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F E B •2 0 1 8 T H E A DV E N T U R E I S S U E

PREPARING FOR OVERNIGHT CAMP TIPS TO AVOID THE SLEEP-AWAY JITTERS

PLUS INTRODUCE YOUR CHILD TO WINTER SPORTS AND

HOW TO TALK TO YOUR CHILD ABOUT DIVERSITY TAKING CARE OF YOUR CHILD’S TEETH: A GUIDE BY AGE


It’s Your Time to Celebrate with up to a $100 Resort Credit! Make any occasion special at Gaylord Opryland Resort From finding a new job to your child receiving straight A’s, we’ll help make your celebration getaway extra special by offering a $50 resort credit per night.* Luxurious spa treatments, delicious dining, unique shopping and fun entertainment options provide everything you need for a joyous occasion.

Book your getaway today!

GaylordOpryland.com/Celebrate or call (888) 677-9872 (refer to promo code ZJL) OTHER LOCATIONS * Valid through October 31, 2018. Limited number of rooms available for this promotion. Offer does not apply to groups of 10 or more rooms. Offer cannot be combined with any other promotion. Limit one (1) $50 resort credit per night (maximum of $100 per stay). A stay is defined as consecutive nights at the same hotel, regardless of check-in/check-out activity. See website for complete terms and conditions.

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MEMPH IS PARE NT

FEBRUARY 2018

Gaylord National National Harbor, MD (Washington, D.C. area)

Gaylord Palms Kissimmee, FL (Orlando area)

Gaylord Texan Grapevine, TX (Dallas/Ft. Worth area)


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Join us for our first-ever

memphisparent

memphis-parent

THIS MONTH

OUR COVER KID

FEATURES

15

Jackson (7) is pictured with his brother Andy (12) and parents Jennifer and Andrew Spann. He loves playing soccer, eating cheese pizza and playing video games.

Preparing for Overnight Camp By CHRISTA MELNYK HINES

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Representatives from area day camps, overnight camps, extracurricular camps, and more will be on hand.

Meet the staff of area Camps and plan your Spring, Summer, and Fall kids camps!

SATURDAY

MARCH 24 11AM-3PM

BY MICHELLE MCKISSACK

20

Celebrate Diversity

BY MEENA VISWANATHAN

Eagle watching; Green thumbs; and Soup Sunday

8 Early Years Learning kindness through pets

Should my child read e-books?

24 Calendar & Events February fun for the whole family

22 What’s Cookin’ Packing a power lunch

31 Favorite Moments

OUR STAFF Editor Michelle McKissack Art Director Bryan Rollins

FREE ADMISSION

Advertising Manager Sheryl Butler

MEMPHISCAMPEXPO.COM and to the

MEMPHIS PARENT FACEBOOK PAGE! ME EM MP PH H II S S P EN NT M PA AR RE T

F EOBVREUMABREYR 22001 8 N 17

23 Study Guide Learning time management

19 Health Matters Taking your child to the dentist

Advertising Art Director Christopher Myers

sponsored by

Photographer: Bryan Rollins

DEPARTMENTS 10 Dear Teacher 6 #901Fun

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDENS

For more info head on over to

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Oh! It’s Olympics Time

memphisparent

Graphic Designer Jeremiah Matthews

Production Operations Director Margie Neal Calendar Editor Meena Viswanathan Copy Editors Shara Clark

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE Memphis Parent strives to provide information of value to all who are invested in our children’s future.

Memphis Parent is published by Contemporary Media, Inc. CEO Kenneth Neill Director of New Business Development Jeffrey A. Goldberg Editorial Director Bruce VanWyngarden Special Projects Director Molly Willmott Email Marketing Manager Britt Ervin Distribution Manager Lynn Sparagowski Controller Ashley Haeger IT Director Joseph Carey Advertising Assistant Roxy Matthews Memphis, TN 38103 p: 901.521.9000 • f: 901.521.0129 Send advertising queries to: sheryl@memphisparent.com Visit us online at memphisparent.com


EDITOR’S NOTE

SNEAK PEEK active learning

agile teaching

to build disciplined minds, adventurous spirits, and brave hearts

MICHELLE McKISSACK

michelle@memphisparent.com

We got hit with a double dollop of wintry weather last month that extended the winter break from school for a lot longer than most of us anticipated. The snow coming down was so pretty, but the ice, on the other hand, was a different story. Depending on whether you are a kid or parent, there were mixed reviews on the lingering snow and ice patches all over metro Memphis. My kids kept their fingers crossed for “one more day” out of school, and by the end of the week, I also had my fingers crossed except I was saying, “not one more day.” My 14- and 15-year-old sons have stomachs that are bottomless pits and were eating us out of house and home. With that said, the cold winter days have me already looking forward to the warmer days of summer and all the fun that comes with that. That’s where the “sneak peek” comes into play. Next month we are so excited here at Memphis Parent to be launching our first-ever Camp Expo presented by our sponsor, Orion Federal Credit Union. We are so grateful for their support with this event, which will be a free resource for Memphis-area parents. In March, the Memphis Parent Camp Expo will be a one-stop shopping event for parents to take a look at all the summer camp programs, day camps, and overnight camps in our area. On page 15, we give you a sneak peek of what’s to come at the expo with a story on exploring overnight camps and what to expect, as well as tips on how to deal with the sleep-away jitters. Also, find out all the “who, what, when, and where” details about our Camp Expo in the story. You probably have noticed the signs around town announcing MLK50, a commemoration the city of Memphis and the National Civil Rights Museum are undertaking to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., 50 years after he was assassinated in Memphis. Next April, concerts, events, and symposiums will mark how far we’ve come as a city and nation and where we need to go from here. As we kick off Black History Month in February, now is a perfect time to discuss with your kids what MLK50 is all about and have conversations about diversity. There’s a wonderful article on page 19 to help you jumpstart that conversation with your family. Finally, I don’t know about you, but I go “ga-ga” over watching the Winter Olympics. When it comes around every four years, I envision myself whirling and twirling on the ice with the top figure skating athletes … of course from the comfort of my couch with remote in hand. But on page 12, we show you there’s a way for your kids, and even you, to a get a touch of Olympic fever and get in on the action right here in the Mid-South. Happy Parenting!

fostering careful reflection ~ supporting healthy risks so your children bravely embraces challenge At St. George’s Independent School, we teach your children to weigh their words and consider their actions, while also urging them to live bravely and dare greatly. We weave consideration and courage together, equipping your children with the best of both worlds—for the world they’re about to inherit.

ST. GEORGE’S INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

sgis.org ME EM MP PH H II S SP EN M PA AR RE NT T .. C CO OM M

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It’s Time to Apply!

#901FUN

Putting the spotlight on fun activities for local families.

Grace-St. Luke’s Episcopal School is a coed, independent school located in the heart of Midtown’s beautiful Central Gardens neighborhood. Since 1947, GSL has been preparing boys and girls to become creative problem solvers, confident lifelong learners, and responsible citizens in their communities and the world. Come explore our preschool, including the outdoor classroom complete with a mud kitchen, garden, music wall, and so much more. Schedule a tour today!

PRESCHOOL

LOWER SCHOOL

Little Lukers (Age 2) Pre-Kindergarten (Age 3) Junior Kindergarten (Age 4)

Senior Kindergarten-4th Grade

MIDDLE SCHOOL 5th-8th Grade

ULTIMATE BIRD WATCHING February 2-4

Reelfoot Lake State Park Visitors Center

Coed | Age 2 - Grade 8 | Midtown gslschool.org • 246 S. Belvedere Blvd., Memphis, TN 38104 901.278.0200 • learnmore@gslschool.org

DANCE! CREATE! PERFORM! 10 Summer Dance Camps!

June 4 - July 27 Special camps for ages 3-15!

The 14th annual Reelfoot Lake Eagle Festival takes places in Tiptonville, TN, a relatively short two-hour getaway from Memphis for an amazing experience. Watch these majestic birds soar high above. There are currently 35 nesting eagles and a plethora of waterfowl to view at this great family event. Include children’s activities, Eagle Tours, photo tours, photo & art contests, Live Birds of Prey programs, Live Wildlife educational program (live animals), and more. Price: $10, Eagle Tours. Visit reelfoottourism.com for more information.

CALLING ALL 4TH AND 5TH GRADERS WITH GREEN THUMBS February 10

Urban Earth Garden Center 80 Flicker Sreet Get ready to play in the dirt at the launch of a new 4-H club. Melissa Knirr and Joni Roberts from the University of Tennessee Extension Office will be kicking off the new Urban Earth 4-H Club at Urban Earth Garden Center. Free. Registration required. For more info, contact john@urbanearth.com or call 323-0031. Visit 4-h.org to learn more about the organization.

SOUP’S ON! February 25

FedExForum 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Get the details at newballet.org/summer-at-nbe or call 901-726-9225

Ballet • Hip-Hop • Jazz • Tap Contemporary • Jookin’ • Breakdance Flamenco • Musical Theatre African dance & drums (Crafts too!)

Located in Cooper-Young since 2001 6 6

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The Soup Sunday fundraiser for Youth Villages is back for its 29th annual installment. The event will feature a wide assortment of mouthwatering soups, seafood gumbos, unique specialty items, fresh breads, and delicious desserts from nearly 50 of the Memphis-area’s best restaurants and caterers, including Celtic Crossing Irish Pub & Restaurant, Hard Rock Café Memphis, Huey’s Restaurant, and Nothing Bundt Cakes. A tasty treat for the whole family. Adults, $20; children ages 6-12, $10; ages 5 and under, free. Visit soupsunday.org for more info.


WHAT AGE SHOULD CHILDREN

FIRST SEE THEIR PEDIATRIC DENTIST? AGE 5 AGE 3 AGE 1

Laurelwood Shopping Center 389 Perkins Extd 901.685.8417 @ cottontailsmemphis

Yes, that’s right! Actually within 6 months of their first birthday!

! AM wo T X r E de EEldren Un aluen)ts R F r Chi 2 V w Patie. Fo $6 ils. Ne /28/18 red (a Call foOr nDley.taExpirsesm2ay beainsceus.r c e al fe ual ition divid Add in in

Pediatric Dentists

Steven J. Fuson, D.D.S., M.S., John A. Acosta, D.D.S., Toddrick Smith, D.D.S., Dr. Nathaniel Denson, D.D.S., M.D.S.

Family Dentists

Clayton Floriani, D.D.S., Adam Fitzhugh, D.D.S.

Orthodontists

Gregg Bouldien, D.D.S., M.S., Dr. Taylor Collazo, D.D.S., M.S.D.

Germantown

901.453.4382 Kirby

901.453.4383

Olive Branch

662.985.6047 Southaven

662.985.6048

www.pdg4kids.com

SR. K– GRADE 5

Open House WEDNESDAY, FEB. 28 9:00 a.m.

1100 Cherry Road Memphis, TN 38117

Visit our Open House to learn how you can be anything at Harding.

901-767-4494

HARDINGLIONS.ORG/OPENHOUSE God has gifted children with strong, flexible minds that are uniquely equipped to develop rapidly through exploration, questioning, and collaboration. We teach children to love learning, to take on challenges and solve problems, and to be confident in their faith in God in all circumstances.

M E M PH I S PA R ENT.COM

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EARLY YEARS

HOW A DOG CAN HELP PARENTS RAISE KINDER KIDS BY VALERIE LAW

A common thread with bullies is they lack kindness, empathy, and caring skills.

Class that Really Rocks

Music for Aardvarks, Memphis!

dren 6 months to 5 years and their parents/caregivers

er Classes

ging and dancing

Winne

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A Kid’s Music Class that Really Rocks

or one FREE class

Come Jam with Music for Aardvarks, Memphis! An interactive music program for children 6 months to 5 years and their parents/caregivers

Spring Registration Starting Soon! • Great Music

ast Memphis, Collierville, and Cordova at www.memphisaardvarks.com 227 or info@memphisaardvarks.com

• Live guitar and storytelling, singing and dancing • Fun for parents too! • Great for special events, & school programs Newcomers welcome to drop in for one FREE class CLASSES IN MIDTOWN AND EAST MEMPHIS Visit us at www.memphisaardvarks.com or call 871-0227 for more info

88 MMEEMMPPHHI ISS PPAARREENNTT FFEEBBRRUUAARRYY 22001 188

Children who understand how their words and actions affect others don’t make fun of people who are different. Young children first learn how to treat others by watching and listening to their parents and caregivers, so it’s important to start building children’s emotional skills early. Matia Finn-Stevenson, Ph.D., a research scientist at Yale University and developer of a program called Mutt-i-grees At Home says, “I work with kids nationwide and see the immediate impact a dog has on them, especially on the kids who are despondent and anxious, and those who have developmental and behavioral problems. When I ask both younger children and teens what they like about dogs, they say, ‘They make me happy;’ ‘They make me laugh;’ ‘They make me feel kind;’ and ‘They need our help.’ Their responses are amazingly aligned with the research showing that being in the presence of a dog, or simply thinking about dogs, elicits hormones that make us calm, happy, and amenable to social interactions.” Mutt-i-grees is what Finn-Stevenson calls shelter pets. Finn-Stevenson says dogs can also help children learn to be kind and caring so they not only won’t bully others, but they will also know how to help kids who are bullied. If a family doesn’t have a pet, puppets or even pictures of dogs and cats can work, too. The Mutt-i-grees curriculum has been implemented at more than 4,000 schools across the country. And now it’s being exposed to the home market. A child’s stress or anxiety can show up as misbehavior, difficulty focusing, or becoming withdrawn. Mutt-i-grees At Home guides parents through establishing routine activities interacting with a pet to help kids connect with their feelings, encourage empathy and cooperation, and learn the steps that lead to making good decisions. The program takes advantage of the time children and parents spend together in the morning, before bedtime, during meals, and while riding in the car to build important skills. Parents can easily tailor activities for children of any age. Each section builds on skills learned previously, helping children gain a gradual understanding of complex ideas. The program is unique both in its focus on dogs and the notion that learning social and emotional skills is not only for kids. Adults also find that using the program enhances their own mental health, according to Finn-Stevenson. Visit education.muttigrees.org to learn more about the shelter pet program.


M E M PH I S PA R ENT.COM

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DEAR TEACHER By PEGGY GISLER AND MARGE EBERTS

COMMON CORE MATH STANDARDS VS. STATE STANDARDS

Question: Our state has opted out of using the Common Core Standards. Instead, the schools will be following our own state’s standards. What do you think the differences between the two standards would be in mathematics? – Inquisitive

Answer: There may or may not be a substantial difference between the two sets of standards in math. In fact, the Common Core Standards were based on standards of the individual states. Before Common Core, states covered different math topics at different grade levels. What Common Core does is put all the states using them on the same page at the same time. Plus, it is believed that the sequence of math topics in Common Core is mathematically coherent and will lead to college and career readiness. This may or may not be true of math standards for individual states. One criticism of state math standards is that they are a mile wide and inches deep. The Common Core Standards generally have far fewer broad statements and are more specific. They concentrate on a clear set of math skills and concepts so students will be learning math in a more organized way. And the Core Standards make sure the students are learning math in each grade so they can succeed at a higher level.

THE DOWNSIDES TO YOUNG CHILDREN READING E-BOOKS

Question: My second-grader loves reading e-books far more than

print books because they have so many fun, interactive features. Are there any downsides to her love of e-books? – Book Lover Answer: One important question comes up: Is your child really reading the e-books, or is she spending more time playing with the interactive features? One study by Carol Smith and Jordan Schugar showed that children spent as much as 43 percent of their time using e-books playing games rather than reading. You should observe what your daughter is doing with e-books. Is she spending most of her time reading them or playing games on them? If she is spending more time playing games, different e-books should be selected. You want to find those that force her to have more interaction with the actual text. And that interaction should occur on the page that she is reading rather than on a different screen. Plus, these interactions should be brief. Otherwise, she is likely to lose

the thread of the story. There are other negatives to children reading e-books over traditional print books. One is the “read to me” option. It can be helpful when children meet words that they do not know. However, if used too frequently, it can stop children from using important word attack skills, like sounding out a word. Also, if children use the dictionary feature too often to learn what words mean, they are not learning to use the context of the story to get the meaning of the word. Unfortunately, not all e-books are of the same quality. Parents need to look for those that feature interaction with the text. And parents should also talk with their children about the e-book stories that they have read, just like they would talk to them about print books.

Do you have a question? Parents should send questions and comments to dearteacher@dearteacher.com or ask them on the columnists’ website at dearteacher.com. ©Compass Syndicate Corporation, 2017. Distributed by King Features Syndicate 0 11 0

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GIVING. BRAVE. JOYFUL. SHE’S ST. MARY’S.

Discover your daughter’s full potential. Our community cultivates creativity, celebrates individuality, and challenges girls to accomplish exceptional results. Set up a tour: www.stmarysschool.org or call 901-537-1405 ©2018 St. Mary’s Episcopal School. All rights reserved.

How well does your child see? If you’ve noticed a change in academic performance, an eye exam can help rule out undiagnosed problems with your child’s vision. Make an appointment today with the Pediatric Service at The Eye Center at Southern College of Optometry or learn more at eyecentermemphis.com. Courtesy of the Pediatric Primary Care Service of

1225 Madison Ave., in the Midtown Medical District

901-722-3250 www.eyecentermemphis.com

M E M PH I S PA R ENT.COM

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FEATURE

OH! IT’S OLYMPICS TIME Introduce your child to winter sports in the Mid-South BY MICHELLE MCKISSACK

The cool, crisp breeze flows off the ice as kids swish by, or maybe for some, as they slink along, clinging to the wall at the beginning of their lessons. It’s an occurrence that happens all week long at an ice-skating rink on the outskirts of Memphis. But this year, like every four years, there’s even more interest in figure skating.

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2018 WINTER OLYMPICS FAST FACTS

“My parents took me to the mall to try ice skating and I fell in love.” “I’ve always wanted to ice skate, and I’ve seen people on TV do it and I thought it was cool ever since I was 6,” says 9-year-old Lilly Robbins who’s taking figure skating lessons for the first time. It happens to coincide with the Winter Olympics taking place this month, and Lilly’s mom, Emily Robbins, says this is a dream come true for her daughter. “Two lessons in and she says she’s going to the Olympics. So we just want to support her interest.” WINTER SPORTS IN THE MID-SOUTH The Mid-South Ice House in Olive Branch, Mississippi, advertises that it offers “winter games all year long.” It certainly fills a void since the Mall of Memphis closed in 2003, which offered the only public year-round skating rink in the area. The next closest iceskating rinks are in Little Rock and Nashville. The Ice House offers more than figure skating. Ice hockey is also a main attraction at the rink. “It was formed out of a passion of the parents of budding skaters and hockey players to continue to give their kids a place to improve,” says Jene Rogers, general manager of the Ice House. In 2010, a handful of hockey and figure skating parents and other participants came together to tackle the problem of having nowhere to skate. They wanted to bring back an amateur hockey and figure skating rink that was state-of-the-art, while also creating a

recreational facility for anyone to come and skate in the greater Memphis area. PASSING ON A PASSION FOR THE ICE Sarah Guenther, now a senior at the University of Memphis, was one of those kids who started skating lessons, at the Mall of Memphis, when she was only 6 years old. “One day I just wanted to try it,” Guenther says. “My parents took me to the mall to try ice skating and I fell in love.” For the last 16 years, Guenther has participated in competitions from the east coast to the west coast. She now shares her passion for the ice with young students she teaches at the Mid-South Ice House “First and foremost, always love it,” Guenther says. “We want our skaters to have fun with it. We give them as much help as we can. If you lose the passion for this sport, there’s no reason to keep going.” Six-year-old Sophie Herring took up the sport of figure skating after a field trip to the Ice House as part of her homeschooling group, and a year later she loves it more than ever. “I get to do fun stuff, even though it’s hard,” says Sophie. Parents, if you ever want to try your hand at an Olympic sport like figure skating or hockey but without having to strap on a pair of skates, it’s not too late. There’s always curling, which we hear so much about during the Olympics.

The 2018 Winter Olympics will take place in Pyeongchang, South Korea. This will be South Korea’s second time hosting the Olympics. The country also hosted the 1988 Summer Olympic games in Seoul. The 23rd Winter Games kick off with opening ceremonies on February 8 and will run until the closing ceremonies on February 25. You can watch the Olympics on the NBC network and online. A full line-up of the days and times of an exciting month of competition in sports — figure skating, hockey, curling, and many more events — can be found at nbcolympics.com.

MID-SOUTH ICE HOUSE

10705 Ridgeway Industrial Road Olive Branch, MS 38654 midsouthicehouse.com 901-881-8544 Lessons are offered in ice-skating and hockey for children and adults year-round. Visit the website for more information. Learn-to-Curl sessions offered Sunday, February 18 from 11:15 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. and Saturday, February 24, from 5 to 7 p.m. During the school year, Mid-South Ice House offers a special rate for home school participants and groups every Wednesday from 1:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Open skating times vary. Admission, $10. Children age 3 and under, $4. Skate rental, $3.

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CRAYON AY ON CRAYON

CR

CR

AY ON

T

DDARD SCHO GO O HE

Christ-Centered Residential Summer Camp for Ages 7-17

Register Online Today!

The Goddard School’s Summer Camp offers a broad range of programs and mini camps crafted to pique the interest and curiosity of every child; there is something for everybody! Call today to enroll! POWERED BY STEAM. FUELED BY FUN!

CALL TODAY! COLLIERVILLE* • 901-861-0108 CORDOVA • 901-708-3338

A Ministry of French Camp Academy

www.CampoftheRisingSon.com • 662-547-6169

Spring 2018

GoddardSchool.com The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc. Programs and ages may vary. Goddard Systems, Inc. program is AdvancED accredited. © Goddard Systems, Inc. 2018

FREE!

Community Education

Family Art Workshops Saturdays from 2–4pm

Make time for your kid to

MAKE ART After School Art Studio (Ages 11-17) Wednesdays, 4–5:30pm on the following scheduled dates.

Feb. 7–28 March 21–April 11 April 18–May 9

JAN. 6 Comics FEB. 3 Zines

Saturday School

Select the course best for your young artist based on their age. Story Illustration (Ages 5–7) Adventures in Mixed Media (Ages 8–10) Illustration (Ages 10–12) Drawing & Painting (Ages 13–17) Photographic Printmaking (Ages 13–17)

Jan. 27–March 3 Saturdays, 9am–12pm

Fashion Sewing for Teens (Ages 13–17)

Feb. 3–March 3, Saturdays, 9:30–11:30am

APRIL 7 Summer Art Camp PREVIEW DAY

Private Lessons (Ages 5+)

MAY 5 Pop Art

Visit mca.edu and click on Community Education banner for pricing, additional information and registration. Hurry! Class sizes are small to foster individualized attention.

1930 Poplar Avenue | Memphis, TN 38104 | (901) 272-5116

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MARCH 3 Spring Art

mca.edu (901)272-5116

*


OVERNIGHT CAMPS COOK UP MEMORABLE FUN FEATURE

Explore a menu of choices to suit every taste.

Are you ready for the summer? Memphis Parent is prepping now to get you and your child ready for overnight and day camps. Memphis Parent will host its first-ever Camp Expo next month to put all types of camps on display. From whitewater rafting to performing arts and cooking, today's camps appeal to a wide range of interests while still providing the long-term benefits summer camp is known for. And a great way to experience that is with a sleep-away camp. There are many benefits of overnight camp. In addition to learning new skills, children learn how to collaborate and live in a community while at camp, gaining self-confidence and independence through problem-solving and teamwork. "All those things are life skills and life assets that every parent wants for their child," says Jill Tipograph, a camp consultant and author of Your Everything Summer Guide & Planner.

BY CHRISTA MELNYK HINES

ME EM MP PH H II S SP EN M PA AR RE NT T .. C CO OM M

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POPULAR CAMP ACTIVITIES. According to the American Camp Association, 75 percent of camp directors reported adding new activities and programs to accommodate trends in popular culture. The top three activities camps are integrating into their more traditional fare, like campfires, swimming, and horseback riding, include performing arts, adventure, and more recently, culinary. "Culinary is the hottest and newest in terms of camps investing in building kitchens and bringing in specialists to teach the kids. The other part that goes along with culinary is the whole, farm-to-table — taking things from the gardens and cooking them," Tipograph says. TRADITIONAL VS. SPECIALTY. Specialty camps are designed for kids interested in pursuing a specific interest. Traditional camps, on the other hand, offer a combination of programming. Children can try different activities, including those they may not have tried otherwise, whether stained glass design, rock climbing, or singing in a recording studio. "I feel that if children start their camping career on a purely specialty track, [parents] are really missing what camp can do for their child. The advantage traditional camps offer is they are all about the child holistically," says Tipograph. CONSIDERATIONS FOR A SUCCESSFUL SLEEP-AWAY EXPERIENCE: Maturity. Most kids are ready by ages 9 or 10, but consider your child's physical and emotional maturity first.

Plan ahead. If possible, start researching camps a year ahead of time. Check out websites, talk to friends and family for recommendations, and visit prospective camps. Many overnight camps offer family weekends in the fall. Length of camp. How long do you want your child away at camp? Camps offer both shortand long-term sessions. Size of camp. Decide whether your child would do better in a large setting or a smaller gathering. Gender. Choose from a single-sex or a co-ed camp. Not sure which? Consider whether a younger sibling may eventually join your older child at camp. Location. Determine the types of activities you want your child to experience. Because of their geographical location, some camps offer better outdoor or adventure activities than others and may be more likely to have access to experienced adventure specialists. Meet the director. A meeting with the director is imperative in order to get a sense of his or her personality, trustworthiness, and compatibility. "You need to see how they're interacting with your child," Tipograph says. "They set the tone and the philosophy for the camp, and it trickles down. How they relate to you and your child is the same way they train their staff to do the same."

SATURDAY MARCH 24 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Memphis Botanic Gardens, Hardin Hall A brand-new, free event; open to the public! Showcasing area day camps, overnight camps, and summer camp programs. Guests can learn about various camps and speak directly with camp reps. Go to memphisparentcampexpo.com for more details.

REGIONAL OVERNIGHT CAMPS

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CAMP BEAR TRACK 295 Prim Road Drasco, AR 72530 campbeartrack.com (501) 825-8222 Olivia S Dowell, Director

CAMP MASTERCHEF 339 Nacoochee Drive Rabun Gap, GA 30568 campmasterchef.com (754) 301-8885 Sandro Lucarini, Director

TWIN LAKES CAMP 155 Milner Road Florence, MS 39073 twinlakescamp.org (601) 845-6858 Andrew Vincent, Director

CAMP OF THE RISING SON 444 Lake Road French Camp, MS 39745 campoftherisingson.com (662) 547-6169 Carrie Browning, Director

RIVERVIEW CAMP FOR GIRLS 757 County Road 614 Mentone, AL 35984 riverviewcamp.org (800) 882-0722 Susan Hooks, Director

VICTORY RANCH 4330 Mecklinburg Drive Bolivar, TN 38008 victoryranch.org (731) 659-2880 Dennis Smith, Director

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MAR 9, 10 / 7:30 p.m. MAR 11 / 2:30 p.m. Join BPACC Youth Theatre for this exciting show! Broadway musical is a tale of friendship, loyalty and love. From the creator of WICKED, Godspell songs – SAVE THE PEOPLE – DAY BY DAY – LIGHT OF THE WORLD. Godspell … always a crowd pleaser!

Tickets & Info – BPACC.ORG

BOX OFFICE HOURS / 10AM TO 2PM / M – F / 901.385.5588

Woodland combines small class sizes, dedicated teachers, and personalized instruction to help grow your child’s success. Call 901-685-0976 to schedule a tour, or email admissions@ woodlandschool.org.

A co-ed, 2-year-old – 8th grade independent schoolin the heart of East Memphis. woodlandschool.org ©2017 Woodland Presbyterian School. All rights reserved.

Auditory Processing • Processing Speed Long Term Memory • Short Term Memory

Being a good reader comes with lots of great benefits.

Is your child missing out?

Most reading struggles are caused by one or more weak cognitive skills. At LearningRx, we identify weak skills with a one-hour Cognitive Skills Assessment — then strengthen those skills with brain training.

Call us this week, mention this ad, and we’ll give your child a Cognitive Skills Assessment for just $249 (that’s $50 off the regular price of $299!) Give your child the benefits — and the joy! — that strong reading skills provide.

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17


Thank Thank You You Memphis Memphis & & the the Mid-South Mid-South

Can you imagine... a world without children?

We Can’t.

Call 1-800-996-4100 to help.

www.stjude.org

Together Together we we raised raised

$903,043 $903,043 to help heal the traumas of poverty,

to help heal the traumas of poverty, addiction, addiction, homelessness homelessness and and violence violence for women, children & families for women, children & families in in Memphis Memphis & & the the Mid-South. Mid-South.

RUN IN THE #FIGHTFORGOOD RUN IN THE #FIGHTFORGOOD SATURDAY, MARCH 24 | MEMPHIS SATURDAY, MARCH 24 | MEMPHIS MOSTAMAZINGRACEMEMPHIS.ORG MOSTAMAZINGRACEMEMPHIS.ORG

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February 10 - November 16, 2018

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SEE IT AT THE PINK PALACE! to to help hel February 3 - May 6, 2018

This Exhibition was organized by the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archeology and Anthropology

P!NK PALACE MUSEUM 18

MEMPH IS PARE NT

FEBRUARY 2018


HEALTH MATTERS

BRUSHING UP Dove Family Dentists in Memphis

TAKING CARE OF YOUR CHILD’S TEETH: AN AGE-BY-AGE GUIDE BY MEAGAN RUFFING

February is National Dental Hygiene month, which means it’s a great time to get your kids on board with learning how to brush their teeth properly — and actually enjoy it. No more battling your kids to take responsibility for cleaning their teeth or going back and doing it again. These insider tips from a mom who has been there and done that will have you feeling prepared to tackle the tricky life-lesson of teaching your children how to take care of their teeth. AGES 0-2 It’s never too early to start cleaning the inside of your child’s mouth. For this age, when your child has not yet sprouted his first tooth, use a damp washcloth to wipe his gums down after nursing or bottle-feeding. If your child has a few teeth, use a finger brush with a tiny amount (the size of the tip of a pencil) of fluoride-free toothpaste and do it yourself. Getting your children in the habit of cleaning their mouths is a great way to get them prepared for their very first visit to the dentist. Around age two is when your dentist will recommend doing a “lap” exam for their first dental visit. This just means the child sits in your lap (facing you) and lays back with her head on your knees. The dentist goes knee-to-knee with the parent while looking at the inside of your daughter’s mouth. The exam is usually just a few minutes long and the dentist is checking for any signs of decay.

FLOSSING & BRUSHING Your child should be seeing the dentist every six months for regular check-ups once they turn 3. Flossing is encouraged, even at this young age, especially when kids are learning to do some basic tasks for themselves. Buying the kid-friendly floss sticks is much easier than trying to use the floss adults use. You can get all sorts of fun floss sticks that are colored, flavored, and even charactershaped to help encourage flossing. If you see that your child is having a hard time with wanting to brush her teeth or brush them long enough to actually make a difference, try brushing your teeth with her. Grab your toothbrush and do it together. Kids are more likely to try new things and be encouraged to brush their teeth when they see that mom and dad do it too. Have a brush-yourteeth-a-thon and see who can brush them the longest. There will still be some children who just don’t want to brush their teeth. Try taking them to the store and letting them pick out their own toothbrush..

SPECIAL NEEDS If you have a child with special needs, look for dentists who specialize in this. Most kids get anxious about going to the dentist anyway so if you can find AGES 3-5 one who is sensitive to your child’s needs, you’ll be By now, your child should be seeing a dentist and setting them up for a successful visit. Calling ahead brushing his or her own teeth with adult supervision. of time and talking to the front office about what Buying a toothbrush with a smaller, softer head will your child’s specific challenges are and asking if the ensure your child has the best toothbrush for his dentist is familiar with working with children like mouth. For the younger ages (3-5), using a pea- yours, can take the worry out of the appointment sized amount of toothpaste with fluoride in it will for you as the parent. Even if your visit does not go ensure your child is getting the protection he needs as smoothly as you had hoped, you can always try to keep his tooth enamel strong. To make the actual another dentist. process of tooth brushing more fun, humming the “Happy Birthday” song is a great way to get your Teaching your children about keeping their teeth child involved in the process. Doing this serves two clean is a great way to introduce what it means to purposes: 1.) Making sure your child is brushing long take care of their bodies. Don’t be afraid to tackle enough and, 2.) Keeping him or her engaged long the tooth-brushing battle with your kids. They may enough to keep the toothbrush in their mouth. surprise you at how well they can keep those teeth sparkling white.

recommends the following books to help get your child more comfortable with the idea of visiting the dentist.

JUST GOING TO THE DENTIST by Mercer Mayer This classic and heartwarming book follows Little Critter while he visits the dentist. It covers topics like x-rays, professional dental cleanings, and even finding a cavity. It’s a great option for preparing your child for their visit to the dentist. ABC DENTIST: HEALTHY TEETH FROM A TO Z by Harriet Ziefert If you want to combine learning the alphabet with helping your child feel confident about the dentist, then this book is for you! It covers 26 letterspecific entries that include facts about dental care, equipment, procedures, and more. MY DENTISTRY, MY FRIEND by P.K. Hallinan This book uses a fun rhyme scheme to discuss dental health topics like brushing and flossing, while also covering why seeing the dentist is important and what your child can expect during an appointment. SESAME STREET READY, SET, BRUSH! by Che Rodko For children who are already familiar with Sesame Street characters like Elmo, this pop-up book is a fun option focused on proper tooth brushing, why it is essential, and how seeing the dentist helps keep them healthy. It also uses a fun rhyme structure and a few interactive elements, making the whole process as entertaining as it is helpful. SUGARBUG DOUG: ALL ABOUT CAVITIES, PLAQUE AND TEETH by Dr. Ben Magleby Sugarbug Doug and its companion coloring book (sold separately) explains how sugar can damage teeth as well as how the dentist helps to keep their mouth healthy. It promotes proper oral care and also helps relieve many fears children may have about seeing the dentist. HAVE YOU EVER SEEN A MOOSE BRUSHING HIS TEETH? by Jamie McClaine and April Goodman Willy The rhyming structure and fun images chronicle a moose’s journey as he cares for his “toofers” and regains his “pearly whites” after neglecting his teeth. DENTIST TRIP WITH PEPPA PIG by Scholastic This tale follows Peppa and George, two beloved pig characters, as Peppa helps George prepare for his first dental visit. George is initially nervous, but Peppa shows him all of the ways a trip to the dentist can be fun, making it a great book for children who are experiencing some anxiety about their visit. ME EM MP PH H II S SP EN M PA AR RE NT T .. C CO OM M

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FEATURE

HELPING YOUR CHILD FALL IN LOVE WITH THE WORLD The community’s role in raising globally minded kids. BY MEENA VISWANATHAN

Have you ever heard of the African term Ubuntu? It means “I am what I am because of who we all are.” According to South African Nobel Laureate Archbishop Desmond Tutu, it describes the essence of being human and how we all are interconnected in this global community. In other words, you can’t be human all by yourself, what you do (and say) affects the whole world. So the question is, how do we help our children befriend the world? As the old proverb goes, it takes a village to raise a child and it becomes every individual’s responsibility to create a safe and healthy environment, planting the seeds of compassion and love. As the nation commemorates the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s death, his legacy still lives on and reminds us of King’s words, "Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God's children." OPENING THE TOPIC FOR DISCUSSION – HOW AND WHEN Last October, Sandra Brown Turner, director of Barbara K. Lipman Early Childhood School and Research Institute at the University of Memphis, conducted a workshop at the Collierville Burch Library on the topic, “How to talk with your children about race?” During the workshop, she shared practical ideas on how parents have the opportunity to help define the concepts of fairness, social justice, and cooperation to children. “It is important to understand how children perceive their worlds,” notes Turner. “We do not bring the subject up in a 20 0 2

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forced manner. We listen to them, their conversations, their questions, and respond to them at their developmental level.” Social cruelty is out in the open — teasing/name-calling, exclusion/rejection/scapegoating, bullying, and hazing. In Give Your Child the World, Jamie Martin talks about paying attention to the news, but not too much attention. When parents come to a strong foundation of what they want their family to value, then it becomes relatively easier to discuss such issues and help children understand the world they live in. “Children should get information from reliable sources — parents and guardians fall into that category,” points out Terri Lee Freeman, president of the National Civil Rights Museum. “We used to teach ‘sticks and stones can break my bones but words can never hurt me.’ Well, that’s simply not true. Words can cut like a knife. And with the access that young people have to social media, our words and their words are that much more important.” Freeman was one of the guest speakers at the recent TEDx Memphis conference held at the Halloran Centre. In her speech on the topic “Apologetically Human,” she stressed the point of how communication is fundamental. AT HOME & SCHOOL – GIVING CHILDREN THE TOOLS TO EMBRACE THE WORLD In Best Friends, Worst Enemies – Understanding the Social Lives of Children, Michael Thompson points out that a secure


attachment is the first friendship and, among other things, a securely attached child can trust or believe that we hold him/her in mind. “Attachment is part of how the child learns whether or not the world can be trusted — parents, caregivers, family members,” observes Turner. “A child who sees adults demonstrating friendship and caring will know that having a friend is an exchange of the heart and mind.” Be it school or community, exclusion still remains the number one problem. It makes it hard to witness the traits of empathy and kindness — “Everyone is welcome here” and “You can’t say you can’t play.” Turner makes a valid point. One of the most important words for an adult to say to a child is, “Look!” That implies putting our phones, iPads, and other screens away and paying attention ourselves to what there is to see, hear, taste, smell, and feel. As the child’s observation skills develop, the best question for an adult to ask a child is, “What were you thinking about when you asked that question?” When you make such authentic conversation, you are speaking with children. For instance, when a child overhears a racist comment and relates the incident to you, pay close attention to the information being shared and listen for their take on it. After hearing the whole story, change the script for them, if necessary, and show them what is right. You could say, “In this family, we work toward loving everyone,” Turner emphasizes. COMMUNITY’S ROLE IN ENCOURAGING GOOD CITIZENSHIP The National Civil Rights Museum just

celebrated King Day, drawing around 7,000 visitors from around the country to be part of the event. “Museums represent truth,” remarks Freeman. “I think museums are safe spaces for children and adults to learn and be comfortable asking questions that they may not be able to get answered from their parents or friends.” She adds, “While museums like ours have a specific mission to pass on history that is focused on treating all people with dignity and recognizing the diversity of our world, even museums that don’t specifically focus on history share a cultural component and teach diversity inclusion by having diverse people represented in their exhibits.” Turner talks about the importance of participating in consciousness-raising events where children come to understand what it means to be a human within the context of other human beings. The Lipman School observes annual Peace Day in October as a way to counteract fearful events such as 9/11 and begin a lifelong conversation about making peace. Last year the school had 14 countries represented at their Multicultural ‘Peace-Nic’ Lunch. Other highlights of the celebration included “Wings of Grace” Peace Dove Release and a performance and a sing-along with Dr. Thomas Moore, an early childhood consultant and children’s recording artist based in Charlotte, North Carolina. “Tolerance only brings us so far together,” concludes Turner. “Acceptance means we offer our own talents and gifts of the heart and mind and ask others to do the same so that we all are better for the outcomes.”

IDEAS FOR WELCOMING THE WORLD INTO YOUR HOME • Take advantage of family-fun outings that celebrate culture and history.  Globe-Trotting Family Day @ Dixon Gallery and Gardens takes place on Saturday, February 17, from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Free. 761-5250.  Celebrate Black History Month through Dance @ GPAC takes place on Tuesday, February 20, at 7 p.m. Free. Reservations required. 751-7500. • Discuss world events together during dinnertime. Look into kid-friendly news sites like Youngzine and DOGOnews for topics. • Learn a foreign language as a family. Check out Mango Language Learning, available through Memphis Public Library and Germantown Community Library. • Explore different cuisines through cooking and baking food from another country. Try international gourmet recipes from the Kids Cooking Activities website. • Share stories of the world. For ideas, attend Cordova Branch Library’s International Story Time: South Korea on Saturday, February 3, from 11 a.m. until noon. Free. 754-8443. Go to memphisparent.com for a related story Giving Your Children a World View. ME EM MP PH H II S SP EN M PA AR RE NT T .. C CO OM M

2 11 2


WHAT’S COOKIN?

NEW YEAR, PACK A HEALTHIER LUNCH

BY SUSIE BURRELL

After an extended winter break, school is finally underway for the second half of the school year. This could be a good time for parents to think of healthier ways to start the new year. Think about how your kids can eat smarter at lunchtime. For busy parents, packing a nutritious and appealing lunch box for children is no easy feat. Considering that growing children consume up to 30 percent of their total calories while they are at school, what we pack them each day is important. Here are easy steps to take to pack a healthy yet child-friendly lunch box. The easiest way to pack a nutritionally balanced lunch box is to think of it in terms of compartments or sections. This way you will ensure you have enough items in the lunch but also the right nutritional balance. A well-balanced lunch box will include: 1. Sandwich, wrap, or crackers. Remember that whole grain and wholemeal varieties of breads and crackers are best. Try to also include a protein-rich fillings such as ham, tuna, chicken breast, or egg on sandwiches, as the protein helps to keep kids full throughout the afternoon. 2. Piece of fruit. Fresh fruit is always best, as dried fruit, fruit juice, and fruit roll-ups are high in sugar and digested quickly. 3. Dairy food. Dairy foods including milk, cheese, yogurt, and dairy snacks provide both calcium and protein for healthy bones, teeth, and growth. Look for the few yogurts that do not contain added sugar. 4. Snack. Aim to serve snacks that contain 100 calories per serving and options that are made from whole grains. If you have time to make them, homemade snacks such as banana bread or mini

muffins are better options nutritionally. 5. Water. Water should always be the drink of choice for children. Fruit juice and flavored waters are high in sugar and should not be consumed regularly. Research shows on average children are consuming three packaged snacks — such as cheese and dip packs, fruit twists, potato chips, and snack bars — per day. Snack foods are often highly processed food choices that offer little nutrition. For this reason, it is suggested that, at most, children consume one packaged snack each day. Good snack foods contain dietary fiber, whole grains, and/or protein and contain 100 calories per serving. If you are worried that you child’s lunch box does not contain enough “fun” foods, consider letting your child choose his/her snacks once each week and negotiate healthy choices for the remainder of the week. To keep lunch boxes at the right temperature, look for freezerstyle cooler packs or try freezing an ice block and pack with the lunch to keep it fresh. One of the biggest issues in relation to children’s lunch box choices is that they have too much choice. Limit your child’s choice to just one or two food items to avoid starting a never-ending negotiation about all the different types of food that you can include in the lunch box.

Susie Burrell is a nutritionist and author of the book Your Kids, Their Food. Visit shapeme.com.au to find out more about her approach to healthy eating for the family. 22

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FEBRUARY 2018

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23


FEATURE

BLUEPRINT FOR SUCCESS:

TIME MANAGEMENT

Part 3 in this study guide series explores “How do I get there?” BY GRACE COPELAND

Learning how to learn is essential for success in school. This third installment, How do I get there?, details several skills your child can learn and practice that will help him/her in school now and in lifelong learning. “Time management” means being efficient at “spending” time. Your child’s day is filled with school assignments and extracurricular activities. By dividing any assignment or activity into manageable subtasks (remember “objectives”?), and taking action to accomplish each subtask, the “big” assignment can be completed on time without too much drama. Time management is a skill that can be learned.

SKILL: LEARN “TIME MANAGEMENT” HOW? Do an activity together and talk about how “time management” is a part of completing the “assignment.” You might make a cake, plan a vacation, or go to a movie. GET A PLANNER Planners are calendars that are usually divided into blocks of days, and even hours, and come in the “at a glance” weekly type or monthly type. The idea is that when an assignment is given, the student writes it down in the planner/calendar. Many schools suggest buying a planner and may have a particular type in mind. Not all schools require that all teachers use the planner or that all students keep up with one, but it’s a good idea if you, as a parent, insist that your child use a planner. Let your child pick out the planner that fits her/ his learning style. Some students may prefer a digital planner. Encourage them to keep it up to date. Look at it with them daily and ask about the assignments. TO-DO LIST (CHILD): • Use a pencil to write in a hard-copy planner to allow for changes. • When an assignment is given and entered in a planner, that’s the day that the assignment is due. Break the assignment down and establish

pre-dates: The spelling test is Friday. Enter in the planner: Monday and Wednesday, go over the words based on learning style. Thursday, take a practice test. • Use the planner to prepare for assignments: Have materials (poster board, markers, pictures, etc.) ready for projects before projects are due. • Stay committed and self-disciplined to complete assignments. Attitude is important! • Add extracurricular activities to the planner. They take planning, too. • Allow time each day to do something you love or may come to love. Plan time for family and friends. Parent: Introduce new activities and experiences to your child. He or she may discover their passion and purpose!

having enough time to do the assignment that keeps you from getting started. “Don’t let the fear of the time it will take to accomplish something stand in the way of your doing it. The time will pass anyway, we might as well put that passing time to the best possible use.” — Earl Nightingale • Don’t overschedule. School assignments can be overwhelming at times. Take needed breaks from studying. Plan carefully, stay on task, complete one step at a time/one subtask at a time. If there are too many extracurricular activities, even if they are fun, cut back. • Don’t forget to prioritize. Consider all of your assignments. Do the “hardest” assignment first. “If you want to make good use of your time, you’ve got to know what’s important and then give it all you’ve got!” — Lee Iacocca • Parent: Don’t ignore signs of anxiety and stress in your child. Take time to talk and listen. Request parent/teacher conferences if your child is having trouble with the workload.

This article introduced the third building block in our Study Guide foundation by adding “Time • Eliminate or limit time-busters/time-wasters. Management” to your child’s study skills toolbox. TV and devices may have their place in learning Skills need to be practiced to be learned, so have and relaxing, but they can easily take over your patience and give lots of encouragement while time. Parent: Establish a TV/device time your child masters each skill and applies it to schedule that is posted on the refrigerator; use school and lifelong learning. Find previous Study a kitchen timer if you have to. Stick to the Guide articles at memphisparent.com. schedule. The December 2017 installment addressed: Where Am I Now? That segment centers on learning NOT-TO-DO LIST (CHILD) styles. Is your child a visual, auditory, or kinesthetic learner — or a combination of styles? Study • Procrastinate. “Never put off till tomorrow suggested techniques that could support their what you can do today.” — Thomas Jefferson learning style. However, sometimes it may be a fear of not

In the January 2018 issue of Memphis Parent, we focused on Where Do I Want to Be? It teaches how to think about and write goals, objectives, and action plans. Next month’s skills: organization and listening. Please visit studyskillssystem.org for more information. ME EM MP PH H II S SP EN M PA AR RE NT T .. C CO OM M

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FEBRUARY CALENDAR

by MEENA VISWANATHAN

Doktor Kaboom!

It’s Just Rocket Science.

HALLORAN CENTRE AT THE ORPHEUM

Friday, February 9 • 6 p.m.

Doktor Kaboom! explores rocket science and focuses on the scientific hurdles of space travel in this interactive show targeting children in grades 5-8. Topics covered include math patterns, centripetal and centrifugal force, momentum and inertia, Newton’s Third Law, and more. $15/person. 525-3000. 1 · THURSDAY

KidsTown Children’s Consignment. The Agricenter. February 1-3. Thursday & Friday, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. (halfprice sale). Free. Visit consignkidstown.com or call 849-6842 for details.

Sprouts. Dixon Gallery and Gardens. Thursdays, 10:30-11 a.m. This new interactive program for toddlers and their caregivers helps build social and motor skills and encourage creative play. $8/child. Call 7615250 to register. Wild Lunch at Lichterman. Lichterman Nature Center. Tuesdays through Saturdays at noon. Watch the Backyard Wildlife Center’s animal keepers feed the animals. Free with admission. 636-2210.

2 · FRIDAY

plaza. Post-race party includes kids activities, food and beverage samples. Registration: $50. Benefits Church Health. Go to crosstown10k.racesonline.com for details. Chucalissa Family Days. C.H. Nash Museum at Chucalissa. Saturdays at 10 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. (except February 17). Family programs and craft activities change weekly. Feb. 3: Mystery Box/Beading. Feb.10: Trail of Tears/ Weaving. Feb. 24: Music/Coloring Book. Activities include museum tour, throwing darts with an atlatl, scavenger hunt, the hands-on-lab tour, an educational program, and creating a keepsake craft to take home. $6/adult. $4/child (ages 4-11). 785-3160.

Museum at Chucalissa. Sundays, 1-5 p.m. Tour the museum and Native American Mounds. See a family-friendly film at 2 p.m. Go to memphis.edu/chucalissa/events for details on the film. Free. 785-3160.

Winter Garden Games. Memphis Botanic Garden (MBG). 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Families are invited to spend a chilly day getting “pumped” for the Winter Olympics. Indoor activities include a bounce obstacle course, giant games, and hula hoops. Medals awarded for completing activities. $10/ person. 636-4119.

Caterpillar Club. Memphis Botanic Garden (MBG). On select Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 10-11 a.m. Choose Tuesday or Wednesday session. Feb. 6 or 7: Birds Eat Berries. Feb. 20 or 21: Sipping Nectar. Children ages 2-5 are invited for stories, music and movement, nature-inspired art, and adventure hikes in My Big Backyard. Semester theme: Let’s Get Growing. Six-class semester fee: $75. Call 636-4122 to register.

14th Annual Reelfoot Lake Eagle Festival. Reelfoot Lake State Park in Tiptonville, TN. February 2-4, from 9 a.m. until 8 p.m. Festivities include art and photo contests, “Imagine that!: Circus Circus” Workshop. guided eagle tours, children’s activities, Ballet Memphis. 1-2:30 p.m. A special Live Birds of Prey programs, photo tours, afternoon workshop geared toward children live animals and educational program, of all ages. $15/person. 737-7322. Smithsonian Waterways exhibit, and vendors. Free admission. $10 for Eagle Tours. Call 731- Free Family Art Workshop: Zines with Katie 253-9652 for Eagle Tour reservations. Visit Dean/Anna Craig. Memphis College of Art. reelfoottourism.com or call 731-253-2007 2-4 p.m. Open to all ages and experience for details. levels. Workshops include drawing, painting, and sculpture. Free, donations go toward 3 · SATURDAY youth scholarship fund (recommended Crosstown 10K. Crosstown Concourse. 8 donation is $10 per family). Walk-ins are a.m. Inaugural Crosstown 10K is part of welcome on a first-come, first-served basis. the new Start2Finish Run the 901 Series. Visit mca.edu/community/communityFeatures 10K race along Midtown Memphis education to register online. course and a festive post-race party in Crosstown Concourse. Race entertainment 4 • SUNDAY and awards ceremony take place on the Free Sundays at Chucalissa. C.H. Nash 24 4 2

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5 · MONDAY

Tea & Toddlers. Universal Parenting Place @ Christ Community Health Services. Mondays from noon until 2:45 p.m. Parents are invited for a weekly parenting topic while tots enjoy toddler time over refreshments. Free. RSVP to brittany.hart@christchs.org or call 701-2871 for details.

6 • TUESDAY

Mini Masters. Dixon Gallery and Gardens. Tuesdays from 10:30 to 11:15 a.m. Parent/ child workshop designed for toddlers features story time, art activity, and snack. $8/child. Call 761-5250 to pre-register and pre-pay by noon the day before class.

7 • WEDNESDAY

Wee Wednesday: ART. Westminster Academy. 9 a.m. At this Mommy and Me event, preschool-aged children create and learn in a classical environment. Children learn about works of art and make a valentine. Free. Refreshments provided. 380-9192.


CALENDAR

Swimming Lessons

Year ‘round in our HEATED indoor pool!

• Group Lessons • Private Swim Lessons • Adult Swim Lessons • Baby & Me Classes -Ages 2mo and Up

We have swim packages for all age groups. SAVE MONEY! We have small class ratios... Do you need SPECIALTY Training? We are definitely the place for you!

Magic Carpet presents Strictly Ballroom with DanceSmiths. Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s School. 10 a.m.

Toddler Time. Baptist Memorial Hospital for Women. Meets Wednesdays from 10:30 a.m. until noon. Interactive group for parents and children ages 1-3 years. Discover the joys and challenges of parenting toddlers through meet & greet, play, and activities. Free. 227-9558.

Symphony Orchestra present a story set to music. Free. 5372500. ET The Extra Terrestrial Live in Concert with the Memphis Symphony Orchestra. The Orpheum. 7:30 p.m. Experience the magic of Steven Spielberg’s classic movie with a live performance by Memphis Symphony Orchestra. $15-$88. Call 525-3000 for tickets.

Music for Aardvarks. Universal Parenting Place @ Christ Community Health Services. On select Wednesdays (February 7 & 21), from noon until 1 p.m. Bring 16 · FRIDAY your child ages 6 months to 6 The Diary of Anne Frank. The years for this Early Childhood Harrell Theatre. Through Music Class. Free. RSVP to February 25. Friday & brittany.hart@christchs.org or Saturday at 7 p.m.; Sunday at 2 call 701-2871 for details. p.m. Collierville Arts Council presents this drama capturing the fear, hope, laughter, and grief 9 · FRIDAY Doktor Kaboom! It’s Just Rocket of eight people hiding from the Nazis in a concealed storage Science. Halloran Centre at The attic. $20/adult. $15/child. Group Orpheum. 6:30 p.m. Doktor Kaboom! explores rocket science discounts available. Reservations required. 457-2780. and focuses on the scientific hurdles of space travel in this interactive show targeting 17 · SATURDAY children in grades 5-8. Topics Anansi and the Sky God by New covered include math patterns, Ballet Ensemble. Germantown centripetal and centrifugal force, Performing Arts Center (GPAC). momentum and inertia, Newton’s 9:30 & 10:30 a.m. New Ballet Third Law, and more. $15/person. Ensemble brings this classic 525-3000. folktale to life with traditional West African dance, a ballerina fairy, Python’s modern dance, 10 · SATURDAY and a Hip Hop Hornet. $8. Magic Carpet presents Strictly Includes up to two adults. Ballroom with DanceSmiths. Reservations required. 751-7500. Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s School. 10 a.m. Children Globe-Trotting Family Day. Dixon ages 2 to 8 are invited to Gallery and Gardens. 10 a.m. to 2 grab their dancing shoes for a p.m. Pack your passport and get ballroom adventure across the globe with DanceSmiths. $5/child. ready to explore far-away places with games, activities, music, Free to adults. 537-1483. and special performances. Free. Refreshments available. 761-5250. Library Tunes & Tales. At area libraries including Central, Bartlett, Cordova, Collierville, 20 · TUESDAY and Germantown. 11 a.m. The Celebrate Black History Month musical families of the Memphis Through Dance. GPAC. 7 p.m.

CALL(BRENNA) SWIM901-300-0384 SCHOOLS Gift Cards make great gifts! 999 South Yates, Memphis, TN 901-763-3483 www.diveshop1.com

Friday, March 2nd 8:00am-7:00pm

Saturday, March 3rd 8:00am-12:00 noon Many items half price on Saturday ACCEPTED

Gently Used Name Brand Spring Clothing Children’s Shoes - Baby Equipment & Furniture Infant/Toddler Toys & Outdoor Toys

T utoring S uyecarcs heelpisngs for

Ove r 30 students learn TEST PREP

ACT • SAT • PSAT • GRE PRAXIS ... and more

School Subjects • Study Skills Test-Taking • Writing

Pamela Palmer M.S., M.A., Ed.D. 901.331.6082 / pam@pamelapalmer.com ME EM MP PH H II S SP EN M PA AR RE NT T .. C CO OM M

25 5 2


Pregnant Moms’ Empowerment Program

CALENDAR

Volunteers Wanted for a University of Memphis Research Study: �ur goal is to create e�ec�ve programs for suppor�ng pregnant  women who have recently experienced in�mate partner violence.   



�ar�cipa�on includes 4 interviews & the possibility of joining  a 5‐week support group for pregnant moms. 



Free child care is available and we provide help with transpor‐ ta�on and parking.   

�re you eligi�le to par�cipate� 

Currently pregnant 



Experienced violence (physical, emo�onal, or sexual) from a  roman�c partner in the last year 



English speaker 



Age 18 or older  Par�cipants will �e compensated for their �me� �i� cards totaling $160.00 ($40.00 at each interview)  �f par�cipa�ng in the support group, 5 small baby care items  (1 for every 2 group sessions)

This research is conducted under the direction of Kathryn Howell, PhD, at the U of M Psychology Department.

MARCH 2018

SUMMER CAMPS

SUMMER IS

ON THE WAY! ADVERTISE YOUR CAMP IN THE GO-TO SOURCE FOR PARENTS!

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. The Orpheum. February 2-3.

The event highlights African-American dance artists creating and performing in the Mid-South. Free. Reservations required. 751-7500.

22 · THURSDAY

High School 2018 Winter Musical: The Addams Family. Briarcrest Christian School. February 22 & 23 and March 1-3, at 7 p.m.; Saturday, February 24, at 2 p.m. Briarcrest Christian School students present this new musical comedy. $15/adult. $12/child. Contact Brenda Taylor at 751-6421 for tickets.

23 · FRIDAY

To advertise or for more information contact

Disney’s Aladdin Jr. Landers Center Theater in Southaven, MS. Through March 4. Friday & Saturday at 7 p.m.; Sunday at 2 p.m. Get ready for a flying carpet ride with Disney’s Aladdin Jr. presented by DeSoto Family Theatre. $10/person. Call 1-800-745-3000 for tickets.

at 901.289.4671 or sheryl@memphisparent.com

ONGOING EVENTS

Sheryl Butler

MUSEUMS AND EXHIBITS

The Pink Palace Museum. Beneath the Surface: Life, Death, and Gold in Ancient Panama. February 3 through May 6. Exhibit features findings at the pre-Columbian cemetery of Sitio Conte in Central Panama, shedding light on a mysterious society that thrived more than 1,000 26 6 2

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CALENDAR

Africool African-Print Fashion Now! A Story of Taste, Globalization, and Style

Feb 24–Aug12

African-print styles by seamstresses and tailors across the continent. International runway fashions by Africa’s newest generation of couturiers. Boundary-breaking, transnational and youth styles favored in Africa’s urban centers. All feature the colorful, boldly designed, woven cotton textiles known as ‘African-print cloth.’

BROOKS 1934 Poplar Ave. 901-544-6200 | brooksmuseum.org Wed 10 a–8 p, Thur & Fri 10 a–4 p, Sat 10 a–5 p, Sun 11 a–5 p Members & under 6 Free, Adults $7, 65+ $6, Students $3 Organized by the Fowler Museum at UCLA in association with Vlisco Netherlands B.V. Guest-curated by Suzanne Gott with Kristyne S. Loughran, Betsy D. Quick, and Leslie W. Rabine. Major funding provided by National Endowment for the Arts with the additional support of R.L. Shep, DutchCulture, and the Pasadena Art Alliance.

Sponsors: Sue Layman Designs, Malco, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Boyland, Mr. and Mrs. Kent Farmer and Dr. Linda Tharp Brooks gratefully acknowledges the financial support of ArtsMemphis, AutoZone, Hyde Family Foundations, the Jeniam Foundation & Tennessee Arts Commission. Ituen Bassey, designer (b. Nigeria), Ituen Basi, based in Lagos, Nigeria, and London, United Kingdom, Ngozi Dress, “Independence” collection, 2010, African-print cloth, Courtesy of the Designer, Photo: Joshua White/JWPictures.com

years ago. 636-2362. CTI 3D Giant Theater. 2D Repertory Films: February is SCI-FI movie month. Weekends in February (also on President’s Day, Feb. 19) at 4 p.m. Feb. 3 & 4: Flash Gordon (1980 version). Feb. 10 & 11: Forbidden Planet. Feb. 17, 18, & 19 (President’s Day): Walt Disney’s 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea. Feb. 24 & 25: Disney’s The Black Hole. $10/ adult. $8/child ages 3 and up. Dream Big 3D. February 10 through May 25. The film celebrates the human ingenuity behind engineering marvels big and small. 636-2362. AutoZone Dome at the Sharpe Planetarium. Seasonal Stargazing. Through March 19. One World, One Sky: Big Bird’s Adventure. Until further notice. 636-2362. Morton Museum of Collierville History. The Volunteers: Americans Join WWI. Through March 8. 457-2650.

OTHER PROGRAMS

Mallory-Neely House Tour. Mallory-Neely House, 652 Adams Avenue. Fridays & Saturdays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $7/adult. $5/child (ages 3 and up). Reservations required. 523-1484.

Premier Lanes Entertainment Center is 45,000 square feet of exciting family fun! Featuring the Action Alley Arcade, Laser Maze, Boutique Bowling and Rowan Oak Cafe (complete with a cozy outdoor patio), there is something for everyone from 2 to 102! Conveniently located next door to the Oxford Commons Cinema, all roads lead to F-U-N! Got a Group? Email for more info! salesoxford@premierlanes.com ME EM MP PH H II S SP EN M PA AR RE NT T .. C CO OM M

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CLASSES & WORKSHOPS

Breastfeeding Class. Baptist Women’s Hospital. Thursday, February 1, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $30. Call 226-5764 to register. Guy Talk. Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital. Friday, February 2, 6:30-8:30 p.m. for parents only. Saturday, February 3, from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. for parent and son. Guy Talk is an educational program to enhance open communication between fathers (or mothers) and sons ages 9-12 years about changing bodies, behaviors, and beliefs that can last a lifetime. $60 for parent & child. $40 for additional child. Call 516-6645 to register. Saturday Childbirth Class. Baptist Women’s Hospital. On select Saturdays (February 3 & 17), from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. $75. Call 226-5764 to register. Kaleidoscope Club. Dixon Gallery and Gardens. Wednesdays from 4 to 5 p.m. Ages 5-9. $8. Snack provided. Call 761-5250 to register.

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Mid-Day Mindfulness in Motion. Universal Parenting Place @ Christ Community Health Services. On alternate Wednesdays (February 9 & 23), from noon until 1 p.m. Features simple dynamic movement, gentle balance exercises, deep breathing, and guided relaxation. Free. RSVP to brittany.hart@christchs.org or call 701-2871 for details. Saturday Sketch. Dixon Gallery and Gardens. Saturday, February 10, from 10 to 11 a.m. Ages 15 and up. Free with admission. 761-5250. Weeknight Childbirth Series. Baptist Women’s Hospital. Fourweek series starts February 12. Class covers childbirth information, including breastfeeding, new mom & infant care, and hospital tour. $55. Call 226-5764 to register. African Family Drum Circle. Universal Parenting Place @ Christ Community Health Services. On select Tuesdays (February 13 & 27), from 1:30 until 2:30 p.m. A creative family engagement activity to enjoy through the spirit of African music. It offers children the tools for developing lifelong safety, health, and learning habits. Free. Call 701-2871 to RSVP. Expectant Parents Class. Baptist Women’s Hospital. Saturday, February 24, from 9 a.m. until noon. $30. Call 226-5764 to register. Grandparent Connection Class. Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital. Saturday, February 24, from 9 a.m. until 11:30 a.m. Class discusses the role of grandparents and how they can help during pregnancy, birth, and beyond. $30. Call 516-6645 to register.

GROUP CLASSES

S

Boy Scout Camp-in. The Pink Palace Museum. Friday, February 9, from 7 p.m. until Saturday, February 10, 10 a.m. Geared for scouts and guardians. Night opens with a planetarium show and badge work followed by sleepover. Tour the exhibits the next morning and take part in education programming. $50/guest. 636-2437.

HOME SCHOOL CLASSES

er.

PEOPLE REAL PEOPLE REAL PEOPLE REAL NEEDS NEEDS REAL NEEDS REAL SOLUTIONS REAL SOLUTIONS REAL SOLUTIONS

Visit mifa.org mifa.org to Visit mifa.org to volunteer. Visit tovolunteer. volunteer.

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Discovery Days: Beneath the Surface. The Pink Palace Museum. February 22 & 23, from 9 a.m. until noon. Children in grades kindergarten through 8 and their families can check out three teacher activity carts in Bodine Hall exhibits exploring activities on archeology and anthropology. Free with admission. Standard fees for school and general admission. Call 636-2437 for details.

FUND-RAISERS

33rd Annual “Bowlin’ on the River” Bowl-A-Thon. Participating bowling centers include Winchester Bowl, Billy Hardwick’s All-Star Lanes, and FunQuest. February 17 & 18 and 24 & 25 (other dates available). Teams of five raise a minimum of $350. Each member receives a souvenir T-shirt. Benefits the Junior Achievement of Memphis and the Mid-South. Contact Ellen Celosky at 366-7800 to reserve lanes.

AUDITIONS

Memphis Fashion Week (MFW) Model Auditions. Wolfchase Galleria. Saturday, February 3, from 9 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. Ages 14-35. Features seminars with model coach, Valentine’s Fashions Runway Show presented by Wolfchase Galleria, and auditions. MFW will be held the second week of April 2018. Models under 18 will receive a guardian general admission ticket for the shows. Models should wear form fitting jeans, a white fitted shirt, and heels. Please wear little makeup. Bring a photo or comp card to leave with MFW. Visit memphisfashionweek.org/model-auditions for details.


THEATRE PERFORMANCES

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. The Orpheum. February 2-3. Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 2 & 8 p.m. $39-$89. Call 525-3000 for tickets.

An Evening with Naturally 7. The Orpheum. Saturday, February 3, at 7:30 p.m. The seven musicians use their voices to recreate the sound of different instruments. $35/person. 525-3000. Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson “Ten Things You Should Know about the Universe.” The Orpheum. Wednesday, February 7, at 7 p.m. $39-$89. VIP tickets: $250. Call 525-3000 for tickets. Mindy Smith. Buckman Arts Center at St. Mary’s School. Friday, February 9, at 8 p.m. $28/adult. $25/child. 537-1483. The Color Purple. The Orpheum. February 13-18. Tuesday through Thursday, at 7:30 p.m.; Friday at 8 p.m.; Saturday at 2 & 8 p.m.; Sunday at 1 & 6:30 p.m. $25-$125. Call 525-3000 for tickets. U of M Symphony Orchestra. Harris Concert Hall. Wednesday, February 14, at 7:30 p.m. Celebrate Valentine’s evening with music of Claude Debussy, Richard Wagner, and Georges Bizet. $15. Call 6782541 for tickets. Small Places. Playhouse on the Square. February 16-18. Friday at 8 p.m. (Free spark pre-show discussion with the choreographer at 6:30 p.m. in the café). Pay-what-you-can Community Day performance, Saturday at 2 p.m.; regular show on Saturday at 8 p.m., Sunday at 2 pm. Ballet Memphis presents a mixed repertory show of three new works by Stephanie Martinez, Julie Marie Niekrasz, and Brian McSween. $10, $25, & $45. Group discounts available. 737-7322. Ronald K. Brown/Evidence. GPAC. Saturday, February 24, at 8 p.m. Ticket prices start at $35. Reservations required. 751-7500.

STORY TIME AT AREA BOOKSTORES AND MUSEUMS

Barnes & Noble Booksellers The Avenue Carriage Crossing Mall, 853-3264 Saturdays at 11 a.m. Ages 1-6. Barnes & Noble Booksellers 2774 N. Germantown Pkwy., 386-2468 Tuesdays and Saturdays at 11 a.m. Ages PreK-6. Feb 3 & 6: I am Harriet Tubman. Feb. 10 & 13: Click, Clack, Moo I Love You. Feb. 17 & 20: Mother Bruce. Feb. 24 & 27: Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss. Character Story Time with Madeline! Sunday, February 18, 3-3:30 p.m. Meet Madeline, listen to a story, and work on a coloring page. Free. Story Time at Morton Museum of Collierville History 196 N. Main St., 457-2650 Fridays, 10:30-11 a.m. Ages 5 and under. Enjoy a new story theme each week with songs, related craft, and snack.

MEMPHIS LIBRARY EVENTS

Stop by your local branch or go to memphislibrary.org for a complete listing of library events. CENTRAL

3030 Poplar Ave., 415-2700 CLOUD901 Classes & Events: CLOUD901 is the library’s state-of-theart Teen Learning Lab that includes a music studio, a video production lab, an art studio, Makerspace, gaming zone, and a performance stage. Open to teens ages 13-18 with a Memphis library card. Go to memphislibrary.org/cloud901 for a class list. BARTLETT

6382 Stage Rd., 386-8968

• Transformations Early Access. Thursday, February 8, 9-10 a.m. Library opens early for a special story time for the Transformations Autism Treatment Center and families with special needs. • Valentine’s Day Crafts. Wednesday, February 14, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Children ages 6-12 create Valentine’s Day crafts. • Transformations Outreach. Thursday, February 22, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Children ages 5 and under. Outreach program at the Transformations Autism Treatment Center.

S.E. Academy Christian Private School Learning is our FIRST PRIORITY! Scholarships available now.

OPEN HOUSE February 8th, 2018 from 3:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m. (901) 729-6021 School Office (901) 497-1504 School Admin 5960 Knight Arnold Rd. Ext., Memphis, TN 38115 weloveseacademy.com • (901) 729-6021 ME EM MP PH H II S SP EN M PA AR RE NT T .. C CO OM M

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Join us for our first-ever

CALENDAR

Representatives from area day camps, overnight camps, extracurricular camps, and more will be on hand. CORDOVA

Meet the staff of area Camps and plan your Spring, Summer, and Fall kids camps!

SATURDAY

MARCH 24 11AM-3PM

• Dancing with e.Studio. Saturday, February 3, 11-11:45 a.m. Children ages 6-12 are invited for dance lessons with e.Studio Dance. • International Story Time: South Korea. Saturday, February 3, from 11 a.m. until noon. Discover South Korea, home country of the 2018 Winter Olympics, with stories, crafts, music, and food. • Valentine’s Day Craft Party. Saturday, February 10, 11-11:45 a.m. Make valentines, share stories, and enjoy snacks. • Family Movie Madness: Clifford’s Really Big Movie. Saturday, February 24, from 11 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. Watch the movie, share big red treats, and make a craft to take home.

CORNELIA CRENSHAW

531 Vance Ave., 525-1643

• Black History Month Discussion. Saturday, February 10, from noon until 1:30 p.m. Children, teens, and adults discuss Black History Month of the past, present, and future.

EAST SHELBY

7200 E. Shelby Dr., 751-7360

• Social Justice Book Club for Kids. Thursday, February 22, 4-5 p.m. As part of the 50th commemoration of Dr. King’s death, this club teaches children ages 9-12 the value of standing up for what you believe.

FRAYSER

MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDENS

3712 Argonne St., 357-4115

FREE ADMISSION

1040 S. Third, 942-0836

sponsored by

For more info head on over to

MEMPHISCAMPEXPO.COM and to the

MEMPHIS PARENT FACEBOOK PAGE! 30 0 3

8457 Trinity Rd., 754-8443

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• Kids on the Block Puppet Show. Saturday, February 24, 2-3 p.m. Children ages 6-12 watch a puppet show.

GASTON PARK

• DiscoverREAD. Wednesdays, 4:15-5:15 p.m. Children ages 5 and under work on early literacy skills. • Valentine’s Arts & Crafts. Saturday, February 10, noon until 1 p.m. Children ages 5 and under are invited to create arts and crafts for Valentine’s Day.

HOLLYWOOD

1530 N. Hollywood St., 323-6201

• Boy Talk. Saturday, February 3, from 11:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. Boys ages 11-18 participate in an open forum discussing school, life, and other related topics.

NORTH

1192 Vollintine Ave., 276-6631

• After-school Fun. Wednesday, February 14, 4-5 p.m. Children ages 6-12 make Valentine’s Day Rice Krispie Treats.


YOUR CHILD SHOULD BE HERE!

Send us your kid funnies, photos, or artwork via email with Favorite Moments in the subject line to michelle@memphisparent.com

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We’re all in. For kids. Le Bonheur is included in all local health plans. When it comes to providing the best care for every child, Le Bonheur is all in. Although local insurance plans may change from time to time, we’re included in all of them. When it comes to your children – to your health plan – and to your own sense of security and peace of mind, you’ll find that Le Bonheur is still the best place for kids. lebonheur.org/plans

Memphis Parent, February 2018  

It's our Adventure Issue! How to prepare for overnight camps, introduce your child to winter sports, talk about diversity, take care of thos...

Memphis Parent, February 2018  

It's our Adventure Issue! How to prepare for overnight camps, introduce your child to winter sports, talk about diversity, take care of thos...