Page 1

F E B2019

CELEBRATE BLACK HISTORY MONTH

PREPARING FOR SLEEPAWAY CAMP

NEW YEAR, APPRECIATE YOU!

COMBATING DENTAL FEARS

PUPPY LOVE: THERAPY ANIMALS


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FEBRUARY 2019

OVERNIGHT CAMPS OUR COVER KID

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Prepare your child — and yourself — for camp.

Sameer (4) with his proud mom Stacy

by the American Camp Association

Woodland combines small class sizes, dedicated teachers, and personalized instruction to help grow your child’s success. Call 901-685-0976 to schedule a tour, or email admissions@ woodlandschool.org.

12

10 BENEFITS OF SUMMER 23 CAMP

20 Dad Libs Jeff Hulett shares how his family will celebrate Black History Month

OUR STAFF Managing Editor Shara Clark

Art Director Bryan Rollins Advertising Art Director Christopher Myers

JF AE N B R UU AA RR Y Y2 0 2 10 91 9 4 6

30 Favorite Moments Kid funnies and photos

Memphis Parent is published by Contemporary Media, Inc.

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE Memphis Parent strives to provide information of value to all who are invested in our children’s future.

P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101 p: 901.521.9000 • f: 901.521.0129 Send advertising queries to: sheryl@memphisparent.com

Account Executive Mary Ballard

BOX OFFICE HOURS / 10AM TO 2PM / M – F / 901.385.5588

24 Calendar and Events Family-friendly fun all month long

Calendar Editor Meena Viswanathan

Advertising Manager Sheryl Butler

Tickets & Info – BPACC.ORG

22 Outstanding Teacher Honoring unsung heroes

CEO Kenneth Neill Director of New Business Development Jeffrey A. Goldberg Editorial Director Bruce VanWyngarden Special Projects Director Molly Willmott Email Marketing Manager Britt Ervin Distribution Manager Carrie O’Guin Controller Ashley Haeger Digital Services Director Kristin Pawlowski IT Director Joseph Carey Editorial Assistant Julia Baker

Graphic Designer Jeremiah Matthews

HIGH-ENERGY STORY OF THE STUDENTS AT EAST HIGH SINGING & DANCING TO AN IRRESISTIBLE POP SCORE. THINK ROMEO AND JULIET MEETS GLEE!

Have your best year yet by just being you. by Christina Katz

10 Health Matters Combating dental fears

8 Dear Teacher Helping children reduce test anxiety

MARCH 8, 9 / 7:30 pm & MARCH 10 / 2:30 pm

NEW YEAR, APPRECIATE YOU!

DEPARTMENTS 6 901 Fun Celebrate Black History Month with these activities

HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL

Parents can help children avoid favoritism fallout. by Kim Clark

The experience can give kids a leg up in life. by Christa Melnyk Hines

A co-ed, 2-year-old – 8th grade independent schoolin the heart of East Memphis. woodlandschool.org

BPACC YOUTH THEATRE PRESENTS

YOU ALWAYS TAKE HER SIDE

14

Therapy animals prove not all medicine comes in a bottle. by Shara Clark

17

©2017 Woodland Presbyterian School. All rights reserved.

PUPPY LOVE

Photographer: Louis Tucker

Production Operations Director Margie Neal

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TO CONNECT WITH YOUR

COMMUNITY PARENT TO PARENT

MY GIFT

by SHANTRA JOYNES

For me, being a parent is giving the last bite of my sandwich to my child, who said he wasn’t hungry but later changed his mind.

Can you imagine... a world without children?

We Can’t.

Call 1-800-996-4100 to help.

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OUR 18 LOCATIONS HOST EVENTS FOR EVERY AGE AND INTEREST.

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LIBRARY CARD SIGN-UP MONTH Sign up online and at all Memphis Public Libraries

TEENS & TWEENS ROBLOX TOURNAMENT February 23 | 9 AM - 3 PM

Shantra Joynes is the mother of three boys, age 7 and 4-year-old twins. We want to hear from you! Would you like to share from-theheart commentary on your parenting experience? Let us know what’s on your mind. Please send submissions for consideration with the subject line “Parent to Parent” to shara@memphisparent.com.

Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library Meeting Rooms A, B, C & Goodwyn Gallery

ALL AGES REFLECTING ON THE MOMENT THAT SPARKED THE 1968 MEMPHIS SANITATION STRIKE February 1 | 10:30 AM - 11:30 PM North Branch Library

Volunteer with your entire family—no matter your child’s age!

LITTLE DID I KNOW: THE COMING OF AGE OF A BLACK BOOMER February 9 | 2 PM - 4

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It’s when your socks have a hole in the heel and in the toe, but when you go shopping you get everybody else a new pair of socks and think, “I will stitch mine.” These things represent the unconditional love that parents have for their children. Being a parent is fun. Don’t get me wrong — there are days that I could scream because with three boys there’s a lot of horseplay, and somebody is going to end up hurt. Or when it’s time to get dressed in the morning, and one of the three does not like what he is wearing for the day because it’s “not cool” or because he thinks the pants are too long. I calmly ask my child, “Do you remember when you wore them last week and they fit perfectly?” Being a parent also brings laughter. We have fun telling jokes, playing a card game or board game as a family, sleeping in a tent in the yard because we are “camping out,” riding bikes, and making up songs and pretending we are in a band. These are just a few of our precious moments. Being a parent is my gift, given to me from God up above, and for that I am grateful.

5


#901FUN

Celebrate Black History Month with these local activities.

9

SATURDAY I, TOO, AM AMERICA

As part of its Saturday Series, the Halloran Centre @ The Orpheum hosts Hattiloo Theatre’s I, Too, Am America, a play in which lives of black historical figures like Ida B. Wells and Sojourner Truth are recounted. The show, which will be held at 10 a.m. on February 9th, introduces audiences to significant points of history through drama and music. $15. Call 5253000 for tickets.

LOVE IS

.

Also on February 9th, the Stax Museum of American Soul Music celebrates Black History Month and Valentine’s Day with activities and crafts honoring some of the greatest names in black history. Noon until 2 p.m. Free with admission. Call 942-7685 for more information.

LIBRARY EVENTS LAURELWOOD SHOPPING CENTER • 389 Perkins Extd - 901.685.8417 @cottontailsmemphis @cotton.tails1

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FOR EVERY STAGE OF YOUR CHILD’S LIFE

On February 11th at 4 p.m., the Frayser branch at 3712 Argonne Street hosts author and educator Alice Faye Duncan, who will read her new children’s book Memphis, Martin, and the Mountaintop – The Sanitation Strike of 1968. For more information, call 357-4115.

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FRE

20 1 9 F E B R U A R Y

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Germantown

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Olive Branch

662.371.4123 Southaven

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TUESDAY FRONT PORCH MUSIC SERIES WITH CHRISTIAN STANFIELD

From 5:30 to 7 p.m. on February 12th, the Central branch at 3030 Poplar Avenue hosts Christian Stanfield of the Side Street Steppers, who will present a history of black music through lecture and musical examples. Call 415-2700 for details.

For Ch E EXAM ild (a $62ren Under Two! Steven J. Fuson, D.D.S., M.S., John A. Acosta, D.D.S., Dr. Nathaniel Denson, D.D.S., M.D.S. Toddrick Smith, D.D.S.,

MONDAY EXPLORING MEMPHIS’ BLACK HISTORY

23

SATURDAY BLACK HISTORY JEOPARDY GAME

From noon until 2 p.m. on February 23rd, the Cornelia Crenshaw branch at 531 Vance Avenue hosts a Jeopardy game for children ages 6 to 12 to learn about black history. Call 5251643 for details.


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a tour.

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DEAR TEACHER

REDUCING TEST ANXIETY Q My daughter gets anxious before big

active learning

tests. Are there any good ways to psych her up so she will be in a position to do well? — Want to Help

agile teaching

to build disciplined minds, adventurous spirits, and brave hearts

A

In his new book Psyched Up: How the Science of Mental Preparation Can Help You Succeed, Daniel McGinn gives some solid suggestions and five techniques that parents can use to put children in the right mindset before tests and competitive events. 1. Build their confidence by recalling with them some of their past successes. 2. Around your home and in your children’s rooms, display photos and trophies of past triumphs, which can inspire them to try harder. 3. Avoid saying “Don’t be nervous” before a big event. Instead, help them focus on how lucky they are to be able to showcase their skills. 4. Encourage them to follow a set routine before competing. It will help them do better. 5. Before an event, encourage them to play music that improves their mood and energy level.

WHAT MAKES A GOOD STUDENT? At St. George’s Independent School, we teach your children to weigh their words and consider their actions, while also urging them to live bravely and dare greatly. We weave consideration and courage together, equipping your children with the best of both worlds—for the world they’re about to inherit.

F E B R U A R Y

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fostering careful reflection ~ supporting healthy risks so your children bravely embraces challenge

ST. GEORGE’S INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

sgis.org 8

Q My neighbors and I were discussing what

makes a good student. What do you think? — Unknown Qualities

A

Research shows that teachers place more emphasis on personal characteristics than academic skills. Most want to see students who are motivated, curious, self-disciplined, respectful toward teachers, and persistent. They also consider children good students if they are willing to ask questions. Teachers appreciate students who are honest, trustworthy, problem-solvers, and hard workers. Parents should send questions and comments to dearteacher@dearteacher.com or to the Dear Teacher website. Compass Syndicate Corporation, 2018. Distributed by King Features Syndicate


A New Day in Education Opening August of 2019.

COMPASS Community Schools Six Locations to Serve You. COMPASS - Berclair - K-8

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© P R E S S M A S T ER - D R E A M S T I M E .COM

Combating Dental Fears

HEALTH MATTERS

by JAMIE LOBER

With some help, your child won’t mind a trip to the dentist.

F E B R U A R Y

20 1 9

The dentist tries to be a good friend and ally for oral health, but despite his best efforts, some kids remain fearful. Dr. Nate Denson with Pediatric Dental Group and Orthodontics recommends seeing the dentist by the child’s first birthday, or six months after the first tooth comes in, to go over how to take care of teeth, good habits to start, and things to watch for — and to get them acquainted with the place and process. The dental office should be seen as a positive, helpful environment. “Usually at the first visit we show the child around the office and encourage the positive parts of it, like checking out the toothbrush, getting to pick out stickers and toys, meeting the dentist, and making it a fun time,” Denson says. Every child reacts differently. “If the child does well, we want to take a look at their teeth and clean them with the toothbrush. And if they are shy and nervous, we make it more of a happy visit where they meet everybody, see the different things, and end on a good note with a prize.” The inquisitive child may enjoy reading a book about going to the dentist. Feel free to share a little bit about your child’s personality so the dentist can adapt the visit accordingly. “Some want to check everything out — like the stem brush, straw, and water gun — while others are more laid

back and are content to check out the television,” says Denson. The anxious child may appreciate when the dentist takes an interest in him. “Some kids need to be distracted a little bit, so we talk about pets they have, activities they like, or something to get their mind off of the visit so they are not worried.” Information is power. Denson’s team makes sure to cover important things with parents: how and when to start brushing; how much toothpaste to use; how to manage if the kid is sucking his thumb, finger, or pacifier; and eating and drinking habits. Little actions can go a long way when it comes to dental health. “Make sure not to put your child to bed with a bottle, brush at nighttime and not just in the morning, and be careful of things like fruit snacks, which sound healthy but can be rough on teeth because they are sticky,” Denson says. Consistency is key. For most, the dental visits are once every six months. This helps the child get used to the office and helps the dentist keep a close eye, so if something comes up or a cavity emerges, it will be caught early. Pay attention to your own feelings about the dentist. “Nervousness can be transferred from parent to child, so parents

play a crucial role in the early relationship with the dentist,” says Denson. “Make sure you are reflecting the dentist as a positive visit rather than something to be scared about.” Set an example and walk your child through the appointment by comforting and encouraging them as best you can. Pediatric dentists appreciate the role they have in children’s growth and development, and Denson says it’s important to normalize going to the dentist during childhood because cavities are preventable. “The earlier we see kids, the more we can guide them and their parents to create good brushing and eating habits.” It’s important to find a pediatric dentist you like and trust. “Pediatric offices are made for kids, where everything is on their level and feels like more of a fun place rather than a sterile, cold medical facility,” Denson says. If you have a child who is afraid of the dentist, sometimes finding the right one can ensure that the anxiety is not permanent. “The most rewarding part is having the kid who is scared to go to the dentist and meeting them, walking through the appointment, and getting them to a point where they are not afraid to go,” says Denson. “We have a lot of kids who love coming to the dentist.” Regardless of your child’s attitude toward the dental visit, it’s a good idea to set up regular cleanings and checkups for the entire family.

Jamie Lober, author of Pink Power (getpinkpower.com), is dedicated to providing information on women’s and pediatric health topics. 10


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Therapy animals prove not all medicine comes in a bottle. BY SHARA CLARK

12

P H OTO S C O U R T E S Y M I D S O U T H T H E R A P Y D O G S & F R I E N D S

F E B R U A R Y

20 1 9

Those of us with dogs at home know the joy their unconditional love brings — wagging tails, slobbery kisses, and the excitement exuded when we open the door after a long day of work or errands add a bit of happiness to our days. Studies suggest that being in the presence of animals can lower blood pressure, decrease stress, and help with alleviating depression and anxiety, in addition to increasing empathy and teaching responsibility. But the benefits can’t always be proven with stats or hard data. Some must be experienced. “We call them special moments,” says Mary Ehrhart, executive director of Mid South Therapy Dogs & Friends, a nonprofit organization that trains teams to provide animal-assisted interactions at local medical facilities, schools, and more. The Germantown-based organization has offered its services to the community since 1999. A big part of what the group does is bring therapy animals to patients, including moms in the Baptist Women’s Hospital antepartum unit, pediatric patients in the emergency department and inpatient unit at the Spence and Becky Wilson Baptist Children’s Hospital, and residents of Baptist Reynolds Hospice House and their families. “When the therapy dog enters the room, the whole energy changes,” Ehrhart says. “Everybody puts a smile on their face. They weren't expecting to see a dog. Or the dog reminds them of their dog. [Older patients] can kind of go back in time and talk about something that was very enjoyable to them, the animals that they had in their lives. It gives them all a little bit of a respite from what they've been dealing with — the poking, the prodding, and everything else.” The range of people the group sees includes those who are wheelchair-bound, awaiting transplants, in grief camp, or otherwise in the midst of tragic situations. “It's unbelievable what it does to people and how it touches them,” Ehrhart says. She recalls a little boy they visited at Lakeside. “He was remanded to the state, and we went out on

a Saturday afternoon and walked with the kids around the lake. And he just started crying, just sobbing. And I said, ‘Gosh, what's wrong?’ And he said, ‘Well, this is the best thing in my life.’” Having a dog by your side can transform your day in ways that sometimes aren’t able to be verbalized. “It doesn't matter if, like at Lakeside, you're wearing cardboard clothing because you came out of the home with nothing but what they gave you when you got there,” says Ehrhart. “The dog doesn't judge you. If you're having a bad time, the dog will listen to you and doesn't come with any predisposed, ‘I want you to do this.’ But instead, ‘I'll just meet you where you are. You tell me about your day.’” For those in the hospital, awaiting surgery, or in rehabilitation, a visit from a dog can add a bit of normalcy to their day, and bring joy to those who may be lonely or scared. “Not all medicine comes in a bottle. The unconditional love that the dog gives is what some of the doctors order, so to speak,” says Ehrhart. “You never know where you'll reach somebody. You just have to be there. And the animals have an instinct about it. They just know who needs them at that particular time, and what they do need.” The Mid South Therapy Dogs & Friends team also includes a donkey and a llama that visit groups in the region. The organization also provides a R.E.A.D. (Reading Education Assistance Dogs) program, in which reluctant readers in local schools are paired with a dog for one-on-one reading sessions. Look for a story on this program in a future issue of Memphis Parent.


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YOU ALWAYS TAKE

HER

SIDE

Parents can help children avoid favoritism fallout. By KIM CLARK

When we were younger, ideas of family life no doubt entertained some of our minds. We had thoughts of raising little ones, and it seemed like overnight we went from being somebody’s child to somebody’s parent. We didn’t ponder what we would do when our children found themselves struggling for our attention. But soon, we became referee between our lovely little brood, and someone usually felt we were always taking the side of another. Welcome to adulting! A social media post mentioned, “If we had realized adulting would be this difficult, we would have stayed in a child’s place like mama said.” Being an adult can be pretty intense, and sometimes struggles come about because of our actions. Unintentionally, we might overlook a child, show more attention to another, or worse than both of these, compare siblings.

Parents who compare one child to another, more often than not, contribute to tension amongst siblings. A child who takes his frustration out on his sibling may do so because he can’t express how sad it made him feel when the parent compared him to his sibling, therefore his aggression becomes displaced. Sisters and brothers usually compete with one another, and while some competition can be healthy, siblings can also develop unhealthy, competitive relationships when parents contrast their children. Instead of complimenting each other’s strengths, siblings might find themselves belittling the other’s weaknesses. It can be an unsettling way to grow up, and sometimes these children spend their adult lives distant. Such rivalrous relationships often go back to childhood.

HELP SIBLINGS AVOID FAVORITISM FALLOUT While it’s possible to avoid comparing siblings, it’s still bound to happen at times.

Here are some ways to lessen the rivalrous phenomenon. BE AWARE – Sibling rivalry occurs. It is important to know and recognize how it begins. Usually, it starts with competing for the parents’ attention, yet it continues as children grow. We parents have our reasons for calling on one child more than another. Maybe the eldest child seems more dependable. The youngest child could appear more favored when he or she is actually needy and may demand more attention than the rest. Children with special needs must have our attention, and we may be even more overprotective of them. Generally, children do not understand the reasoning behind our actions. They can only relate to what we put before them. Explain these situations to them; they are more intelligent than we realize. If we look through our children’s lens, we will see ourselves as stars — they look to us for approval, praise, and guidance.

BE FAIR AND BALANCED – Something as simple as acknowledging one child each time you acknowledge the other goes a long way. As parents, we set the tone. When you smile and acknowledge one child, smile and acknowledge the other as well. One child might shine a little brighter in an area than her other siblings, and that’s fine. Just be sure to acknowledge, with the same level of enthusiasm, the other’s gifts or talents, too. It is good to be honest, but it is best to be kind about our honesty and use words that will bring siblings closer. Children appreciate gentle honesty. This same guide holds true for punishments. If we have rules in place that apply to every child equally yet equitably, then feelings of “side taking” might come to a screeching halt. That’s being fair and balanced. Actively practicing ways to reduce rivalry is a start to letting your children know they are loved equally. Even if you do have a favorite, siblings shouldn’t be able to tell.

BE EMPATHETIC – If you grew up in a home where there were multiple children,

Kim Clark is raising a spunky young son and two teenage daughters. She began a homeschool co-op last year, H.I.S. (Help Is Serving) Life School. 14

I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y B R YA N R O L L I N S

F E B R U A R Y

20 1 9

COMPARING SIBLINGS CAUSES FAVORITISM FALLOUT AKA SIBLING RIVALRY.

you may know the joy that comes with comparative parental approval. On the flip side, another sibling is left to feel hurt and unaccepted, even if it’s a result of their own unacceptable behavior. Being able to empathize with all of the children may illuminate some of the rivalry.


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by THE AMERICAN CAMP ASSOCIATION

Prepare your child — and yourself — for camp. For parents, the most heart-racing, adrenalinepumping moments happen when you let go and watch your child try something on their own. PHOTOGR APHY BY LOUIS TUCKER I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y B R YA N R O L L I N S

The moment the training wheels come off, the first trip down the driveway on a skateboard, the first farewell as they ride off on the school bus — these are more than just memories, these are critical moments that define growth and change. Sending a child off to camp is another of these moments — hold your breath and watch them soar. In today’s world of high-tech kids and families who have a constant connection to each other, it’s essential to take the time to emotionally prepare for camp. It is, of course, important to prepare the first-time camper, but families need to make sure that mom, dad, younger siblings at home — virtually everyone — is ready to adjust to camp life. The American Camp Association (ACA) provides the following tips to help ease first-time families into the camp experience.

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 Parents – As parents, it is important to focus on the positive aspects of camp. Remember that separation is natural, necessary, and inevitable — what better place to have that first experience than in a caring and nurturing environment designed specifically for children? Parents can also focus on the amazing benefits of camp — an experiential education like no other, teaching valuable twenty-first century survival skills like leadership, teamwork, problem-solving, and interpersonal communication.  Siblings – Bob Ditter, family therapist and one of the nation's leading experts on camp, cautions

it is likely that the child left at home will experience separation anxiety and truly miss his or her sibling. To help them prepare, be sure to talk about the upcoming separation. Before the eldest child leaves for camp take a picture of your children together that the sibling can keep in their room or carry around. Remind your children about the communication they can have with each other through letters and postcards.  Other family members – Be sure that everyone is aware of the upcoming experience. Let family members know how to contact the camper through letters and care

packages — make sure they are aware of any communication policies the camp may have, i.e. no phone calls or restrictions on what can be sent in a care package. In addition, an increasing number of camps are using websites to display photos or videos during the camp session. According to ACA’s Emerging Issues Survey, 75 percent of responding camps indicated that they post photos or videos to a website for families to view. Fortyfive percent indicated that they post information, photos, and videos to social media outlets like Facebook. Families should ask camp directors about these options.

Camp is an equal opportunity life-changer. By sending a child to camp, families are truly giving a gift that lasts a lifetime. By taking steps to mentally prepare for camp, families not only keep from getting “kid-sick” for their camper, but they can stay positive about the camp experience — which goes a long way toward helping first-time campers adjust to life at camp. And just like taking off the training wheels, the moment families see their camper radiating confidence and joy, they will feel that burst of pride and gratitude that they allowed their child this experience. For more information about preparing for the summer camp experience, or to find a camp, parents can visit acacamps.org or view the camp guide on memphisparent.com. Reprinted with permission of the American Camp Association. ©2019, American Camping Association, Inc.

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10 Benefits of Summer Camp Choosing an Overnight Camp

The experience can give kids a leg up in life. by CHRISTA MELNYK HINES Are you ready for the summer? Memphis Parent is prepping now to get you and your child ready for overnight and day camps. We will host our second annual Camp Expo — March 23rd at Memphis Botanic Garden — to put all types of camps on display. Visit memphisparentcampexpo.com to learn more!

NURTURES SOCIAL SKILLS. Camp is a community away from home and school where kids learn to work with each other and adult mentors, build relationships, and manage conflict. "You learn to navigate through group dynamics, to barter, to keep one another happy, to be sensitive and support a friend who's sad," says James Spearin, a YMCA senior vice president of youth development. "These skills transfer and build adults with strong character and leadership." MODELS HEALTHY LIVING. According to the Centers for Disease Control, obesity in children has doubled, and in teens has quadrupled, in the last 30 years. Thanks to the many activities camp offers, kids stay busy and physically active. More camps are also working to offer healthier food choices for their campers. According to 2014 study in the American Journal of Health Behavior, camps that offer wholesome foods are more likely to turn out campers who eat more fruits and veggies. Many resident and day camps now offer cooking and gardening tracks where kids learn

how to prepare nutritious meals.

Plan ahead. Check out websites, talk to friends and family for recommendations, and visit prospective camps. Size of camp. Decide whether your child would do better in a large or small setting.

EASES THE SUMMER SLIDE. You know that Location. Because of their geographical location, old saying, "if you some camps offer better outdoor or adventure snooze, you lose"? In activities than others and may be more likely to the absence of regular have access to experienced adventure specialists. enrichment over summer break, research Meet the director. A meeting will help you get a finds that kids typically sense of his or her personality, trustworthiness lose as much as two and compatibility. months of grade level Source: everythingsummer.com equivalency in math. Reading comprehension and spelling skills also take a hit during the summer. To help curb summer learning loss, many say camp helped them specialized camps offer educational opportunities 96% make new friends in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) that make learning and problem-solving fun say people at camp and interactive. Also look for camps geared 92% make them feel good toward reading, writing, and the arts. about themselves

What Campers Say:

PROVIDES A SENSE OF ACHIEVEMENT. From rock climbing to whitewater rafting and horseback riding, summer camp gives kids a chance to try activities that they wouldn't ordinarily get to try. Local and regional camps offer a variety of unique

74%

did something they were afraid to do at first

Source: acacamps.org

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As 14 million children across the country head off to day and overnight camps this summer, they'll return home with more than just a cute camp T-shirt. The summer camp experience can give kids an advantage in school and in life. Here's how camp benefits kids.

Maturity. Most kids are ready by ages 9 or 10, but consider your child's physical and emotional maturity first.

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opportunities for children to try new things — music, sports, dance, and more. ENHANCES SELF-CONFIDENCE. According to an extensive study of camper outcomes conducted by Philliber Research Associates, 70 percent of parents report that their child gained self-confidence while at camp. Whether they work through homesickness or tackle an activity that pushed them outside of their comfort zone, kids walk away feeling a stronger sense of personal pride and self-reliance. HELPS THEM UNPLUG. In a distracting digital world, camp offers valuable space where kids can slow down, connect, and focus. Removing hand-held devices, games, and screens gives children a chance to connect with the great outdoors, try new sports and activities, and bond with their peers without distractions. BUILDS FRIENDSHIPS. Away from the pressures, labels, and social structure of school, one of the best parts of camp is the

opportunity for kids to make new friends. With plenty of play time, activities, and conversation, kids can get to know new people and build lasting friendships. REINTRODUCES THEM TO NATURE. According to a nationwide poll conducted by The Nature Conservancy, only about 10 percent of children spend time outdoors every day. Why? Kids say they aren't interested, they lack access, and are uncomfortable outside. In the meantime, they're growing more and more attached to life in cyberspace and further detached from the natural world. "To connect with our woods and forests, our wildlife, our lakes and streams and oceans, our stars in complete darkness, all while depending on other campers and adults to keep one another safe is an experience unlike most others in life," YMCA’s Spearin says.

Whether they're working to build a campfire together, playing a game, or preparing a meal, campers learn to problemsolve to accomplish their goals. Through teamwork, kids learn that they are each an integral part of the camp community where they feel a sense of acceptance and belonging.

ENCOURAGES PERSONAL GROWTH. While camp may simply seem like a quintessential summer pastime for kids where they might learn to swim, sleep in a cabin, and sing around a campfire, they're rewarded with personal development skills that will help them in the classroom, in their relationships, and eventually, the boardroom — or whatever their calling. "Those tangible experiences lead to building the foundations of stronger children who can lead others, show empathy, navigate through difficult group dynamics, value the FOSTERS TEAMWORK. Camp facilitates an differences in everyone, and give of oneself environment where kids learn that to succeed for the benefit of others," says Spearin. they must work together with their peers and "These are skills that the best in our society their camp leaders. show throughout life."

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Freelance journalist Christa Melnyk Hines is the mom of two sons who love to attend camps each summer. Christa's latest book is Happy, Healthy & Hyperconnected: Raise a Thoughtful Communicator in a Digital World.

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DAD LIBS

CELEBRATE & EDUCATE Black History Month is a time of reflection and celebration for all. By JEFF HULETT

As Memphis commemorates its bicentennial this year, it’s important that we reflect, remember, and dream, but also celebrate and honor those who have made our city a better place.

F E B R U A R Y

As a parent of two young girls, Ella, 7, and Beatrice, 4, I try to be as honest as I can about our city and country’s history, including civil rights and the sanitation strikes that heavily define our past. They have lots of really good questions and are already learning so much just by living in a diverse neighborhood and going to school. Our discussions range from slavery to poverty to equal rights to minority contributions in art, literature, and sports. Last year, in fact, Ella was champion Olympic gymnast Gabby Douglas for Historical Halloween at her school. Not to mention the girls have participated in several marches around our city for women and immigrants. While there have been some big wins achieved through the Civil Rights Movement and beyond, there have also been some dark, deplorable times from which our city is still recovering. God knows there are immeasurable wounds from our past, but we can acknowledge the injustices and work to ensure they don’t ever happen again. That’s why this year I hope to take my kids on a tour of the city to show them that history was made and is still being made right here in our hometown. From food to

music, nightlife to art, there is so much to celebrate and share this month and all year long. First up, I plan to take them on Carolyn Michael-Banks’ aka Queen’s A Tour of Possibilities. A Tour of Possibilities (ATOP) was created to share the historical and cultural gems that African Americans have contributed to Memphis, as well as explore their influence on local business, music, sports, politics, education, and religion. As Queen would say, “The possibilities are endless!” Last time I took the tour I was blown away by the expertise and passion she had when it came to where certain speeches were given and where plans were made for different marches and protests. I even got the chance to stand at the pulpit where Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. famously gave his final “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” speech at Mason Temple of the Church of God in Christ. This is something I will never forget and forever cherish. Next, we plan to visit the Brooks Museum of Art to check out the Ernest Withers: A Buck & a Half Apiece photography exhibition. On display through March 20th, this show includes photographs taken on Beale Street, in Memphis recording studios,

nightclubs, churches, and on city streets. Withers’ photos are a perfect conversation starter with my kids to talk about Memphis in the 1960s and ’70s. From there, and to see more of his work, we will stop by the Ernest Withers Museum on Beale Street. Five dollars gets you in, and there is so much there. Finally, I plan to take the girls to the Slave Haven Underground Railroad Museum, which offers an in-depth look at one of the largest forced migrations in history. I look forward to witnessing this incredible experience through the eyes of my girls as they see and hear this story. I’ve been more times than I can count, but every time I go, I learn something new and am able to take away something special. The last time I went, I was moved by the use of quilts as symbols to let slaves know it was clear to pass and enter the Burkle Estate. The use of creativity, collaboration, and ingenuity to avoid capture is astounding. When I think about being a kid studying and commerrating Black History Month in school, I remember writing reports about Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad and discussing Rosa Parks’ defiance on a bus that fateful day in Montgomery. Those important stories continue to inspire. But I want my kids to know more than I did as a kid and have more of a depth and breadth of knowledge and understanding to take with them into adulthood, and to teach their kids.

Jeff Hulett is a Memphis superfan who enjoys sharing with his two daughters what he loves about the city. 20

P H OTO G R A P H Y R . G I N O S A N TA M A R I A / S H U T T E R F R E E , L L C A N D C A LV I N L . L E A K E | D R E A M S T I M E . C O M

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Last year’s MLK50 events in and around the National Civil Rights Museum did just that, but we need to keep this conversation in the forefront. Memphis has a rich history, filled with change-makers and activists, both living and deceased, who fought or are still fighting to make Memphis, and our country, more just — and we need to introduce them to our children.


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JEANETTE KEATH By JULIA BAKER

F E B R U A R Y

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Oftentimes in life, we take different paths than we originally intended. Jeanette Keath, a preschool teacher at Christ the King (CTK) Lutheran School, is a prime example. She was a churchgoer at Christ the King Lutheran Church and working at Weight Watchers When her life goal became clear, 25 years ago, AFTER she was asked to help teach pre-k for the school. Keath had been working for Weight Watchers part-time and was looking for a second part-time job. “A friend of mine told me that Christ the King was looking for someone to help with the kids,” she says. “So I came out and interviewed, and the woman [who interviewed me] said they had an opening for Mondays and Wednesdays. I already worked Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, so I told them that if they wanted to change it to Tuesdays and Thursdays, I’d do it. So they changed it.” In 2002, after 120 hours of training throughout the first few years of her teaching career at CTK School, Keath received her Childhood Development Associate Credential, a widely recognized accreditation in early childhood education, at State Technical Institute at Memphis (now known as Southwest Tennessee Community College). Now a full-time teacher, Keath has an interactive approach with her children and uses a play-based learning technique, where play is the central focus of learning. “I have found that 3-year-olds don’t want to sit at a table and do worksheets,” Keath says. “They’re too young for that.” Keath utilizes process-focused art as part of her play-based learning technique. “[My students] are invited to use lots of different media of art materials to cut and glue their own works,” she says. “That’s the kind of art I like them to have. It’s called process art. The emphasis is more on the process — and they’re using their hands and sensory systems — rather than what the outcome is.” She also teaches children through repetition. “We use a calendar every day, and this is how the children learn

to count,” says Keath. “They’re learning to recognize the numbers. This is rote memorization.” This technique is also used to teach them how to recognize and spell their own and their classmates’ names. Keath covers all bases by also teaching students shapes, colors, memorization skills, and even virtues like sharing, taking turns, and patience, through group games and activities. Ultimately, Keath knows teaching pre-k at CTK is her life’s calling. “It’s exactly where I’m supposed to be and what I’m supposed to be doing,” she says. “You find a job like that, and you want to do that forever. It’s not always easy. It’s hard like any other job. But it’s worth it to see the kids move on and grow.” The parents of Keath’s students believe she’s where she’s supposed to be, too. “I have parents who will say, ‘You’re not retiring any time soon, are you? We’ve got a younger child, and we want him to take your class,’” she says. “That’s always the ultimate compliment — when a parent loves and appreciates what you did with one child and now wants their younger child to get the same experience.” Although her husband would like to do some traveling when Keath retires, she plans to stay in the field as long as she can. “Even after I retire, I might try substitute teaching or maybe writing a blog coming up with ideas for other teachers,” she says. “I have been so blessed with other teachers [on Pinterest] sharing ideas with me, and I’d love to give back.”

We want to shine a light on your child’s teacher, or even a teacher who made a difference in your life. Submit your nomination today by emailing teacher@memphisparent.com. 22


i c e r p p A

! u o Y

Have your best year yet by just being you. By CHRISTINA KATZ

PHOTOGR APHY Š K A ZZ AKOVA | DRE A MSTIME.COM

The new year often leaves moms feeling less-than. Are you sure you are not too fat? Don't you have a bit too much debt? Couldn't you feed your family homemade food every night as a fivecourse, sit-down dinner accommodating everyone's dietary needs? Are your children doing their best in every aspect of existence, or should we just go ahead and blame you now?

Seriously, the new year is often not a whole lot of fun for moms. That's why I'm turning the table on resolutions this year. This year, I'd like you to celebrate all the ways you are already good enough. To that end, I've gathered up 10 ways you can treat your imperfect self to a daily toast in your own honor. The year is new, but don't change a thing. Just relish in being the spectacular person you already are, and I bet you'll have your very best year yet.

Put the freeze on criticism. Put a dusting of snow or ice color on your nails. Then pull out your best ice princess look whenever anyone suggests it might be time to get busy on those resolutions. If only you could zap them with your fingertips like Elsa in Frozen. (Until that kicks in, use your icy stare with imaginary freezing action.)

This calls for chocolate. Most things call for afternoon chocolate, so don't save this strategy for a sleety day. See how many variations of hot chocolate you can try this winter (peppermint, caramel, or marshmallow?), then share the best with the rest of the family when the next snow day rolls around.

Tuppence a bag. Worried about money? A family viewing of the classic film Mary Poppins will put everything in perspective. Then rally the family to install the largest bird feeder you can afford and keep it overflowing with bulk bird seed from your local big box store or farm supply. You'll feel absolutely abundant every time you fill it. And birds will follow you around the yard as though you were a Disney character!

Color all over the lines. Did you get one of those adult coloring books for a holiday gift? Great! Now try coloring all over the lines. Seriously, go ahead and break the coloring book rules. See how many ways your bursts of color can spill beyond all those very serious lines. It feels liberating, doesn't it?

Twist and shout. Hula hooping is a fun activity for a dreary afternoon when you don't feel like dragging yourself to the gym. Crank up some music and hula away the blues as you burn calories and whittle your waist. No hoop? Try twisting and shouting until the hoop you order arrives in the mail. You'll stretch your back and loosen up your shoulders.

Take stock. You have a bunch of strengths. You also have an assortment of skills. Most importantly, you have a plethora of passions. Make three columns on a single page and list them all (strengths, skills, passions). See how much you rock? Make sure others catch you being awesome.

Tough crowd. You got a flat tire, the kids have the flu, and all the people you've been trying to avoid are calling you? Girlfriend, you need to call on your superpower. Go take a long winter's nap. Practice until you are good at it.

Pep talk. Everyone else is crushing their resolutions, but will they stick? While you are waiting to find out, why not write a letter to your inner little girl. You can pick a specifically challenging age or just address all your flubs and fears. Tell her what you know now that you wish you had known then. You'll become her favorite heroine of all time.

Did someone say comfort food? Oh yeah! You definitely did not try enough soup, casserole, and bread recipes over the holidays. You were too busy juggling the hustle and the bustle. So now's your chance. But hurry! Spring is coming and bringing bunny food back with it. Go ahead and indulge now. You did great today. And as a reward, you deserve a generous slathering of thick, scented lotion on your hands, feet, and elbows before bed. Make this your new nightly ritual and go to sleep floating on a cloud of your own essential worthiness. Ahhhh.

Author, journalist, and writing coach Christina Katz likes herself despite a couple of mistakes she may have made once or most days. She has learned, over the years, to hide the chocolate in her home office and give the icy freeze-stare to anyone who dares to try and take it.

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, r a e Y w Ne ate

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FEBRUARY CALENDAR

By MEENA VISWANATHAN

30th Annual

Youth Villages Soup Sunday FEDEX FORUM

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 11 A.M.-2 P.M. Features soups, seafood gumbos, specialty items, bread, and desserts served by local restaurants and caterers. Kids Zone includes Magic Mr. Nick, Oreo-stacking contest, inflatables, face painting, and appearances by local team mascots. $20/ADULT. $10/CHILD AGES 6-12. FREE FOR CHILDREN AGES 5 AND UNDER. VISIT SOUPSUNDAY.ORG FOR DETAILS.

1 ∙ FRIDAY

Mom and Baby Yoga. Universal Parenting Place (UPP) @ Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women. On select Fridays (Feb. 1 & 8), 10-11 a.m. Geared for children ages 1 and under. Free. 227-9558.

2 ∙ SATURDAY

Bluff City Fire and Ice - Polar Bear Plunge & Chili Cook-off. Mud Island River Park. 10 a.m. Come dressed in your wackiest costume for a chance to win the Golden Plunge Award! Enter the chili cookoff or be the judge ($5) to vote for your favorite one. Benefits Special Olympics Greater Memphis. Visit specialolympicsmem.org for details.

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15TH ANNUAL REELFOOT LAKE EAGLE FESTIVAL

Reelfoot Lake State Park in Tiptonville, Tennessee. February 1-3. Festivities include art and photo contests, guided eagle tours, children’s activities, Live Birds of Prey programs, special photography tours and hiking, live animals and educational program, and vendors. Native American percussionist John Long Eagle performs at the festival. Free admission. $10/person for Eagle Tours. Call 731-253-9652 for Eagle Tour reservations. Free gift to the first 100 families. Visit reelfoottourism.com or call 731-253-2007 for details. First Friday Fun. Westminster Academy. 9:30-10:30 a.m. Ages 2-5 years. Join for this Mommy and Me series featuring stories, songs, and crafts. Free and open to the public. 380-9192.

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Chucalissa Family Days. C.H. Nash Museum at Chucalissa. Saturdays at 10 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. Family programs and craft activities change weekly. Feb. 2: Mystery Box/Beading. Feb. 9: Sports & Hunting/ Pottery. Feb. 16: Stone Tools/Talking Sticks. Feb. 23: Trash Talks/Snake Painting. $6/adult. $4/child ages 4-11. Free for children 3 and under. 785-3160. Library Tunes & Tales. At area libraries including Central, Bartlett, Cordova, Whitehaven, Collierville, and Germantown. 11 a.m. Join the musical families of the Memphis Symphony Orchestra as they present a story set to music followed by a craft activity. Free. 537-2500.

3 ∙ SUNDAY

Free Sunday at Chucalissa. C.H. Nash Museum at Chucalissa. Sundays, 1-5 p.m. Tour the museum and grounds, learn about archaeology in the hands-on lab, and take part in a scavenger hunt in the exhibit gallery. Free. 785-3160.

4 ∙ MONDAY

Tea & Toddlers. UPP @ Christ Community Health Services. Mondays from noon until 1:45 p.m. Parents are invited for a weekly parenting topic while tots enjoy toddler time over refreshments. Free. RSVP to brittany.hart@christchs.org or call 701-2871 for details.

5 · TUESDAY

Tuesdays at S.T.A.X.: See. Touch. Ask. eXplore. Stax Museum of American Soul Music. Tuesdays from 2 to 4 p.m. Feb. 5: Soulful Style to Swag. Feb. 12: Messages in Music, Memes, and Other Mediums. Feb. 19: Integration, Segregation, and Crossover Success. Feb. 26: (Black) History in the Making. Explore Black History Month at the Stax with handson activities, objects from the archive on display, and soul sounds. Free admission for Shelby County residents from 1 to 5 p.m. Visit staxmuseum.com for details.

6 ∙ WEDNESDAY

Toddler Time. UPP @ Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women. Wednesdays from 10:30 a.m. until noon. Play group for parents and toddlers. Free. 227-9558. Music for Aardvarks. UPP @ Christ Community Health Services. On select Wednesdays (Feb. 6 & 20), from noon until 1 p.m. Early childhood music class for children ages 6 months to 6 years. Free. RSVP to brittany.hart@christchs.org or call 7012871 for details.

8 ∙ FRIDAY

H.M.S. Pinafore by Gilbert & Sullivan. Germantown Performing Arts Center (GPAC). Through February


10. Friday & Saturday at 7:30 p.m.; Sunday at 3 p.m. Opera Memphis presents this classic tale featuring beloved characters, memorable tunes, and a hilariously topsy-turvy ending. $38-$99. Reservations required. 257-3100.

your little one to discover nature, hands-on, in the great outdoors. Six-class semester fee: $75. Call 636-4122 to register.

16 ∙ SATURDAY

9 ∙ SATURDAY

28 ∙ THURSDAY

Underwater Bubble Show. Buckman Arts Center @ St. Mary’s School. 5 & 7:30 p.m. Performance incorporates drama, pantomime, dance, puppetry, juggling, aerial arts, acrobatics, contortion, sand art, and imagery with the beauty of soap bubbles. $30/ adult. $20/child. 537-1483.

Love is . Stax Museum of American Soul Music. Noon until 2 p.m. Celebrate Black History Month and Valentine’s Day with activities and crafts honoring some of the greatest names in black history. Free with admission. 942-7685.

Stories and Songs from the Garden. Memphis Jewish Community Center. 2:30-3:30 p.m. Bring the whole family for Stories and Songs from the Garden performed by Two Old Crows Puppet Theatre. $10/ family. 761-0810.

12 ∙ TUESDAY

Caterpillar Club. Memphis Botanic Garden (MBG). Also on February 26 & 27. Choose Tuesday or Wednesday session. Children ages 2-5 join for stories, games, and crafts. Led by instructor “Mister Drew” Massengale, this preschool program allows

23 ∙ SATURDAY

The Jungle Book. Germantown Community Library. 2 p.m. One-act play presented by Germantown Community Theatre as part of the City of Germantown’s The Big Read program. Free. 4537449.

Hattiloo Theatre’s I, Too, Am America. Halloran Centre @ The Orpheum. 10 a.m. Part of the Saturday Series, I, Too, Am America is a play in which lives of black historical figures like Ida B. Wells and Sojourner Truth are recounted. The show introduces audiences to significant points of history through drama and music. $15. Call 525-3000 for tickets.

10 ∙ SUNDAY

face painting, and appearances by local team mascots. $20/adult. $10/child ages 6-12. Free for children ages 5 and under. Visit soupsunday.org for details. 

KIDS ROCK FAMILY DAY

Dixon Gallery and Gardens. Saturday, February 16. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Features studentcreated activities, live performances and music, after-school snacks, games, and more. Free. 761-5250.

17 ∙ SUNDAY

30th Annual Youth Villages Soup Sunday. FedExForum. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Features soups, seafood gumbos, specialty items, bread, and desserts served by local restaurants and caterers. Kids Zone includes Magic Mr. Nick, Oreo-stacking contest, inflatables,

LO O K I N G A H E A D

MARCH 2 ∙ SATURDAY

Magic Carpet Jam in Your Jammies: Breakfast with Siphne. Buckman Arts Center @ St. Mary’s School. 10 a.m. Children ages 2 and up will wear their pajamas and join Siphne on a musical adventure exploring beatboxing and vocal percussion. $5/child. Free to adults. 537-1483.

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Give us a boy, and we’ll make him stronger, smarter, happier, and overall, better.

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Swimming Lessons

Year ‘round in our HEATED indoor pool!

• Group Lessons • Private Swim Lessons • Adult Swim Lessons • Baby & Me Classes -Ages 2mo and Up

We have swim packages for all age groups. SAVE MONEY! We have small class ratios... Do you need SPECIALTY Training? We are definitely the place for you!

CALL(BRENNA) SWIM901-300-0384 SCHOOLS Gift Cards make great gifts! 999 South Yates, Memphis, TN 901-763-3483 www.diveshop1.com

ONGOING EVENTS MUSEUMS AND EXHIBITS

Memphis Botanic Garden. Origami at the Garden. Through March 24. An exhibition of 17 outdoor sculptures and 3 indoor unfolded cast wall hangings created by American artists Kevin and Jennifer Box are on display throughout 31 specialty gardens. 636-4100. The Pink Palace Museum. The Pink Palace Mansion Reopens. The renovated mansion exhibits include Piggly Wiggly Store model, Old Country Store, Clyde Park Miniature Circus, and the Polar Bear. Pocket Tour Guide app available for download at The App Store and Google Play. 636-2362. CTI 3D Giant Theater. February Giant Screen Science Fiction Film Festival. War of the Worlds (1953 version). February 2 & 3 at 4 p.m. Tron. February 9 & 10 at 4 p.m. Galaxy Quest. February 16 & 17 at 4 p.m. Planet of the Apes (1968 version). The Mysteries of China 3D. February 9 through May 24. 6362362. AutoZone Dome at the Sharpe Planetarium. Seasonal Stargazing. Ongoing. Perfect Little Planet. Until further notice. One World, One Sky: Big Bird’s Adventure. Until further notice. 636-2362.

Mallory-Neely House Tour. MalloryNeely House, 652 Adams Avenue. Fridays & Saturdays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $9/adult. $5/child (ages 3 and up). 523-1484.

Crafting a Legacy: 40 Years of Collecting & Exhibiting – Opening Reception & Gallery Talk. Metal Museum. Sunday, February 3. Reception at 3 p.m. and gallery talk at 4 p.m. Metal Museum presents an exhibition of past, current, and future Master Metalsmiths and Tributaries artists in honor of its 40th anniversary. Free with admission. Light snacks and refreshments provided. 774-6380. Making Memphis: Storytelling with Jimmy Ogle Series. Pink Palace Mansion Theater. February 4 through March 14. Mondays & Thursdays, from noon until 1 p.m. This Lunch and Learn series is part of the museum’s Making Memphis: 200 Years of Community bicentennial exhibit. Memphis historian Jimmy Ogle will focus on Memphis history from the 1800s to now covering a wide range of topics from the roaring ’20s to the historic riverfront. Free. Reservations required. Lest We Forget Commemoration: Dramatic Reading of Slave Narratives. Hattiloo Theatre. Monday, February 25, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Hattiloo curates an eight-month long commemoration remembering the African-American community’s achievements, rejoicings, and struggles. The series uses theatre, film, scholarship, and music to share the 400-year history (1619-2019). Free. Reservations recommended.

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No INdoor Voices Allowed

OTHER PROGRAMS

Magevney House Tour. Magevney House. Open first Saturday (February 2), 1-4 p.m. Admission is free. 523-1484.

Try us out! Join us for a complimentary class to see the wonderful impact The Little Gym can have on your

BROADWAY 101: ON YOUR FEET!

The Little Gym of Germantown,TN www.tlggermantowntn.com 901-755-1323

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Halloran Centre @ The Orpheum. Thursday, February 14, 4:30 p.m. Students in grades 7-12 learn music or choreography from cast members performing in the touring Broadway shows. Broadway 101 covers a workshop, Q & A, personalized keepsake Orpheum Theatre Group lanyard and name tag, pre-show dinner, and a ticket to the performance following the workshop. $60. Call 529-4242 to register two weeks before the workshop.


FREE Homeschool Days

at Memphis Brooks Museum of Art PHILADANCO

Buckman Arts Center @ St. Mary’s School. Friday, February 8, 8 p.m. This world-renowned touring company comes for an electrifying performance on the Buckman stage. $28/adult. $25/child. 537-1483.

CLASSES & WORKSHOPS

Mid-Day Mindfulness in Motion Yoga. UPP @ Christ Community Health Services. Meets Fridays, from noon until 1 p.m. Features simple, dynamic movement, gentle balance exercises, deep breathing, and guided relaxation. Free. RSVP to brittany.hart@christchs.org or call 701-2871 for details. Guy Talk. Germantown Methodist Hospital. Friday, February 1, 6:308:30 p.m., for parents only. Saturday, February 2, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., for parent and son. An educational program to enhance open communication between father (mother) and son (ages 9-12 years). $60 for parent & child. Call 516-6645 to register. Spanish Classes. Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library. Ten-week session meets on Saturdays (excluding February 16 and March 13), 9 a.m.12:30 p.m. The Rotary Club provides an instructor to teach and refresh Spanish language for beginner/ intermediate learners. Free. Registration required. 415-2700. Saturday Childbirth Class. Baptist Women’s Hospital. February 2 & 16, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $75. Call 226-5764 to register. Interactive Nutrition Classes. Cordova Branch Library. Eight-week series meets on Mondays, 1-2:30 p.m. Janice Dunlap from UT Extension Services teaches how to cook safely, grocery shop inexpensively, and live a healthier lifestyle. Free. 754-8443.

Yoga Center. February 5 through March 19. Meets Tuesdays, 6-7:15 p.m. Practice yoga poses to help you feel comfortable and strong as your baby grows. $18/class or $100 for seven-week series. 647-2716. Work It Wednesdays. South Branch Library. Meets on select Wednesdays, from 11 a.m. until noon. Feb. 6: Resumes and Cover Letters. Feb. 13: Apply for Jobs Online. Feb. 20: Interview Skills. Each session will cover a critical skill to help stand out in the job market. Free. 946-8518.

Drop-in art-making studio, guided tours, gallery guides and more.

Spring 2019 schedule Thursday, February 14: Leading Ladies Thursday, March 21: Writer’s Eye Thursday, April 11: When you work at an art museum 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. | Art studio opens at 10 a.m. Tours begin at 10:30 and 11:15 a.m. No reservations needed to participate and the program is free of charge.

brooksmuseum.org

B

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

Ukulele Class. Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library. Thursdays, 5:30-7 p.m. Class open to all levels. Ukuleles are provided and are also available for checkout. Free. Contact Sue at 415-2843 for details. Breastfeeding Class. Baptist Women’s Hospital. Thursday, February 7, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $30. Call 226-5764 to register. Junior Artisans: Spiral Dragon Mobiles. Metal Museum. Saturday, February 9, from 10:30 a.m. until noon. Children ages 7-10 celebrate the Chinese New Year by creating dragon mobiles out of copper sheet. $15. Reservations required. 7746380. Bomba Dance Workshop. Evergreen Theatre. Saturday, February 9, 11 a.m. Join for a workshop with Redobles de Cultura of New York City and learn the traditional dance and musical style of Puerto Rico. $25. Call 662469-6095 for details. 

Citizenship Test Prep. Cordova Branch Library. Meet on Tuesdays, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Prepare for the civics test by reviewing more than 100 questions. Free. 754-8443.

Young Coppersmiths: Fire Breathing Dragon Masks. Metal Museum. Saturday, February 9, 2:30-4 p.m. Children ages 11-13 celebrate the Chinese New Year by learning how to create dragon masks out of copper. $15. Reservations required. 774-6380.

Prenatal Yoga Classes. Evergreen

African Family Drum Circle. UPP @

M E M PH I SPA R ENT.COM

Email Elizabeth Baines at events@ hattilootheatre.org to make your reservations. 

Activities

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At HappyFeet, we use a ‘Story Time with a Soccer Ball’ approach to provide an amazing fitness program for boys and girls from ages 2-5. Our curriculum is ageappropriate and designed to captivate the imagination of your little soccer star and empower them to learn some of the most challenging skills in soccer... fearlessly. • Professional Coaches & Communication • Builds social skills and improves self-confidence • Instills a brave and creative go for it mentality • Fun & Non-competitive environment

2019 Spring League March 23-May 11 Spring Program Info & Registration: www.memphishappyfeet.com or call 901-496-1195 www.facebook.com/memphishappyfeetsoccer/

Friday, March 1st 8:00am-7:00pm

Saturday, March 2nd 8:00am-12:00 noon Many items half price on Saturday ACCEPTED

Gently Used Name Brand Spring Clothing Children’s Shoes - Baby Equipment & Furniture Toys, Outdoor Toys, Books, DVDs & More

Christ Community Health Services. Tuesday, February 12, 1:30-2:30 p.m. A creative family engagement activity for everyone to enjoy through the spirit of African music. It offers children the tools for developing lifelong safety, health, and learning habits. Free. RSVP to brittany.hart@christchs.org or call 701-2871 for details. Mini Metalsmiths: Aluminum Formed Moons. Metal Museum. Wednesday, February 13, 3:454:45 p.m. Children ages 3-6 learn how to use trinkets to decorate an aluminum foil moon wall piece. $10. Reservations required. 774-6380. Living a Plant-Based Life. Frayser Branch Library. Wednesday, February 13, 4-5 p.m. Angela Hyde conducts cooking demos promoting a simple and affordable plantbased diet. Also learn about natural remedies and natural preventive measures that result from a plantbased life. Free. 357-4115. Broadway 101: On Your Feet! Halloran Centre @ The Orpheum. Thursday, February 14, 4:30 p.m. Students in grades 7-12 learn music or choreography from cast members performing in the touring Broadway shows. Broadway 101 covers a workshop, Q & A, personalized keepsake Orpheum Theatre Group lanyard and name tag, pre-show dinner, and a ticket to the performance following the workshop. $60. Call 529-4242 to register two weeks before the workshop. Make Your Own: Prismacolor on Copper. Metal Museum. Saturday, February 23. Two sessions offered from 10 a.m. until noon and from 2:30 p.m. until 4:30 p.m. Children ages 7 and up learn how to use Prismacolor pencils to create their own decorative designs on copper. $10. Reservations required. 7746380.

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HOMESCHOOL CLASSES

DO GOOD. BETTER. 901.726.5725 momentumnonprofit.org We help Mid-South nonprofits succeed.

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Nature’s Candy Store. MBG. Wednesday, February 6, 2-3:30 p.m. Children ages 5 and up join for a hands-on learning experience. $5/person. Garden admission not included. Call 636-4100 to register and pre-pay.

FUND-RAISERS

2nd Annual Heart to Heart Reception and Silent Auction. Crosstown Concourse. Thursday, February 7, 5:30-7:30 p.m. An opportunity to browse beautiful pieces of art from local artists while enjoying light hors d’oeuvres, wine, and dessert. Celebrate Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) Awareness week and honor an outstanding individual in the CHD community. Tickets are $20 in advance. Benefits the Heart Institute

at Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital. Visit bigheartfund2019.eventbrite. com for details. 

THEATRE PERFORMANCES

Glenn Miller Orchestra. The Orpheum. Friday, February 8, 7 p.m. The legendary Glenn Miller is bringing more than 20 musicians and singers to take you back to the swing era of the 1930s and ’40s. $63-$83. Call 525-3000 for tickets. Guitar Fest. Harris Concert Hall. February 8-10, 7:30 p.m. Features classical guitarists Lily Afshar and Nicholas Ciraldo (Feb. 8), William Kanengiser (Feb. 9), and Andrea Dieci (Feb.10) performing at the University of Memphis. Go to memphis.edu/guitarfest for ticket information. PHILADANCO. Buckman Arts Center @ St. Mary’s School. Friday, February 8, 8 p.m. This worldrenowned touring company comes for an electrifying performance on the Buckman stage. $28/adult. $25/ child. 537-1483.

Afro-Latino Night. Evergreen Theatre. Saturday, February 9, 7 p.m. First Afro-Latino Night concert features Redobles de Cultura of New York City and Afro-Puerto Rican Bomba Group. $25 at the door. Advance discounts available. 662469-6095. Dancing with the Stars: Live! The Orpheum. Saturday, February 9, 8 p.m. Features fan-favorite professional and troupe dancers in a brand-new production that showcases all types of dance styles. $49.50-$79.50. Call 525-3000 for tickets. Kafe Kirk with special guest Everette Harp. Halloran Centre @ The Orpheum. Sunday, February 10, 6 p.m. Part of On Stage at the Halloran Centre, the series will bring an uplifting mix of musical entertainment to downtown Memphis. $45-$75. 525-3000. On Your Feet! The Orpheum. February 12-17. Tuesday through Friday at 7:30 p.m; Saturday at 2 & 8 p.m.; Sunday at 1 & 6:30 p.m. Features some of the iconic songs of the past quarter-century and one of the most inspiring stories in music history. $25-$125. 525-3000. Date Night at the Scheidt – A Valentine’s Celebration in Song. Harris Concert Hall. February 14, 7:30 p.m. Join for an evening of romantic music at the U of M. Free. 678-2541. Sarah McLachlan. The Orpheum. Friday, February 22, 8 p.m. This three-time Grammy Award-winning


Memphis Made-Center Stage presents This Place, This Time with Siphne A. Sylve. Buckman Arts Center @ St. Mary’s School. Friday, March 1, 8 p.m. Siphne’s stage performance is in conjunction with her Levy Gallery exhibit. $20/adult. $15/child. 537-1483.

STORY TIME AT AREA BOOKSTORES AND MUSEUMS

Barnes & Noble Booksellers The Avenue Carriage Crossing Mall, 853-3264 Saturdays at 11 a.m. Ages 1-6. Barnes & Noble Booksellers 2774 N. Germantown Pkwy., 386-2468 Tuesdays and Saturdays at 11 a.m. Ages 2-8. Story Time at Morton Museum of Collierville History 196 N. Main St., 457-2650 Fridays, 10:30-11 a.m. Ages 5 and under. Enjoy a new story theme each week with songs, related craft, and snack. Free. CENTRAL 3030 Poplar Ave., 415-2700 CLOUD901 Classes & Events: CLOUD901 is the library’s stateof-the-art Teen Learning Lab that includes a music studio, a video production lab, an art studio, Makerspace, gaming zone, and a performance stage. Open to teens ages 13-18 with a Memphis library card. Go to memphislibrary.org/ cloud901 for a class list.  Adult Sensory Story Time. Wednesdays, 10-11 a.m. Special story time, songs, and activities for adults with disabilities. Teens and children with special needs also welcome to attend.  Front Porch Music Series – Christian Stanfield. Tuesday, February 12, 5:30-7 p.m. Christian Stanfield of the Side Street Steppers presents a history of black music through lecture and musical examples. Cordova 8457 Trinity Rd., 754-8443  Dixon Art Classes for Teens: Playful Pastels. Tuesday, February 5, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Inspired by Eye to Eye: a New Look at the Dixon Collection, teens create drawings on velour using chalk pastel.  Family Movie Madness. Saturday, February 9, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Watch The Adventures of Scamper the Penguin, share snacks, and sculpt and decorate a penguin to take home.  International Story Time. Saturday, February 16, 11 a.m. until noon. Learn about the country of Poland with stories, music, arts, games, and snacks.  Family Fun with Robotics. Saturday, February 23, 11 a.m. until noon. Build a robot and race through a maze to win. Cornelia Crenshaw 531 Vance Ave., 525-1643  Black History Jeopardy Game. Saturday, February 23, from noon until 2 p.m. Children ages 6-12 play this game to learn about black history. Frayser 3712 Argonne St., 357-4115  Teens Exploring Art: Knitting. Tuesday, February 5, 4-5 p.m. Teens learn the basics of knitting.  Teens Appreciating Black History and its Leaders. Wednesday, February 6, 4-5 p.m. Teens research and identify leaders of their choice and discuss their roles related to black history.  Children Exploring Memphis’ Black History. Monday, February 11, 4-5 p.m. Author and educator Alice Faye Duncan reads her new book Memphis, Martin, and the Mountaintop – The Sanitation Strike of 1968.  Anti-Valentine Day. Tuesday, February 12, 4-5 p.m. Teens decorate cookies/cupcakes, make anti-Valentine cards, and listen to songs.  Explore STEAM: Tech it, Think it, and Grow! Thursday, February 21, 3-4 p.m. Children ages 6-12 explore STEAM activities using high-tech to no-tech tools.  A Teen Musical Performance. Monday, February 25, 4-5 p.m. Teens present and perform their own style of music as it relates to black history. Poplar-White Station 5094 Poplar Ave., 682-1616  Youtube 101 for Teens. Wednesday, February 20, 3-4:30 p.m. Join for video editing 101 and get started with making your first YouTube video today.

Explore the Wild Side of Science! Camp Lichterman Spring Break STEM Camp Lichterman Nature Center March 11-15, 2019 9:00 am – 3:00 pm Grades 3-8 Grab a lab coat and experiment with nature at Lichterman Nature Center this Spring Break! Meet live animals and hike in nature while participating in true experimental science. Meet a scientist from a different STEM field every day. Come over to the wild side of science! Before care 7:30 am – 9:00 am After care 3:15 pm – 6:00 pm Monday - Friday For registration forms and information, visit www.memphismuseums.org, call reservations at 901-636-2221, email nature.reservations@memphistn.gov or camp director, Dr. Dawn Manning at 901-636-2226 dawn.manning@memphistn.gov

5992 Quince Road, Memphis, TN 38119

M E M PH I SPA R ENT.COM

singer-songwriter performs at the Orpheum. $45.50-$85.50. Call 5253000 for tickets.

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YOUR CHILD SHOULD BE HERE!

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Send us your kid funnies, photos, or artwork via email with Favorite Moments in the subject line to shara@memphisparent.com

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Announcing the 2nd annual

SATURDAY

MARCH 23RD

10am-1

FREE pm ADMISSION

Meet the staff and leadership of area camps and learn all about your child's spring, summer, and fall enrichment options. Representatives from day camps, sports camps, overnight camps, enrichment camps, educational camps and more will be on hand! Check out memphisparentcampexpo.com for more information, and be sure to follow Memphis Parent on your favorite social channel for updates!

M E M PH I SPA R ENT.COM

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN 750 CHERRY ROAD

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As a Top 10 heart hospital, we reach higher. We all want the best for kids. At Le Bonheur, we’re proud to be recognized as one of the nation’s Top 10 pediatric heart programs by U.S. News & World Report. We are the only children’s hospital in the Southeast to earn this distinction.

Where Every Child Matters lebonheur.org

Profile for Contemporary Media

Memphis Parent February 2019  

Countdown to Camp

Memphis Parent February 2019  

Countdown to Camp