, burgers, sandwiches, and baked mac-and-cheese. 2125 Madison. 207-1436. L, D, WB, tilapia Veracruz, quesadillas, chili rellenos, and chicken and subs.  342 Hwy 70, Mason, TN. 901-294-3400. L, D, $-$$ medallions.  8274 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 672-0769. L, D X, X, $-$$ BRAZIL FLAVOR—Offers daily buffet with traditional Brazilian $-$$ BAR-B-Q SHOP—Dishes up barbecued ribs, spaghetti, dishes. Closed Monday.  8014 Club Center Dr. 746-9855. L, D, $ bologna; also pulled pork shoulder, Texas toast barbecue sandwich, ABYSSINIA RESTAURANT—Ethiopian/Mediterranean BRASS DOOR IRISH PUB—Irish and New-American cuisine chicken sandwich, and salads. Closed Sun. 1782 Madison. 272menu includes beef, chicken, lamb, fish entrees, and vegetarian includes such entrees as fish and chips burgers, sandwiches, salads, 1277. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ dishes; also a lunch buffet. 2 600 Poplar. 321-0082. L, D, X, $-$$ and daily specials. 1 52 Madison. 572-1813. L, D, SB, $ BARDOG TAVERN—Classic American grill with Italian influence, ACRE—Features seasonal modern American cuisine in a stylish BROADWAY PIZZA HOUSE—Serving a variety of Bardog offers pasta specialties such as Grandma’s NJ Meatballs, as well setting using locally sourced products; also small-plates/bar. Closed pizzas,including the Broadway Special, as well as sandwiches, salads, as salads, sliders, sandwiches, and daily specials.  73 Monroe. for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 690 S. Perkins. 818-2273. L, D, X, wings, and “soul-food specials.”  2581 Broad. 454-7930; 627 S. 275-8752. B (Mon.-Fri.), L, D, WB, X, $-$$ $$-$$$ Mendenhall. 207-1546. L, D, X, $-$$ BARI RISTORANTE ENOTECA—Authentic Southeastern AGAVE MARIA—Menu items at this Mexican eatery include BROOKLYN BRIDGE ITALIAN RESTAURANT— Italian cuisine (Puglia) emphasizes lighter entrees. Serves fresh fish duck tacos, shrimp and scallop enchiladas, and salmon sashimi Specializing in such homemade entrees as spinach lasagna and lobster and beef dishes and a homemade soup of the day. 22 S. Cooper. tostadas; also family-style chef’s seasonal selections. 83 Union. ravioli; a seafood specialty is horseradish-crusted salmon. Closed 722-2244. D, X, MRA, $-$$$ 341-2096. L, D, X, $-$$ Sun.  1779 Kirby Pkwy. 755-7413. D, X, MRA, $-$$$ BAYOU BAR & GRILL—New Orleans fare at this Overton ALCHEMY—Southern fusion, locally grown cuisine features BROTHER JUNIPER’S—Breakfast is the focus here, with Square eatery includes jambalaya, gumbo, catfish Acadian, shrimp small and large plates; among the offerings is the pan-seared specialty omelets, including the open-faced San Diegan omelet; also dishes, red beans and rice, and muffalettas; also serves some hanger steak with duck-fat-roasted fingerling potatoes; also daily specials, and homemade breads and pastries. Closed Mon. 3519 favorites from the former Le Chardonnay. 2094 Madison. handcrafted cocktails and local craft beers. Closed for dinner Walker. 324-0144. B, X, MRA, $ 278-8626. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ Sun.  940 S. Cooper. 726-4444. D, SB, X, $-$$ THE BRUSHMARK—New American cuisine with a menu that ALDO’S PIZZA PIES—Serving gourmet pizzas — including BEAUTY SHOP—Modern American cuisine with international changes seasonally; offers sandwiches, salads, soups, pastas, and Mr. T Rex — salads, and more also 30 beers, bottled or on tap.  100 flair served in a former beauty shop. Serves steaks salads, pasta, crepes. Closed Mon. and Tues. Brooks Museum, Overton Park, 1934 and seafood, including pecan-crusted golden sea bass. Closed for S. Main. 577-7743; 752 S. Cooper. 725-7437. L, D, X, $-$$ Poplar. 544-6225. L, WB, X, $-$$ dinner Sunday. 966 S. Cooper. 272-7111. L, D, SB, X, $-$$$ AMERIGO—Traditional and contemporary Italian cuisine BRYANT’S BREAKFAST—Three-egg omelets, pancakes, and includes pasta, wood-fired pizza, steaks, and cedarwood-roasted BELLE-A SOUTHERN BISTRO—Brisket in a bourbon The Sampler Platter are among the popular entrees here. Closed brown sugar glaze, and chicken with basmati rice are among the fish. 1239 Ridgeway, Park Place Mall. 761-4000. L, D, SB, X, Tuesday. 3 965 Summer. 324-7494. B, L, X, $ specialties; also seafood entrees and such vegetables as blackened MRA, $-$$$ green tomatoes. Closed for dinner Sun. and all day Mon.  117 Union BUCKLEY’S FINE FILET GRILL—Specializes in steaks, ANDREW MICHAEL ITALIAN KITCHEN—Traditional Ave. 433-9851. L, D, WB, X, $-$$$ seafood, and pasta. (Lunchbox serves entree salads, burgers, and Italian cuisine with a menu that changes seasonally with such entrees more.) 5355 Poplar. 683-4538; 919 S. Yates (Buckley’s Lunchbox), as Maw Maw’s ravioli. Closed Sun.-Mon. 712 W. Brookhaven Cl. BENIHANA—This Japanese steakhouse serves beef, chicken, and , 682-0570. L (Yates only, M-F), D, X, MRA, $-$$ and seafood grilled at the table; some menu items change monthly; 347-3569. D, X, $$-$$$ sushi bar also featured. 912 Ridge Lake. THE BUTCHER SHOP—Serves steaks ANOTHER BROKEN EGG CAFE—Offering several varieties 767-8980. L, D, X, $$-$$$ ranging from 8-oz. fillets to a 20-oz. of eggs benedict, waffles, omelets, pancakes, beignets, and other DINING SYMBOLS porterhouse; also chicken, pork chops, fresh breakfast fare; also burgers,sandwiches, and salads. . 6063 Park Ave. BHAN THAI—Authentic Thai cuisine seafood.  107 S. Germantown Rd. includes curries, pad Thai noodles, and 729-7020. B, L, WB, X, $ B — breakfast (Cordova). 757-4244. L (Fri. and Sun.), D, vegetarian dishes, as well as seafood, THE ARCADE—Possibly Memphis’ oldest cafe. Specialties L — lunch X, MRA, $$-$$$ pork, and duck entrees. Closed for lunch include sweet potato pancakes, a fried peanut butter and banana D — dinner Sat.-Sun. and all day CAFE 1912—French/American bistro sandwich, and breakfast served all day. 540 S. Main. 526-5757. B, Mon.  1324 Peabody. 272-1538. L, D, X, SB — Sunday brunch serving such seafood entrees as grouper and L, D (Thurs.-Sat.) X, $ MRA, $-$$ steamed mussels: also crepes, salads, and AREPA & SALSA— Offering Venezuelan dishes such as the WB — weekend brunch French onion soup, 2 43 S. Cooper. 722-2700. BLEU—This eclectic restaurant features namesake arepa (a corn-based dish with a variety of fillings) and X — wheelchair accessible D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ American food with global influences and tostones with shredded pork or black beans. Closed Sunday. 662 MRA — member, Memphis local ingredients. Among the specialties CAFE ECLECTIC—Spanish omelets, Madison. 949-8537. L, D, X, $ Restaurant Association are a 14-oz. bone-in rib-eye and several and chicken and waffles are among menu ASIAN PALACE—Chinese eatery serves seafood, vegetarian items, seafood dishes. 221 S. Third, in the items, along with sandwiches, wraps, and $ — under $15 per person without dim sum, and more. 5266 Summer Ave. 766-0831. L, D, X, $-$$ Westin Memphis Beale St. Hotel. burgers.  603 N. McLean. 725-1718; 111 A-TAN—Serves Chinese and Japanese hibachi cuisine, complete drinks or desserts 334-5950. B, L, D, WB, X, $$-$$$ Harbor Town Square. 590-4645; 510 S. with sushi bar. A specialty is Four Treasures with garlic sauce. 3445 $$ — under $25 Highland. 410-0765. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, BLUE DAZE BISTRO—Serving Poplar, Suite 17, University Center. 452-4477. L, D, X, $-$$$ $$$ — $26-$50 $ American cuisine with Cajun flair; lunch AUTOMATIC SLIM’S— Longtime downtown favorite entrees include the Black & Bleu Salad and $$$$ — over $50 CAFE FONTANA— Hearty Italian specializes in contemporary American cuisine emphasizing local a crab cake sandwich; dinner entrees cuisine features pizzas, pasta, and several SHADED — new listing ingredients; also extensive martini list. 83 S. Second. 525-7948. L, D, range from salmon to Cajun cream penne seafood dishes, including pesce al forno and WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ pasta. Closed for dinner Sun., and all day fish of the day special. Closed for lunch Sat. BABALU TACOS & TAPAS—This Overton Square eatery Mon.-Wed.  221 E. Commerce St. Hernando (MS). and all day Mon. 8556 Macon Rd. 529-7526. L, D, SB, X, $-$$$ dishes up Spanish-style tapas with Southern flair; also taco and 662-469-9304. L, D, SB, X, $-$$$ CAFE KEOUGH—European-style cafe serving quiche, paninis, enchilada of the day; specials change daily. 2115 Madison. 274BLUE NILE ETHIOPIAN— Kabobs, flavorful chicken and salads, and more.  12 S. Main. 509-2469. B, L, D, X, $ 0100. L, D, SB, X, $-$$ lamb stew, and injera (flatbread) are traditional items on the menu, CAFE OLE—Now under new ownership, this 23-year-old eatery BAHAMA BREEZE—Baby back ribs, Jamaican chicken wings, along with vegetarian options. 1788 Madison. 474-7214. L, D, X, specializes in authentic Mexican cuisine; one specialty is the buildand coconut shrimp are among the entrees at this Caribbean-fusion $-$$ your-own quesadilla. 959 S. Cooper. 343-0103. L, D, WB, X, MRA, restaurant. 2830 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 385-8744. BLUEFIN RESTAURANT & SUSHI LOUNGE—Serves $-$$ L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ Japanese fusion cuisine featuring seafood, duck, and steaks, with CAFE PALLADIO—Serves gourmet salads, soups, sandwiches, BANGKOK ALLEY—Thai fusion cuisine includes noodle and seasonally changing menu; also, a sushi bar and flatbread pizza. and desserts in a tea room inside the antiques shop. Closed Sun. 2169 curry dishes, chef-specialty sushi rolls, coconut soup, and duck and Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 135 S. Main. 528-1010. L, D, X, MRA, Central. 278-0129. L, X, $ seafood entrees. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. at $-$$ CAFE PIAZZA BY PAT LUCCHESI—Specializes in gourmet Brookhaven location; call for hours. 121 Union Ave. 522-2010; BOMBAY HOUSE—Indian fare includes lamb korma and pizzas (including create-your-own), panini sandwiches, and pasta. 2150 W. Poplar at Houston Levee (Collierville). 854-8748; 715 chicken tikka; also, a daily luncheon buffet. 1727 N. Germantown Closed Sun. 139 S. Rowlett St. (Collierville). 861-1999. L, D, X, W. Brookhaven Cl. 590-2585. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ Pkwy. (Cordova). 755-4114. L, D, X, $-$$ $-$$ BAR DKDC— Features an ever-changing menu of BONEFISH GRILL—Serves wood-grilled fish,as well as steaks, CAFE PONTOTOC—Serves a variety of internationally inspired international “street food,” from Thai to Mexican, Israeli to chicken and pork entrees. 1250 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). small plates, as well as salads and sandwiches. Closed Mon.  314 S. Indian, along with specialty cocktails. Closed Sun.-Mon. 964 S. 753-2220; 4680 Merchants Park Circle, Carriage Crossing Main. 249-7955. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ Cooper. 272-0830. D, X, $ (Collierville). 854-5822. L (Fri.-Sat.), D, SB, X, $-$$$ N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 105

104_MM11_2015_CDL.indd 105

10/13/15 3:38 PM


CIT Y DINING LIST CASUAL DINING

These establishments offer American cuisine in a relaxed atmosphere. While some serve ethnic entrees, the emphasis is on steaks, salads, sandwiches, pasta, fish and seafood. Also some soulfood and homestyle cooking. J. ALEXANDER’S—2670 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 381-9670. APPLEBEE’S—2114 Union Ave. 7257136; 2890 Bartlett Blvd. (Bartlett). 2135034; 710 DeSoto Cove (Horn Lake, MS). 662-772-5914; 7515 Goodman Rd. (Olive Branch, MS). 662-893-7555. AJAX DINER— 118 Courthouse Sq., Oxford, MS. 662-232-8880. BELLY ACRES—2102 Trimble Pl, 529-7017.. BLUE AND WHITE RESTAURANT—1355 US 61.N., Tunica, MS. 662-363-1371. BLUE PLATE CAFE—5469 Poplar. 761-9696; 113 S. Court. 523-2050. BLUE SHOE BAR & GRILL—Hotel Memphis, 2625 Thousand Oaks Blvd. 362-6200. BON TON CAFE—150 Monroe. 525-0883. CAJUN CATFISH COMPANY—1616 Sycamore View Rd. 383-8958; 336 New Byhalia Rd. Collierville. 861-0122 CHEDDAR’S—7684 Winchester. 624-8881; 2147 N. Germantown Pkwy. 380-1119. THE CHEESECAKE FACTORY—2760 N. Germantown Pkwy, Suite 193 (Wolfchase). 937-1613. CHILI’S—7810 Poplar (Germantown). 756-5203; 4609 Poplar. 685-2257; 8100

Giacosa Pl. 372-3132; 287 W. Goodman Rd. (Southaven). 662-349-7002; 237 Market Blvd. (Collierville). 853-7520; 1260 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 756-7771; 8526 Highway 51 (Millington). 872-0555. COLTON’S STEAKHOUSE—8030 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 383-8445; 8051 Goodman Rd. (Olive Branch). 662-8904142. COMO STEAKHOUSE—203 Main St. Como, MS. 662-526-9529. THE COVE—2559 Broad Ave. 7300719. THE CUPBOARD—1400 Union. 276-8015 ELWOOD’S SHACK— 4523 Summer. 761-9898. EVERGREEN GRILL—1545 Overton Park. 249-2393. T.G.I. FRIDAY’S—185 Union, Double Tree Hotel. 523-8500; 176 E. Goodman Rd. (Southaven). 662-349-4223; 7733 Winchester Rd. 752-1369; 8325 Highway 64. 372-2539.. KEM’S RESTAURANT—2751 New Brunswick Rd., Holiday Inn & Suites. 2661952. LBOE—2021 Madison Ave. 725-0770. LOGAN’S ROADHOUSE—2710 N. Germantown Parkway. 381-5254; 5901 Poplar. 684-2272; 7755 Winchester Rd. 759-1430; 6685 Airways Blvd. (Southaven). 662-772-5015. MAC’S BURGERS—4698 Spottswood. 512-4604. MIDTOWN CROSSING GRILLE—394 N. Watkins. 443-0502. O’CHARLEY’S—6045 Stage Rd., #74. 373-5602 (Bartlett); 1040 N. Germantown

CAFE SOCIETY—With Belgian and classic French influences, serves Wagyu beef, chicken, and seafood dishes, including baconwrapped shrimp, along with daily specials and vegetarian entrees. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 212 N. Evergreen. 722-2177. L, D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ CAPITAL GRILLE—Known for its dry-aged, hand-carved steaks; among the specialties are bone-in sirloin, and porcinirubbed Delmonico; also seafood entrees and seasonal lunch plates. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. Crescent Center, 6065 Poplar. 6839291. L, D, X, $$$-$$$$ CAPRICCIO GRILL ITALIAN STEAKHOUSE—Offers prime steaks, fresh seafood (lobster tails, grouper, mahi mahi), pasta, and several northern Italian specialties. 149 Union, The Peabody. 529-4199. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$$ CARRABBA’S ITALIAN GRILL—Serves chicken Bryan, calamari, various pastas, and other “old-world” Italian entrees. 4600 Merchant’s Park Cl., Carriage Crossing (Collierville). 854-0200; 5110 Poplar. 685-9900. L (Sat.-Sun.), D, X, $-$$$ CASABLANCA— Lamb shawarma is one of the fresh, homemade specialties served at this Mediterranean/Moroccan restaurant; fish entrees and vegetarian options also available. 5030 Poplar. 725-8557. L, D, X, $-$$ CELTIC CROSSING—Specializes in Irish and American pub fare. Entrees include shepherd’s pie, shrimp and sausage coddle, and fish and chips. 903 S. Cooper. 274-5151. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ CENTRAL BBQ—Serves ribs, smoked hot wings, pulled pork sandwiches, chicken, turkey, nachos, and portobello sandwiches. Offers both pork and beef barbecue. 2249 Central Ave. 272-9377; 4375 Summer Ave. 767-4672; 147 E. Butler. 672-7760. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ CHEZ PHILIPPE— Classical/contemporary French cuisine presented in a luxurious atmosphere with a seasonal menu focused on local/regional cuisine. Afternoon tea served Wed.-Sat, 1-3 p.m. (reservations required). Closed Sun.-Mon.-Tues. The Peabody, 149 Union. 529-4188. D, X, MRA, $$$$ CIAO BELLA—Among the Italian and Greek specialties are lasagna, seafood pasta, eggplant rolotini, gourmet pizzas, and vegetarian options. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 565 Erin Dr., Erinway Shopping Center. 205-2500. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$

CLUBS/PUBS/SPORTS BARS Pkw. 754-6201; 357 W. Goodman Rd. 662-349-6663 (Southaven); 656 W. Poplar (Collierville). 861-5811. THE OLIVE GARDEN—7778 Winchester. 624-2003; 8405 Highway 64, Wolfchase Galleria. 377-3437; 6615 Airways (Southaven). 662-536-3350; 5679 Poplar, #1. 761-5711. OSHI BURGER BAR—94 s. Main. 341-2091. OUTBACK STEAKHOUSE— 1110 N. Germantown Parkway. 751-9800; 2255 Union Ave. 7285100; 125 W. Goodman Rd. (Southaven). 662-349-7488. MRA. RAFFERTY’S—4542 Poplar. 374-0096; 505 N. Germantown Pkwy. 755-4799. RUBY TUESDAY—1653 Sycamore View. 382-9280;7535 Winchester. 7556570. SIDECAR CAFE—2194 Whitten. 388-0285. SILVER CABOOSE—132 E. Mulberry (Collierville). 853-0010. SKIMO’S—1166 N. Houston Levee, #107. 756-5055. MRA. SOUL FISH CAFE—862 S. Cooper. 725-0722; 3160 Village Shops Dr.(Germantown). 755-6988. 4720 Poplar. 590-0323. MRA. SPAGHETTI WAREHOUSE—40 W. Huling. 521-0907. TUGS—River Inn, 51 Harbor Town Square. 260-3344. MRA. VINEGAR JIM’S—12062 Forrest (Arlington). 867-7568. WOLF RIVER CAFE—460 U.S.194 (Rossville). 853-2586.

CITY GROCERY—Southern eclectic cuisine; shrimp and grits is a specialty. Closed for dinner Sunday. 152 Courthouse Square (Oxford, MS). 662-232-8080. L, D, SB, X, $$-$$$ COLETTA’S—Longtime eatery serves such specialties as homemade ravioli, lasagna, and pizza with barbecue or traditional toppings. 2850 Appling Rd. (Bartlett). 383-1122; 1063 S. Parkway E. 948-7652. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ CORKY’S—Popular barbecue emporium offers both wet and dry ribs, plus a full menu of other barbecue entrees. Wed. lunch buffets, Cordova and Collierville. 5259 Poplar. 685-9744; 1740 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 737-1911; 743 W. Poplar (Collierville). 405-4999; 6434 Goodman Rd., Olive Branch. 662-893-3663. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ COZY CORNER—Serving up ribs, pork sandwiches, chicken, spaghetti, and more; also homemade banana pudding. Closed Sun.-Mon. 745 N. Parkway. 527-9158. L, D, $ THE CRAZY NOODLE—Korean noodle dishes range from bibam beef noodle with cabbage, carrots, and other vegetables, to curry chicken noodle; also rice cakes served in a flavorful sauce. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 2015 Madison. 272-0928. L,D, X, $ DEJAVU—Serves Creole, soul, and vegetarian cuisine, including po-boys, jambalaya, and shrimp and grits. 51 S. Main. 505-0212. L,D, X, $-$$ DERAE RESTAURANT—Ethiopian and Mediterranean fare includes fuul, or fava beans in spices and yoghurt, goat meat and rice, and garlic chicken over basmati rice with cilantro chutney; also salmon and tilapia. Closed Monday. 923 S. Highland. 552-3992. B, L, D, $-$$ ECCO—Mediterranean-inspired specialties range from rib-eye steak to seared scallops to housemade pastas and a grilled vegetable plate; also a Saturday brunch. Closed Sun.-Mon. 1585 Overton Park. 410-8200. L, D, X, $-$$ EDO—Traditional Japanese cuisine includes shrimp tempura, nagiri, and chicken teriyaki. Closed Mon. 4792 Summer. 767-7096. D, X, $ EIGHTY3—Contemporary menu of steaks and seafood offers a variety of eclectic specialties; also weekly specials, small plates, appetizers, and patio dining. 83 Madison Ave. 333-1224. B, L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ EL MEZCAL—Serves burritos, chimichangas, fajitas, and other Mexican cuisine, as well as shrimp dinners and steak. 402 Perkins

From Beale Street night spots to neighborhood bars/grills, these places dish out a variety of food. Many offer live entertainment, and patrons can’t miss the large-screen TVs. ALEX’S TAVERN—1445 Jackson. 278-9086. ALFRED’S—197 Beale. 525-3711. MRA. B.B. KING’S BLUES CLUB— 143 Beale. 524-5464. MRA. BEALE STREET TAP ROOM—168 Beale St. 576-2220. BELMONT GRILL—4970 Poplar. 767-0305; 9102 Poplar Pike (Germantown). 624-6001. MRA. BLIND BEAR SPEAKEASY— 119 S. Main, Pembroke Square. 417-8435. BLUE MONKEY—2012 Madison. 272-2583; 513 S. Front. 527-6665. BLUES CITY CAFE—138 Beale St. 526-3637. MRA. BROOKHAVEN PUB & GRILL—695 W. Brookhaven Circle. 680-8118. MRA. BUFFALO WILD WINGS—3448 Poplar. 324-9225; 3770 Hacks Cross Rd. 737-9463; 7188 Airways (Southaven). 662-3497776; 8385 Highway 64. 380-9294. DOUBLE J SMOKEHOUSE & SALOON—124 E. G.E. Patterson. 347-2648. EARNESTINE & HAZEL’S— 531 S. Main. 523-9754. MRA. EAST END GRILL—7547 Highway 64. 937-1392; 7956 Winchester Rd. 432-4256. MRA. FLYING SAUCER DRAUGHT EMPORIUM—130 Peabody Place. 523-7468; 1400 Germantown Pkwy. 755-5530. MRA. FLYNN’S RESTAURANT & BAR— 159 Beale St. 5231940. FOX AND HOUND ENGLISH PUB & GRILL—847 Exocet Dr. 624-9060; 5101 Sanderlin Ave. 763-2013; 6565 Town Center Crossing (Southaven). 662-536-2200. GRAWEMEYER’S—520 S. Main. 800-1553. HADLEY’S PUB—2779 Whitten Rd. 266-5006. HARD ROCK CAFE— 126 Beale. 529-0007. HIGH POINT PUB—477 High Point Terrace. 452-9203. HUEY’S—1927 Madison. 726-4372; 1771 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 754-3885; 77 S. Second. 527-2700; 2130 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-4455; 7090 Malco Blvd. (Southaven). 662-349-7097; 7825 Winchester. 624-8911; 4872 Poplar. 6827729; 7677 Farmington Blvd. (Germantown). 318-3030. MRA. JERRY LEE LEWIS’ CAFE & HONKY TONK—310 Beale St. 654-5171. KING’S PALACE CAFE— 162 Beale. 521-1851. MRA. MEMPHIS SPORTS PUB— 5012 Park Ave. 767-8632. MIDTOWN CROSSING GRILLE—394 N. Watkins. 443-0502. MURPHY’S—1589 Madison. 726-4193. MRA. NEIL’S MUSIC ROOM—5727 Quince Rd. 682-2300. OLD ZINNIE’S— 1688 Madison. 726-5004. PATRICK’S— 4972 Park Ave. 682-2852. MRA. P & H CAFE—1532 Madison. 726-0906. PIG ON BEALE—167 Beale. 529-1544 ROCKHOUSELIVE—2586 Poplar. 324-6300. 5709 Raleigh LaGrange. 386-7222. R.P. TRACKS— 3547 Walker. 327-1471. RUM BOOGIE CAFE— 182 Beale. 528-0150. SAMMY HAGAR’S RED ROCKER BAR & GRILL— Southland Park, 1550 North Ingram Blvd. (West Memphis). 872-735-3670. SILKY O’SULLIVAN’S— 183 Beale St. 522-9596. MRA. THE SILLY GOOSE— 100 Peabody Place. 435-6915. THE SLIDER INN— 2117 Peabody. 725-1155. SOUTH OF BEALE— 361 S. Main. 526-0388. T J MULLIGAN’S—8071 Trinity Rd. (Cordova). 756-4480; 2821 N. Houston Levee Rd. 377-9997. UBEE’S—521 S. Highland. 323-0900 WESTY’S—346 N. Main. 543-3278 . THE WINDJAMMER— 786 E. Brookhaven Cl. 683-9044.

106 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

104_MM11_2015_CDL.indd 106

10/19/15 11:57 AM


CIT Y DINING LIST Extd. 761-7710; 694 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 755-1447; 1492 Union. 274-4264; 11615 Airline Rd. (Arlington). 867-1883; 9045 Highway 64 (Lakeland). 383-4219; 7164 Hacks Cross Rd. (Olive Branch). 662-890-3337; 8834 Hwy. 51 N. (Millington). 872-3220; 7424 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 417-6026; 9947 Wolf River (Collierville) 853-7922. L, D, X, $ EL PORTON—Fajitas, quesadillas, and steak ranchero are just a few of the menu items. 2095 Merchants Row (Germantown). 7544268; 8361 Highway 64. 380-7877; 65 S. Highland, Poplar Plaza. 452-7330; 1805 N. Germantown Parkway (Cordova). 624-9358; 1016 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-5770. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ ELFO GRISANTI’S—Specializing in northern Italian cuisine, including pasta, fish, beef and nightly specials — all made in-house. Closed Sun. 2285 S. Germantown Rd. 753-4017. D, X, $-$$$ EMERALD THAI RESTAURANT—Spicy shrimp, pad khing, lemon grass chicken, and several noodle, rice, and vegetarian dishes are offered at this family restaurant. Closed Sunday.  8950 Highway 64 (Lakeland). 384-0540. L, D X, $-$$ ERLING JENSEN—Presents “globally inspired” cuisine: specialties are rack of lamb, big game entrees,and fresh fish dishes. 1044 S. Yates. 763-3700. D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ EVELYN & OLIVE—Jamaican/Southern fusion cuisine includes such dishes as Kingston stew fish, Rasta Pasta, and jerk rib-eye. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun.-Mon. 630 Madison. 7485422. L, D, X, $ EXLINES’ BEST PIZZA—Serves pizza, Italian dinners, sandwiches, and salads.  2935 Austin Peay. 388-4711; 6250 Stage Rd.(Bartlett). 382-3433; 2801 Kirby Parkway. 754-0202; 7730 Wolf River Blvd.(Germantown). 753-4545; 531 W. Stateline Rd. 662-342-4544 (check online for additional locations). L, D, X, $ 4DUMPLINGS—Chicken with celery and pork with Napa cabbage are among the hand-made dumpling varieties; also serves Asian tacos, and noodle and rice meals. Closed Sunday.  6515 Poplar. 762-4184. L, D, X, $ THE FARMER—Serving upscale Southern cuisine, with a focus on locally grown ingredients. Among the specialties are smoked beef tenderloin and shrimp and grits. Closed for dinner Sun.-Mon. 262 S. Highland. 324-2221. L, D, X, $-$$ FELICIA SUZANNE’S—Southern cuisine with low-country, Creole, and Delta influences, using regional fresh seafood, local beef, and locally grown foods. Entrees include shrimp and grits. Closed Sun. and Mon. Brinkley Plaza, 80 Monroe, Suite L1. 523-0877. L (Fri. only), D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ FERRARO’S PIZZERA & PUB—Rigatoni bolognese and capellini pomodoro are among the pasta entrees here, along with pizzas (whole or by the slice), with a variety of toppings.  111 Jackson. 522-2033. L, D, X, $-$$ FIREBIRDS—Specialties are hand-cut steaks, slow-roasted prime rib, and wood-grilled salmon and other seafood, as well as seasonal entrees. 8470 Highway 64 (Bartlett). 379-1300; 4600 Merchants Circle, Carriage Crossing (Collierville). 850-1637. L, D, X, $-$$$ THE FIVE SPOT—Tucked behind Earnestine & Hazel’s, this popular eatery features innovative bar food by chef Kelly English.  531 S. Main. 523-9754. D, X, $-$$ FLEMING’S PRIME STEAKHOUSE—Serves wet-aged and dry-aged steaks, prime beef, chops, and seafood, including salmon, Australian lobster tails, and a catch of the day. 6245 Poplar. 7616200. D, X, MRA, $$$-$$$$ FLIGHT RESTAURANT & WINE BAR—Serves steaks and seafood, along with such specialties as pork rib-eye and roasted duck, all matched with appropriate wines; also gourmet plate lunches. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 3 9 S. Main. 521-8005. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ FLYING FISH—Serves up fried and grilled versions of shrimp, crab, oysters, fish tacos, and catfish; also chicken and burgers. 105 S. Second. 522-8228. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ FOLK’S FOLLY ORIGINAL PRIME STEAK HOUSE— Specializes in prime steaks, as well as lobster, grilled Scottish salmon, Alaskan king crab legs, rack of lamb, and weekly specials. 551 S. Mendenhall. 762-8200. D, X, MRA, $$$-$$$$ FORMOSA—Offers Mandarin cuisine, including broccoli beef, hot-and-sour soup, and spring rolls. Closed Monday. 6685 Quince. 753-9898. L, D, X, $-$$ THE FOUR WAY—Legendary soul-food establishment dishing up such entrees as fried and baked catfish, chicken, and turkey and dressing, along with a host of vegetables and desserts. Closed Monday.  998 Mississippi Blvd. 507-1519. L, D (call to check hours.), $ FRATELLI’S—Serves hot and cold sandwiches, salads, soups, and desserts, all with an Italian/Mediterranean flair. Closed Sunday.  750 Cherry Rd., Memphis Botanic Garden. 766-9900. L, X, $ FRIDA’S—Mexican cuisine and Tex-Mex standards, including chimichangas, enchiladas, and fajitas; seafood includes shrimp and tilapia.  1718 Madison. 244-6196. L, D, X, $-$$ FUEL CAFE—Focus is on natural “Americana” dishes with such specialties as bison burgers, grass-fed beef dishes, and wild-caught

fish; also vegan and gluten-free entrees. Closed Sun.-Mon. 1761 Madison. 725-9025. L, D, X, $-$$ GERMANTOWN COMMISSARY—Serves barbecue sandwiches, sliders, ribs, shrimp, and nachos, as well as smoked barbecued bologna sandwiches; Mon.-night all-you-can-eat ribs. 2290 S. Germantown Rd. S. (Germantown). 754-5540. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ GOLDEN INDIA—Northern Indian specialties include tandoori chicken as well as lamb, beef, shrimp, and vegetarian dishes. 2097 Madison. 728-5111. L, D, X, $-$$ GREEN BAMBOO—Pineapple tilapia, pork vermicelli, and the soft egg noodle combo are Vietnamese specialties here.  990 N. Germantown Parkway, #104 (Cordova). 753-5488. L, D, $-$$ GREENCORK—Wine-on-tap bar serves seasonal menu of modern Southern cuisine. Specialty is the picnic basket, which includes cheese truffles and daily selections of premium meats. Closed Sun.-Mon.  2156 Young Ave. 207-5281. D, X, $-$$ GRIDLEY’S—Offers barbecued ribs, shrimp, pork plate, chicken, and hot tamales; also daily lunch specials. Closed Tues. 6842 Stage Rd. (Bartlett). 377-8055. L, D, X, $-$$ FRANK GRISANTI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT— Northern Italian favorites include pasta with jumbo shrimp and mushrooms; also seafood, fillet mignon, and daily lunch specials. Closed for lunch Sunday. Embassy Suites Hotel, 1022 S. Shady Grove. 761-9462. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ RONNIE GRISANTI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT—This Memphis institution serves some family classics such as Elfo’s Special and chicken ravioli, along with lighter fare and changing daily chef selection. Closed Sun.  Sheffield Antiques Mall, 684 W. Poplar (Collierville). 850-0191. L (Mon.-Sat.), D (Thurs.-Sat.), X, $-$$$ THE GROVE GRILL—Offers steaks, chops, seafood, and other American cuisine with Southern and global influences; entrees include crab cakes, and shrimp and grits, also dinner specials. 4550 Poplar. 818-9951. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $$-$$$ GUS’S WORLD FAMOUS FRIED CHICKEN—Serves chicken with signature spicy batter, along with homemade beans, slaw, and pies. 310 S. Front. 527-4877; 215 S. Center St. (Collierville). 853-6005; 2965 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 373-9111; 730 S. Mendenhall. 767-2323; 505 Highway 70 W., Mason, TN. 901-294-2028. L, D, X, MRA, $ HALF SHELL—Specializes in seafood, such as King crab legs; also serves steaks, chicken, pastas, salads, sandwiches, a ”voodoo menu”; oyster bar at Winchester location. 688 S. Mendenhall. 682-3966; 7825 Winchester. 737-6755. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ HAPPY MEXICAN—Serves quesadillas, burritos, chimichangas, vegetable and seafood dishes, and more. 385 S. Second. 529-9991; 6080 Primacy Pkwy. 683-0000; 7935 Winchester. 751-5353. L, D, X, $ HAVANA’S PILON—Tiny eatery serving Cuban cuisine, including fried plantains in a pilon topped with shrimp, ropa vieja (shredded beef in tomato sauce), roasted pork, and a Cuban sandwich. Closed Sunday.  143 Madison. 527-2878. L, D, X, $ HERITAGE TAVERN & KITCHEN—Featuring classic cuisine from the country’s five regions, including lobster rolls, fried chicken, smoked tamales, Green Goddess shrimp, and more.  6150 Poplar, Regalia. 761-8855.L, D, WB, X, $-$$$ HIGH POINT PIZZA—Serves variety of pizzas, subs, salads, and sides. Closed Monday.  477 High Point Terrace. 452-3339. L, D, , X $-$$ HOG & HOMINY—The casual sister to Andrew Michael Italian Kitchen serves brick-oven-baked pizzas, including the Red-Eye with pork-belly, and small plates with everything from meatballs to beef and cheddar hotdogs;and local veggies. Closed for lunch Mon. 707 W. Brookhaven Cl. 207-7396. L, D, SB, X, $-$$$ HONG KONG—Cantonese and Mandarin standards are sweetand-sour chicken, and pepper beef. Closed Sunday. 3966 Elvis Presley. 396-0801. L, D, X, $

HOUSTON’S—Serves steaks, seafood, pork chops, chicken dishes, sandwiches, salads, and Chicago-style spinach dip,  5000 Poplar. 683-0915. L, D, X $-$$$  I LOVE JUICE BAR—Serving an extensive line of juices and grab-and-go lunch items. 553 S. Cooper. 612-2720. L, D, X, $ IMAGINE VEGAN CAFE—Dishes range from salads and sandwiches to full dinners, breakfast items served all day. 2299 Young. 654-3455. L, D, SB, X, $ INDIA PALACE—Tandoori chicken, lamb shish kabobs, chicken tikka masala are among the entrees; also, vegetarian options and a daily lunch buffet. 1720 Poplar. 278-1199. L, D, X, $-$$ INTERIM—Offers American-seasonal cuisine with emphasis on local foods and fresh fish; macaroni and cheese is a house specialty. Closed for lunch Sat. 5040 Sanderlin, Suite 105. 818-0821. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ INTERSTATE BAR-B-Q—Specialties include chopped porkshoulder sandwiches, ribs, hot wings, spaghetti, chicken, and turkey. 2 265 S. Third. 775-2304; 150 W. Stateline Rd. (Southaven). 662-393-5699. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ ITTA BENA—Southern and Cajun-American cuisine served here; specialties are filet Oscar and shrimp and grits, along with steaks, chops, seafood, and pasta. 145 Beale St. 578-3031. D,X, $$-$$$
 JASMINE THAI AND VEGETARIAN RESTAURANT—Entrees include panang chicken, green curry shrimp,and pad thai (noodles, shrimp, and peanuts); also vegetarian dishes. Closed Mon.-Tues. 916 S. Cooper. 725-0223. L, D, X, $ JIM ’N NICK’S BAR-B-Q—Serves barbecued pork, ribs, chicken, brisket, and fish, along with other homemade Southern specialties. 2 359 N. Germantown Pkwy. 388-0998. L, D, X, $-$$ JIM’S PLACE/JIM’S PLACE GRILLE—Features American, Greek, and Continental cuisine with such entrees as pork tenderloin, several seafood specialties, and hand-cut charcoal-grilled steaks. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 518 Perkins Extd. 7662030; 3660 Houston Levee (Collierville). 861-5000. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ JOE’S CRAB SHACK—Serves a variety of seafood, along with chicken, steak, and pasta. 7990 Horizon Center Blvd. 384-7478. L, D, X, $-$$$ JULLES POSH FOOD CO.— The changing menu features seasonal “cooking light” dishes such as salmon-shrimp cakes with green salad and roasted sweet potato wedges; also cold-pressed juices, to-go dishes, and desserts.  6300 Poplar. 509-8675. B, L, D, X, $-$$ JUST FOR LUNCH—Serves sandwiches, quiche, salads, fresh fish including fried oysters, daily specials, and homemade rolls. Closed Sunday. 3 092 Poplar, Chickasaw Oaks Plaza. 323-3287. L, D (Thurs. only), X, MRA, $-$$ KOOKY CANUCK— Offers prime rib, catfish, and burgers, including the 4-lb. “Kookamonga”; also late-night menu. 97 S. Second. 578-9800; 1250 N. Germantown Pkwy. 1-8002453 L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ LA BAGUETTE—An almond croissant and chicken salad are among specialties at this French-style bistro. Closed for dinner Sun.  3088 Poplar. 458-0900. B, L, D (closes at 7), X, $ LA PLAYITA MEXICANA—Specializes in seafood and Mexican entrees, including red snapper, tilapia, oysters, chimichangas, tostados, and taco salad. 6194 Macon (Bartlett). 377-2282. L, D, X, $-$$ LA TAQUERIA GUADALUPANA—Fajitas and quesadillas are just a few of the authentic Mexican entrees offered here. 4818 Summer. 685-6857. L, D, $ LAFAYETTE’S MUSIC ROOM—Serves such Southern cuisine as po boys and shrimp and grits, and wood-fired pizzas; also live music.  2119 Madison. 207-5097. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ LAS DELICIAS—Popular for its guacamole, house-made tortilla chips, and margaritas, this restaurant draws diners with its chicken enchiladas, meat-stuffed flautas, and Cuban torta with

COFFEEHOUSES/BOOKSTORE CAFES

In addition to gourmet coffees and drinks, these eateries generally serve pastries, sandwiches, soups, and salads, and some have a wider range of menu items. AVENUE COFFEE—786 Echles. 454-3348. BARNES & NOBLE BOOKSELLERS— 2774 N. Germantown Pkwy. 386-2468; 4610 Merchants Park Cl., #521 (Collierville). 853-3264. BELLA CAFFE—Pink Palace Museum, 3050 Central. 3206320 BLUFF CITY COFFEE—505 S. Main. 405-4399. THE BOOKSELLERS AT LAURELWOOD— 387 Perkins Extd. 683-9801. CARITAS VILLAGE COFFEE SHOP— 2509 Harvard. 327-5246.. CITY AND STATE—2625 Broad. 249-2406.

JAVA CABANA—2170 Young. 272-7210. MUDDY’S GRIND HOUSE—585 S. Cooper. 683-8844. OTHERLANDS—641 S. Cooper. 278-4994. MRA. QAHWA COFFEE BAR—Claridge House, 109 N. Main.800-2227. REPUBLIC COFFEE—2924 Walnut Grove. 590-1578. SQUARE BEANS ESPRESSO + GELATO— 103 N. Center St. (Collierville). 854-8855. STARBUCKS—1850 Union Ave. 729-4288; 3388 Poplar. 320-1021; 5201 Poplar. 818-9954; 2955 Kirby Whitten (Bartlett), 266-2497; 180 Goodman Rd. E. (Southaven). 662-349-0342; 8140 Goodman Rd. (Olive Branch). 662-890-9507. For more listings, check online. TAMP & TAP—122 Gayoso. 207-1053 THE UGLY MUG— 4610 Poplar. 552-3165. N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 107

104_MM11_2015_CDL.indd 107

10/13/15 3:39 PM


CIT Y DINING LIST

901.347.3060 schweinehaus.com

Memphis Magazine’s

THE 2015

FACE OF

BAVARIAN BEER & PORK

BRUNCH IS SERVED! Saturdays and Sundays 11am-5pm

TRY LUNCH b SCHWEINEHAUS mon • tue • wed • thu • fri • sat • sun try our fresh Fall menu selections

HAPPY

EXPRESS

HOUR LUNCH Mon - Fri 11 AM-6PM

for just

$10

$1 off

entire bar

Speedy Hot Weiner

w/Pretzel Bun, Fries, & Drink

2110 Madison Ave Overton Square

11am-2am

21 & Up after 9pm

Evenings inVienna

w

every day

PIANIST

Victor Asuncion

Internationally acclaimed pianist Victor Santiago Asuncion will explore the music of Vienna’s famous sons. We’ll hear Mozart’s Sonata No. 18 in D Major, the Sonata for Piano by Alban Berg, Arnold Schoenberg’s 6 Little Pieces, Op. 19, and the great Wanderer Fantasy by Schubert. JOIN US

sunday, November 15, 2015, 3pm at the home of

DR . & M RS . R ICHARD MILLER 264 Windover Road memphis, tn 38111 for ticket info, call 901.758.0150

spicy pork. Closed Sunday. 4002 Park Ave. 458-9264; 5689 Quince. 800-2873. L, D, X, $ LAS TORTUGAS DELI MEXICANA—Authentic Mexican food prepared from local food sources; specializes in tortugas — grilled bread scooped out to hold such fillings as brisket, pork, and shrimp; also tingas tostados and such sides as steamed corn. Closed Sunday. 1215 S. Germantown Rd. 751-1200. L, D, X, $-$$ LEONARD’S—Serves wet and dry ribs, barbecue sandwiches, spaghetti, catfish, homemade onion rings. and lemon icebox pie; also a lunch buffet. 5465 Fox Plaza. 360-1963. L, X, MRA, $-$$ THE LITTLE TEA SHOP— Downtown institution serves up Southern comfort cooking, including meatloaf and such veggies as turnip greens, yams, okra and tomatoes. Closed Sat.-Sun.  69 Monroe. 525-6000, L, X, $ LOCAL GASTROPUB—Eclectic entrees with a focus on locally grown products include lobster mac-and-cheese and pork osso bucco. 95 S. Main. 473-9573; 2126 Madison. 725-1845. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ THE LOOKOUT AT THE PYRAMID—Serves Southern fare, including catfish tacos and crawfish tails, atop The Pyramid with a panoramic view of the river. 1 Bass Pro Dr. 620-4600/291-8200. L, D, X $-$$$ LOS COMPADRES—Serves enchiladas, burritos, tamales, tacos, and vegetarian dishes; also Cuban entrees. 3295 Poplar. 458-5731. L, D, X, $-$$ LOST PIZZA—Offering pizzas (with dough made from scratch), pasta, salads, sandwiches, tamales, and more. 2855 Poplar. 5721803; 5960 Getwell, Southaven. 662-892-8684. L, D, X, $-$$ LOTUS—Authentic Vietnamese-Asian fare, including lemon-grass chicken and shrimp, egg rolls, Pho soup, and spicy Vietnamese vermicelli. 4970 Summer. 682-1151. D, X, $ LYFE KITCHEN—Serving healthy, affordable wraps, bowls, sandwiches, and more; entrees include roasted salmon and “unfried” chicken. 6201 Poplar. 684-5333. B, L, D, WB, X, $ LYNCHBURG LEGENDS—This restaurant with a Jack Daniels’ theme and Southern cuisine serves such entrees as Bourbon Street salmon, buttermilk-fried chicken, and grilled steak and wild mushroom salad. Double Tree Hotel, 5069 Sanderlin. 969-7777. B, L, D, X, $- $$$ THE MAJESTIC GRILLE—Housed in a former silent-picture house, features aged steaks, fresh seafood, and such specialties as roasted chicken and grilled pork tenderloin; offers a pre-theatre menu and classic cocktails. 145 S. Main. 522-8555. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ MANILA FILIPINO RESTAURANT—Entrees include pork belly cutlet with lechon sauce, and shrimp and vegetables in tamarind broth; also daily combos, rice dishes, and chef specials. 7849 Rockford (Millington). 209-8525. L, D, X, $ MARCIANO MEDITERRANEAN AND ITALIAN CUISINE—Rack of lamb with roasted potatoes and demiglaze is among the entrees; also steaks, seafood, and gourmet pizza. 780 Brookhaven Cl. 682-1660. D, X, $-$$
 MARDI GRAS MEMPHIS—Serving Cajun fare, including an etoufee-stuffed po’boy. 496 Watkins. 530-6767. L, D, X, $-$$ MARLOWE’S—In addition to its signature barbecue and ribs, Marlowe’s serves Southern-style steaks, chops, lasagne, and more.  4381 Elvis Presley Blvd. 332-4159. D, X, $-$$ MARMALADE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE—Southern homestyle entrees include catfish, honey-baked ham, steaks, and shrimp, all with a choice of three vegetables. Closed Sun. and Mon.  153 G.E. Patterson. 522-8800. D, X, $ MAUI BRICK OVEN— Serving an all-gluten-free menu with grain bowls, pizzas, and more. Among the specialties: the vegan Barefoot Bowl and the Paradise Pesto Pizza. 7850 Poplar. 505-2525. L, D, X, $-$$ MAXIMO’S ON BROAD—Serving a tapas menu that features creative fusion cuisine.  2617 Broad Ave. 452-1111. L, D, SB, X, $-$$ MAYURI INDIAN CUISINE—Serves tandoori chicken, masala dosa, tikka masala, as well as lamb and shrimp entrees; also a daily lunch buffet, and dinner buffet on Fri.-Sat. 6524 Quince Rd. 753-8755. L, D, X, $-$$ MCEWEN’S ON MONROE—Southern/American cuisine with international flavors; specialties include steak and seafood, sweet potato-crusted catfish with macaroni and cheese, and more. Closed Sun., Monroe location.  120 Monroe. 527-7085; 1110 Van Buren (Oxford). 662-234-7003. L, D, SB (Oxford only), X, MRA, $$-$$$ DAN MCGUINNESS PUB—Serves fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, burgers, and other Irish and American fare; also lunch and dinner specials. 4694 Spottswood. 761-3711; 3964 Goodman Rd. 662890-7611. L, D, WB (Spottswood), X, $ MEDALLION—Offers steaks, seafood, chicken, and pasta entrees. Closed for dinner Sunday. 3700 Central, Holiday Inn (Kemmons Wilson School of Hospitality). 678-1030. B, L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ MELLOW MUSHROOM—Large menu includes assortment of pizzas, salads, calzones, hoagies, vegetarian options, and 50 beers on

T UNICA TA BLES CHICAGO STEAKHOUSE AT THE GOLDSTRIKE—1010 Casino Center Dr., Robinsonville, MS, 1-888-24KSTAY /662-357-1225. DON B’S STEAKHOUSE AT THE FITZ —711 Lucky Ln., Robinsonville, MS, 1-888-766-LUCK, ext 6501. FAIRBANKS AT THE HOLLYWOOD—1150 Casino Strip Blvd., Robinsonville, MS, 1-800-871-0711 JACK BINION’S STEAK HOUSE AT HORSESHOE—1021 Casino Center Drive, Robinsonville, MS, 1-800-303-SHOE. tap. 9155 Poplar, Shops of Forest Hill (Germantown). 9070243; 5138 Park Ave. 562-1211. L, D, X, $-$$ MEMPHIS BARBECUE COMPANY—Offers spare ribs, baby backs, and pulled pork and brisket, along with such sides as mac and cheese, grits, and red beans.  709 Desoto Cove, Horn Lake (MS). 662-536-3762. L, D, X, $-$$ MEMPHIS PIZZA CAFE—Homemade pizzas are specialties; also serves sandwiches, calzones, and salads. 2087 Madison. 726-5343; 5061 Park Ave. 684-1306; 7604 W. Farmington (Germantown). 753-2218; 797 W. Poplar (Collierville). 861-7800; 5627 Getwell (Southaven). 662-536-1364. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ MESQUITE CHOP HOUSE—The focus here is on steaks, including prime fillet, rib eyes, and prime-aged New York strip; also, some seafood options. 5 960 Getwell (Southaven). 662-8902467; 88 Union. 527-5337; 3165 Forest Hill-Irene (Germantown). 249-5661. D, SB (Germantown), X, $$-$$$ MISTER B—Features New Orleans-style seafood and steaks. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 6655 Poplar, #107. 7515262. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$$ MOLLIE FONTAINE LOUNGE—Specializes in tapas (small plates) featuring global cuisine. Closed Sun.-Tues. 679 Adams Ave. 524-1886. D, X, MRA, $ MOLLY’S LA CASITA—Homemade tamales, fish tacos, a vegetarian combo, and bacon-wrapped shrimp are a few of the specialties. 2006 Madison. 726-1873. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ MORTIMER’S—Contemporary American entrees include trout almondine, several chicken dishes, and hand-cut steaks; also sandwiches, salads, and daily/ nightly specials. Closed for lunch Sat.-Sun. 590 N. Perkins. 761-9321. L, D, X, $-$$ MOSA ASIAN BISTRO—Specialties include sesame chicken, Thai calamari, rainbow panang curry with grouper fish, and other Pan Asian/fusion entrees.  850 S. White Station Rd. 683-8889. L, D, X, $ MULAN—Hunan Chicken, tofu dishes, and orange beef served here; some sushi, too. 2059 Houston Levee (Collierville). 8505288; 2149 Young. 347-3965. L, D, X, $-$$ NAGASAKI INN—Chicken, steak, and lobster are among the main courses; meal is cooked at your table. 3951 Summer. 4540320. D, X, $$ NAGOYA—Offers traditional Japanese cuisine and sushi bar; specialties are teriyaki and tempura dishes. 7075 Malco Blvd., Suite 101 (Southaven). 662-349-8788. L, D, X, $-$$$
 NAM KING—Offers luncheon and dinner buffets, dim sum, and such specialties as fried dumplings, pepper steak, and orange chicken.  4594 Yale. 373-4411. L, D, X, $
 NAPA CAFE—Among the specialties is miso-marinated salmon over black rice with garlic spinach and shiitake mushrooms. Closed for lunch Sat. and all day Sun. 5101 Sanderlin, Suite 122. 6830441. L, D, X, MRA, $$-$$$ NEW ASIA—Specializing in authentic Chinese food, including roast Peking duck. 2075 Exeter, Suite 90. 758-8388. L, D, X, $ NEW HUNAN—Chinese eatery with more than 80 entrees;also lunch/dinner buffets. 5052 Park. 766-1622. L, D, X, $ THE OFFICE@UPTOWN— Offering sandwiches, wraps, pizza, soups, salads, and several vegetarian options. Closed Sunday. 594 N. Second St. 522-1905. B, L, D, X, $ OLD VENICE PIZZA CO.— Specializes in “eclectic Italian,” from pastas, including the “Godfather,” to hand-tossed pizzas, including the “John Wayne”; choose from 60 toppings. 368 Perkins Ext. 767-6872. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$ ON THE BORDER—Dishes out such Tex-Mex specialties as fajitas and Southwest chicken tacos; also fresh grilled seafood specials. 8101 Giacosa Pl. (Cordova).881-0808 ; 4552 Poplar. 763-0569; 6572 Airways (Southaven). 662-655-4750. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $ ONE & ONLY BBQ—On the menu are pork barbecue sandwiches, platters, wet and dry ribs, smoked chicken and turkey platters, a smoked meat salad, barbecue quesadillas, and more.   1779 Kirby Pkwy. 751-3615; 567 Perkins Extd. 249-4227. L, D, X, $ ONIX RESTAURANT—Serves American seafood and pasta dishes. Closed for lunch Sat., all day Sun., and for dinner Mon. 412 S. Main. 552-4609. L, D, X, $-$$

108 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

104_MM11_2015_CDL.indd 108

10/16/15 1:44 PM


CIT Y DINING LIST ORR RESTAURANT—Serves Mediterranean/African cuisine, such as lamb Kowzi flavored with raisins and roasted nuts and served with white bean soup. 661 N. Mendenhall, Suite 101. 275-8692. L, D, X, $-$$ OSAKA JAPANESE CUISINE— Featuring an extensive sushi menu as well as traditional Japanese and hibachi dining. Hours vary for lunch; call.  3670 Houston Levee (Collierville). 861-4309; 3402 Poplar. 249-4690; 7164 Hacks Cross. 662-8909312; 2200 N. Germantown Pkwy. 425-4901. L, D, X, $-$$$   OWEN BRENNAN’S—New Orleans-style menu of beef, chicken, pasta, and seafood; jambalaya, shrimp and grits, and crawfish etouffee are specialties. Closed for dinner Sunday. The Regalia, 6150 Poplar. 761-0990. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ PANCHO’S—Serves up a variety of Mexican standards, including tacos, enchiladas, and mix-and-match platters; also lunch specials. 3600 E. Broadway (West Memphis). 870-735-6466. 717 N. White Station. 685-5404. L, D, X, MRA, $ PANDA GARDEN—Sesame chicken and broccoli beef are among the Mandarin and Cantonese entrees; also seafood specials and fried rice. Closed for lunch Saturday. 3735 Summer. 323-4819. L, D, X, $-$$ PASTA ITALIA—Northern Italian cuisine features homemade stuffed pastas; a specialty is rosetta al forno; also serves fish and steaks. Closed Sun.-Mon.  8130 Macon Station Dr., Suite 106. 751-0009. D, X, $$$-$$$$ PAULETTE’S—Presents fine dining with a Continental flair, including such entrees as filet Paulette with butter-pepper cream sauce and popoovers with strawberry butter; also changing daily specials. River Inn. 50 Harbor Town Square. 260-3300. B, L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$$ PEARL’S OYSTER HOUSE—Downtown eatery serving seafood, including oysters, crawfish, and stuffed butterfly shrimp, as well as beef, chicken, and pasta dishes. 299 S. Main. 522-9070. L, D, SB, X, MRA, $-$$$ PEI WEI ASIAN DINER—Serves a variety of Pan-Asian cuisine, including Japanese, Vietnamese, Korean, and Thai. Noodle and rice bowls are specialties; a small plates menu also offered. 1680 Union Ave., #109. 722-3780; 2257 N. Germantown Pkwy. 382-1822. L, D, X, $-$$
 PETE & SAM’S—Serving Memphis for 60-plus years; offers steaks, seafood, and traditional Italian dishes, including homemade ravioli, lasagna, and chicken marsala. 3886 Park. 458-0694. D, X, $-$$$ PETRA CAFÉ—Serves Greek, Italian, and Middle Eastern sandwiches, gyros, and entrees. Hours vary; call. 6641 Poplar Ave. (Germantown). 754-4440; 9155 Poplar (Germantown). 7555440; 1560 Union. 505-2812. L, D, X, $-$$ PINK DIVA CUPCAKERY & CUISINE— Vegetarian/ vegan fare, including cupcakes and build-your-own ramen and mac and cheese bowls. Closed Thurs. and Sun. 936 Florida. 9460056. L, D, $ PF CHANG’S CHINA BISTRO—Specialties are orange peel shrimp, Mongolian beef, and chicken in lettuce wraps; also vegetarian dishes, including spicy eggplant. 1181 Ridgeway Rd., Park Place Centre. 818-3889. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ PHO BINH—Vietnamese, vegetarian, and Cantonese specialties include lemon tofu and spring rolls. Closed Sunday. 1615 Madison. 276-0006. L, D, $ PHO SAIGON—Vietnamese fare includes beef teriyaki, roasted quail, curry ginger chicken, vegetarian options, and a variety of soups. 2 946 Poplar. 458-1644. L, D, $ PIG-N-WHISTLE—Offers pork shoulder sandwiches, wet and dry ribs, catfish, nachos, and stuffed barbecue potatoes.  6084 Kerr-Rosemark Rd. 872-2455. L, D, X, $ PORCELLINO’S CRAFT BUTCHER—Small plates, charcuterie selections, speacialty steaks, house-made pastries, and innovative teas and coffees are offered at this combination butcher shop and restaurant featuring locally sourced menu items.  711 W. Brookhaven Cl. 762-6656. B, L, D, X $-$$ PRESENTATION ROOM, THE—American bistro run by the students of L’Ecole Culinaire. Menu changes regularly; specialties may include such items as a filet with truffle mushroom ragu. Closed Fri.-Sun. 1 245 N. Germantown Pkwy (Cordova). 754-7115. L, D, X, $-$$ PYRO’S FIRE-FRESH PIZZA—Serving gourmet pizzas cooked in an open-fire oven; wide choice of toppings; large local and craft beer selection. 1 199 Ridgeway. 379-8294; 2035 Union Ave. 208-8857; 2286 N. Germantown Pkwy. 207-1198. B, L, D, X, $ RAVINE—Serves contemporary Southern cuisine with an emphasis on fresh, locally grown foods and a menu that changes weekly. Closed Mon.-Tues. 5 3 Pea Ridge/County Rd. 321 (Oxford, MS). 662-234-4555. D, SB, X, $$-$$$ RED KOI—Classic Japanese cuisine offered at this family-run restaurant; hibachi steaks, sushi, seafood, chicken, and vegetables.  5847 Poplar. 767-3456. L, D, X $-$$

Call now to book your holiday party at The Rendezvous! We have space available for parties of 15 to 300. Call Tuesday - Friday 9:30 - 4 for details and booking your event. 52 S. Second St. Memphis, TN 38103 / 901.523.2746

presents

A CELEBRATION OF

WORLD

W NE JAZZ AND

featuring

JEFF KASHIWA with

CINDY BRADLEY & JULIAN VAUGHN

DECEMBER 04, 2015

MINGLEWOOD HALL • Memphis • 7-10pm ADMISSION: $45 • VIP ADMISSION: $80 VIP LOUNGE: 6pm minglewoodhall.com • worldwineandjazz com PROCEEDS BENEFIT

SPONSORED BY

kirbywines.com

Shoponline or stopby&let us help you!

2865 Kirby Pkwy (One Block North off of 385) · p901.756.1993 · f901.757.0275 Monday - Thursday · 9am-10pm · Friday - Saturday · 9am-11pm N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 109

104_MM11_2015_CDL.indd 109

10/19/15 1:53 PM


CIT Y DINING LIST LOCALITY GUIDE BARTLETT

Vote now in the annual Memphis magazine Readers Restaurant Poll!

GO TO

MemphisMagazine.com TO VOTE NOW!

Joe’s Crab Shack Logan’s Roadhouse Abuelo’s Moe’s Southwest Grill Applebee’s T.J. Mulligan’s Cajun Catfish Company O’Charley’s Coletta’s Olive Garden Colton’s Steakhouse On the Border Dixie Cafe Osaka Japanese El Porton Outback Steakhouse Exlines’ Best Pizza Pasta Italia Firebirds Pei Wei Asian Diner Gridley’s The Presentation Room Hadley’s Pub Pyro’s Fire Fresh Pizza La Playita Mexicana Rafferty’s O’Charley’s Red Lobster Ruby Tuesday Romano’s Macaroni Grill Sekisui Sekisui Side Car Cafe Shogun Side Porch Steakhouse Skimo’s Tops Bar B-Q CHICKASAW GARDENS/ Tannoor Grill Zaytos UNIV. OF MEMPHIS DOWNTOWN A-Tan Agave Maria Brother Juniper’s Aldo’s Pizza Pies Cheffie’s Alfred’s Derae The Arcade El Porton Automatic Slim’s The Farmer Bangkok Alley Just for Lunch Bardog Tavern La Baguette B.B. King’s Blues Club Los Compadres Belle — A Southern Bistro Lost Pizza Bleu Medallion Blind Bear Speakeasy Osaka Japanese Blue Monkey Pete & Sam’s Bluefin R.P. Tracks Blues City Cafe Woman’s Exchange COLLIERVILLE/WEST TN. Bon Ton Cafe Brass Door Irish Pub (ARLINGTON, COVINGTON, Burrito Blues Mexican Grill MILLINGTON, OAKLAND) Cafe Eclectic Bangkok Alley Cafe Keough Bonefish Grill Cafe Pontotoc Bozo’s Hot Pit Bar-B-Q Capriccio Cafe Piazza Central BBQ Cajun Catfish Company Chez Philippe Carrabba’s Italian Grill City Market Chili’s Cozy Corner Corky’s DeJaVu Crepe Maker Double J Smokehouse & Saloon El Mezcal Earnestine & Hazel’s El Porton Eighty3 Emerald Thai Felicia Suzanne’s Firebirds Ferraro’s Pizzeria Ronnie Grisanti’s Italian Five Spot Restaurant Flight Gus’s Fried Chicken Flying Fish Huey’s Flying Saucer Jim’s Place Grille T.G.I. Friday’s Manila Filipino Grawemeyer’s Mulan Gus’s Osaka Japanese Happy Mexican Memphis Pizza Cafe Hard Rock Cafe Pig-N-Whistle Havana’s Pilon Sekisui Huey’s Silver Caboose Itta Bena Stix King’s Palace Cafe Vinegar Jim’s Kooky Canuck Wolf River Cafe Little Tea Shop CORDOVA Local Bahama Breeze Lookout at the Pyramid Bombay House McEwen’s on Monroe Bonefish Grill The Majestic Brazil Flavor Marm Divaalade Butcher Shop Mesquite Chop House Cafe Fontana Mollie Fontaine Lounge Cheddar’s The Office@Uptown Chili’s Onix Corky’s Oshi Burger Bar East End Grill Paulette’s El Mezcal Pearl’s Oyster House El Porton Pig on Beale T.G.I. Friday’s Pink Diva Cupcakery & Cuisine Flying Saucer Rendezvous, Charles Vergos’ Green Bamboo Rizzo’s Diner Gus’s Rum Boogie Cafe Happy Mexican Silky O’Sullivan’s Hunan Palace South of Beale Huey’s Spaghetti Warehouse J. Alexander’s Spindini Jerry Lee Lewis’ Cafe The Terrace & Honky Tonk Texas de Brazil Jim N Nick’s Bar-B-Q

Alchemy Aldo’s Pizza Pies Alex’s Applebee’s Babalu Tacos and Tapas EAST MEMPHIS Bar DKDC Acre Andrew Michael Italian Kitchen Bar Louie Bar-B-Q Shop Asian Palace Bari Bangkok Alley Barksdale Restaurant Belmont Grill Bayou Bar & Grill Blue Plate Cafe Beauty Shop Booksellers Bistro Belly Acres Broadway Pizza Bhan Thai Brookhaven Pub & Grill Blue Nile Ethiopian Buckley’s Fine Filet Grill Boscos Carrabba’s Italian Grill Bounty on Broad Casablanca Broadway Pizza House Central B B Q The Brushmark Chili’s Cafe 1912 Ciao Bella Cafe Eclectic City East Cafe Ole Corky’s Cafe Palladio Dixie Cafe Cafe Society El Mezcal Celtic Crossing El Porton Central B B Q Folk’s Folly The Cove Fox & Hound Cozy Corner Fratelli’s The Crazy Noodle The Grove Grill The Cupboard Half Shell Dino’s Hog & Hominy Ecco Houston’s El Mezcal Huey’s Evergreen Grill Interim Fino’s from the Hill Erling Jensen Frida’s Jim’s Place Fuel Cafe Las Delicias Golden India LYFE Kitchen Greencork Lynchburg Legends Huey’s Dan McGuinness Pub I Love Juice Bar Marciano Imagine Vegan Cafe Mayuri Indian Cuisine India Palace Mellow Mushroom Jasmine Thai Memphis Pizza Cafe Java Cabana Mortimer’s Lafayette’s Music Room Mosa Asian Bistro LBOE Napa Cafe Local Neil’s Mardi Gras Memphis New Hunan Maximo’s on Broad Old Venice Memphis Pizza Cafe On the Border Midtown Crossing Grille One & Only BBQ Molly’s La Casita Patrick’s Mulan Chinese Bistro Porcellino’s Craft Butcher Murphy’s Rafferty’s Old Zinnie’s Sekisui Pacific Rim Otherlands Skewer Outback Steakhouse Soul Fish Cafe P & H Cafe Taziki’s Mediterranean Cafe Pei Wei Asian Diner Three Little Pigs Pho Binh Whole Foods Market Pho Saigon GERMANTOWN Restaurant Iris Belmont Grill Robata Ramen & Yakitori Bar The Cheesecake Factory Saigon Le Chili’s Schweinehaus City East The Second Line Elfo Grisanti‘s Sekisui El Porton The Slider Inn Exlines’ Best Pizza Soul Fish Cafe Germantown Comm. Stone Soup Maui Brick Oven Strano Sicilian Kitchen Mellow Mushroom Sweet Grass Memphis Pizza Cafe Tart Mesquite Chop House Tsunami New Asia Young Avenue Deli Petra Cafe Royal Panda NORTH MISSISSIPPI Russo’s New York Pizzeria & Ajax Diner Wine Bar Applebee’s Sakura Blue and White Soul Fish Cafe Blue Daze Bistro West Street Diner Bonne Terre MEDICAL CENTER Chili’s City Grocery Arepa & Salsa The Cupboard Colton’s Steakhouse Evelyn & Olive Como Steakhouse Corky’s Sabrosura Tops Bar-B-Q Fox & Hound Huey’s Trolley Stop Market Lee’s Family Restaurant MIDTOWN Logan’s Roadhouse Abyssinia Tugs Twilight Sky Terrace Uncle Buck’s Fishbowl & Grill Westy’s

Lost Pizza McEwen’s Memphis Barbecue Company Memphis Pizza Cafe Mesquite Chop House Nagoya O’Charley’s Olive Garden Osaka Japanese Cuisine Outback Steakhouse Ravine Sekisui Tuscany Ital Steakhouse

PARKWAY VILLAGE/ FOX MEADOWS Blue Shoe Bar & Grill Leonard’s Jack Pirtle’s Chicken Three Little Pigs Bar-B-Q

POPLAR/I-240

Amerigo Benihana Blue Plate Cafe Brooklyn Bridge Capital Grille, The P.F. Chang’s Chipotle Exlines’ Best Pizza 4Dumplings Fleming’s Frank Grisanti’s Happy Mexican Heritage Tavern & Kitchen Julles Posh Food Co. Mister B’s Olive Garden One & Only BBQ Owen Brennan’s Pyro’s Fire-Fresh Pizza Red Koi River Oaks Rock’n Dough Pizza Ruth’s Chris Salsa Seasons 52 Sekisui Wang’s Mandarin House

RALEIGH

Exline’s Best Pizza

SOUTH MEMPHIS Coletta’s The Four Way Interstate Bar-B-Q Jack Pirtle’s Chicken

SUMMER/BERCLAIR Bryant’s The Cottage Edo Elwood’s Shack High Pockets High Point Pizza La Taqueria Guadalupana Lotus Nagasaki Inn Orr Restaurant Pancho’s Panda Garden Tops Bar-B-Q

WEST MEMPHIS/ EASTERN ARK.

The Cupboard Pancho’s Sammy Hagar’s Red Rocker Bar & Grill

WHITEHAVEN Hong Kong Marlowe’s

WINCHESTER

Cheddar’s East End Grill Formosa Half Shell Happy Mexican Huey’s Logan’s Roadhouse Olive Garden Red Lobster Ruby Tuesday T.G.I. Friday’s Tops Bar-B-Q Tycoon

110 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5

104_MM11_2015_CDL.indd 110

10/20/15 4:02 PM


ompany

se

ine

ouse

LAGE/ WS

l

-B-Q

itchen

za

ouse

HIS

LAIR

upana

S/

Rocker

CIT Y DINING LIST and more; also a wide variety of beers. 2 110 Madison. 347-3060. F A S T- C A S U A L L, D, X, $-$$ SEASONS 52—This elegant fresh grill and wine bar offers a Fresh cuisine prepared while you wait and served seasonally changing menu using fresh ingredients, wood-fire in an upscale setting. Not your typical fast-food grilling, and brick-oven cooking; also a large international wine list restaurants, most serve beer, wine, and liquor. and nightly piano bar. Crescent Center, 6085 Poplar. 682-9952. BONEHEADS—555 Perkins Extd. 746-8867. L, D, X, $$-$$$ BURRITO BLUES MEXICAN—156 Beale. 528-1055. THE SECOND LINE—Kelly English brings “relaxed Creole CHIPOTLE MEXICAN GRILL—5865 Poplar, cuisine” to his new eatery; serves a variety of po-boys and such Ridgeway Trace, #104. 416-1944; 2760 N. Germantown Pkwy. specialties as barbecue shrimp, and andouille, shrimp, and pimento 620-0469. cheese fries.  2144 Monroe. 590-2829. L (Sat.-Sun. only), D, WB, X, $-$$ CREPE MAKER—4630 Merchants Park Cir., #731 SEKISUI—Japanese fusion cuisine, fresh sushi bar, grilled meats (Collierville). 861-1981. and seafood, California rolls, and vegetarian entrees. Poplar/Perkins GENGHIS GRILL—2362 N. Germantown Parkway. location’s emphasis is on Pacific Rim cuisine. Menu and hours vary 584-0412; 7706 Winchester. 522-5048; 5849 Poplar, #117, at each location. 2 5 Belvedere. 725-0005;1884 N. Germantown Ridgeway Trace. 308-4040. Pkwy. (Cordova). 309-8800; 4724 Poplar (between Perkins & HUMDINGERS—6300 Poplar. 260-8292; Colonial). 767-7770; 2130 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-0622; 1134 N. Germantown Parkway (Cordova). 271-2912. 1255 Goodman Rd. (Horn Lake). 662-536-4404; 2990 KirbyMOE’S SOUTHWEST GRILL— Whitten (Bartlett). 377-2727; 6696 Poplar. 747-0001. L, D, X, 465 N. Germantown Parkway (Cordova). 737-5058. MRA, $-$$$ 6300 Poplar Ave., #108. 685-5685; 3660 S. Houston Levee SHOGUN JAPANESE RESTAURANT—Entrees include (Collierville). 457-7227; 3546 Walker. 590-0192 tempura, teriyaki, and sushi, as well as grilled fish and chicken SWANKY’S TACO SHOP—6641 Poplar (Germantown). entrees. 2 324 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 384-4122. L, D, 737-2088. 4770 Poplar. 730-0763; 711 Southcrest Pkwy, #101 X, $-$$ (Southaven). 662-655-0662. MRA. SIDE PORCH STEAK HOUSE—In addition to steak, the TAZIKI’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFE— menu includes chicken, pork chops, and fish entrees; homemade 540 S. Mendenhall. 290-1091. rolls are a specialty. Closed Sun.-Mon. 5689 Stage Rd. (Bartlett). 377-2484. D, X, $-$$ RED LOBSTER—Specializes in crab legs, lobster, and shrimp SKEWER—Japanese yaikitori cuisine features bite-sized meat dishes; also pastas, salads, steaks, and chicken. 8161 Highway 64 and vegetables served with dipping sauce, along with sushi, ramen, (Cordova). 387-0056; 6535 Airways (Southaven). 662-536-1960; and donburi — rice bowls topped with a variety of foods. Closed 7750 Winchester. 759-9045. L, D, X, $-$$ Monday. 5101 Sanderlin, #105. 682-9919. L, D, X, $-$$$ RENDEZVOUS, CHARLES VERGOS’—Menu items include SPINDINI—Italian fusion cuisine with such entrees as woodbarbecued ribs, cheese plates, skillet shrimp, red beans and rice, and fired pizzas, gorgonzola stuffed filet, and fresh seafood; pizza Greek salads. Closed Sun.-Mon. 52 S. Second. 523-2746. L (Fri.specials on Mon.; large domestic whiskey selection.  383 S. Main. Sat.), D, X, MRA, $-$$ 578-2767. D, X, $$-$$$ RESTAURANT IRIS— French Creole cuisine includes shrimp and STIX—Hibachi steakhouse with Asian cuisine features steak, delta-grind grits, and New York strip stuffed with fried oysters and chicken, and a fillet and lobster combination, also sushi. A specialty blue cheese. Closed Sun. 2146 Monroe. 590-2828. D, X, MRA, is Dynamite Chicken with fried rice.  4680 Merchants Park Circle, $$-$$$ Avenue Carriage Crossing (Collierville). 854-3399. L, D, X, $-$$ RIVER OAKS—A French-style bistro serving seafood and steaks, STONE SOUP CAFE— Cooper-Young eatery serving soups, with an emphasis on fresh local ingredients. Closed for lunch Sat. and salads, quiche, meat-and-two specials; and daily specials such as all day Sun. 5871 Poplar Ave. 683-9305. L, D, X, $$$ Italian roast beef. Closed Monday. 993 S. Cooper. 922-5314. B, L, RIVERFRONT BAR & GRILL—Beale Street Landing eatery SB, X, $ serves Southern American specialties, including Tom Lee Catfish, and STRANO SICILIAN KITCHEN & BAR—Presenting a Tennessee Caviar, a fresh veggie salsa of black-eyed peas and cilantro Sicilian/Mediterranean mix of Arab, Spanish, Greek, and North with pimento cheese and toast points; also sausage-cheese appetizer. African fare, Strano serves small plates, wood-grilled fish, and Closed Monday.  251 Riverside Dr. 524-0817. L, D, X, $ hand-tossed pizzas such as the King Alaska, with salmon and RIZZO’S DINER—Chorizo meatloaf, lobster pronto puff, and chevre. Closed Mon.  948 S. Cooper. 275-8986. L, D, SB, X, brisket are menu items at this upscale diner, Closed for dinner Sun. and $$-$$$ all day Mon.  492 S. Main. 304-6985. L, D, WB, X, $-$$ SWEET GRASS—Low-country coastal cuisine includes such ROBATA RAMEN & YAKITORI BAR— Serves ramen specialties as shrimp and grits. Closed Mon. The restaurant’s “sister,” noodle bowls and Yakitori skewers as well as rice and noodle dishes, Sweet Grass Next Door, open nightly, serves lunch Sat.-Sun. 937 S. and sake.  2116 Madison. 410-8290. D, WB, X, $ Cooper. 278-0278. D, SB, X, $-$$$ ROCK’N DOUGH PIZZA CO.—Specialty and custom pizzas TANNOOR GRILL—Brazilian-style steakhouse with skewers made from fresh ingredients; wide variety of toppings. 1243 served tableside, along with Middle Eastern specialties; vegetarian Ridgeway. 435-6238. L, D, X, $$ options also available.  830 N. Germantown Pkwy. 443-5222. L, ROMANO’S MACARONI GRILL—Serves MediterraneanD, X, $-$$$ Italian cuisine, including hand-crafted pasta Milano and penne TART—Combination patisserie, coffeehouse, and restaurant rustica, and create-your-own pasta; also steaks, seafood, and salads.  serving rustic French specialties, including baked eggs in brioche, 2859 N. Germantown Pk wy. (Cordova). 266-4565. L, D, X, $-$$ topped with Gruyere, and french breads and pastries.  820 S. ROYAL PANDA—Hunan fish, Peking duck, Royal Panda chicken Cooper. 725-0091. B, L, WB, X, $-$$ and shrimp, and a seafood combo are among the specialties.  3120 TERRACE—Creative American and Continental cuisine includes Village Shops Dr. (Germantown). 756-9697. L, D, X, $-$$ such entrees as filet mignon, beef or lamb sliders, five-spice salmon, RUSSO’S NEW YORK PIZZERIA AND WINE BAR— and grilled vegetarian eggplant; also small plates. Rooftop, River Inn Serves gourmet pizzas, calzones, and pasta, including lasagna, of Harbor Town, 50 Harbor Town Square. 260-3366. D, X, $$ fettucine Alfredo, scampi, and more. 9087 Poplar, Suite 111. 755TEXAS DE BRAZIL—Serves beef, pork, lamb, and chicken 0092. L, D, WB, X, MRA, $-$$ dishes, and Brazilian sausage; also a salad bar with extensive RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE—Offers prime steaks cut and toppings. 150 Peabody Place, Suite 103. 526-7600. L (Wed.aged in-house, as well as lamb, chicken, and fresh seafood, including Fri.), D, SB, X, $$-$$$ lobster.  6120 Poplar. 761-0055. D, X, MRA, $$$-$$$$ THREE LITTLE PIGS—Pork-shoulder-style barbecue with SABROSURA—Serves Mexican and Cuban fare, including arroz tangy mild or hot sauce, freshly made cole slaw, and baked tapada de pollo and steak Mexican.  782 Washington. 421-8180. B, beans.  5145 Quince Rd. 685-7094. B, L, D, X, $ L, D, X, $-$$ TOPS BAR B-Q—Specializes in pork barbecue sandwiches and SAIGON LE—Vietnamese/Chinese specialties include calamari with sandwich plates with beans and slaw; also serves ribs, beef brisket, ginger, and pork chops with mushrooms; vegetarian options too. and burgers.  1286 Union. 725-7527. 4183 Summer. 324-4325; Closed Sunday. 51 N. Cleveland. 276-5326. L, D, X, $-$$ 5391 Winchester. 794-7936; 3970 Rhodes. 323-9865; 6130 Macon. 371-0580. For more locations, go online. L, D, X, $ SAKURA—Sushi, tempura, and teriyaki are Japanese specialties here. 2 060 West St. (Germantown). 758-8181. 4840 Poplar. 572TROLLEY STOP MARKET—Serves plate lunches/dinners as 1002. L, D, X, $-$$ well as pizzas, salads, and vegan/vegetarian entrees; a specialty is the locally raised beef burger. Also sells fresh produce and goods SALSA—Mexican-Southern California specialties include carnitas, from local farmers; delivery available. Saturday brunch; closed enchiladas verde, and fajitas; also Southwestern seafood dishes such Sunday.   704  Madison. 526-1361. L, D, X, $ as snapper verde. Closed Sun. Regalia Shopping Center, 6150 Poplar, Suite 129. 683-6325. L, D, X, $-$$ TSUNAMI—Features Pacific Rim cuisine (Asia, Australia, South Pacific, etc.); also a changing “small plate” menu. Specialties SCHWEINEHAUS— Serving Bavarian-influenced fare with a Southern twist; includes wurst platters, pork schnitzel, sauerbraten,

DELI DISH

Serving sandwiches and salads, burgers and bagels, wings and chicken, these are popular spots. BOGIE’S—715 S. Mendenhall. 761-5846. MRA; 2098 LaSalle Place. 272-0022. MRA; 80 Monroe. 525-6764; 2028 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-8555. CHEFFIE’S — 483 High Point Terrace. 343-0488. CHING’S HOT WINGS—1264 Getwell. 743-5545. CITY EAST BAGEL & GRILLE—6698 Poplar at Kirby. 754-2660. CITY MARKET— 66 S. Main. 729-6152. CORDELIA’S TABLE—737 Harbor Bend Rd. 526-4772. FINO’S FROM THE HILL—1853 Madison. 272-3466. MRA. HOLIDAY HAM—2087 Union. 881-6433; 585 Erin Dr. 7634499; 7652 Poplar (Germantown). 869-6650; 3750 Hacks Cross Rd., #112. 624-4848 JASON’S DELI—1213 Ridgeway. 685-3333; 1585 Chickering (Cordova). 844-1840; 3473 Poplar. 324-3181. KWIK CHEK—2013 Madison. 274-9293. LENNY’S SUB SHOP—2893 Poplar. 320-0022; 7424 Stage Rd. 937-0800; 22 N. Front. 543-9230; 521 S. Highland. 454-7077; 2095 Exeter, Suite 30 (Germantown). 755-0750; 4970 Raleigh-LaGrange. 371-9979; 1016 W. Poplar (Collierville). 854-8299; 4726 Spottswood. 202-4800; 4740 Showcase. 3684215; 8950 Hwy. 64 (Lakeland). 12 S. Cooper. 6300 Poplar, #111. 761-2403. MRA. LETTUCE EAT SALAD COMPANY—6641 Poplar, Suite 106. (Germantown), 552-5604. LUCCHESI’S BEER GARDEN—84 S. Reese. 452-3002. LUCCHESI’S RAVIOLI—540 S. Mendenhall. #3. 7669922. LUNCHBOX EATS—288 S. Fourth. 526-0820. MCALISTER’S DELI—3482 Plaza Ave. 452-6009; 7990 Trinity Rd. (Cordova). 737-7282; 7710 Poplar (Germantown). 753-1507; 975 580 S. Mendenhall. 763-2711; 3855 Hacks Cross. 881-6068; 6600 Stage Rd. (Bartlett). 213-3311. 9091 Poplar (Germantown) 756-5292. PANERA BREAD—714 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 754-5813; 4530 Poplar. 767-3116; 5865 Poplar, Ridgeway Trace. 683-9384; 7850 Poplar. 759-1439; 7501 Goodman Rd. (Olive Branch). 662-890-1985. PARADISE CAFE—6150 Poplar, Suite 120. 821-9600. JACK PIRTLE’S FRIED CHICKEN—3571 Lamar. 7941254; 2520 Mt. Moriah. 565-0203 RAFFE’S DELI—3358 Poplar. 458-5110. SCHLOTZSKY’S DELI—4758 Poplar. 763-0741. UNCLE LOU’S FRIED CHICKEN—3633 Millbranch. 332-2367. WHOLE FOODS MARKET— 5014 Poplar. 685-2293. YOUNG AVENUE DELI—2119 Young. 278-0034. include Asian nachos and roasted sea bass. Closed Sunday.  928 S. Cooper. 274-2556. D, X, $$-$$$ TUSCANY ITALIAN STEAKHOUSE—Filet mignon, beef tenderloin, and various seafood and pasta dishes are served up here. 5910 Goodman Rd. (Olive Branch, MS). 662-895-3663. L, D, WB. X, $-$$$ TWILIGHT SKY TERRACE—Offers small plates of tostados, nachos, flatbreads, paninis; also hand-crafted cocktails and sweeping rooftop views of the downtown Memphis skyline. Open, weather permitting.  The Madison Hotel, 79 Madison. 333-1224. L (Sat.-Sun.), D, WB.X, $ TYCOON—Among the Asian entrees are spicy garlic shrimp, Thai gumbo, and special house noodle soup. 3307 Kirby Parkway. 362-8788. B, L, D, X, $ UNCLE BUCK’S FISHBOWL & GRILL—Burgers, pizza, fish dishes, sandwiches, and more served in a unique “underwater’ setting.  Bass Pro, Bass Pro Drive, 291-8200. L, D, X, $-$$ WANG’S MANDARIN HOUSE—Offers Mandarin, Cantonese, Szechuan, and spicy Hunan entrees, including the golden-sesame chicken; next door is East Tapas, serving small plates with an Asian twist.  6065 Park Ave, Park Place Mall. 763-0676. L, D, X, MRA, $-$$ WOMAN’S EXCHANGE TEA ROOM—Chicken-salad plate, beef tenderloin, soups-and-sandwiches, and vegetable plates are specialties; meal includes drink and dessert. Closed Sat.Sun.  88 Racine. 327-5681. L, X, MRA, $ ZAYTOON—Serves such Mediterranean cuisine as shish kebabs, falafel, hummus, and gyros. 694 N. Germantown Pkwy. (Cordova). 754-6366. L, D, X, $            

N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 5 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E . C O M • 111

104_MM11_2015_CDL.indd 111

10/13/15 3:39 PM


LAST STAND

Mayor Strickland, Meet Coach Fuente What could city government’s CEO learn from a football coach? More than you might think.

by frank murtaugh

Before I go further, let’s clarify: Running a major U.S. city is considerably harder than running a football program. Justin Fuente has yet to balance the cost of paving streets with those for policing the same streets. And whatever budget problems the U of M athletic department may face, they pale in comparison with those of a city with a shrinking tax base and citizens largely opposed to even a hint of paying more for the services their city provides. If I were to guess, Strickland would switch jobs with Fuente long before the coach would give thought to such role reversal. (Strickland’s predecessor, it should be noted, has been far more competent at his job than was Fuente’s.) Some lessons can be taken from the Justin Fuente Story in Memphis. A program that rested at the bottom of the FBS barrel in 2011 now finds itself in the Top 25, with crowds in excess of 40,000 now routine at the Liberty Bowl. All of this under the watch of a 39-year-old man who had never held a program’s top job before moving to Memphis. How has Fuente done it? And what

could a city mayor take from his formula? Here are three components — they’re not secrets — to Fuente’s success. ◗ He didn’t listen. At Fuente’s introductory press conference shortly after the Tigers’ 2011 season (2-10), a veteran Memphis journalist noted how many men he’d seen take the Memphis job, explain a vision for success, and

Justin Fuente ultimately land, at best, in mediocrity. What made Fuente different? To the rookie coach’s credit, he graciously said, essentially, “I don’t know.” How could he, hav-

ing no baseline for his own performance as a head coach? But Fuente had a plan. And it began with forgetting what’s happened before. Focus on what can be done moving forward, as individuals and as a program. Cynicism can be contagious if it’s allowed in the room. Building and selling a football program — or a city, for that matter — requires a short memory if tough times are to be put in the past tense. Justin Fuente had nothing to do with Memphis football before the 2012 season. He embraced that. ◗ He counts small victories. Among Fuente’s opening remarks after the upset of Ole Miss last month: “We’re bowl-eligible, and I’m happy about that.” Let me speak for the entire pool of reporters in that room: No one was thinking “bowl-eligible!” No one but Fuente. We were thinking, 13 wins in a row . . . Top 25 . . . can this team go undefeated? . . . is a New Year’s Six bowl game possible? Fuente doesn’t allow any big-picture projections to interfere with his team’s task at hand: winning the next game. It’s as hopelessly cliché as it gets: One game at a time. “We have to go 1-0 this week.” Well, the Memphis Tigers went 1-0 for the equivalent of an entire season, 13 games (at press time). Bowl-eligibility in these parts was once a goal to be achieved around Thanksgiving. That goal was secured this season two weeks before Halloween. Budget policy, crime-fighting, better schools, talent retention . . . these are major challenges for

a city. Our new mayor needs to find small wins when he can, and emphasize each of those wins as steps in the direction we must go. ◗ He got lucky. Paxton Lynch took a Memphis scholarship because Florida State didn’t offer him one. Or Miami. Or Alabama. Or Michigan or UCLA. Having thrown 13 touchdown passes (and but one interception) in his team’s first six wins this season, Lynch has made a national name for himself. The junior quarterback has stirred Heisman Trophy talk — in Memphis! — and is making the across-the-field throws that have NFL scouts grabbing their

Our new mayor needs to find small wins when he can, and emphasize each of those wins as steps in the direction we must go. cell phones. Fuente recognized the possibilities in recruiting Lynch and had the patience to redshirt him as a freshman in 2012, allowing a year of development — in body and mind — for the raw talent. A football team will go as far as its quarterback can take it. Here’s hoping mayor-elect Strickland can find an overlooked gem (somewhere, anywhere) who can approach problem-solving a little differently and perhaps make a throw into the corner of that metaphorical end zone a town calls prosperity. It can happen. We’ve seen it at the Liberty Bowl. After all, luck is merely where preparation meets opportunity. An earlier version of this essay appeared in the October 22nd issue of the Memphis Flyer.

PHOTOGRAPH BY LARRY KUZNIEWSKI

I

’ve got my first piece of advice for Memphis mayorelect Jim Strickland: Buy Justin Fuente lunch. Matter of fact, with more than a month until Strickland’s first term as mayor begins, he’d do well to meet the University of Memphis football coach for a weekly pow-wow. Nothing formal. No agenda. Just a conversation between leaders on the nature of overcoming formidable challenges. Because one of these men has become the personification of establishing new standards for what seemed (not that long ago) a lost cause. Have lunch with the coach, Mr. Strickland. And do more listening than talking.

112 • M E M P H I S M A G A Z I N E .C O M • N O V E M B E R 2 0 15

112_MM11_2015_LastStand.indd 112

10/20/15 4:24 PM


UNBELIEVABLE PRICES WILL MAKE YOUR DREAM APRICES REALITY. UNBELIEVABLE WILL MAKE YOUR DREAM A REALITY.

With over one million square feet of in-stock flooring, at Floor & Decor, you have to see it to believe it! Stop by today and ask about our free Design Services. With over one million square feet of in-stock flooring, at Floor & Decor, you have to see it to believe it! Stop by today and ask about our free Design Services. Memphis

5234 Summer Avenue

901-800-5670

flooranddecor.com

Memphis

5234 Summer Avenue

901-800-5670

flooranddecor.com

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/10/15 12:14 PM


HOLIDAY DESIGNER JEWELRY SHOW Friday and Saturday November 20 - 21 Coomi Mariani Gumuchian Vendorafa Penny Preville Jude Frances Mattia Cielo Federica Rettore Moritz Glik Utopia Pearls Ray Griffiths

474 Perkins Extended, Memphis | 3384 Peachtree Road N.E., Atlanta | Coming Soon, Nashville

MM_FullPage_TrimSize_9x25_11x125.indd 1

10/20/15 8:23 AM

Profile for Contemporary Media

Memphis magazine, November 2015  

In this issue: Our Homegrown Holiday Gift Guide, the Memphis street racing scene, and 901 Health on how to age gracefully.

Memphis magazine, November 2015  

In this issue: Our Homegrown Holiday Gift Guide, the Memphis street racing scene, and 901 Health on how to age gracefully.