Page 1

J A N •2 0 1 8 T H E E D U C AT I O N I S S U E

TIPS FOR FINDING THE RIGHT SCHOOL

HOW TO IMPROVE STUDY SKILLS PLUS

A BIKE TRAIL DESIGNED FOR KIDS

AND

IS TECHNOLOGY AFFECTING YOUR CHILD’S VISION?


2

MEMPH IS PARE NT

JANUARY 2018


OUTSTANDING

EDUCATOR OF THE MONTH Memphis Parent is calling for YOUR nominations for the awesome educators in your kid’s lives. They could be your child’s teacher or a teacher who has positively impacted your life. To submit a nominee, please email teacher@memphisparent.com with the subject line “Outstanding Educator” and include the following: • Teacher’s name • Teacher’s email address • School • Grade Taught • Why (in 100 words or less)

Submited by: Your name Your email address

M E M PH I S PA R ENT.COM

3


memphis-parent

memphisparent

memphisparent

THIS MONTH active learning

agile teaching

FEATURES

12

Finding the Right School by MICHELLE McKISSACK

to build disciplined minds, adventurous spirits, and brave hearts

OUR COVER KID Tony Hatley III (10) loves math and wants to become a video game programmer.

14

16

Discovery Park

On Track for Fun

by CHRIS MCCOY

by JULIA BAKER

DEPARTMENTS

ST. GEORGE’S INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

sgis.org J AONVUEAMRBYE R 2 021 0 81 7 N

8 Health Matters 5 tips for choosing a pediatrician

18 Early Years Promoting boredom

Editor Michelle McKissack

Visit sgis.org/admissionevents for dates and information.

ME EM MP PH H II S S P EN NT M PA AR RE T

10 Dear Teacher Help for handwriting and Hi-tech vision problems

OUR STAFF

It’s time to apply!

4 4

6 901 Fun Doggone fun; toddler time; and a day of remembrance

Art Director Bryan Rollins Advertising Art Director Christopher Myers Graphic Designer Jeremiah Matthews Advertising Manager Sheryl Butler Production Operations Director Margie Neal Calendar Editor Meena Viswanathan Copy Editor Shara Clark

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE Memphis Parent strives to provide information of value to all who are invested in our children’s future.

20 What’s Cookin’ Exploring culinary cultures 21 Study Guide Where do I go from here? Part 2 in series 23 Calendar and Events 31 Favorite Moments

Memphis Parent is published by Contemporary Media, Inc. CEO Kenneth Neill Director of New Business Development Jeffrey A. Goldberg Editorial Director Bruce VanWyngarden Special Projects Director Molly Willmott Email Marketing Manager Britt Ervin Distribution Manager Lynn Sparagowski Controller Ashley Haeger IT Director Joseph Carey Advertising Assistant Roxy Matthews Memphis, TN 38103 p: 901.521.9000 • f: 901.521.0129 Send advertising queries to: sheryl@memphisparent.com Visit us online at memphisparent.com


EDITOR’S NOTE

HAPPY 2018!

MICHELLE McKISSACK

michelle@memphisparent.com

Happy New Year! This is the time of year where many of us make New Year’s resolutions. It’s also the time of year where despite our best intentions, those resolutions can fizzle out before we barely get started. But Memphis Parent has some sure-fire suggestions that you and your children can do together throughout the year. Resolve to honor an educator. With 2018, Memphis Parent is resolving to recognize Outstanding Educators. Every month we will put the spotlight on a teacher who has impacted your child’s life or even a teacher that you had. So we need your help to nominate an outstanding educator. Send us who you think is the best of the best. We’ll announce our first recipient next month. Look for the nomination guidelines in this issue. Resolve to give back and get involved in your community. A great way to do that is with the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday. You’ve probably seen the billboards around town marking MLK50, a commemoration of the life of Dr. King fifty years after his assassination in Memphis and his legacy that our city and country has built upon. In our 901 Fun segment on page 6, we showcase how the National Civil Right’s Museum is making it possible to give back and get involved with their outreach campaigns at the museum on the King holiday and leading up to MLK50 events later in April. Resolve to explore another culture through a culinary experience. What’s Cookin’ on page 20 highlights different types of food to try with your kids. If you’re not as adventurous to prepare a meal yourself, we feature a few local restaurants that make it easier to have a scavenger hunt for the palette. Resolve to have a one-day getaway. There are so many wonderful things to do and places to go in our region that are roughly within a two-hour radius of greater Memphis. I recently had the pleasure of driving with my family to Discovery Park of America. It’s located in Union City, Tennessee, just a couple of hours north of Memphis. The drive goes by really quickly so it does not feel like you’re stuck in a car for a “road trip.” The museum, for lack of a better word, is very interactive and nothing short of amazing. Trust me when I say that Discovery Park is totally worth the drive for all ages. Read about it on page 14. Finally, resolutions or not, 2018 is full of possibilities to hit the reset button and simply create little family memories every day. Happy Parenting,

Kids with special needs just want your love ... Nothing else.

Show them some love. Volunteer with us. • New Parent Brunches • Get Down & Derby Gala

• Bright Song Summer Camp • Step Up for Down Syndrome Walk • Tutoring

• Self-Advocacy Events • Job Training • Job Placement

www.dsamemphis.org/volunteer-opportunities The Down Syndrome Association of Memphis & the Midsouth 2893 South Mendenhall, Memphis, TN 38115 • 901-547-7588

ME EM MP PH H II S SP EN M PA AR RE NT T .. C CO OM M

5 5


#901FUN

Cold Weather Fun and Community Service for January

NEW FUN SPROUTS AT THE DIXON

JANUARY 4

Look, listen, walk, talk, touch, smell, sing, and discover! The Dixon Gallery and Gardens is introducing new children’s programming called Sprouts! This new interactive program for toddlers and their caregivers allows participants to explore the Dixon with all of their senses. Goals include building social and motor skills, encouraging creative play, and having a ton of fun. Space is limited, so reservations are required. Members free; $8 non-members. Sprouts is for ages 12 to 24 months. Every Thursday, 10:30-11 a.m.

HONORING DR. KING

JANUARY 15

Woodland combines small class sizes, dedicated teachers, and personalized instruction to help grow your child’s success. Call 901-685-0976 to schedule a tour, or email admissions@ woodlandschool.org.

A co-ed, 2-year-old – 8th grade independent schoolin the heart of East Memphis. woodlandschool.org

Make it a family day of remembrance and service during the National Civil Rights Museum’s King Day activities. The museum will remember the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on the holiday. In the spirit of service, the museum will hold its annual drives for Mid-South Food Bank and Lifeblood, and serve as a center for community resources and engagement. Special MLK Day admission: $5; $3 with canned food donation; free for up to four people with blood donation. For more details about this year’s MLK day, visit civilrightsmuseum.org or call 521-9699.

CALLING ALL DOG LOVERS!

JANUARY 27

The Buckman Performing Arts Center is going to the dogs… in the very best way. Olate Dogs, the 2012 winners of America's Got Talent, will stop in Memphis to show off. Richard Olate and his son Nicholas lead this fastpaced show of pooch performers. The dogs — all rescue pups — wow the audience with astounding pet tricks. The trainers are third- and fourthgeneration circus performers. Shows at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tickets: $32 adults, $25 students. 60 Perkins Ext. For ticket information, call 537-1483.

©2017 Woodland Presbyterian School. All rights reserved.

6

MEMPH IS PARE NT

JANUARY 2018

8

MEMPH IS PARE NT

DECEMBER 2017


WHAT AGE SHOULD CHILDREN

FIRST SEE THEIR PEDIATRIC DENTIST?

ST. AGNES ACADEMY ST. DOMINIC SCHOOL

AGE 5 AGE 3 AGE 1 Yes, that’s right! Actually within 6 months of their first birthday!

! AM wo T X r E de EEldren Un aluen)ts R F r Chi 2 V w Patie. Fo $6 ils. Ne /31/18 red (a Call foOr nDley.taExpirsesm1ay beainsceus.r c e al fe ual ition divid Add in in

Pediatric Dentists

Steven J. Fuson, D.D.S., M.S., John A. Acosta, D.D.S., Toddrick Smith, D.D.S., Dr. Nathaniel Denson, D.D.S., M.D.S.

Family Dentists

Clayton Floriani, D.D.S., Adam Fitzhugh, D.D.S.

Orthodontists

Gregg Bouldien, D.D.S., M.S., Dr. Taylor Collazo, D.D.S., M.S.D.

Germantown

901.453.4382 Kirby

901.453.4383 www.pdg4kids.com

Olive Branch

662.985.6047 Southaven

662.985.6048

APPLY NOW!

An academic and spiritual foundation for life. www.saa-sds.org ST. AGNES ACADEMY 2K-12

ST. DOMINIC SCHOOL 2K-8

M E M PH I S PA R ENT.COM

7


EARLY YEARS

5 TIPS FOR CHOOSING A PEDIATRICIAN BY SARAH LYONS Your child’s doctor plays an important role in his or her life; therefore, you will need to find one who is a good fit for the parents and the child. It can be a challenge to find a pediatrician that’s right for your family. Here are some tips to get you started on your search: START WITH RECOMMENDATIONS As a first-time parent or a family that has just relocated, it is hard to know where to begin your search for a pediatrician. One good place to start is by asking other parents for recommendations. It’s a great way to see what names come up repeatedly. Asking your OB-GYN for a recommendation is also a good idea. Some parents opt to choose the same primary care doctor for the whole family.

C A L L TO D AY TO S C H E D U L E A TO U R E C S E AG L E S . CO M | 9 0 1 . 7 5 4 . 7 2 1 7

STEM program teaching medical science and the importance of health to your children. We offer before and after-school programs. Find a local program near you

Register Today! www.littlemedicalschool.com/memphis (336) 686-7671 8 8

ME EM MP PH H II S S P EN NT M PA AR RE T

AN NU UA AR RY Y 2 20 0 11 8 8 JJ A

COVER THE BASICS First, compare your list of candidates with your insurance policy and start looking for reviews of those doctors online. Also check to determine if the doctor is certified by the American Board of Pediatrics. This means the doctor has passed a specialized test in pediatrics. If you choose a family doctor, ask if the doctor is certified by the American Board of Family Medicine. Family doctors are trained to treat patients of all ages, including children, but they do not have a specialty in pediatrics. Next, consider the basic office information that can be found online or with a quick phone call. What are the office hours? Do they have walk-in hours? Will the doctor visit the hospital where you will deliver your baby? What hospital will your child be admitted to if needed? Is the office location convenient to your home, work, school, and daycare? Take these things into consideration as you narrow down your list. VISIT THE OFFICE To find out if you feel comfortable in the pediatrician's office, you will have to take a tour. Call the office and ask if they have times set up for potential patients to come and visit the office or if you would need to make an appointment, and ask if you can interview the doctor at the same time. Remember to ask if there is a charge for visiting. Verify with your insurance company to see if the cost would be covered or if you would be responsible for the fees. When visiting the office be aware of what the overall environment feels like. Take into consideration if the office staff is courteous, polite, and willing to help. Is the office clean and inviting? Was parking convenient? Do they have separate sick and well waiting areas? If you plan to visit more than one office, be sure to take notes for later consideration. ASK SOME QUESTIONS After you have decided that the office environment is a good fit, you will need to interview the pediatrician. Start by asking how sick appointments work. How long would it take for a sick child to be seen? Is there a good chance the child will be seen by his own doctor? Do you have similar views on health and wellness, such as circumcision, breastfeeding, and immunizations? Overall, does the doctor seem genuinely interested in your child or does he seem distracted or rushed? Take your overall impression into account when making your decision. BEDSIDE MANNER How the doctor interacts with your child will have a lot of impact on the decision to choose a pediatrician. Do you feel comfortable around the doctor? Does your child like him or her? Are they willing to take the time to listen to your questions and concerns? A good beside manner can go along way in making you and your child feel comfortable. Finding the right pediatrician can be overwhelming, but realize your decision does not have to be permanent. It’s important to recognize you are not stuck with your decision. You see your pediatrician a lot in those first months and in the years to come. If there is something really bothering you, it’s okay to switch. The parent’s goal is the same as the pediatrician: a happy and healthy child. When you find a doctor that is a good fit for your family, you can all work together to reach this goal. Sarah Lyons is a mother of six children, including 2-year-old triplets. With a full house, they visit the pediatrician very often.


CURIOUS. CREATIVE. BRIGHT. SHE’S ST. MARY’S. Discover your daughter’s full potential. Our community cultivates creativity, celebrates individuality, and challenges girls to accomplish exceptional results. Set up a tour: www.stmarysschool.org or call 901-537-1405 ©2018 St. Mary’s Episcopal School. All rights reserved.

We know

boys. Give us a boy, and we’ll make him stronger, smarter, happier, and overall, better. Presbyterian Day School BUILDING BETTER BOYS 4025 Poplar Avenue, Memphis, TN 38111 901.842.4600 | pdsmemphis.org

M E M PH I S PA R ENT.COM

9


DEAR TEACHER By Peggy Gisler and Marge Eberts

ENTICING CHILDREN TO DO MORE HANDWRITING My children in grades three and five never write anything but school assignments. Is there any way to entice them to write more? – Concerned You are lucky that your children still pick up a pencil or pen to do their homework. In many schools that have gone totally paperless, children only use their computers for any form of written communication. When you talk about handwriting, you are talking about fine motor skills that are harder to learn and require more practice to develop than other motor skills. It takes people over 20 years to perfect their fine motor skills; however, the first six or seven years are the most critical in developing the basic skills. Your child may not be judged in school by how he colors, copies, pastes, or cuts, but his ability to do these tasks will make a major difference in learning how to write legibly, which is important to teachers. If you truly want your children to develop better handwriting skills or just practice their handwriting, try getting them great and interesting writing props like calligraphy pens, invisible ink pens, colored pencils and a great electric pencil sharper, glitter pens, gel pens, feather quills and bottles of ink, along with a wide selection of different kinds and colors of paper. Having a chalkboard or dry erase board also gives children an opportunity to write messages or even share jokes with their families. Play games where children will need to write, like pictogram, hangman, or even crossword puzzles. Blank books also lure children into writing more, as they can doodle or draw illustrations and then write down the thoughts that go with the illustrations. Plus, it is important that you teach them to write handwritten notes to thank friends and relatives for gifts. And do be sure to set a good example by letting them see that you do the same thing.

ARE THERE VISUAL PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH EXCESSIVE USE OF TECHNOLOGY? My children never seem to move without a cellphone in hand. I think this is excessive. How much time are kids really spending on their electronic devices? Can excessive use damage their eyes? – Worried According to a survey by the American Optometric Association, parents severely underestimate the time their children spend on digital devices. Eighty-three percent of children between the ages of 10 and 17 estimated they use an electronic device for three or more hours each day. However, a separate AOA survey of parents revealed that only 40 percent of parents believe their children use an electronic device for that same amount of time. Eye doctors are concerned that this significant disparity may indicate that parents are more likely to overlook warning signs and symptoms associated with vision problems due to technology use, such as digital eyestrain. Furthermore, when parents think about their kids' mobile consumption habits, they don't think about how much time they spend on devices in the classroom, according to Lori Roberts, O.D., chair of the AOA's New Technology Committee. Every year when school starts, optometrists see an increase in kids complaining of symptoms synonymous with eyestrain. Unfortunately, 80 percent of the children surveyed in the AOA report experienced burning, itchy, or tired eyes after using electronic devices for long periods of time. These are all symptoms of digital eyestrain, a temporary vision condition caused by prolonged use of technology. Additional symptoms may include headaches, fatigue, loss of focus, blurred vision, double vision, or head and neck pain. Parents should strongly insist that their children follow these AOA

guidelines to help prevent or reduce eye and vision problems associated with digital eyestrain in their children: Check the height and position of the device. Computer screens should be 4 to 5 inches below eye level and 20 to 28 inches away from the eyes. Digital devices should be held a safe distance away from eyes and slightly below eye level. Check for glare on the screen. Windows or other light sources should not be directly visible when sitting in front of a computer monitor. If this happens, turn the desk or computer to prevent glare on the screen. Also consider adjusting the brightness of the screen on your digital device or changing its background color. Reduce the amount of lighting in the room to match the computer screen. A lower-wattage light can be substituted for a bright overhead light, or a dimmer switch may be installed to give flexible control of room lighting. Adjust font size. Increase the size of text on the screen of the device to make it easier on your eyes when reading. Keep blinking. To minimize the chances of developing dry eye when using a computer or digital device, make an effort to blink frequently. Blinking keeps the front surface of the eye moist. Parents should also make sure that their children follow the 20-20-20 rule when using technology. They should take a 20-second break every 20 minutes and view something 20 feet away.

Got a question? Parents should send questions and comments to dearteacher@dearteacher.com or ask them on the columnists’ website at dearteacher.com. ©Compass Syndicate Corporation, 2017 ~ Distributed by King Features Syndicate 1 0 MME EMMP PHHI SI SP PAARRE ENNT T DJEACNEUMABREYR 22001 187 8


3K-12 OPEN HOUSE: SUNDAY, JAN. 21, 2-4PM 3-6TH GRADE PREVIEW MORNING: THURSDAY, JAN. 11, 8:30AM JK-2ND GRADE PREVIEW MORNING: THURSDAY, JAN. 18, 8:30AM

I found my True North .

Maybe it’s music. Or biology. Or basketball. Whatever your child’s passion and inspiration, we will help them to discover and develop it. All in a Christcentered, nurturing environment that prepares them for their unique future.

Black Resistance in Black and White. Ernest C. Withers and the Civil Rights Movement.

3 . B E F S OPEN

Ernest Withers (1922-2007) is internationally recognized for his images of Black resistance, from pickets and sit-ins to his iconic photographs of the 1968 sanitation strike. This exhibition showcases some of his best-known works from one of the defining events of the city of Memphis. 7400 Getwell Road Southaven, MS 38672 662.349.5127 www.ncstrojans.com

Notice of Nondiscriminatory Policy as to Students

Northpoint Christian School seeks to admit students of any race, color or ethnic origin to all rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally made available to our students. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin in the administration of its educational policies, admission policies, financial aid programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.

BROOKS 1934 Poplar Ave. 901-544-6200 | brooksmuseum.org

Wed 10 a–8 p, Thur & Fri 10 a–4 p, Sat 10 a–5 p, Sun 11 a–5 p, Members & under 6 Free, Adults $7, 65+ $6, Students $3

Exhibition Sponsors: Diversified Trust, “Remembering George Riley at MLK 50” and Montgomery Martin Brooks gratefully acknowledges the financial support of ArtsMemphis, AutoZone, Hyde Family Foundations, the Jeniam Foundation & Tennessee Arts Commission. Ernest C. Withers, American, 1922 – 2007 I Am A Man, Sanitation Workers Strike, Memphis, March 28, 1968 Gelatin silver print, printed from original negative in 1999 Memphis Brooks Museum of Art purchase with funds provided by Ernest and Dorothy Withers, Panopticon Gallery, Inc., Waltham, MA, Landon and Carol Butler, The Deupree Family Foundation, and The Turley Foundation 2005.3.33 © Withers Family Trust

SR. K– GRADE 5

Open House WEDNESDAY, FEB. 28 9:00 a.m.

1100 Cherry Road Memphis, TN 38117

Visit our Open House to learn how you can be anything at Harding.

901-767-4494

HARDINGLIONS.ORG/OPENHOUSE God has gifted children with strong, flexible minds that are uniquely equipped to develop rapidly through exploration, questioning, and collaboration. We teach children to love learning, to take on challenges and solve problems, and to be confident in their faith in God in all circumstances.

M E M PH I S PA R ENT.COM

11


OPEN HOUSE COVER STORY

From pre-school to high school, find a learning environment that matches your child’s interests and needs BY MICHELLE MCKISSACK

For parent Andre Jones, looking for a high school for his middle school daughter to attend in the fall is one that has taken him from observing several types of schools that Memphis has to offer — public, private and charter. “I simply want the best for my daughter that stimulates her academically.”

PUBLIC SCHOOL

Shelby County Schools is the largest school district in the Memphis area, catering to a hundred thousand students with differing needs. Educators here say focusing on the individual child is key. Whether you’re looking for a school with a specialized learning focus and competitive entry requirements or a traditional K-12 setting with a broad set of courses and extracurricular offerings, SCS offers many options for your child.

NO LINE, NO WAITING FOR SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOLS

For the first time with Shelby County Schools there will be no line, no waiting to apply to optional schools or any school this year. For years, parents often bundled up in the cold to improve their child’s chances of getting in the school of their choice. Now SCS takes the standing-in-line process online exclusively. Starting January 29th at 10 a.m., all applications for all schools will only be accepted online. 2 11 2

ME EM MP PH H II S S P RE EN NT M PA AR T

AN NU UA AR RY Y 2 20 0 11 8 8 JJ A

QUICK FACTS

ABOUT SCS 2018-19 SCHOOL CHOICE APPLICATION PROCESS

• Online school choice application opens at 10 a.m. on January 29, 2018 at scsk12.org • One online process for ALL school choice applications — general choice & optional schools! • Apply online anytime, anywhere using any device with Internet access. • Must have a valid email address to apply; Parents will receive an email confirming date/time of application. • Students may apply for two general choice options and/or two optional schools. • NO COMPUTER OR INTERNET? Visit your school, the SCS Parent Welcome Center, public libraries, or anywhere with free WiFi.

PHOTO BY BRYAN ROLLINS

The current school year is only halfway done, but if you’re in the market for a new school for your child, now is the time to take a closer look at your options.


PRIVATE SCHOOL

The Memphis Association of Independent Schools cites five factors that drive success for kids and schools that parents should consider whether the school is public or private. HIGH-QUALITY, COMMITTED TEACHERS. They should be well prepared in their content, possess strong teaching skills, and have a command of the materials they present in the classroom. They develop an understanding of how each student learns and what interests and motivates their students. CLASSROOM LESSONS THAT ARE INNOVATIVE AND ENGAGING. Hands-on learning experiences, stimulating class discussions, group projects, and off-site field trips are just some of the ways successful schools challenge students to stretch their minds. INTIM ATE CL A SSROOM SET TINGS WITHIN CLOSE-KNIT COMMUNITIES. Smaller classes allow teachers to tailor their teaching style to the needs of the students. In close-knit communities, every student is known, and knows adults he or she can rely on. AN ACHIEVEMENT-ORIENTED CULTURE. Quality schools expect all students to succeed. They encourage students to explore and value perseverance and achievement. PARE NTAL INVOLVEME NT. Schools that promote regular communication among students, parents, and teachers make sure that everyone is working toward the same goals for the student. Parental involvement can take many forms, including talking regularly to the child about what he or she is learning, helping out in the classroom, and serving on school-wide committees.

PRESCHOOL

Early childhood education is a key indicator of success in later school years. Studies show that children should be introduced to an enriching environment to develop their cognitive, motor, behavioral, and social skills by the time they are 2 years old. There are excellent preschool options out there — but how can parents “hack” the preschool search to find them? What are the things to look out for? Following is a list of 10 quality indicators parents should look for during their search to choose the best preschool for their child. 1. LICENSE CHECK Only consider options that are licensed by the state regulatory agency for all center-based programs and family child care.

6. QUALITY CHECK Ask about any quality assessments or ratings completed by the program. This can easily help indicate a high-quality environment.

2. THE BASICS Ask about hours, educational philosophy and curriculum, teacher credentials, teacher turnover rates, and guidance strategies.

7. TEACHER RATIOS What are the teacher/student ratios? Compare to your state regulations. Lower ratios are another indicator of a high-quality program.

3. VISITOR POLICY View the school calendar and learn about family activities, volunteer opportunities, and their visitor policy. The program should have an open visitor policy for parents. 4. DAILY SCHEDULE The program should follow the individual schedule of each baby, so that they eat when they’re hungry, sleep when they’re tired, and aren’t trapped in a bouncy seat the entire day. For toddlers and preschoolers, a more structured day with a predictable schedule and routine is best. 5. OUTDOOR TIME How often do they take the children outside? Ideally, they go outside daily — even multiple times per day.

8. NO YELLING Are teachers engaged with the kids? Do they kneel down to their level versus talking down to them? Can you hear the sound of happy, busy children or do you hear yelling? Look for context behind any noise and activity. 9. TELEVISIONS A preschool with a TV is a big no-no — minus a few exceptions. This signals a lack of engagement and activities for children. 10. PARENT GUT CHECK Check how you feel when you’ve stepped into the building. Parental instincts are just as important as tangible facts and figures on whether the environment is a good fit for your child.

Checklist courtesy of Wonderschool Early Care and Education. Visit wonderschool.com for more pre-school childcare resources. ME EM MP PH H II S SP EN M PA AR RE NT T .. C CO OM M

3 11 3


FEATURE

PHOTO BY TREY CLARK

ON TRACK FOR FUN A Memphis bicycle shop offers a oneof-a-kind bike course BY JULIA BAKER

4 11 4

M ME EM MP PH H II S S P PA AR RE EN NT T

AN NU UA AR RY Y 2 20 0 11 8 8 JJ A

the track is good for BMX, mountain, and road bikes. One bike he recommends is the Haro Shredder ($209.99), a 20-inch kids’ bike that is modeled after BMX bikes. For teenagers and adults, a good all-around bike Steffens recommends is the Pure Cycles Urban Commuter ($449). Other bikes Bikesmith sells include road bikes, mountain bikes, BMX, cyclocross, and fixed-gear. Bicycles aren’t the only set of wheels that can go around a pump track. Steffens says he has also seen people use remote-controlled cars. And the track can even be rented out for private parties. In the past, Bikesmith has hosted baby showers, birthday parties, and rock shows. One of the latest rock shows (a going-away party) was thrown in honor of Kyle Wagenschutz, Memphis’ first bike/pedestrian coordinator and one of the main pioneers in the movement for bike lanes in our city. First-timers must sign a waiver (parents and legal guardians must sign for children under the age of 18) and everyone must wear a helmet. Steffens also recommends that everyone wear gloves (in case riders need to brace their fall with their hands), but they are not required. In addition to the pump track, Bikesmith has hosted a number of cyclocross races around the corner from their shop at East Parkway and Sam Cooper Boulevard. Steffens says he plans to host more cyclocross races in February. Bikesmith will also repair your bicycle. Customers can either bring their bikes in and watch the employees repair them, or Bikesmith can come to them. Once their Bicycle Truck

comes to you, they can either take your bicycle back to the shop or fix it on-site. Bikesmith initially began its business with just the Bicycle Truck. Four years ago, Steffens and his wife wanted to make bicycle repairs available to neighborhoods that did not have repair shops. Thus, they came up with the idea of a mobile repair shop. After two years, the business grew, and they built a home base at 509 N. Hollywood Street, where they remain to this day. Steffens has ridden his entire life and loves sharing his passion for zooming around on two wheels with others, including the next generation of bikers as Memphis becomes a more bike-friendly city.

BIKESMITH 509 N. Hollywood St. Open year round Tuesday and Thursday, 3 to 6 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cost to ride is $5 on weekdays, $10 weekends

PHOTO BY NATHAN BERRY

The bicycle retail and repair shop at Hollywood Street and Summer Avenue has a kid-friendly bicycle course, called a pump track, right in its backyard. And it was the first of its kind to open in Memphis. “The reason it’s called a pump track is because you pump the bike with your body, rather than with the pedals,” says Jim Steffens, founder of Bikesmith. “It is also safe for kids. Even if a kid were to fall, it would be a soft landing because it’s just dirt.” The pump track, which opened in 2016, is a small 4,500-square-foot looping track made of mounds of dirt and grass, with three 90-degree turns and three 180-degree turns. These berms and hills give bicycles speed and momentum, meaning bicyclists don’t really need to use the pedals. Another thing that makes this track kidfriendly is the fact that the track is fenced in, which means kids can’t wander off, and adults can remain on the sidelines while having grownup conversation with other parents. Bikesmith does not rent out bicycles yet, but they do sell them. For beginners, Steffens recommends the Pure Cycles Balance Bike ($119). Perfect for children 2 to 6 years old, balance bikes are small bikes with no pedals that are meant for children who are learning to ride. Unlike tricycles or training wheels, balance bikes will quickly teach children how to balance, because children start out by walking the bike on the track and then eventually rolling and balancing. For older children and adults, Steffens says

PHOTO BY AVERELL MONDIE

Christmas is over now, and your children are likely eager to ride those new shiny bikes they received from Santa Claus. One place where they can have some fun is at Bikesmith.


Threshold

Montessori School 581 Ellsworth Memphis, TN 38111

901-327-4980

“Building the Joy of Learning” Opening time 6:30 a.m. Starting Students at 18 months. Close to U of M, Midtown and East Memphis.

Visit us at ThresholdMontessori.com

g n i r o t Tu S uyecarcs heelpisngs for

Ove r 30 students learn TEST PREP

ACT • SAT • PSAT • GRE PRAXIS ... and more

School Subjects • Study Skills Test-Taking • Writing

Pamela Palmer M.S., M.A., Ed.D. 901.331.6082 / pam@pamelapalmer.com

MEMPHIS MATH TUTORS is the only-ACT Specialized academic service in Memphis. We provide unique ACT tools: ACT Diagnostics Test One-on-One Tutoring Seminar Tutoring (4 to 6 students)

ACT Time Budgeting Math • Science Register by email at registration@memphismathtutors.com, or call us at 901-218-6050. Visit us at www.memphismathtutors.com. M E M PH I S PA R ENT.COM

15


FEATURE

DISCOVERY PARK OF AMERICA A short drive away for a world-class learning experience BY CHRIS MCCOY

“When Mr. Kirkland decided he wanted to do this [open Discovery Park of America], he came to me. I was the first one who heard it,” says CEO Jim Rippy. “Still, to this day, I can’t believe it.”

Robert Kirkland, who passed away in 2015, was the Union City, Tennessee, entrepreneur behind the Kirkland’s chain of home furnishing stores. His wife Jenny is a semiretired philanthropist still living in the same small Obion County community — 120 miles straight up Highway 51 from downtown Memphis, just south of the Kentucky border — where Robert grew up. One day, almost a decade ago, Kirkland called up his old friend Rippy to run a notion by him. “Basically, his idea was that he wanted to bring to West Tennessee what people would not get an opportunity to directly see somewhere else, like New York or Washington,” Rippy says. “He wanted to let people in this part of the world see things they would never get to see, to increase their knowledge of what the world really is like, not just what you are here. To travel without traveling, not have to go so far, and have it not be so expensive.” Kirkland thought they could get it done for about $20 million. “He didn’t want to call it a museum,” explains Rippy. “We’re kind of a hybrid. Education first, entertainment second, and tourism third. So whatever we do, I don’t want it to be a stuffy place. I want it to be a place where people can touch it, 6 11 6

ME EM MP PH H II S S P PA AR RE EN NT T M

AN NU UA AR RY Y 2 20 0 11 8 8 JJ A

get in it, feel it. I don’t want it to just be stuff on the wall.” To ensure it would be a true community project, Kirkland and Rippy called for volunteers to help flesh out the idea. To their surprise, more than 250 people attended the meeting. He said, “Think outside the box! Tell us anything you would like to see,” recalls Rippy. Before the Discovery Park of America opened on November 1, 2013, the cost ballooned from $20 million to more than $80 million. Museum and theme park experts they consulted all cautioned against locating the attraction in Union City. “Rural West Tennessee is not that heavily populated,” says Rippy. “Neither is Arkansas or Kentucky. Everybody said we’d be lucky if we hit 100,000 [annual visitors].” The experts were wrong. By the end of 2014, more than 270,000 people had visited Discovery Park. And by the end of last year, more than one million discovered this museum tucked away in Northwest Tennessee. “I’ll be truthful. I don’t know how it ended up being so good. I know we had the best people, but we had no experience,” says Rippy.

WIDENING THE MIND The Discovery Park of America sits on the outskirts of Union City. The 120-foot Observation Tower of the central Discovery Center is easily the most prominent structure in this town of 13,000. The Center was designed by Verner Johnson, Inc., an architecture firm based out of Boston, Massachusetts, that specializes in museums. The flowing structure boasts more than 70,000 square feet of exhibit space in nine galleries. “It’s very interactive, says marketing director Mary Nita Bondurant. “In every gallery, there’s something you can do that’s hands-on.” Like the CEO, Bondurant has been with Discovery Park since the inception. “I was a volunteer chairman of the marketing committee,” she says. “I planned the original groundbreaking, when we turned over the first shovel of dirt.” The nine permanent gallery exhibits inside the Center each had their own development committees. “We’re 10 miles from UT Martin. Where we didn’t have expertise, we borrowed professors. Mr. Kirkland sent people all over the place to get information and find out things for their gallery. My husband was on the natural


PHOTOS BY CHRIS MCCOY, BRIAN GROPPE, AND MICHELLE MCKISSACK

history committee with two professors from UT Martin. We went out West to buy dinosaurs. Who gets to do that?” says Bondurant. The thunder lizards occupy the largest open space inside the center, and form the backbone of the ground-floor Natural History gallery. A mastodon skeleton guards the entrance to the interactive exhibits, designed by New York museum designers Thinc. The Natural History gallery traces the entire history of the planet, with an extensive gems and minerals collection, and a giant interactive globe that can display maps of not only our planet, but all of the planets in the Solar System. A wall-sized bookshelf with a “secret” door beacons toward the Enlightenment Gallery. A sign over the door reads, “Culture is the widening of the mind and of the spirit.” Inside are a variety of artifacts, including a reclining Thai Buddha statue and replicas of the Rosetta Stone and the Ark of the Covenant. “We call this our cabinet of curiosities,” says Bondurant. “Things that don’t really fit into the themes of any of our other galleries end up here.” Beyond that is the Transportation Gallery, which tells the story of the evolution of the

car with pristine artifacts from automotive history. “We wanted to give the history of cars, not just 10 Corvettes,” says Rippy. Visitors are free to meander through the interconnected curving galleries at their own pace. “There are no halls; there are no straight lines. You just kind of migrate from one gallery to another,” says Rippy. THE BIG SLIDE The biggest attraction for the kids is the jumping-off point for the three-story Human Slide located on the top floor of the museum. A vast metal sculpture of a jovial figure in a cap holding a globe forms the exterior support for the slide, which takes visitors back down to the lower level in a big hurry. The slide, which was fabricated in Germany and assembled in Chicago, was named number two in the world by the Rough Guides travel website. It sees near constant use by children of all ages. GIVING BACK Taken as a whole, the park is a look inside the minds, interests, and fascinations of an entire community, filtered through the coordinating influence of Kirkland. “I still go

out and read stuff I have never seen before, and I’ve been here since Day One,” says Rippy. Through good fortune and hard work, Kirkland was able to amass a fortune. But he still stayed true to his people and community, and Discovery Park of America is his way of giving back, says Bondurant. “He is a world traveller. But he knows people in Obion County aren’t. Kids stand there and stare at the escalator because they’ve never seen one. We’re in a very rural, not-wealthy area. He wanted people to get to see and experience some things he has been able to see and experience.”

DISCOVERY PARK OF AMERICA 830 Everett Blvd. Union City, TN 38261 731-885-455 discoveryparkofamerica.com ME EM MP PH H II S SP EN M PA AR RE NT T .. C CO OM M

7 11 7


EARLY YEARS

THE IMPORTANCE OF BOREDOM BY RUTH LAMBERT

Back in the very early days of my marriage, when I was a new stepparent to two young daughters, but not yet a mother, my sister came to visit for a week at the beach. She brought along my nieces, ages 3 ½ and 11 months. With the older girls, I played Scrabble and Careers, Parcheesi, and Rummy 500. I loved games, and so did they. But what in the world would two very little girls do all day long? Before their arrival, I carefully worked on a schedule of activities: 7:00-7:30 7:30-8:00 8:00-8:30 8:30-9:00

Pancakes Sand castles Take a walk Do puzzles

At the 9:00 a.m. mark, I panicked. I showed my sister the schedule when she arrived, and she laughed her head off and explained, “Little kids PLAY most of the day. And they do it more or less on their own. You give them simple stuff to play with, and they’ll direct the action.” At the time, I had very little experience — obviously! — with toddlers and babies.

I learned that it’s much less about equipment than about showing kids something new and interesting, and letting them explore to their heart’s content. Kids need to get dirty, smelly, and wet. And they usually enjoy it! When my own kids were 5 and 1, I found that the best way to encourage creativity was to provide a simple environment, and do very little to engage them. Instead, I let them get bored and figure it out for themselves. I put a bucket of warm water on our porch, sat Alex, my 1-year-old, down in front of it dressed only in a diaper, and gave him a small pile of objects. These were usually rather random: several corks, a few plastic measuring cups, and an old My Little Pony, perhaps. Then, I sat down on a nearby chair, slightly away from him. At first, the baby looked distressed, and called “Mama?” several times. Then, he looked at the bucket of water, and the objects on the floor.

“Play with water,” I suggested in a neutral voice. He tentatively slapped the surface of the water, making a big splash. Then, he began putting the toys into the bucket and sloshing them around. Soon, he was scooping water into the small plastic cups, and pouring it over the toys, the floor, and his own head. (I did have to get up a few times to refill the bucket of water, but he was completely absorbed for 30-40 minutes.) Recently, my 2 ½-year-old granddaughter Clio was given the same setup at our cottage. She was less than enthusiastic about getting wet and looked skeptically at the bucket of water, the cups, and the toys. Finally, I picked up a cup, filled it with water, held it high, and poured it slowly into the bucket. Then I handed her the cup and stepped away. Within moments, she was splashing away on her own, tossing toys into the water, and dumping and pouring while chatting to herself in a constant (incomprehensible) monologue. Our kids spent summers at our cottage with no TV, no iPads, and no iPhones. We happily engendered just enough boredom to help them be creative. Alex and his best buddy turned a commercial board game featuring Ewoks from Star Wars into daily adventures, changing the rules as they went along, adding maps, crayons, and complex strategies. Kate and her bestie Maggie played hide-and-seek, were treasure hunters (certain shells were highly prized), and held dance parties on the grass. We wrote out lists of items for scavenger hunts. We had a costume chest for dragons and knights, pirates and princesses. There was a seaquarium on the porch that the kids were invited to fill with sea creatures, seaweed, rocks, snails, and shells. (At the end of the day, we emptied them back into the sea.) When the kids said: “But what should we do?” — we let them figure it out.

Ruth Lambert is a family and parenting expert, and the author of the newly published book, 101 Survival Tactics For New And Used Parents. 8 11 8

ME EM MP PH H II S S P RE EN M PA AR NT T

AN NU UA AR RY Y 2 20 0 11 8 8 JJ A


It’s Time to Apply! Grace-St. Luke’s Episcopal School is a coed, independent school located in the heart of Midtown’s beautiful Central Gardens neighborhood. Since 1947, GSL has been preparing boys and girls to become creative problem solvers, confident lifelong learners, and responsible citizens in their communities and the world. Come explore our preschool, including the outdoor classroom complete with a mud kitchen, garden, music wall, and so much more. Schedule a tour today!

PRESCHOOL

Little Lukers (Age 2) Pre-Kindergarten (Age 3) Junior Kindergarten (Age 4)

LOWER SCHOOL

MIDDLE SCHOOL

Senior Kindergarten-4th Grade

5th-8th Grade

Coed | Age 2 - Grade 8 | Midtown gslschool.org • 246 S. Belvedere Blvd., Memphis, TN 38104 • 901.278.0200 • learnmore@gslschool.org

YOU’LL LOVE OUR NEW LOCATION! Now Open!

11870 Cranston Drive, Suite 104 - Arlington, TN 38002

901-757-3535

Dr. Shazia Hussain

pedseast.com

Dr. Daniel Chatham

Dr. Melanie Smith

Dr. Jennifer Lum M E M PH I S PA R ENT.COM

19


WHAT’S COOKIN?

GIVE YOUR KIDS A TASTE OF CULTURE Kick off the New Year with family mealtime adventures by KIMBERLY BLAKER America takes great pride in its cultural diversity. So why not give your kids the opportunity to experience the many cultures that make up our great country? Trying out new foods and exploring the mealtime customs of other nationalities or unique American regions is a fun way for kids and parents alike to learn about different cultures. If your kids are picky eaters, don't sweat it. There are yummy foods from every culture kids will love. Have your kids try the following dishes typically found in ethnic eateries. If you can't find the cuisine in your area, look up recipes online, and have the whole family pitch in and cook together. Middle-Eastern. There are many different Arab cuisines, but the most popular in America is Lebanese. The ever-popular hummus and pita bread is a healthy, mouth-watering appetizer. If you've only tried store-bought hummus, you're in for a real treat with fresh, authentic hummus. The most popular Lebanese meal is deliciously seasoned chicken shawarma, which you can order as a dinner or in a pita sandwich. Indian. The food of India varies somewhat by region, but there are several Indian dishes kids love. Curd rice, a yogurt rice dish of Southern India, is a favorite. Eat it plain or combine it with lentils or a meat dish. Also, nearly everyone loves tandoori chicken, including kids. A Northern India favorite is matter paneer, a curry dish made with peas and fried cubed cottage cheese in a tomato sauce. Greek. Pita gyros stuffed with chicken or pork, tomatoes, and lettuce are the most popular Greek food. There's also spanakopita, which is a great way to get kids to eat their veggies; these turnovers are stuffed with spinach. Then there's crispy and gooey saganaki, fried cheese, which everyone loves. Thai. Pad Thai is an introductory dish loved by everyone. This sweet and savory noodle dish is made with peanut sauce. Gaeng Daeng (red curry) is another delicious choice. Thai is the hottest (spicy-hot) cuisine you'll find. So request mild for your kids. For dessert, don't miss out on the sticky rice served with mango. Spanish. Not to be confused with Mexican food, one of the dishes that kids in Spain enjoy is paella, which is a rice and meat dish. It can be made with rabbit or squid, which some kids won't be keen on. But it can also be made with chicken or other seafood. Another yummy entree is empanadas, which are pockets filled with tuna or ham and cheese. Cajun. This style of Louisiana cooking is well known for its shellfish dishes and spice. Jambalaya, made with sausage, shellfish, celery, and rice stew, is one of several favorites. Another is gumbo, made with meat stew, seafood, and okra. Vietnamese. The most popular Vietnamese dish for both kids and adults is pho. This noodle soup is made with beef or chicken, but it's far more substantive than the chicken soup Americans eat. It's usually served with fresh veggies on the side. Another yummy dish is banh goi. These deep-fried pockets are filled with meat, mushrooms, and other vegetables. 20 0 2

M ME EM MP PH H II S S P PA AR RE EN NT T

AN NU UA AR RY Y 2 20 0 11 8 8 JJ A

A TASTE OF THE WORLD, AROUND TOWN

Memphis has no shortage of great places to eat, and when it comes to ethnic food, many are familiar with Mexican and Asian offerings, but there are some lesser-known cuisines to explore.

ALI BABA

MEDITERRANEAN GRILL

5800 Raleigh LaGrange Rd., Memphis Tasty Mediterranean food, known for its hummus

BLUE NILE ETHIOPIAN KITCHEN

1788 Madison Ave., Memphis Traditional Ethiopian comfort food and healthy, vegetarian options

CAJUN CATFISH COMPANY

336 New Byhalia Rd., Collierville A unique dining experience combining Southern favorites and spicy Cajun cuisine

CASBAH RESTAURANT

1890 N. Germantown Pkwy., Cordova A Moroccan-inspired restaurant featuring Middle-Eastern and Mediterranean fare

EMERALD THAI RESTAURANT

8950 U.S. 64, Lakeland Tucked into a strip mall, serving tasty Thai favorites like tom yum soup and spicy stir-fry

HAVANA’S PILON

143 Madison Ave., Memphis A down-to-earth eatery serving old-school Cuban fare such as empanadas

MAMA GAIA

1350 Concourse Ave., inside Crosstown Concourse 2144 Madison Ave., inside Ballet Memphis A Greek-inspired menu offering organic and vegetarian options

MAYURI INDIAN CUISINE

6524 Quince Rd., Memphis An all-you-can-eat buffet restaurant serving Northern and Southern Indian food

PHUONG LONG

306 N. Cleveland, Memphis A Midtown restaurant serving Vietnamese classics


FEATURE

BLUEPRINT FOR SUCCESS:

WHERE DO I WANT TO BE? A how-to study guide series BY GRACE COPELAND

In last month’s article, “Where am I Now?” (the first of three foundational building blocks in this study guide), you helped your child go through a checklist of his/her current study skills. Next, she or he discovered what kind of learner s/he is: visual – seeing learner; auditory – hearing learner; kinesthetic – doing learner; or a combination of learning styles. Then, you were given techniques to help your child study based on their learning style, and you were encouraged to use those techniques to enhance learning. The next building block: “Where do I want to be?” takes what has been learned so far and applies it to goals, objectives, and action plans. You will go from just observing your child’s current status related to learning and study skills to constructing manageable steps to reach dreams, solve problems, build “castles in the air.” Every day your child encounters situations they need to handle, problems that need solving, and/or dreams they want to turn into realities. Let’s develop a process that can be used to meet these challenges.

What does he want to do? Raise his grade from a C to a B. By when? The end of the next grading period. In the second column, write: “Raise my grade from a C to a B by the end of the next six week grading period.” Next, think of ways he could make that happen — use his learning strengths. As he states a way/technique, write it in the third column. For example: 1. “Make flash cards of the spelling words and go over them every night — say the word then spell the word” (visual learner: use different colors; auditory: say and spell the words

area that is a problem in school (goal) has been broken down into an action statement that is specific, measurable, realistic, and time-bound (objective) and that some ways to make that action statement happen have been listed (action plan). Encourage your child to realize that even the most daunting assignment or problem can be accomplished/solved by breaking it down into clear (specific, measurable, realistic, and timebound) objectives with action plans that will meet those objectives. Choose another card and go through the process again.

“IF YOU HAVE BUILT CASTLES IN THE AIR, YOUR WORK NEED NOT BE LOST; THAT IS WHERE THEY SHOULD BE. NOW, PUT FOUNDATIONS UNDER THEM.”

Big Picture To begin: Ask your child to come up with some “big pictures” of what her typical week includes. Help her get started by suggesting “School.” Family, friends, sports, church, pets, etc. are reasonable — HENRY DAVID THOREAU, WALDEN topics she may list. Encourage all responses. Write each of the “main ideas” on an index card or piece of paper. The visual learner may want to write the ideas in different colors. The auditory learner may out loud; kinesthetic: walk around the room while “Where do I want to be?” In this article your child want to “talk it through” and ask you to write them. reviewing the words). 2. “Write the words two has discovered a process to apply to any problem The kinesthetic learner may enjoy acting out a times on Monday night and Wednesday night.” 3. or situation — to be where they want to be and do typical day and finding the main ideas that way. “On Thursday night, have someone give me a what they want to do. This pattern of Goal/ Have fun with this activity. practice test so that I will be ready for the real test Objective/Action Plan gives your child a model to on Friday.” 4. “Keep a list of all grades I make in organize his or her thoughts and actions. Organize Spelling in a notebook at home so I know that I’m Frustration and fear of failure are replaced with Now, let your child choose one of the cards. Let’s on track to make a B.” confidence and success as a “big” situation/ say he picks “School.” Here’s the plan for this main problem/dream is reduced to manageable idea: Make a horizontal chart with three columns. Support organized steps he or she can take. After some Leave room at the top of the chart for labels. Ask Praise your child for the good work and ideas. practice, your child will not need to fill in a chart him to give you a word or short sentence that Then, complete the chart. Write the word “School” because they have learned the thought process. states an area he wants or needs to work on in at the top. Over the first column, write “Goal.” Next month, “How Do I Get There?” will school, such as spelling. Write “Spelling” in the Over the second, write “Objective.” Over the continue to build the study guide foundation with first column. third, write “Action Plan.” Talk about how a subject specific study skills. Grace Copeland is a retired Memphis educator who now consults families on ways to improve their child’s study habits. Visit victusstudyskillssystem.org for more information. ME EM MP PH H II S SP EN M PA AR RE NT T .. C CO OM M

2 11 2


How well does your child see? If you’ve noticed a change in academic performance, an eye exam can help rule out undiagnosed problems with your child’s vision. Make an appointment today with the Pediatric Service at The Eye Center at Southern College of Optometry or learn more at eyecentermemphis.com. Courtesy of the Pediatric Primary Care Service of

1225 Madison Ave., in the Midtown Medical District

901-722-3250 www.eyecentermemphis.com

Class that Really Rocks

Music for Aardvarks, Memphis!

ldren 6 months to 5 years and their parents/caregivers

er Classes

nging and dancing

HIGH QUALITY EARLY EDUCATION & CARE

Winne

r

A Kid’s Music Class that Really Rocks

or one FREE class

Come Jam with Music for Aardvarks, Memphis! An interactive music program for children 6 months to 5 years and their parents/caregivers

Winter Registration Now Open! • Great Music

ast Memphis, Collierville, and Cordova at www.memphisaardvarks.com 227 or info@memphisaardvarks.com

• Live guitar and storytelling, singing and dancing • Fun for parents too! • Great for special events, & school programs Newcomers welcome to drop in for one FREE class CLASSES IN MIDTOWN AND EAST MEMPHIS Visit us at www.memphisaardvarks.com or call 871-0227 for more info

Childrenʼs Choice at the Memphis Service Center

NOW Enrolling Programs for Infants through 5-Year-Olds

Learn More: brighthorizons.com/memphis (901) 707-4890

The Primary Choice Boys & Girls, 2K-6th cmdsmemphis.org 22

MEMPH IS PARE NT

JANUARY 2018


JANUARY CALENDAR

by MEENA VISWANATHAN

King Day 2018 NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM

Monday, January 15 • 8 a.m.-6 p.m.

Festivities include daylong performances, youth-centered “edutainment,” a Healthy Community Pavilion, and the museum experience. Museum holds its annual drives for Mid-South Food Bank and Lifeblood. Special admission: $5. $3 with canned food donation and free for up to four people with blood donation. 521-9699.

1 • MONDAY

Music for Aardvarks. Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women. 10-Week Series takes place on Mondays, at 10 or 11 a.m. Geared for children 6 months to 5 years and their parents. This interactive music program features live guitar and storytelling, singing, dancing, and instrumental play. Free. Reservations required. 227-9558.

2 • TUESDAY

Mini Masters. Dixon Gallery and Gardens. Tuesdays from 10:30 to 11:15 a.m. Parent-child workshop designed for toddlers features story time, art activity, and snack. $8/child. Call 7615250 to pre-register and pre-pay by noon the day before class. Wild Lunch at Lichterman. Lichterman Nature Center. Tuesday through Saturday at noon. Watch the Backyard Wildlife Center’s animal keepers feed the animals. Free with admission. 636-2210. Indiana Jones & The Last Crusade (2D repertory film). CTI 3D Giant Theater at The Pink Palace Museum. Through January 5, at 4 p.m. Watch your favorite movie on the big screen at the Pink Palace. $10/adult. $8/child. Children under 3 free. 636-2362.

3 • WEDNESDAY

Toddler Time. Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women. Meets Wednesdays from 10:30 a.m. until noon. Geared for parents and children ages 1-3 years. Discover the joys and challenges of parenting toddlers through meet & greet, play, and activities. Free. 227-9558.

4 • THURSDAY

Sprouts. Dixon Gallery and Gardens. Thursdays,

10:30-11 a.m. This new interactive program for toddlers and their caregivers helps explore the Dixon with all their senses. Goals include building social and motor skills and encouraging creative play. $8/child. Call 761-5250 to register.

6 • SATURDAY

TEDx Memphis. Halloran Centre at The Orpheum. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. The third TEDx Memphis conference themed “The Slant” features more than 20 speakers touching on topics ranging from city planning, storytelling, technology, and food to the celebration of MLK50 and the digital racial divide. $30-$50. Call 525-3000 for tickets. Family Studio. Dixon Gallery and Gardens. 10 a.m. until noon. Drop in at the Dixon to create works of art open-studio style. Free. 761-5250. Chucalissa Family Days. C.H. Nash Museum at Chucalissa. Saturdays at 10 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. Family programs and craft activities change weekly. January 6: Music/Coloring Books. January 13: Sports & Hunting/Pottery. January 20: Stone Tools & Weapons/Talking Sticks. January 27: Trash Talks/Snake Painting. Activities include museum tour, throwing darts with an atlatl, scavenger hunt, the hands-on-lab tour, an educational program, and creating a keepsake craft to take home. $6/adult. $4/child (ages 4-11). 785-3160. Free Family Art Workshop: Comics with Terri Scott. Memphis College of Art. 2-4 p.m. Open to all ages and experience levels. Workshops include drawing, painting, and sculpture. Free, donations go toward youth scholarship fund (recommended donation is $10 per family). Walkins are welcome on a first-come, first-served basis. Visit mca.edu/community to register online.

7 • SUNDAY

Free Sundays at Chucalissa. C.H. Nash Museum at Chucalissa. Sundays, 1-5 p.m. Tour the museum and Native American Mounds. See a family-friendly film at 2 p.m. Film changes weekly. Jan. 7: Raven Tales: Rough Face Girl (25 minutes). Jan. 14: Tales of Wonder 1 (60 minutes). Jan. 21: Tales of Wonder 2 (60 minutes). Jan. 28: Raven Tales: Rough Face Girl (25 minutes). Free. 785-3160.

12 • FRIDAY

Elvis - Back to Live! Halloran Centre at The Orpheum. 6 p.m. This multimedia musical stage production features World Champion Elvis Tribute Artist Ted Torres Martin and the TCB Flash Band. $25-$40. $40 tickets include postshow VIP meet & greet with Ted Torres Martin and Band. 525-3000.

15 • MONDAY

King Day 2018. National Civil Rights Museum. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Festivities include daylong performances, youth-centered “edutainment,” a Healthy Community Pavilion, and the museum experience. Museum holds its annual drives for Mid-South Food Bank and Lifeblood. Special admission: $5. $3 with canned food donation and free for up to four people with blood donation. 521-9699.

20 • SATURDAY

PB&J: Big Barton. Germantown Performing Arts Center (GPAC). 9:30 & 10:30 a.m. Ages 2-8. Saddle up your horse and put on your boots for classic country and western music with Big Barton. $8/child includes up to two adults. 7517500. Magic Carpet presents Belly Dance with Jasmine’s Jewels. Buckman Arts Center at St. ME EM MP PH H II S SP EN M PA AR RE NT T .. C CO OM M

23 3 2


CALENDAR

Chucalissa Family Days. C.H. Nash Museum at Chucalissa. Saturdays at 10 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. Mary’s School. 10 a.m. Children ages 2 to 8 are invited to grab their magic carpet for a dance adventure across the globe with Jasmine’s Jewels. $5/ child. Free for adults. 537-1483.

Morton Museum of Collierville History. The Volunteers: Americans Join WWI. Through March 8. 457-2650.

Kids in the Garden. Dixon Gallery and Gardens. 10 a.m. until noon. Children ages 7-10 learn about terrariums and create a miniature indoor garden. $15. Tools and snack included. Call 761-5250 to register.

Mallory-Neely House Tour. Mallory-Neely House, 652 Adams Avenue. Fridays & Saturdays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $7/adult. $5/child (ages 3 and up). Reservations: 523-1484.

23 • TUESDAY

OTHER PROGRAMS

Caterpillar Club: It Will Sprout. Memphis Botanic Garden. Also on Wednesday, 10-11 a.m. Choose Tuesday or Wednesday session. Children ages 2-5 join for stories, music and movement, nature-inspired art, and adventure hikes in My Big Backyard. Semester theme: “Let’s Get Growing.” Six-class semester fee: $75. Call 636-4122 to register.

Date Night on the Square. Collierville Historic Town Square. Friday, January 5, 5-8 p.m. Start a date-night tradition the first Friday of each month and explore the shops and restaurants on the square. Listen to live music and enter to win prizes. Reservations recommended for restaurants. Go to mainstreetcollierville.org for details.

Finding Neverland. The Orpheum. Through January 28. Tuesday through Thursday at 7:30 p.m.; Friday at 8 p.m.; Saturday at 2 & 8 p.m.; Sunday at 1 & 6:30 p.m. This Broadway Musical shares the story behind Peter Pan and how playwright J. M. Barrie finds inspiration from four young brothers’ makebelieve adventures. $25-$125. Call 525-3000 for tickets.

100 Women Who Care Meeting. Community Room at Church Health. Tuesday, January 16, 7-8 p.m. 100 Women Who Care is a true “Giving Circle.” Join for the first of three meetings to learn how to make an impact on our local community. Visit 100womenmemphis.org to join and register for the event.

27 • SATURDAY

Opening Reception & Gallery Talk: Alchemy4. Metal Museum. Sunday, January 21, 3-5 p.m. Join for the opening reception of Alchemy4, the newest exhibition at the museum, followed by a gallery talk with the curator. $6/ adult. $4/child. 774-6380.

Breakfast with the Birds. Lichterman Nature Center. 7:30-9:30 a.m. Ages 16 and up. Ornithologists present birding basics and take you on a guided walk through lake, meadow, and forest trails. $25. Binoculars provided. Reservations required. 636-2211.

The Birds & the Seeds. Lichterman Nature Center. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Highlights include gardening & bird watching experts, photography seminar, cooking demos, seed swap, and seed giveaways. Free admission. Fees for tool sharpening, plant purchases, & “Bird on a Wire” string art craft workshops. 636-2211. Olate Dogs. Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s School. 2 & 7 p.m. 2012 Winners of America’s Got Talent show, presented by Richard Olate and his son Nicholas, features rescue pups performing pet tricks. $32/adult. $25/ child. 537-1483.

ONGOING EVENTS

MUSEUMS AND EXHIBITS

CTI 3D Giant Theater. 2D Repertory Films: January is MARVEL Month. January 6-28, Saturdays & Sundays at 4 p.m. Movies change weekly. Jan. 6 & 7: The Avengers. Jan. 13, 14, & 15 (MLK Day): Guardians of the Galaxy. Jan. 20 & 21: Captain America: Civil War. Jan. 27 & 28: Doctor Strange. $10/adult. $8/child ages 3 and up. 636-2362. AutoZone Dome at the Sharpe Planetarium. Seasonal Stargazing. Through March 19. One World, One Sky: Big Bird’s Adventure. Until further notice. 636-2362.

24 4 2

ME EM MP PH H II S S P PA AR RE EN NT T JJAANNUUAARRYY 22001 188 M

CLASSES & WORKSHOPS

Kaleidoscope Club. Dixon Gallery and Gardens. Wednesdays from 4 to 5 p.m. Ages 5-9. $8. Snack provided. Call 761-5250 to register.

Breastfeeding Class. Baptist Women’s Hospital. Thursday, January 4, 6:308:30 p.m. $30. Call 226-5764 to register. Girl Talk. Women’s Pavilion at Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital. Friday, January 5, 6:30-8:30 p.m. for moms only. Saturday, January 6, from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. for moms and daughters. Get together for Girl Talk, an educational program to enhance open communication between mothers and daughters ages 9-12 years. $60 for parent & child. Call 516-6645 to register. Saturday Childbirth Class. Baptist Women’s Hospital. On select Saturdays (January 6 & 20), from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. $75. Call 226-5764 to register. Mindful Motion. Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women. On alternate Mondays (January 8 & 22), 6-7 p.m. Ages 8 and up. Relax and de-stress through intentional stretching, breathing, and meditation. Free. 227-9558. Parent/Child Swim Lessons. YMCA at Schilling Farms. January 10-31. Wednesdays, 10:30-11 a.m. Ages 6 months to 3 years. Class teaches water safety and water adaptation through songs and games. One parent per


A customized day full of imaginative adventures for them. A customized day full imaginative stress-free party for of you, or in otheradventures words an for them. A stress-free party for you, or in other words an

Building a foundation that lasts a lifetime

Coed Pre-K3 – 8th grade

Open House

Monday, January 8, 2018 9:00 am - 12:00 noon

ENROLLING

NOW for 2017-18 season

Bring this ad in and receive $25 off 1st installment. May not combine with other offers. Expires 1/31/18

4841 Park Avenue Memphis, TN 38117 901.685.1231 www.holyrosarymemphis.org

At a The Little Gym Awesome Birthday Bash, your child and their friends have theAwesome whole place to themselves forchild fun and activities At a Thewill Little Gym Birthday Bash, your their createdwill especially them. Plustowe’ll handle everything from friends have thefor whole place themselves for fun activities set-up clean-up, making birthdays at The Littleeverything Gym a big from wish createdtoespecially for them. Plus we’ll handle come for parents too. birthdays at The Little Gym a big wish set-uptrue to clean-up, making come true for parents too. Call or go online to schedule your child’s next birthday at Call or go online to schedule your child’s next birthday at The Little Gym The The Little LittleGym Gymof Germantown,TN www.tlggermantowntn.com The Little Gym of Germantown,TN 901.755.1323 www.tlggermantowntn.com 901.755.1323

M E M PH I S PA R ENT.COM

25


CALENDAR

Come “party” “par rty rt ty” with wit wi ith th us! Kid Station is available on Sundays for private events...including birthday parties! Visit: www.kidstationonline.com/birthdays For details.

Kid Station Drop In and Play Center Visit • 579 Erin Drive East Memphis Call • (901) 761-PLAY (7529) Click • www.kidstationonline.com

Mandy Gonzalez. Halloran Centre at The Orpheum. Friday, January 19, at 7:30 p.m.

Every

HERO needs a

mentor, every mentor needs a GUIDE.

child in the water. Children not potty-trained must wear swim diapers. $50. Call 850-9622 to register. Sibling Class. Baptist Women’s Hospital. Saturday, January 13, from 10 a.m. until noon. $20 for first child. $25 for two or more in same family. Call 226-5764 to register. Saturday Sketch. Dixon Gallery and Gardens. Saturday, January 13, from 10 to 11 a.m. Ages 15 and up. Free with admission. 761-5250.

26 6 2

M ME EM MP PH H II S S P PA AR RE EN NT T JJAANNUUAARRYY 22001 188

Breastfeeding Basics Class. Women’s Pavilion at Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital. Tuesday, January 16, 7-9 p.m. $30 for two participants. 516-6645.

Y Dance. YMCA at Schilling Farms. January 20 through May 18. Ages 3-12. Dance classes offered include tot beginner ballet, junior beginner Grandparents Class. Baptist ballet, and kids hip-hop. Recital is Women’s Hospital. Saturday, January May 19. Cost varies between $5513, 1-3 p.m. $30. Call 226-5764 to $65 depending on class. Call 850register. 9622 to register. NEW! mark-ology. Dixon Gallery and Gardens. On select Saturdays, (January 13, 20, & 27), 1:30-4 p.m. Explore the basics of drawing and mark-making techniques in this three-session workshop. Must be able to attend all three sessions. $45. Supplies and snack included. Call 761-5250 to register.

memphisparent.com

Ages 8 and up accompanied by an adult. Try out different dance styles including Zumba, line dance, mixed fit, urban dance, hip-hop, and more. Free. 227-9558.

Dance FiT. Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women. On alternate Mondays (January 15 & 29), 6-7 p.m.

2-Day Saturday Prepared Childbirth Classes. Women’s Pavilion at Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital. On alternate Saturdays (January 27 & February 10), from 8:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. Part 1 covers expectations to delivery and Part 2 covers baby basics, breastfeeding, and infant safety. $120 for two participants. 516-6645. Expectant Parents Class. Baptist Women’s Hospital. Saturday, January


Spring 2018

FREE!

Community Education

Family Art Workshops Saturdays from 2–4pm

Make time for your kid to

MAKE ART After School Art Studio (Ages 11-17) Wednesdays, 4–5:30pm on the following scheduled dates.

Feb. 7–28 March 21–April 11 April 18–May 9

JAN. 6 Comics FEB. 3 Zines

Saturday School

Select the course best for your young artist based on their age. Story Illustration (Ages 5–7) Adventures in Mixed Media (Ages 8–10) Illustration (Ages 10–12) Drawing & Painting (Ages 13–17) Photographic Printmaking (Ages 13–17)

Jan. 27–March 3 Saturdays, 9am–12pm

Fashion Sewing for Teens (Ages 13–17)

MARCH 3 Spring Art

Feb. 3–March 3, Saturdays, 9:30–11:30am

APRIL 7 Summer Art Camp PREVIEW DAY

Private Lessons (Ages 5+)

MAY 5 Pop Art

Visit mca.edu and click on Community Education banner for pricing, additional information and registration. Hurry! Class sizes are small to foster individualized attention.

mca.edu (901)272-5116

1930 Poplar Avenue | Memphis, TN 38104 | (901) 272-5116

Premier Lanes Entertainment Center is 45,000 square feet of exciting family fun! Featuring the Action Alley Arcade, Laser Maze, Boutique Bowling and Rowan Oak Cafe (complete with a cozy outdoor patio), there is something for everyone from 2 to 102! Conveniently located next door to the Oxford Commons Cinema, all roads lead to F-U-N! Got a Group? Email for more info! salesoxford@premierlanes.com

FEBRUARY 9 • HALLORAN CENTRE AT THE ORPHEUM CALL (901) 525-3000 OR VISIT ORPHEUM-MEMPHIS.COM

Sponsored by:

M E M PH I S PA R ENT.COM

27


CALENDAR

We believe that children are capable, competent, and full of potential.

Memphis Jewish Community Center

Infant Care Beginning at 6 weeks

Toddlers 12 months to 3 years Pre-Kindergarten

27, from 9 a.m. until noon. $30. Call 226-5764 to register. Dynamic Dads Workshop. Baptist Women’s Hospital. Saturday, January 27, 12:30-4 p.m. Free. Registration required. 227-9873.

FUND-RAISERS

Jr. Kindergarten Our caring educators cultivate learning though play and active engagement.

By supporting children in the important early years, we are investing in their future.

Guided by Jewish values and traditions, students of all faiths learn to appreciate our diverse world. For more information or to schedule a tour, please call (901) 259-9207 or visit www.jccmemphis.org.

Memphis Empty Bowls Project. Crosstown Concourse. Sunday, January 21, 5-7 p.m. Guests are invited to a delicious, simple dinner of soup and bread donated by local restaurants. They may select one of the handcrafted bowls to take home as a reminder of the bowls that go empty in Memphis. Features an art market and live music. Go to memphisemptybowls.com for details.

THEATRE PERFORMANCES

Memphis Made - Center Stage Presents: Dead Soldiers. Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s School. Friday, January 5, at 8 p.m. Memphis Americana roots revivalists Dead Soldiers have fashioned a style all their own, blending Southern heritage into soul-stirring music. $15/adult. $10/ child. 537-1483. Brian Regan. The Orpheum. Thursday, January 11, at 7:30 p.m. Renowned stand-up comedian Brian Regan comes to entertain audiences at the Orpheum. $37.50-$47.50. Call 525-3000 for tickets. Muddy Magnolias. Halloran Centre at The Orpheum. Saturday, January 13, at 7:30 p.m. $15. Call 525-3000 for tickets. Mandy Gonzalez. Halloran Centre at The Orpheum. Friday, January 19, at 7:30 p.m. Come watch the current star of Broadway musical Hamilton perform at the Halloran Centre. $35. Call 525-3000 for tickets. Giordano Jazz Dance Chicago. Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s School. Friday, January 19, at 8 p.m. Get ready to enjoy high-energy jazz choreography brought to you by the legendary dance company of late Gus Giordano. $28/adult. $25/child. 537-1483.

STORY TIME AT AREA BOOKSTORES & MUSEUMS

Memphis Jewish Community Center 6560 Poplar Avenue jccmemphis.org (901) 761-0810 28 2 8

M ME EM MP PH H II S S P PA AR RE EN NT T JJAANNUUAARRYY 22001 188

Barnes & Noble Booksellers The Avenue Carriage Crossing Mall, 853-3264 Saturdays at 11 a.m. Ages 1-6.

Barnes & Noble Booksellers 2774 N. Germantown Pkwy., 386-2468  Tuesdays and Saturdays at 11 a.m. Ages PreK-6. Jan. 2: Story of Ferdinand. Jan. 6 & 9: What Do You Do With a Chance? Jan. 13


Swimming Lessons

Year ‘round in our HEATED indoor pool!

• Group Lessons • Private Swim Lessons • Adult Swim Lessons • Baby & Me Classes -Ages 2mo and Up

We have swim packages for all age groups. SAVE MONEY! We have small class ratios... Do you need SPECIALTY Training? We are definitely the place for you!

CALL(BRENNA) SWIM901-300-0384 SCHOOLS Gift Cards make great gifts!

& 17: Paddington. Jan. 20 & 23: You! Jan. 27 & 30: Fancy Nancy: Oodles of Kittens.

999 South Yates, Memphis, TN 901-763-3483 www.diveshop1.com

My Favorite Teacher Contest Launch. Tuesday, January 2, 11-11:30 a.m. Middle and high school students are invited to express their appreciation for their teachers through an essay or letter. Winning student and teacher receive prizes. Free. Go to barnesandnoble.com/h/my-favorite-teacher for details. Story Time at Morton Museum of Collierville History 196 N. Main St., 457-2650 Fridays, 10:30-11 a.m. Ages 5 and under. Enjoy a new story theme each week with songs, related craft, and snack.

MEMPHIS LIBRARY EVENTS

Stop by your local branch or go to memphislibrary.org for a complete listing of library events.

CENTRAL 3030 Poplar Ave., 415-2700 CLOUD901 Classes & Events: CLOUD901 is the library’s state-of-the-art Teen Learning Lab that includes a music studio, a video production lab, an art studio, Makerspace, gaming zone, and a performance stage. Open to teens ages 13-18 with a Memphis library card. Go to memphislibrary.org/ cloud901 for a class list. BARTLETT 6382 Stage Rd., 386-8968 • Transformations Early Access. Thursday, January 11, 9-10 a.m. Library opens early for a special story time for the Transformations Autism Treatment Center and families with special needs. • Transformations Outreach. Thursday, January 25, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Children ages 5 and under. Outreach program at the Transformations Autism Treatment Center. CORDOVA 8457 Trinity Rd., 754-8443 • See & Sign a Story. Saturday, January 6, from 11 a.m. until noon. Learn to sign the story “The Gingerbread Man” and decorate gingerbread men to eat. • Family Fun Saturday: Kids on the Block. Saturday, January 13, from 11 a.m. until noon. Enjoy a puppet show presented by the puppet troupe Kids on the Block and make a puppet of your own to take home. • International Story Time: Liberia. Saturday, January 20, from 11 a.m. until noon. Celebrate the country and culture of Liberia with stories, crafts, music, and fun.

There are many ways to help kids who stutter... Doing nothing is not one of them! For more information...

800-992-9392 www.StutteringHelp.org www.tartamudez.org

THE

STUTTERING FOUNDATION

®

A Nonprofit Organization Since 1947—Helping Those Who Stutter

ME EM MP PH H II S SP EN M PA AR RE NT T .. C CO OM M

29 9 2


CALENDAR

100 WOMEN. 1 HOUR. 10,000 DOLLARS. LOCAL IMPACT. We are a group of women committed to supporting our local community. We come from all walks of life and diverse backgrounds. Why join us? You believe women working together can achieve just about anything! You only have a few hours a year to commit to charity work. You want to ensure 100% of your charitable donations go to those in need. You believe there is power in numbers. You want to be part of an extraordinary group of women who make an immediate, direct and positive impact on the Memphis Community.

First meeting will be January 16, 7- 8 p.m. at the Church Health Center in Crosstown. To join us, please go to www.100womenmemphis.org and register. 30 0 3

M ME EM MP PH H II S S P PA AR RE EN NT T JJAANNUUAARRYY 22001 188

• Library Magic Show with Mr. Nick. Saturday, January 27, from 11 a.m. until noon. Ages 6-12. CORNELIA CRENSHAW 531 Vance Ave., 525-1643 • Winter Animals: Hibernation & Migration. Tuesday, January 2, 1-2 p.m. Ages 6-12. • Snowflake Craft: Popsicle Snowflakes. Wednesday, January 3, 1-2 p.m. Ages 6-12. • Snowman Chemistry. Friday, January 5, 1-2:30 p.m. Ages 6-12. • Martin Luther King Jr. Children’s Program. Saturday, January 6, 12:30-2 p.m. Ages 6-12. • Peace Handprint Flowers. Wednesday, January 17, 4-5 p.m. Ages 6-12. • MLK Jr. Poetry Day. Thursday, January 18, 4-5 p.m. Ages 6-12. • MLK Jr. Scavenger Hunt. Friday, January 19, 4-5 p.m. Ages 6-12. GASTON PARK 1040 S. Third, 942-0836 • DiscoverREAD. Wednesdays, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Children work on early literacy skills while listening to educational stories. • Play-Doh Model. Saturday, January 13, from noon until 1 p.m. Children ages 5 and under create characters with Play-Doh. • “I Have a Dream” Coloring Sheet. Saturday, January 13, 2-3 p.m. Children color a picture of Dr. King and write or talk about their dreams. HOLLYWOOD 1530 N. Hollywood St., 323-6201 • Tying Ties. Saturday, January 6, from 11:30 a.m. until 1 p.m. Children and teens learn the benefits of how to dress for success from influential individuals in the community. • Girls ROCK! Saturday, January 20, from 11:45 a.m. until 1:45 p.m. Girls ages 11-17 learn about resources needed to become dynamic leaders, innovators, and public servants.


YOUR CHILD SHOULD BE HERE!

Send us your kid funnies, photos, or artwork via email with Favorite Moments in the subject line to michelle@memphisparent.com

ME EM MP PH H II S SP EN M PA AR RE NT T .. C CO OM M

3 11 3


We’re all in. For kids. Le Bonheur is included in all local health plans. When it comes to providing the best care for every child, Le Bonheur is all in. Although local insurance plans may change from time to time, we’re included in all of them. When it comes to your children – to your health plan – and to your own sense of security and peace of mind, you’ll find that Le Bonheur is still the best place for kids. lebonheur.org/plans

Memphis Parent, January 2018  

It's our Education Issue! Tips for finding the right school, improving your study skills, the importance of boredom, how technology can affe...

Memphis Parent, January 2018  

It's our Education Issue! Tips for finding the right school, improving your study skills, the importance of boredom, how technology can affe...